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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, August 01, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-08-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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SSOCIATED PRESS
A'lvratchcs of late
‘ \', c published in
rL Evening Capital.
m* **"'' A AZB mi. *TI~IE MARYLAND OAZE luiI u i E tu itixino capital-htabuihid tm.
~ I sVl 11 Xo - ' l!> - Ml)., TUESUAY. AUGUST I, inii PRICE TWO CENTS.
IJOSETOSSERS
[JSJ PREY FDR
i 5. MARINES
Sailors Romp Away
W j t h Second Game Of "Twi-
League" By Big Score Of
rj t 0 3— Lodge Men Showed
fiecd Of Practice
j£INA mkrcedes and
RESCUES TOMORROW
gvntii'l baseball game In the
s tniwu-n i.miiih of the recently
gntiin'l ‘ Twilight League" of An
,,11, |i|,iveil mi thu diamond ut
•* Jfbn’H College yesterday after-
The roiitendiUK teams were the
attached to duty at the Naval
ifiJmiv mid members of the local
yi, „f Moose. The soldier s.iilors
nrr returned winners by the over
iliinjitiK more of 2d to 3.
suit rlcklmr For Marines
n,, Marines, who Have a strong
gtv simply loafed along and won
I t walk" When they were not
I jik the ImII to all corners of the
■fnss.inl. the Moose players were
g-mg m a comedy of errors. Lack
(practice was plainly shown by
work throughout. On the other
mi the Marines are passing through
jwimiti of scheduled games. Besides
A* engage in workouts regularly,
lg ben was decidedly more snap to
ftrplav Hut at no time were they
treri to extend themselves.
Tatker twirled the tlrt four in
u! for the Moose, and McNeff
te.ied the game. Both hnrlers were
tl hard Meyers occupied the mound
h the Marines and twirled steadily
fcoaibout.
Itcsfius \ *.. Itelua Mercedes
’V third contest of the league
w. to be played tomorrow after
'? should develop some good play
Shuttle "ill le between a picked
•* from Aumipolis, playing under
s* name of the Rescues, and tlve
n* of the station ship Heinn Mor
al* of the Naval Academy. The
ill hegm at ;30 o'clock. The
k*.ns sill present the following
P for the go against the Navy en
k*i men:
v J ties, catcher; Windsor, pit* (
* A Bast, tlrst base; Engolke,
W I use; It Newton, shortstop;
•ink. third base; Holliday, left
'’“Her, right Held, and Stevens,
*’f field.
U mil I M11,.,| on I’nfte (.)
For Sale
tillable Mahogany Fur-
Knic anil Other Articles.
1 Wardrobe
‘ l'*r!or rabinet.
• Mantel rabinet,
* : p Centre Tables,
‘" r fc Kackiug Chair,
1 ‘‘ uhle spring Bed.
n bedstead and Bed,
'■(’•a-Tete Chair.
*• $ Saddle,
• n i other articles.
K. .
Chesapeake House.
Circle If not sold
" 'll be sold ut auction
ON
" clay Morning, Aug. 5
'IMKNVING AT 10 A. M.
■ERMS , v
No property re
-14 un ‘>l paid for.
JAMES M. MUNROE.
11
Bazaar j
AND sai.dm !
*■’lll uniKs
" n ’ 1' Ca rsotiaoc
W est g... .
l ’ and Chestnut
Avenue
AlGl ST 2, 3 and 4
foment Chief At
! • •• Night.
SE . /.voAV
HD LB xu? GOOD DEVIL.
OLD pt ß ? AT THE SAME
street E ’ 230 WEST
HaONE 8-- v*’ A - MILEE R
jy-30
(jbenino (Hum tal
IN W. GARREn
HEREFOR PARLEY
WITH LOCAL G. 0. P.
A numlier of prominent Republi
cans of Annapolis and Anne Arundel
county were expected to attend a con
ference called for this afternoon in
the Interest of organizing a campaign
committee In behalf of the interests
of John W. Garrett, of Baltimore,
whom the State forces of the G. O. P.
have indorsed as their standard
bearer in the fight for the nomination
for United Slates Senator in opposi
tion to Senator Joseph I. France. Mr.
