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The Grenada gazette. (Grenada, Miss.) 1885-18??, December 19, 1885, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88067090/1885-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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I.c. R.R. TIME TABLE.
GOING NORTH.
■ No. 2, Pass'g'r arr. Grenada 10.111 p.m
■ No' 4, Mail arr. at Grenada 4.55 a.in
■ GOING SOUTH.
m No. 1, Pass'g'r arr. Grenada 5.35 p.m
■ No. 3, Mail arr. at Grenada 9.85 p.m
F MISS. 4. TENN. RAILROAD.
I No. 1, Mail, leaves Grenada 5.10 a.in
f No. 5, Freight lvs. Grenada 11.00 p.m
No. 2, Mail arr. at Grenada 9.30 p.m
No. 6, Freight, arr. Grenada 4.15 p.m
.1
j
This Paper is entered at the Postoffice
at Grenada, Miss., as 2d class matter.
FOB V. H. SENATORS,
J. /. GEORGE.
E. O. WALTHALL
The price of silver in Mexico is con
stantly on the decline.
Mr. 11. M. Lester and Miss Mollie
flattai Ic, of Yazoo City, were married
at Trinity Church, in that city, on
Wednesday evening of last week by
Rev. W. C. McCracken.
President Cleveland proposes to
provide an office for Mr, Hendricks'
private secretary which will be fully
as remunerative as the One which the
death of the Vice-President compels
him to resign.
Menirigetls prevails among the in
mates of the Tennessee penitentiary
»t Nashville. Several deaths have
already occurred, and precautions are
being taken to prevent its spread
throughout the city.
A sewer which was being construct
ed at Arkon, Ohio, last week caved
In, killed five men and buried three
or four others, Who, although they
Were dug out beforo life had become
bxtlnctj will uo doubt die iu a short
time.
Cdpt. B. F. Jones is receiving most
favorable mention by a number of
our exchanges for the position of
Hergeant-at-Arms in the next House,
(.'apt. Jones has heretofore filled this
position with high credit both to him
self arid his party.
An exchange says that Secretary
Lamar was recently mistook by a
drunken man for Ben. Butler. The
editor who hdd cheek enough to iitake
such an assertion will die within less
than a fortnight with a disease known
iis enlargement of the gall.
As has been the custom with that
.right, able and sterling old journal
heretofore, with the coming together
bf tho Mississippi Legislature the
Jackson Clarion will make Reappear
ance as a dally paper: We look for
ward to the advent of flic daily Clar
ion With great pleasure; for we well
know its "propelling'' powers are not,
deficient
!
White, a young man
well known In this community, hav
ing fiveii here several years prior to
the epidemic of '78, and now a citizen
of Hazlohurst, we are glad to see has
gone into business 'on his own hook,'
and we hope the people of that sec
tion will tender him that shaft of
patronage which his steady habits
aud sterling qualities entitle him to.
Mr. John C
''The longest and heaviest train of
( ars ever pulled into New Orleans
was Uik'eii jit by Major Burke and
Captain Ed: Anderson of the L., N.
0. A T. Rsilicmi: There were in the
I rain 134 caf loads of cotton, 10 loads
of staves and six of mefehandise.
The tolinage of the freight was 1.852,
831 pounds. The aggregate weight of
freiglit aud cars hauled was 5,5442,
531 pounds."
Some few of our State exchanges
Whose editors are professed Christian
gentlemen holding membership in
their respective churches,are making
war upon the Rev. 8am. Jones. This
looks a little miraculous to us. But
perhaps we aro unacquainted with
the facts that prompt our brethren to
such actions. How is tliis ? Will
someone please rise and explain?
We feaf the Rev. Sammy lias been
treading upon some one's toes.
tn looking over our State exchan
ges we have been pleased to notice
I he consolidation of the Hazleluirst
Signal aud Copiahau ; but it a fiords
us still greater pleasure to note the
marked improvement In the appear
ance of that able journal within the
past few weeks, both ns regards its
editorial writings and neat typo
graphical appearance.
Mitchell wc extend the right hand of
fellowship, wishing him abundant
success.
To brotlier
Atlast we have found a curiosity
in Mississippi journalism. The last
issue of the Vicksburg 8uu tliat lias
been received at our office is devoid
of advertisements. We do Viol be
lieve we ever saw a newspaper before
but what contained a half dozen col
umns of advertisements,more or loss.
