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The Grenada gazette. (Grenada, Miss.) 1885-18??, March 27, 1886, Image 3

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THE GRENADA GAZETTE.
Vf. & LADD, Editor Md Mibi,,,.
ORBNADA,
Eisa
AS A MOTHER.
A sudden, piercing wail of pain,
A rush of pattering fert,
In blind, impetuous haste to gal
The mother's solace sweet—
A comforter, who stills the cry
With kiss and soothing song*
•You'll feel all better bv Ond by,
-Hush, dear, 'twin *<K ache long."
.And soon tho magic wofd and aisa
Distil tlwif healing balm;
r The sobbing, frightened outcries cease—
The spell has wrought Its charm.
• Tho restless darling slips away,
His trouble quickly flown;
Hut while his voice rings out In plan
Tho mother sits alone.
Her busy needle falls unsought,
As come, in shadowy train,
Dim messengers, with haunting thought
Of grief, and loss, and pain;
Of anxious hopes too long deforred.
Of gold, proved only Cross,
Mysterious depths of anguish stirred—
life's unseen, crushing cross.
The mother bows In grief alono.
With heart no longer strong,
While throbs life's mourttful Undertone!
" How ton* 0 Lord, bow long?"
WbeU lo! the hcftvrns new radiance shed
À» falls this Host decree:
Behold, as thou bast comforted,
Ttfe IWH will comfort theo."
~lientya A, Pech, in Oood Houtukeeplng,
OLD AND NEW COOKS.
The TMumph of the Home-Made
Mince Pie.
It was a round-faced, smiling, good
matured Pie. It was home-made. Its
• crust was baked to cat.
It
• crust was baked to cat.
It was flaky,
brown and tender. It was deep through
and juicy. It was an old-fashioned He,
and yet it was not proud. Even in this
age of shams and frauds, when genuine
ness in other things than pi«^ is ^ rare
as genius, it was not hau>| ltv , ailll thns
when the Roast of B;. e f, which sat on
the same shelf in '„ no p antry> spoko t0
it the Pie rep' 4 ' ie( j
at once. I doubt
V0r - V i"i" 01 ''.nether the Roast of Beef
w °"V~ .ve been similarly condescend
l n " b sd it occupied the pinnacle of
far je which the Pie did, for like a groat
many people it had a great contempt
for what it couldn't understand, and
Pie was as far above its comprehensi
as Jupiter and the Milky Way, and had
it been any tiling but a common Roast,
too well done on the outside and much
too rare on the inside, it would havo
shown its opinion of the Pie by treat
ing its remarks with silent contempt.
The Pie. however, was refined. It had
a soul and had it had fingers long
-enouFa to hold a pen I believe it would
T**'-' c written beautiful poetry,
made by a lady out of the choicest of
Hour, and tho
on
It was
various meats, juices
spices which gave its interior
flavor aud body were selected with the
utmost care and judgment, whereas
the Roast, before it was a Roast,
Taised in a stall and probably wouldn't
have known what culture was had it
iseen it labeled. Perhaps it was the
iknowledge of its early condition, per
haps it was tlio rough not to say brutal
treatment it received at the hands of
the butchers, or perhaps it was the
scorching it had just undergone in the
kitchen oven, but whatever it was the
Roast felt somewhat humbled on this
particular occasion, or the subjoined
conversation would never havo taken
and
was
place
"It's a nice day," observed the Pie,
graciously.
"Yes." replied the Roast, "so it ap
pears."
"Have you been here loifg?"
"Not very. I only came out of the
oven a few hours ago."
"Are you intended for dinner to
day?"
"Yes. Are you?"
"I don't know," responded the Pie.
"I was baked for a special occasion."
"Aii!" replied the Roast, nettled by
the reply, for it knew it had not been
roasted for a special occasion, and it
galled his pride to hoar that any one
else had been. "I suppose you are
better than common food."
"No, not at all," responded tho Pie,
quickly, for it had no intention of hurt
ing the feelings even of a potato
puring, so gentle was it and consid
erate.