Garrett himself is expected to attend
the conference. |
Just how much of an inroad the
conference will be able to cut into the
Party organization forces of the coun
ty would be; difficult to forecast, for it
is known that the County Central
Committee is strongly for the candi
dacy of France, as are also many
other prominent men of the party.
TRAFFIC IN CHICAGO
STILLED B( STRIKE OF
MOTORIMD OTHERS
<I*T Tlie AwHH-lulrd I'rr.H.)
CHICAGO, Aug. I. Twenty thou
sand motormen, conductors and
guards went on strike today against
a 17 jor cent, wage reduction and
tlie greater part of the working peo
ple of the city's nearly three million
population, had to resort to ull sorts
of makeshifts.
As usual all rolling stocks avail
able including every variety of ve
hicle pusliahle and pullable, was in
adequate, and tlie brunt traf- ,
lie fell on “shank's mare.”
FATHER THUMEL GOES
TO PARISH IN GOTHAM
Father William A. Thumel, priest
attached to St. Mary’s Catholic
Church the last few years, yesterday
received orders transferring him to
duty at St. Alphonsus Catholic
Church, New York City. He left Im
mediately. Father Francis Murray,
popular among the parishioners of St.
Mary's, has returned to his station
here after temporary assignment to
ministerial work In other fields.
OPPOSE DISTRICT MEETING *
TO SETTLE COAL STRIKE
<n.v Tin* ANBwlutrd Prenn.)
PITTSBURGH, PA., Aug. I. The
Pittsburg Coal Producers’ Association
today declined tho invitation of Presi
dent ewis of the United Mine Work
ers to hold a meeting of four districts
to settle the strike, but declared in
a message that it was willing to hold
a district meeting to “negoiate a wage
scale for the district.”
Finn KILLED; SDIIBT
IN PARjSTRAIH CRASH
(By The A.Norlated Prun.)
PARIS, FRANCE, Aug. 1.- Forty
persons were killed and 50 others in
jured in a collision of two excursion
trains, one coming from and the other
going to the grotto of Lourdes, one of
the world’s most famous shrines. The
collision occurred near Villccomtal.
NOTICE
The drawing for Silver Candelabra
of the Ladies’ Auxiliary Society will
be postponed until August 10. a
Awnings & Shades
Made to Order •
A. KRAPF
Sit WEST ST Si
j Entertainment!
EDWARDS HALL. PAROLE.
Tuesday, August 1, 1922
8 P. M. (New Time)
“ AUNTIE ”
Benefit Parole Fanners’ Club.
ADMISSION, Vk-.
Refreshments for Sale! al j
Notice!
Two thousand baskets of white can-’
liing peachy, ripening August 1 to 10.
at 60 cents to 80 cents per one-half
bushel basket. For sale every day.
except Sunday, at the orchard. Alt. *
Zion. Md. Postoffice Lothian. Phone
West River 15-M.
a4 GEO. W. EMMERICit. |
FOR UNIFORMITY
. OF STATE
Thirty-Second Annual Confer
ence Begins In San Fran
cisco Tomorrow
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., Aug. I.
The national conference of commis
sioners on uniform State laws will
open its thirty-second annual meeting
here tomorrow to consider and act on
proposed statutes for submission to
State legislature meeting during the
next year. The commissioners will
continue their sessions throughout
the week.
k Among the subjects which tenta
tive drafts of uniform State laws have
been drawn are aviation, joint par
ental guardianship of children, status
and protection of illegitimate chil
dren, declaratory judgements, extra
dition of persons charged with crime
and commercial pets.
Model Statutes Framed
Each one of these subjects has been
considered by a special committee of
the conference, and model statutes
prepared. Commissioners from every
State of the nation and from Alaska.
Hawaii, Porto Rico, and the Philip
pine Islands are to be represeiyed at
the meetings when action on the pro
posals will be taken.
During the 31 years of the existence
of the conference 311 uniform acts
have been adopted in the various
States and jurisdictions. Twenty-six
uniform acts have been drafted and
approved by the conference as cover
ing the subjects which the commis
sioners believe should be handled by
the State legislatures and in such a
manner as to give general uniformity
between the various commonwealths.