Wc are unable to account for this
strange phenomenon. Do you ex
clude "ads." entirely, brother Ful
kerson ? We «sk merely to gratify a
personal curiosity,and do not wish to
he considered presumptuous.
The marrying season is now at
hand, and for the information of the
gentlemen who contemplate entering
into connubial bliss and are desirous
to know what it will cost them to
have the "knot" tied, wc print tlm
following schedule of prices recently
adopted: One marriage, plain, $2;
ditto, kissing the bride, $3; ditto,
trimmed with one groomsman and
one bridesmaid, |4; fifty cents addi
tional for each groomsman and brides
maid. Bachelors past forty will bo
charged extrrti Maids of flic same
sge, ten peg cent. oil. kjieago will
be charged ftn' long distance matches.
Liberal reductions to clubs. Kay
ments cash j no notes or securities
lake». No money refunded or deduc
tions made for poor goods. Come
early, and come often.
The Grenada Gazette.
Yol. 1.
GRENADA, MISS.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1!), 1885.
Xo.
J
We have been greatly amused with
in the past ten days to notice the
comments upon President Cleve
land's message to Congress, made by
various country newspapers through
out this as well as other States, No
doubt these eminentquill-drivers had
become so addicted to criticising the
President's message udder the long
lease of Republican rule that they
found It impossible to depart from
their former ways, notwithstanding
we now have a Democrat in the chief
executive chair who is u man after
his own ideas and who is In sympa
thy with the interests of the people,
Our confidence in Mr. Cleveland as a
man, a statesman and an executive
officer compels us to admit that he
knows his own business better than
wo do, or better than any out-sider
knows it, and that he is equal to any
emergency that may arise. We are
satisfied that he lias made a thorough
study of all the important national
questions set out in his message, and
this being the case, coupled with his
acknowledged ubility and large brain,
he is more apt to view these subjects
in their proper light than anyone
else. In ancient times each man
knew more about his own business
than anyone else, but in these days
of modern civilization it is in most
cases just tile reverse.
Tho Boy.
See that he always lias somettiing
to occupy liis head and hands. Study
liiH "bent," and keep hi in going in
that direction. He must be a bad
boy who cannot be managed in this
way. Idleness is tlie curse of boy
hood as well as manhood. Few men
who recall their own early experien
ces will fail to confirm tliis statement.
The days in which they had nothing
to do, when they wandered aimlessly
about, a feeling of discontent filled
their hearts, have left impressions
never to be efl'aced. Then bad liahits
were formed—habits of indolence, if
not of \ ieiousnoss.thc effects of which
after years of earnest work have not
corrected. Many a man can trace his
ruin to those idle hours. They are
tlie greatest danger of our boys. They
lead to loafing, bad company,
vices, drinking saloons, gambling
dens, and, at last, to death. They
must he avoided. Otherwise wc can
not hope to save the youth. Country j
lads are not exposed to so great dan-1
gers at this point. They usually find
an abundance of honest and health
ful work to keep them busy. Hence,
country boy» do best. The evil falls
heaviest on those in towns and cities.
eret
Their fathers are often professional
men or laboring men who have no
employment for their sons, or men
engaged in such business that they
cannot readily use the odd hours
which Innig so heavily on the hands
of the boys. How to supply fills lack
is the troublesome question. But it
cannot be put aside. The hoys must
he occupied. The emyloynient must
Regular
attendance) at school will be n great
assistance; hut U will not be suffi
cient . School hours arc Very short
which may be good for the health,
but is no assistance otherwise. Then,
there are the days when there is no
school, and especially the long vaca
tion of the Summer. Something
must be done for them while out of
school. And it should not be a task
—somettiing to which they must he
driven. It should be something eon
genial Anything harmless will do,
which a hoy likes, and which will
occupy Ills niiml and time,
cannot have some actual work, let
him have books, music, art, a garden,
a work-sliop a horse, pets, anything
—something to do. This greatly
needed "something" will not usually
come of Itself. Sometimes it is in
(lie father's occupation. Mostly it is
not. It ilinst ho sought out and se
cured. But secured it must be. It is
the wisest and cheapest antidote for
vice, It is the best prevention ofsiu ;
and prevention is always better than
cure. Soiiietliing to do at home or in
a safe place is immeasurably stronger
to keep a hoy out of bad company
and away from saloons than any
number Of lectures on tlie evils of
bad companionship mid oil temper
ance, poured out on one who lias
nothing to do and nowhere to go.