"You seem to act that way," went
on the Roast, hotly; "and for my part
I don't think you can compare with a
good, honest Roost, or even a Chop, or
a Rib. What are you, anyway?"
"What am I?" answered tho Pie, for
a moment quite taken aback by this
outburst of abuse. "Why, I am ahomo
made mince Pie."
"A home-made mince Pie indeed!"
repeated tho Roast, with all tho con
tempt it could throw into its tones.
"A mass of iudigestibles—a mixture
of dyspepsia producing condiments
never intended to bo eaten by any one
who has sense enough to blow hotsoup.
Bah! 1 know mince Pio!"
"I tuisnro you," responded tho Pie,
politely, "that you are mistaken. That
I ratty bo the case with some ao-called
! minco pies, but I am quite n different
»ortof pastry.''
i "There is only one kind of mince
i pie," continued tho Roast, stubbornly,
k "Milieu pie is mince pie the world
lover."
"Where do you get your informa
tion, may I ask?"
t "From all
Koast
lie used
sources," answered the
"Why the butcher who shaped
unnecessary brutality, but I
t,blame him particularly."
"You
n
were tough P
innocently
'f;(Mperled the Pie
yfePi»**No. sir, I
—_ wasn't tough. Ho had
||en eating mince pio for dinner nnd
*fi was 8U öering from an acute attack
laii ndigestion. It was his stomach
Æpt made him slash me so coarsely.
J" had 11 suspicion that 1 might be des
■J*'l mlnco-meat and that made
fbn vindictive."
1
Ï»
Ijflf'He had
probably been eating
er a pie," observed the Pie.
n makes trouble and brings a great
That
deal of discredit
Btyie of pastry."
"Unworthy, I should say," persisted
the Roast, doggedly, "He had be
eating a mince pie made by his own
wife, i tell you all mince pies are
alike. There isn't a bit of difference
between 'em—not a particle."
"You do us an injustice," explained
the Pie "with admirable control
a serious injustice. There is
really nothing in the world to compare
with a well-cooked, home-made mince
pie. Why poets have immortalized
mince pie. Did you never hear of
* The Ude to Grandmother s Pie?' It
is sung wherever the English language
is spoken."
" That s nothing," interrupted the
Roast, impertinently. " The roast beef
of old England has been sung the world
over,"
upon a very worthy
un
of its
temper,
l am
saying nothing against the
eminence of roast beef," explained the
Pie. "Nothing was farther from my
intention. Why, there is a good deal of
beef in me. I am only defending
own order against your charges."
"You never hear of mince pie being
served at fashionable dinners, do you?"
No not now—that is, not as a rule.
But that is not the fault of mince pie.
There are very few people who know
how to make a good mince pie.
art were more commonly known at the
present time you would hoar of our be
ing served everywhere. The art of pie
making has in a measure fallen into
decay. The grandmothers of the
ent generation of women knew how to
make us."
my
If tho
pres
"But you were
broke in the illogical
"I am a firm believer
a
"That may he so," responded the
Roast, somewhat mollified, for it takes
two to make a quarrel in the pantry, as
Well as in the parlor,
not made by a grandmother."
"No, you are right, but I was made
by a woman who inherited tho art and
has it to a high degree of perfection."
"I don't believe that," replied the
Roast, "that can't he so."
"Oh, hut it is."
"No, sir; you can't make me be
lieve that,"
Roast, rudely,
in the old style of cooking, although 1
have no faith in pies, still I believe
pie baked by one of the cooks of the
Jiast generation might he passably
good, hut one baked by one of those
modern cooks can't ho any thing hut
execrable."
" Were you cooked by one of the
ancient cooks?" asked tho Pie.
"I was," answered the Roast, proud
ly, though to tell the truth it really
didn't know the very first thing about
the rudiments even of eookiug.
was roasted by his mother and sent
over here. She cooked me herself, and
stood over mo until I was done to a
turn."
"i
"That may be so, and 1 don't doubt
that it is so since you say it," remarked
the Pie, with courtesy, "but I can't see
that makes you any better. One
person can cook a roast of beef as well
fts another, but. it requires genius to
mix a mince pie. There are so many
things to look after, and the success or
failure of the pie depends on a hundred
and one little things."