The six-day session is to be taken •
up largely with consideration and ac
tion on committee reports and drafts
of bills. Increasing use of airplanes
for commercial purposes has caused
particular interest to be paid to a
proposed uniform law for adoption by
States governing the flight and re- i
sponsibilities of aeronauts. This will
(Contlnueil On Tnct* 4.)
FOR PBNIDOFTOBACCO
GROWERS AND FARMERS
k On August 16 the Tobacco Growers
and farmers of Anne Arundel and Cal
vert counties will meet in their joint
picnic at the old Fair Haven grounds
wheif in previous years very success
ful days have been held.
As in previous years the picnic will
begin early and last all day. The
kiddies and old folks are wanted.
Bathing and fishing there is also good,
and these, added to the kind of a
picnic the farmers of this section
know how to arrange, augurs for a
fine, day.
During the afternoon the gathering
will be addressed by prominent speak
ers from outside the county and
State. It is hoped that by the time
the next issue of The. Gazette goes to
press, the list of speakers will have
been chosen.
COUNTY ASKS BBS FOB
$50,000 BRIDGE BONDS
Elsewhere in the columns of The
Evening Capital today, the Board of
County Commissioners are advertis
ing for bids for the sale of $50,000
bonds authorized by an act of the
General Assembly for the construc
tion of tfie new bridge span over
j South river between Tucker's Land
ing and Taylorsville.
The bonds will le of the coupon
variety and will be issued in denomi
nations of SSOO each and bear in
terest at the rate of 4V4 percent, per
annum. The bonds will bear date of
July 1, 1922. and will be issued in]
series of $5,000 each, the first series
being payable five years from the date
of issuance, and each succeeding ser
ies at intervals of five years, making
the last series payable in 1972.
Bids will be opened' at noon (stan- ■
dard time) on August 29. next.
LEWIS ISSUES CALL FOR
JOINT WAGE CONFERENCE
(By The Associated Press.)
PHILADELPHIA. Aug. I.—A joint j
wage conference of operators and mi-;
ners of the central competitive field
jto be held at Cleveland next Monday
for tht purpose of negotiating a basic!
agreement designed to terminate the
present coal strike was urged in an
: invitation issued today by John L. j
Lewis, international president of the
I United Mine W ? orkers.
PIAN BIG CEREMONY Td
(HEN HIGHWAY IRK
Southern Maryland Roadway
Construction To Start At
Upper Marlboro
TO UNVEIL A MONUMENT
One of the biggest crowds that Up
per Marlloro has seen in recent years
expected to gather in the old town
in Saturday. Septeml or 30, to witness
the unveiling ot a monument that will
mark the loginning of construction
n the Southern Maryland highway,
provided forty tlie last legislature.
This monument will te built of lo
cal stone, and while it is not expected
to be particularly imposing, as mon
uments go, it will le characteristic
)f the section through which the road
*lll pass. Its design has not yet Leen
worked out.
The road, which probat ly will be
called Crain Highway, in honor of
Robert Crain, who first suggested it
md who worked indefatigably for the
passage of the act making the appro
priation for it, will extend from Mat
tawoman, In Prince Georgo's county,
to Benfield, in Anne Arundel county.
It will furnish a direct route from
Baltimore to Charles and St. Mary’s
counties. *
Four Years To Complete
The road will cost a million dol
lars and will te completed in four
years. With'the unveiling of the raon
iment, tho actual work of construc
tion will begin at Upper Marlboro and
will proceed both north and south.
Bids for the construction of the road
will te asked in a short time.
Among the honor guests will be
•Governor Ritchie, • Mayor Broening,
Admiral Wilson, superintendent of the
Naval Academy, and at least one
memler of the United States Senate,
who will make the principal address
af the day. „
The Naval Academy band will fur
nish music for the celebration. Mrs.
Robert Crain will unveil the monu
ment and brief addresses will be made
by Governor Ritchie, Mayor Broening,
)f Baltimore, and John N. Muckall,
chairman of the State Roads Commis
sion, under whose direction the new
road will be built.
Flgt* To Be Exchanged
One of the most interesting features
jf the program will take place at tlie
fair grounds. This will involve the
ceremony of the exchange of flags be
(Conttnnrd On Pace ft.)