The cheapest and safest way is to oe
cupy your boy yourself and give the
devil uO chance to employ him.—
Pittsburg Advocate.
I be created if not at hand,
Jf 1 h'
A California editor says : Upon t his
story we confidently defy the united
genius of tho ngaregsted press of the
East. A small boy in Quincy,in this
State, went up the mountain side full
of pleasure at the first fall of snow.
At the summit lie slipped and rolled
down tho hill, becoming the nucleus
of a vast showhall which hopelossly
imprisoned hint, lie was.missed nf
ter several hours, und tho searchers j
gut on the truck of the snowball and ] f
trailed it to where It had leaped from;
cl ill- to a canon. Looking down I
they could see It lodged in the boughs
of a pine tree. They finally got it,
broke it Open aild found tlie boy hi
slde, but ratliei' chilly. Upon tliis
incident wti rest the réputation of
Californi a for the seas on._
. C. E. Dancy, Mayor of Columbus
has been placed In the Insane Assy
lu m at Meridian.
i
a
tn
As the holidays approach the <juau
tity of liquors brought to our pn^ty
torn town by express and othet^PPr
by seems to increase. The "unti-proHi"
gets his little jug and is content.
[while the leading "prolii gets his
J live gallon keg and prepaid], hlniseff
for the frolic. The doors of the
saloons arc closed, and the town
sliutteth oft from its revenue, but:
that is all, the liquor gets here all the
same, and we Godforsaken adv
of w hisky, are not the only ones to
get it either. This may cause the
hair to stand straight upon its end on
the heads of some of our "prohi"
a friends, and doubtless some of them
would like to put their prohibition
heel upon our neck and crush us out
of existence for telling the truth,
But we are not ashamed of it. And
now if you don't mind the devil won't
get us, any sooner than he will some
°f our prohibition friends. \\ hieh is
the better man, the one who favors
the legitimate sale of whisky aid i.
not ashamed of it, or the one who
•atess
"
bitterly opposes it openly, ami se
cretly slips around and gets all he
can swill? "Oh, Consistency thou
art a jewel." Oh, hipoeraey thou art
a Jim Dandy.—Advance.
We it ave frequently seen state
ments in our exchanges to this effect
but we had hoped and believed lhat
they were untrue. Winona claimed
to be a prohibition town, and for the
peace and well-being of lier people, if
for no other reason, we hated to be
lieve otherwise, but now the authori
ty of the statement seems reliable,
coming as it does from the home pa
per. If tlie statements in the above
article be true, they do not reflect
very creditably upon tho prohibition
ists. Bro; Moore, please correct your
statements in tlie next issue of the
Advance, and oblige
Kitchen Experiments.
Ho much is said in these times
about the adulterations of food, that
any simple experiment that can he
tried by tlie mistress of the home is
welcomed. Flour, we are toid, is to
an alarming extent adulterated with
alum. The following test «ill al
way* îoveul its presence : Oil a por
tion of adulterated Hour being placed
in a small quantity of clilorform, the
Hour floats, while the alum or other
mineral matter sinks to tlie bottom,
j so, also, in a similar way, alum in
bread may be instantly detected by
placing a small piece of tlie ^inspected
loaf in a solution of logwood and am
luonia, the broad turning blue if any
alum be contained ill it.. Few house
keepers know how the use of am
monia lightens the work in the kitch
en. D is cheaper than soap, and
cleans every thing it touches. A New
England housewife, says:
drops iu a kettle t Hat i« hard to clean
makes grease and stickiness fade
away, and fobs tlie work of all ils
terrors. Let it stand ten minutes lie
fore attempting to scrape oil', and eve
rything will be clean. it cleans the
sink and penetrates into the drain
"A few
Spots, finger-marks on paints,
;ieal inllueuee,
pipe.
disappear under it mu
aud it is equally etteetive on tlie
flooring cloth, though il must lie used
with carb on the latter, or it will in
jure the polish. There is nothing to
equal it in cleaning the silverware,
and it gives a higher polish, ami
keeps clean longer than anything
else. If the silver he only slightly
tarnishe
ammonia into à quart W hot
brush the tarnished article witli it,
and dry'with chamois. If badly dis
colored, they may need a little whit
ing previous to tho washing. An old
nail brush goes into the cracks to pol- 1
isli and brighten. For fine muslin
and delicate lace ii is invaluable, a:
put two tabk'Hpoonfiils of
vttte r.