How much longer this
argument
would have continued I do not know.
Both disputants were idle and had
nothing else to do hut to talk. But
they were interrupted by the advent of
the dining-room maid, who took both
dishes out of the pantry and prepared
them for the coming dinner, which was
served a very short time afterwards.
At tho close of the meal the man oi
the house, between sips of his black
coffee, observed to his wife:
"Mother didn't come over to-day?"
"No, she said she didn't feel well,
but she sent something over for yon to
eat that she knew you liked."
"1 know," he replied. "I knew it
at once. It was that 'delightful mince
pie. I recognized the flavor at
I used to have such pies when I was a
hoy, my dear. I wish you would learn
the art. You never made me a mince
pie."
"How did you like the roast?" in
quired the-wife.
"It was not first rate, I am sorry to
say. Now don't think I am finding
fault, my dear, for you really are an
excellent cook, and when you have had
more experience you will be as good as
my mother, hut I have often
plained about hoof being too well done
on the outside and not well enough
done on the inside. l)i<l you cook the
roast yourself?"
"No," replied the wife, a faint smile
of triumph appearing in the corners of
her pretty mouth, "your mother did. I
baked the pie."
once.
com
The only thing I regret in relation
to this truthful incident is that tliere
wasn't enough of the Pie left to observe
the look of mingled pain and mortifica
tion which appeared on the faco of the
Roast and distorted it so badly that all
the servants who partook of it at the
second table had dyspepsia for a week.
It is to be all the more regretted too
because it never occurred again. In
the future tho man of the house, with
wisdom ot experience, wag always
very particular to inquire who did tho
cooking before ho distributed his opin
ions thereon .—Benjamin Northrop, in
N. Y. Graphic.
Waiter— 1 'se sorry, sali; but do fish |
Guo»t (angrily) Soup and fish both
Every Thing Out
Hotel Guest (in dining-room)— A
little soup, waiter.
Waiter—Sorry, sali; but do soup am
ail out. _
Guest—Soup out already? Well,
bring me some fish.
out, and it's not two o'clock yet! You
send tho proprietor to me at once.
Waiter—Berry sorry, sah; but do
1 miss am out, too.- Drake's Traveller ' 1 $
Ï» agazine.
—The "silk-tailed chattm*er" is the
name of a bird that has reappeared
lately in Middle Germany öfter an ab*
fience of more thau Jhirtv veins.
GLORIOUS VICTORY.
Exciting Contest and
». 1^* Attendant
Pleasure« and DUappoIntmenU.
The tire companies of Lucknow held
their annual contest a few
Jem Cahver went about for
weeks since,
some days
in advance of the affair, offering bio
odds on the "Get Theres," and the
takers were numerous. Brig Lampson
the head of the "Fire Flys," was espec
ially ready and
eager to wager with
him upon the result, and bet every
thing he could lay hands upon. He
began with money, of
lary, as chief clerk i
course. But his
**«"«" k
V c. 1 Smith
" htears grocery, was soon exhausted;
so were his small savings in the bank;
and ha began to bet his dogs, his
trousers and his progressive euchre
outfit. When nothing els > was left he
put up half his favorite
new
mare, "Lu*
relia," against Jem Carver's promise
of the privilege of keeping steady
pany with his sister, Miss Kitty Carver,
for the term of one month,
certainly a curious wager; hut in view
of the destitution they had both reached
in regard td valuable things to put up,
what the impartial observer ought
most to admire is the restraint which
caused the bet to he limited on the one
hand to half of Lampson's mare, and
the other to a month of the society
of Jem Carver's sister.
com
This was
"You guarantee your sister's permis
sion now, Jem," insisted Brig Lamp
son, when they closed the agreement,
"A woman kept steady company with,
against her will, has
affection still—for the other fellow.
She's got to be willing, or it's 110 con
tract."