DESPITE REDUCTION,
U. S. ARMY NEEDS 1.800
SECOND LIEUTENANTS
The War Department is in need of
Second Lieutenants for the Regular
Army.
While the recent act of Congress
limits the total number of Army Of
ficers to 12,000, the reduotions will
be entirely in the higher grades, and
in carrying out the entire plan of
Congress, it will actually create va
cancies in the grade of Second' Lieu
tenant. Thus the Army will le re
duced at the top and.filled up at the
bottom.
Preliminary examinations for ap
pointment as Second Lieutenant in
the Regular Army are now being held
in Maryland, Virginia and the Dis
trict of Columbia under the supervis
ion of the Commanding General of
the 3rd Corps Area, whose headquar
ters are at Baltimore. A board to con
duct preliminary examinations has
been convened at Richmond. Va.
Final examinations for appointment
as Second Lieutenants will Le held
the first week in September.
There are about 1800 vacancies so
that it is expected that every one who
qualifies will be appointed. Appoint
ments will 1 e made in all branches
except the Judge Advocates Depart
ment.
DEMOCRATSTOSELECT
DATE FOR PRIMARIES

. Hearkening to the call of the party
: chariman. Democrats from every sec
-1 tion of Maryland will gather in Balti
more tomorrow for the meeting of the
State Central Committee. The meet
| ing has been called primarily for the
| purpose of agreeing upon a date for
the primary meeting. But there will
be many conferences among county
leaders on the side.
Indications now are that either Sep
! tember 11 or ■ will be the date se
lected for the primaries, providing
J this is agreeable to the chairman of
the Republican Central Committee of
| the State also.
GLEN BUIE'S BIG
CARNIVALNOW ON
' Radio Concerts Among Features
Opening Night—Baby Con
test On Thursday
Hundreds of Anne Arundel county
fanners last night attended the open
ing of the fourteenth annual carnival
at Glen Burnie. Many experienced
their first "listening in” on a radio
concert. They heard lectures and
baseball scores.
Radio concerts will continue a big
feature of the carnival until Thurs
day night, when the county’s baby
show will be held.
Governor Ritchie is expected to at
tend the carnival and deliver an ad
dress one night during the week.
The “annual carnival” is to Glen
Burnie what the county fair is to the
larger rural communities, and accord
ingly the residents of the town and
surrounding towns never fail to add
to the crowd on the "first night.”
From a small local event of 14 years
ago the affair has grown to assume
the proportions of a carnival-fair, and
it is the expressed ambition of the
promoters—the Glen Burnie Improve
ment Association—in a few' years to
designate the annual attraction as
“the county fair.”
Reflects ('oinmunlty Spirit
From the time of its inception the
carnival has reflected the growth and
spirit of the community. Regularly
each year the event has been held,
nearly always on the same date, and
each year sees a marked expansion of
the affair. Where the row of hitch
ing-posts stood, to which not so many
years ago were tied the horses of the
few' hundred visitors, is now a park
ing place for dozens of automobiles;
on the grass where once the couples
waltzed to the tune of the town musi
cians a jazz orchestra holds forth in
an oak-floored pavilion; the radio
concert has replaced many outgrown
attractions, and the lemonade and
soft-drink stands are crowded.
Baby Show Thursday Night
Foremost among the scheduled fea
tures of the week is the "Baby Show”
on Thursday, when the future Anne
Arundel countians will be placed un
der the appraising eyes of especially
selected judges. Gold medals will be
awarded. The contest is limited, as
is stated by the committee, to “prod
ucts of Anne Arundel county.” Sat
urday night is designated as “Anne
Arundel county and home-coming
night,” w'hen, as Jn previous years of
the carnival, Glen Burnieites from
“far and near .come to renew old
friendships and ties,” as set forth on
the program.
FRANKLINOWENSDIES
AT RESIDENCE OF SON
Franklin Owens, 77 years old, a
farmer of Mount Zion. Anne Arundel
county, succumbed to an illness of
kidney trouble at the home of his son,
Allein W. Owens, Oakdale avenue,
Catonsville, Baltimore, yesterday. Mr.
Owens ■'had been in bad health for the
last three months.