1
cleans without nibbing the finest fa- I
hides. Put ft *ew drops into your I
.i . . i !
sponge bath in hot weathei, and \<m
will he astonished at the result, as il
imparts cöolness to tlie skin, i sc it
to clean hair-brushes, and P
any hair or feathers to be used for f
beds or pillows. When employed in
anything that is not especially soil
ed, use the waste water afterward for
tlie house plants that are taken down
from their natural position and im
mersed iilTlie tub of water, Amino
was!
ilia is a fertilizer, and helps to keep
healthy the plants it flourishes." It
... •* 1 , .
will remove spots from clnllung, us
ing a couple of teaspoonfuls in a
basin of water, rub the garment to
be cleaned with a piece of cloth
. . ... . , ,
wrung out ofthe ammonia and water. |
A soiled white nun's veiling will come |
out almost as good as new, if careful
ly cleaned with ammonia ami water, j
Use white tlaflnel as a cleuiiingcloth. j
pose, but was
thought toe hasty.
broached the subject as follows" "If | m
f weVe to speak to you of marriage, j
after having ;<mly made your ae-j'"
quaintance three days ago, what !
would you say of it?'' "Well, Il
should say, never put oil (ill to-mor- ]
row what you should have done the | n
day before yesterday."
-Kx.
"A gentloiiRUi who had been in
Chicago only three days, hut win» w
had been paying attention to a prom- j
i lient Chicago belle, wanted to pro-1
..rn
He delicately j
I
[
The growing litt '(O town of McCooljist
reduced to !
tn Attala county, was
ashes a few* days ago. The fire is sup
posed lo have resulted in easlessness
handling lamps.
j
Men and women ■ , 00:11 worn down
j n mlml and boa;. 1 : o lubors and
kii7l,q° t
; whole system is fiivu! d as a eom-c
I quenoe. I'istii n that
pkjihkkton'i
j acts us a direct n.
Rest for the Weary !
HEALTH FM SICK!
ves give way
ore, and the
K. .
II WINE i
D~ <*f restoration, :
I portent hea.fh D» the mind and .
j body, dissipating very feeling of de
pression and lassitude. 1 id imparting
calmness, energ
ni., I happiness.
1'EMliKKTON'S F 1 I'M : : WINK COCA
is the great nerve restorer and invig
orator.
and the entire sysiein restored, for
the nerves is the life of man. If they j
are deranged, all e sc w ill be; if heaf- 1
thy, then health <> mind aud body ;
„ foil .ws.
Pemberton's FB'txt it Wine Coca
acts specifically u] in Hie nerves, the j
muscles and the w'ioie luinian organ
ism. In every hoA Ic inere is health
and rest an . hi op *■. t*~ For 1
further pai ul*
Gives liei.ltli
.. the nerves
id for hook on
neu W
J. S. l'K.M I'.EK'l ' *N A < ....
Hole Propr's, A Mani'Ts,
Atlanta, ' hi.
For sali» by
Hughes A Nance,
I irenada. Miss.
tlCH* 1 Im
MOCUREÎiyOPAY!
fuiNN!
! mmÿi
I Ir
7
IotsBmiwie?
il
Tlu* iiHTcbant dealing in GuiniiX j *i- ,
oncer Blood Honewvr is hereby an- ;
! Iiorized to refund the money if it <|o»> ;
not cure the di
reconiniended, and when taken ac
a-i'H for which it i
cordimr to directions.
!Iip
jitil
. \n.rti
•roful
ys, Skin Hi
Blood I'oison, I-i-mulo ( *mplai
oil
in' a 11 I* in.I
It. Guinn first imimifsctured and sold i
his medicine from Derry, Ga., in au I
humble way, usimr an ordinary iron j
pot for boiling. The business was run
under the name of Hwift A (■uinn. i
i 1 1 1 the caution printeil
genuine v
Pcrrv, (
on each label ;
■ • N
II.:
out tin
( f u i 1111 and the rneilieine v as
ritten
• f
signature
al *5.00 per bnttle.
Inershin was dissnlveil
Mr. C. T. Swift Hairing and Mr It.