"You're safe enough there, Brig. Kit
enters into the thing heart and soul,
and if the 'Get Theres' get left, she'll
live up to the bargainl But don't
forget that I'm to have half the use of
'Lurulla' if
the roof of Nolan's Block, und the
'Fire Flys' don't."
All the snrrounding country was
present to witness the contest which
was to decide which of the
I
just the same
you
we send our stream over
companies
could throw tho highest stream.
to be settled by determining
which, if either, could in the language
of the articles of agreement, "throw
over the roof of Nolan's block"—the
highest building in town.
The "Fire Flys," under the direction
of Brig Lampson tried first; and Brie's
heart beat high as he gave the word,
and the boys fell to upon the old
fashioned pump with a tremendous
will. They pumped for all they were
worth; hut tho block was high and
human strength lias limits. The stream
reached only to a level with the top
row of windows. Still, this was a big
achievement in itself, and the friends
of the "Fire Flys" shouted themselves
hoarse with approval.
There were cries of derision when
the "Get Theres" trotted out their
ferior machine under the orders of
Jem Carver, for the "Get Theres" had
been defeated woefully the year before.
But there was a smile of confidence
Jem's face as he walked calmly to
where the coiiduetor-pipe (used to con
vey rain water from the roof) was fas
tened to the building. The elbow which
terminates such pipes seemed to come
off as readily in his hands as if it had
been fixed for the purpose, in advance,
ns indeed it had.
This
was
in
on
Then the pooplo watched Jem with
open eyes and mouths as he thrust the
nozzle uf tile "Fire Flys'," hose far up
the pipe, and cried to his waiting fire
laddies: "Now, boys! Give it to her!"
Give it to her they did; and before
any one knew how it happened a
graceful column of water
arched itself above the roof of Nolan's
block, and drooped aud fell in a deli
cate and creamy curve.
But there was nothing particularly
delicate or creamy about Brig Lamp
son's feelings; nor about the feelings of
any member of tho "Fire Flys," and
at once a great cry rose for the umpire.
The umpire was a fair man, and said
he could not go behind the agreement
for the contest, which certainly said
that "whichever company throws its
stream highest over the roof of Nolan's
block, shall receive the prize." It
plain that the "Fire Flys" had not only
not thrown highest over the roof, but
that they had not reached the roof at
all; whereas the "Get Theres" had
got there in splendid shape. It was
true they had used a conductor-pipe,
but the fair umpire could not find any
rose and
•as
'
lv
tiling against the use of a conductor
pipe in the agreement. So he awarded
tho prize to the "Get Theres."
Brig Lampson is not keeping compa
ny with Kitty Carver just now; and
Jem Carver makes a point of taking
out tlie mare
Lurella" on Sundays
and holidays, when the chief of the
" Fire Flys'
young lady (his next best girl, count
ing from Kitty) to drive with him.—
Tid-Bits.
has invited a certain
MEXICAN INDIANS.
Tlie Remarkably Heavy Load» They Carry
on Their iiack«.
The fact is that the Indian puts him
■elf in competition with the burro, that
patient little beast of general totage.
The back of tho Indian seems to be
about as strong
and the Indian has this advantage,
that after transporting his stuff to
market he can make his own bargain
for its sale. I know no more interest
ing sight than to go out in the early
morning on to one of the great high
roads leading into tho city, and to.
watch the never-ending procession of
Indians carrying burdens. The rag
figures sold in a few Boston shops give
exactly their expression. It is the
Aztec face, that dull, bronzed counte
nance, with lusleriess eyes, which
seem to have accepted the lowest con
dition of life as all that is attainable by
Immun endeavor.
that of tho burro,
And what loads these strong Indian
hacks can carry! I watched a gang
the other day loading grain on a ear.
The grain was in hags, and each hag
weighed three hundred pounds. A
little hfouzed chap, »bout iw big »8 the I
of
the
bag, and, weighing not a pound over
one hundred, would take a bag on his
back and run up a platform which
on a level With the ear, and then he
would trot back at once for another
load. And yet some writers assert that
the lower Mexican class are lazy. I
say that they are capable of
mitting, patient toil as any people
top of the planet, and that the true
wealth of Mexico consists of her docile
and industrious laboring population.