Besides Allein W. Owens,
Owens is survived by two othetisqufii
Nicholas F. Owens, of this county,,
and Charles T. Owens, of New York;
a sister, Mrs. Mary W. Davidson, of
Greenock, this county; and two
brothers, James W. Owens, of Anna
polis, and Arthur T. Owens, of Green
ock. Mr. Owens’ wife, Mrs. Mary
Trump Owens, died several years
ago.
Arrangements have beeli made for
the funeral to be hold from the resi
i deuce of his son at Catonsville to&ior
i row at 10 a. m. (daylight-saving
time), and the body will be brought
; to Owensville, this county, for inter
. ment at noon (standard time).
JULY WEDDINGS AHEAD
OF CORRESPONDING
PERIOD LAST YEAR
i
| July weddings in Anne Arundel
county this year exceeded the corres
ponding month of 1921 by eight, ac
f cording to records in the office of
. Clerk of the Circuit Court William N.
. Woodward. During the month just
; closed a total of 31 marriage licenses
. were issued, of which seven were
, taken out by colored couples. The
r total issued during July, 1921, was 23.
! To Duty At Naval Academy
Among the current orders issued
-by the Navy Department are the fol
- lowing:
; Lieut. Francis C. Denebrink. and
f Lieut. William P. Mull, (Medical
[ jCorps), both to duty at the Naval
1 Academy.
KILLED BY PARTIES
UNKNOWN, VERDICT
IN CAOORA SHOOTING
That Michael Cadora. killed in the
pistol fight at Belle Grove Inn, a
roadside house in the upper part of
the county on July 16, came to his
death from gunshot wounds, said
shots having been fired by a party, or
parties, “unknown to the jury,” was
the conclusion reached by the jury of
inquest, of which Police Justice Wil
liam S. Welch, of Annapolis, acted as
coroner.
The Jury held its final session at
the Court House yesterday afternoon
and framed its final report and ver
dict. There was no further testimony
to be given. The jury conducted a
thorough investigation of the tragedy,
half a hundred witnesses, men and
women who were at the inn at the
time of the affray, making up the gal
lery of witnesses, but was unable to
glean any information that would
shed light on the identity of the party,
or parties, who precipitated the gun
fight and resultant general brawl
Under the circumstances, therefore,
there was naught else for the Jury to
do, but render the verdict as above
stated.
MANY NIiOESILED
AND INJURED IN CRASH
OF EXCURSION TRAINS
(ft? The AKNoeluted Free*.)
CINCINNATI, 0., Aug. I. Ten
persons were reported killed and 25
to 30 injured in a head-on collision
between a negro excursion train to
day and passenger train No. 11 from
Dayton, on the Cincinnati, Lebanon
and Northern Railroad at Lester sta
tion, a suburb.
Most of the fatalities were amonj
the negro occupauts of the train bear
ing the excursion party, members of
the Park Avenue A. M. E. Church.
When the two locomotives rushed
together, each rebounded from the
impact, hurljng their tenders back
through the cars in the rear.
R. C. Barnard, superintendent of
the Pennsylvania line, who arrived on
the scene shortly after the collision,
following an investigation, announced
that the wreck was probably due to
the engineer of the excursion train
who was a new man, running past his
passing point.
CHILDREN OF DEAN ST.
HOLD MILK FUND SALE
,An open-air sale was held last
night by the small children of Dean
street for the benefit of the Babies'
Milk and Ice Fund. The sum of sl3
was realized as a result of their ef
forts and this amount has been turned
over to Miss Sarah Sutherland, the lo
cal Red Cross nurse.
Those who took part in the sale
were: Mary Ann Hopping, Adele and
Lillian Tucker, “Bunch” McNew, Jen
nie Deninger, Elizabeth Sheppard,
Francis Barber, Florence Evelyn Day.
and Vincent and Munroe Crutchley.
FIVE MORE EMBRYO
OFFICERS OF NAVY
The following additional candidates
have been admitted as midshipmen of
the new fourth class, Naval Academy:
Robert Rouse Moore, Ist. Ken
tucky; Charles Henry Quinn, 21st.
New York; Walter Fred Rodeo, Sen.,
Arizona; John Shoemaker, Sen., Ari
zona; Richard Holloway Zehm, 4th.
lowa.