Guinn continuing the nuiuwfart um of
this Celebrated Vegetable Blood lie-.*«
•sts un to Un- !
hitlu-n, fort
newer fn
present time,
right therein to tlie Mac on Mcdi'-in. ;
mpuny. Macon, Ga. f i -say me
1 and Skin Diseases mailed free.
now sold h is !
:! ■
1
I'd
Macon M i:i>i< l
E ( '051 K INV,
. (i \.
II rum.' tV: X a NCI , An
U*«*. 1,1 III :
llts
Grenad
ror Hard U...
Ti i
r i
f7P!Tffi
ll
il Li;.
J'l
: DEMO RUSTS 5
MONTHLY
ILLUSTRATED
: MAG A / - ! N E~
of >l
With Twelve Cu< Pnprr
Selection and o
■ y
Both publicati: s, One Year,!
$3,10 (THHfE TEW).
EMOREST'S f
■T THE RE
1 V
«À,
Of all t.lvo Maeiazines.
/CONTAINING Stories, P c
attractions, combining a
H ousehold matters.
'« and ( ther t Ürrr.ry
: ttic, Scientific
ith Ori-r : Slpf't Enfjrar»
IUustrutrtt
iutj*, I'hotoyrarui
fine Woodrtits,
M<w<txine of .
' / ' i
•i
it tfir 31'Jtiii
rorro**
Km h M.'igazino
OlthKIJ cnfitliriytlirAh
ANY I'AiTrifN liiiiH 1 ••
i in J IhJ
i in ANY SI ZU.
niLMOKKsrs MOX'n::
the WiiiMV M !,'l Xwr.
.tin* Lari
r\VO Dollar F:
■ •
■ 1.1
u <\ th
-t in ( in
Uly May
ho the Twenty*-secoml y>
it is continually itnprov■•
■*'' *i> place it in the t
-
V
IW
I l'erlmlîcnls. nn,l equal -
contains 73 patres, larjre«!
I iiriuteJ mul t,
! 1 'hIioi! hv \V. Jrntiiiiif? ' » r«.***t, N 'V \ n
fi y ç^eciAl arrf ünt combined
WITH i HE
xll
f
pith, the Illinois ( k
limgh Sleepers to JiroiAv ester: Points
lav
On ami after lift
; ml H. K , will
Tlir Sigh Hleepor I"
omingt/>n, Moudn
Weekly
run i
l'ami, Divntur. I'
tu, Freeport, Dubuque, Manchester.
, Ft. Podge, .Sioux ( 'ity ami
other Northwestern points, leaving
New Orleans at " 1'. m-i
7:57 » in every l lturs.laj
* Miss.. ' 12:53 a tii.
Tenn., 11 ;05 n ni every Friday until
further notice. This arrangement
M 1 K^ertiy accommodate Returning
exposition ioun-ts, and Louisiana
Mi Tj S si|,pi and Tennessee Land
seekers. J W COLKMAN,
Asst. Gcn'l Pass. Act.
Wat.rl
Hammond
and Jack
.j,| u , ump.rsigneil desires to inform
(he public that !lias on hand and
larg. quantity of tile
m Punk A Liiiih i'k
I.cave orders « ith P..ak A l.iutreius
« tinpnc
%'w « t»« v>AWDEI?5liii
K;irlm , rH a|KlllI ,| rorget wltll
th(1 r ,,i m ( tlitore lias lav
n nd i* now, that I am and will al
for-a!
jllosl Piltsluirff Foal !
w h{eh will he j»o!d «î the lowe'^t <• »'*)>
priées. Send m \ « * n i orders and 1 iie\ i
will receive 'promp -ml en refill at-1
rteetscssWÄssi
tvom my Coal Yard Jusl \
- hardware store.
'-I

ways no prepared lo furnish meals
with tho same good table at the low
rntes and Hie iiesi the niaiket .if
fords. Mrs If J LokaViinstkIn.
(3w) _
Tho Hazlehurst Coplahau lias been
consolidated with the Signal.
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FANCV i'AM'DN I
111' IT 1 ',
CIGARS. CIGAÎÎLTTK.H. 'll
w. Ä. RAGSDALE &
I- r
To Subscribers and Advertisers
Don't fog
Unit tin* Subscription
! prk*»- of Tm; i* $1 50 :
I six month* 7
Ailvi-i'tiriiu
ye* r,
cut*, in iV
ali.
rates w i!i
F . en on
other iuforina
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