Half the time they are idle and have
waa
as unre
nothing to do. That they will work
hard and continuously for a fair wage
the history of the building of the C'en- j
tral railway shows.
on
j
Fx-General Man
ager Robinson, now of the Atlantic &
Pacilic, said that he
preferred them to
any American gang of laborers for hard
work.
„ .. .
Furniture is
rs, with a man
These chaps will pile up
stuff on a litter and bind it with
I have seen an Indian carry from a
car to a weighing scale hag after bag of
giain weighing three hundred pounds,
and four cargadores will carry a grand
piano on their shoulders from one end
of the city to the other,
usually moved on litte
at each end.
ropes,
and then start off at a jog with a bur- !
den big enough for a horse. These j
furniture-movers are remarkably care
fill, and rarely injure any tiling. They
work cheaply and well.
Frequently you will
perched on another's shoulders being
taken about the streets.
Hi*
a rant»
I have ofteu
seen well-dressed old gentlemen being
trotted along in this fashion,
were victims of rheumatism out for
airing, or on a visit to some friend.
I he poorer classes carry their babies
on their backs, and one of the quaint
est sights is to see a little brown face
with black eyes peeping
hood-like fold.
'They
an
out of the
»f its mother's upper
see babies being
tote<l about in this way on the backs of
little brothers or sisters, for the kind
ness of Mexicans of all classes to young
children is a most praiseworthy char
acteristic,
where the
garment. I of bn
!
Even in tht- narrow streets,
very poor live in hut-like
houses, you see no trouble
thildren; they play quietlv, and their j
mothers are not engaged in frequent
brawls regarding childish difficulties. 1
T , , ,, . , . . j
Indeed, there is a certain refinement oi !
action, a decency and courteousness of
behavior among the poorest Indians
which would put to shame the c
ness of people of tin- same grade of life
in an American city. — Cor. Dostuu lkr
alil.
g th
am
mrsc
wa y* rewarded, sooner or later, but to
Which is Held by
CAKE FOR BREAD.
A Mistaken Notio
Many Mer
I
motive suggested in tales which assert !
id Wi
It is not well to be guided by tho
that virtue is at once highly rewarded
however implicitly one may believe the
stories themselv
(»uod deeds are al
expect and hope for an immediate I
"squaring of accounts" is most igno
ble. Working for inciv pay is to be
governed by a mean motive. It is bet
ter to do right because such a course is
noble in itself, than because other peo
ple may have been at
for fine deeds, and wo therefore expect '
the same result to foil»»
;
mve rewarded !
' ill our own
case. Moreover, the person who hopes |
to find his honesty instantly recognized
and praised by his little world is liable
tG he disappointed.
A lady who learned this lesson very
early in life, says that when a little
girl, she went alone to the village store
to buy several package-of llower-seeds
for her garden. On leaving the shop, !
she was looking over her purchases,
with a child's delight in the new, when 1
she discovered that the shopman had |
given her two more packages of seeds I
than he had intended. She savs:
I
"I went hack to return them, fully
persuaded that lie would say to me: |
•What a remarkable little girl you are! I
Ilow honest! Take as liiiiny packages
of seeds as you can carry home, and;
then come and lie my partner in the I
store.'" J
And when nothing of the sort hap
pened she was bitterly disappointed.
She had expected to find honesty paid j
for by the day, and not by the long job |
of a life-time.
Another true incident jioints to the |
same mistaken notion. A little girl :
was once told the story oi a child who
gave lier' own bread and blitter to a !
jggar, and was therefore presented
. , , , . I is
with cake by her delighted parents
lv
with cake by her delighted parents
Going to school tho next day, acoom- i
panied by a maid, tin* little girl who j
had heard the story peeped into her !
"i i»;
scorn at finding only bread and butter
therein.
But a sudden thought struck
iter. She stopped short, resisting the
maid's persuading hand.
"Bring m e a little beggar child!'
»lie cried, imperiously.
beggar!"