3 deadWeating
POISONED PIE; BAKER
HELM HOMICIDE
(Ur The AiitoHatfd Preee.)
NEW YORK. Aug. 1. —Charles
Abrahanvson, a baker, who had been
discharged from Shelbourne’s Res
taurant, at Broadway and 26th street,
was arrested on a homicide charge to
day following an investigation grow
• ing out of the poisoning of number of
i persons—three of whom are dead—
'■ who ate at the restaurant yesterday.
> Officials of the medical examiners’ bu
• reau, after an investigation, reported
that a quantity of berry pies, baked
before Abrahamson left the restau
-1 rant’s employ, had been heavily
. charged with arsenic.
t Marriage License
I GRIEFJU - CRAWFORD John
l Griefju, 21, Baltimore city; Helen
Crawford, 27, divorced, Chester, Md.
THE WEATHER:
* Fair tonight and
Wednesday. Moderate
temperature.
HEADS DFI4B
ROADS CONFER ‘
JN PROPOSALS
Parley Resumed In New York
This Afternoon For Further
Consideration Of Plans Of
President Harding To End Big
Strike **. .
% 4. %
STREET TRAFFIC IN
CHICAGO PARALYZED
(B.v The Aanorleteri I’rfud.)
NEW YORK, Aug I.—The heads of
one hundred and forty-eight railroads,
threading nil parts of the country,
this afternoon resumed their confer
ence at the Grand Central Station,
presumably to vote on reception or
rejection of President Harding's pro
posal for settlement of the nation
wide strike.
While no official expression of
opinion could be obtained, it wan
understood that the executives had
?ompared notes of conditions on their
various lines and decided that It
would be unfair to their loyal em
ployees to accept the President's
third proposal.
It was pointed out that to restore
til the strikers to their posts with
seniority privileges would work hard
ships on many men who had advanced
n rank since the strike.
Restoration of all the strikers, it
was said, also would mean that the
roads would be compelled to dismiss
many new employees—a majority of
whom are ex-servicc men.
Seniority, Big Controversy
WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug. I.
President Harding’s proposal for set
tlement of the railroad strike on the
big controversial point of seniority
rights, declares “all employees now
an strike to be returned to work and
to their former positions with sentor
ty and other rights unimpaired.”
This was revealed in an announce
ment from the White House giving
he basis of the Executive’s proposal,
is follows:
“1. Railway managers and
workmen are to agree to recog
nize the validity of all decisions
of theßailroad Labor Board and
to faithfully carry out such de
cisions as contemplated by the
law.
“2. The carriers will withdraw
all law suits growing out of the
strike, and Railroad Labor Board
decisions which have been In
volved in the strike may be taken
In the exercise of recognized
rights of either party to the Rail
road Labor Board for bearing.
“3. All employees now on
strike to be returned to work and
to their former positions with
seniority and rights unim
paired. The representatives of the
carriers and the representatives
of the cft-ganizatiojis especially
agree that there will be no dis
crimination against men who did
not go on strike.”
These three points, it was empha
tized at the White House, constituted
merely the basis for a settlement and
the President in transmitting them to
B. M. Jewell, head of the railway
shopmen, and to DeWitt Cuyler, head
af the Association of Railway Execu
tives, sent a letter amplifying and ex
plaining them.
X. Y. CENTRAL WILL HOT
RECEDE ON SENIORITY
CINCINNATI, 0., Aug. I.—Officials
af the Big ur railroads announced
here today that they had received a
telegram informing them that Presi
dent Smith, of the New York Central
line, announced at the meeting of the
, railway executives in New York to
day that the New York Central Rail
road would not recede from their
i position regarding seniority. The
telegram stated that Mr. Smith told
. the rail executives, who are consider
ing acceptance of President Harding’s
. plan for settlement of the railroad
. strike, that the New York Central
[ would stick by the old employees who
. had remained faithful and *tbe new
employees who have made possible
. the continuation of transportation.
1 '
l New York Conference On
- NEW YORK, Aug. I.—The confer
f ence of railroad presidents assembled
at the Grand Central terminal today
to discuss President Hrading’s. pro
posal for an ending of the railroad
} strike, adjourned until this afternoon
j without taking action after Secretary
(Continued On Page 2d . i

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