*• What, ntv dear 3 !> 7 i al do
,
:
" » want a |
you
want? naked the puz/lcd nurse.
"I want a little beggar, so that 1
may give her 1113 bmul. and have cake
myself!"
To do right for the purpose of pro
curing an immediate supply of moral
cake is to be compared only to the ic
nobility of serving one's country only
for the sake of the salary she can
— Youth's Votnp<imon.
p»y
—It has recently been discovered
that Lake Dias, near DeLeon Springs,
Volusia County, Fla., is fed by an
enormous spring, which holla up about
two hundred yards off the south shore
of tlie lake. When the surface is per- !
fectly still tho boiling can be seen over
an area of about five acres. It is pro
posed to anchor a buoy over the
ter of the spring, since the best of cool
water can he obtained there at
time.
At
cen
any
—At Birmingham, Conn., the corpse
of a young lady was disinterred and all
the pins In the hair and shroud
moved to quiet her ghost that had been
disturbing $be neighborhood,— Hartford
re
A NOBLE 000,
Abased Kind That
On# Creature of
Earned More tint
It« Salt.
[Birmingham (Ala.) Age.J
J. E. Walter, the master of train services
of the Louisville & Nashville railroad, has
a dog he values highly. The dog is a N
foundland, and has been raised by his
owner from a small puppy. Mr. Walter
has a little girl who is fond of the
and the affection between the two is inter
esting. A fe
girl was left in the room alone by a large
fire in the grate. Hhe went too
blaze and the dog opened the door
^ re< ^
j
th 9
i mal,
mornings since the little
He went to her and began to pull
I
teeth. Thetwf
played about
j the room for some time, until the little
girl grew tired and sleepy. Hhe went too
Dear the fire agai
orapan
<1 tBo do;
get her away. He pulled at h
for some time, hut could uot
her. He then hurried to her moth,
and began to act strangely by
against her hand and catching h»
pulling her toward the door. .She
him and told'him to go ana
Nellie. He made a strange
with his mouth, and then sl<
back to where the little
The fire was growing hotter
one was sleeping, unco
•ould not
• clothes
dress,
''Lining
noise
va Iked
one
id the little
*f he»- great
111
»us
danger. The dog: made
! to arouse her and failed. He the
j ?° k " n beside her ' betwe
ty a l"w entered the rno.
later and t,
r attempt
l CTOU Led
Ini
her and the (ire,
•ell. Mrs.
i to protect h**r
few 11
d the noble dog in this
bile the hair
his back. Little
1"
tion whining and crying,
was being singed fr<
Nellie w
sleeping sweetly.
The Egg Found Her a lii
A roi
intle ec
'tsbip has been g
for some tii
clerk in
and
e In-twee
Frank N„1
grocery at Elizabeth;»,-t, N.
young school-teacher of Iiak,,ta. Mr.
Nolan, one ilav about four
outLs
while unpacking
that ha«l th« young lady's
address writte t upon it.
s. It
1
The find-." of the
ed to
egg was reijin
it
plied with the fai
eral letters kav
bo felt
1111
dally
dined. V
g Noli
photographs b
her last missiv
iged,
id il
eJ a fe
asts li-r
the y
n g w
to
to Dakota imiu-ilintelv.
come
Red Star Cough Cure i
T' r m'- L<
sat s ht. Jacobs On is a spe
paiu.
Congressman Baglet, of Mn iii:
Clous.
is ville, Ky.,
ic for to
How ofte:
with the si
Bide.—A*.
u see a country tavern
fing outside ■ n the inn
-
If silence is golde
fortune lockjaw
"It K
valuable inis*
st be.
<'kn the Sp
and everything in
blotches,
the nature of emotions
blotches, pimples, ulcers
aud incipient
ing more nor 1
-, scrofulous huniurs
. «hi.
us
sthan sc
I completely out of the
and invigorates the li
ach, regulates tho bowels, f
! aml builds up tho weak 1.
*ge table c<
•fultiof the 1
uia
-
P the st.
Ih-stli,
■ »f the 1
It is a purely
1 will
r-rur
do more than is cl
bj Ur. ru-rce'* u g,
limed for it. We
Idea M'diai ///■",.'•■
Wr may be sure that our consciences
rebellious when they
I (mutinous).
'
ire
muta iu us
Tin
• Away Tru
when our m*
per
ure, with
cents in stamps for pamph
ences. Woi ld's Dispensai v Modn-al A.
; ciation, (5fl3 Mai
method is ^
n-nntcf d to
sos of r:j t •
♦•nt 1
t. the use of tho!
Street, Buffalo, N. V.
j
I
!
The selfish
an has nrn.st presi
mind. He never forgets himself.-.V U.
Picayune.
|
! order dep;
1
|
I
•e of
As a toilet luxury. Hall's Hair Rcnevror
never fails to give saiisfnetion.
Sufferers from Bronchitis will find speedy
relief by taking Ayer's Cherry Pectoral
It Was All Right.
"Where <lo you
■xji'vt 1 1; i~
from?'' asked a clerk in tin- in n,
irtment of the post-ofliee
•fa
I woman who presented an order for lii- ;
teen dollars.
"From Chicago.
"And who from? - '
"John Williams."
"Ahem.
"Oh. I km
|
I s,| e signed her
?'■' h'^hand.
hto/'and this is'tl.e
I i']| probablv wet tin
J weeks .''—Fruit /•',
j
1 guess it is all right."
■ it is!" she exelainied a
"He used t,
name.
He offered me lift v do!
up al
ecnml
rest in about tu o
r Press.
True Modesty.
The Duke of Wellington was modest, :
though self-reliant
Being at a d:
IT I
arty, just before li is departuri
i'ortugiil,
the French, lie
^'.'1 h'iends said to him:
thiir'wldlesh' v
for
here he was to
mil r
was so silent that one
In
as the
"von don't talk: wliat
is it you arc thinking so
about?"
^ avo , »permet them; they ha\c hcaten
!*^ J think I shall heat tiiem,
tsstss«»;
more modestlv stated_< »m
v
"Of the French," lie
ered.
"I
ans'
jianiou.
—A child at Pueblo, Col., diet! of ;
viv !
scarlet fever, and her
thrown in a shed. Soon afterward :
dog ami a eat «
with the clothes
same dUeasc and iii--«i.
clothe
* taken with the , uuS
en
1 journ
lnailod
1
Red Star
I TR ADE Vto, MA RK,
(ough(ure
Free from Opiate*, Emetics and Poison-.
. 25%
!
SAFE.
SURE.
PROMPT.
At I>*r»«trr* aim IMui.i
TIIKIH1III.ES 1. TUUEI.ER TO.. H1LTIK0KK, KH.
GERManrëMEDŸ
■ Curs, Rheumatism, Neuralgia,
ItaekMbe, llcsdarhe, Tool bee ho.
An ArarlHon. Wsn, I
Why is an avaricious man like one wltV, •
short memory ! lie * aiwav. fw-emin*
So lathe wise bsret.t f. , .. Vi *
lor's Cherok< ■ !v. ;il r i,- 1)f ^'H 1 . 11 *''
Mullein, the , \. * , .^ m ail £
and consumption r-ur • ' ' 11,1 cougb
Why is
cause Le si
Lcdjtr.
!
h
•ur druggist,
a dirty i Mi
ink, fp.
;i;i like flannel
Bn.
'ushuig.
C/it-.uya
" As Goo
«re the wonb used by a ladv who wn« nf
oue time jr.v, „ UJ) |, y ^ , howaK at
physicians, an.J left to die. ]*. !
' >
diseases pe
us displaci
tion, et<.. *
d as New,"
eminent
•i d to a
>t a I
1 rom
11 th V
[ to suffering f« nia
corrhoea.
tak
ÎM
h
•s.
! ■
n&mm
hr. P;
•• E
local t re atm
is now. yd-
rwiucta hj
■ 1 -
nended by him.
by dr.:
mi
A
:ic. He
wii
Pike sT>
Gehma.n
Bum
It is
to
jrx
Cot
In
11 be
Of H
mon
■ :.k
"I'M
look in
A a,
fl.
r; k
of
C ,1
to Sf
Tim A i,. ■
j.,
B
0
A
toil
'.'.'ll V ;
^ P* Ita' ':X 0 Cï I
f-..
I 3
V-/
1
dancer
If
Rm i i
PJDW!? 5 ^
I mm '
;ky
r
^rrn«TV
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a
r
. > l
\J A
A
&
r/,
n\ sJt*
W Jl v
Ms
L
0* i d
Jl
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i;
III

I : VJ
— THE
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IP
Ld
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a
licklv
.n
II ;
NI : I;
111«'
:
<1.
I
Mn I
1
:
:
pr
Mr
Gov 'i
mi!
Thrbre.
nil d.
Itho Li
■men
•!'. Km».: -
n
FI
yield remiil;
:
Ù •>
£
à r I
■it!

(■>
;
v
LI-SE 3 SK;
k
i :i < * i
rf* P f $
it T[ f. *5 f
Y'j sT.s'Ä ^
B a
I
I
It Is idensmit '
,-stcm.
;
It is p:r
■olv Vt "'
provo bcnrfici.
As a Bit" \i '
'
jo-'her». m-h| c
I
'W-T
d!
■ B
y se to m? v
FT?
M
Bliy
aloenr. Oi
»vlrhoui wrliii!
•f* DJ FV 4
m:\v, im lifYi
FREE
'
••
'
v
1 .
un t \i*i.i
iV;
"rari
Frni
tvioillv,
US hi
TIÎE STGRRS à HARRISORLCÛ.
Daisies villi-:, lag
c«.. OHIO.
yy&HiCi fe..
;
!
a
J
{y*l8thP f .'"-r
, uuS
A
rid.
1 journ
lnailod
LYON 4. HEALY.ie2STi.Tr St Ckicjoc, II
■c 1
.
V* ï, H £«* $J|r
Survival of tie rittest.
A FAMILV MEDICI,\E TII IT tits Ilf UElij
MlLUOWi DIT.IM
mus!
HIE®
rcTJiiîin
mi
!.
A BALM FOB FVI ttT '.VOl XI»
MAS AN» 1IEAST!
« '
The Oldest & Best Linimenth
EVLIt MA LK IN' A MERICA. «
SALES LARGER THAN EVER.
,
Tho Mexican Musfmijç Liniment hasp
he n k
for
It®. In
yettrs ns the best of all l.mi
M
tl IkaiHt. Its Mil
iV Hr
it
iRI'HECr
others fail,
and nitwit 1 , to the very bow
everywhere.
i.
tii
<1 pcnctmtcsHkih. u

EM Id
mm
I

£
Flowers That Gloom
-e ht
before you Jrno
, anti
ligtitiul
; tie hill
■"-lid purl*
y iii«
■U',f
S' a
fyv-iur
!W
:
-Jiy
.1» r«n
npwd
deal
u.-y
Tab'-- It ow.
WI
I ijoa;
■>r ,d
a
It I,.
'
II ,vi'.
h i
TU">
street.
I.'
th
Hogg 3 Sarsaparilla
J'r
: bj
100 Do:
One Dollar
0I ^ 0 3 V i
•irfSS OMI FREE!
LaalU
E - • '
ïm
'V. y,
mmi
ls\
jl*
i iU
n'.Y yjm
v :
t
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ran n ana Mous
0 HEAfî Y BA L M
r/t
Sc°i
[J? c
f^iA YFLV£tijj-g $
£
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v
w
o'*
LA.
HAY-FEVER
wtiii ï «
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FOR COUCHS, AND
ION USE
CONSUhV,
ION USE
A
CONSUhV,
r
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Li ITT;
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BOSTON, N£W YOT'iv, CHii
. izhAkha üàtLg
: r.vts. A
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Be
MSSSSSHv .-Ai
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No Pope to Col 0"
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6N IF t. "
NEEDLES,
SHUTTLES.
REPAIRS. A
Supp! ed.
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f fe.
Tf
ill litelilT I
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