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The Grenada gazette. (Grenada, Miss.) 1885-18??, July 02, 1887, Image 7

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88067090/1887-07-02/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE ENGLISH IN AFRICA.
Pr „ r ,Mlr.or»i Which the BrltUh
Jrocfhl «o the Dork Continent.
;th»r the progreasiveness of the
unwieJ an Arab nor the Protest
Dutch were a match for that su
n(ir progressiveness which the
jtiih brought to the development of
it Africa Bv fair means or foul—
] foul much "of it was, forsooth
irhsve gradually dispossessed the
ihof nearly all their valuable pos
,iona In 1796 they dispossessed
, Dutch Government of the Cape,
Ha 1825 virtually confiscated more
in half the property of the Boers
o remained, by compelling the bold-|
* ** P*f; »>* doU "*>. wWch
had issued for four shillings, to
nt one shilling and six pence
' . .. ° . lane ,1
), for them. In 18.16 the
abandoned the Cape and
set
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hi
nl
rs
t thousand of them founded the
republic of the Transvaal. Even
the British pursued them, and
*t emigrated Westward toward the
range river. In 1852 the British Gov
sment was induced to acknowledge
. , , a au vr- ,
« independence of the Transvaal
•oublic; yet, when some twenty-five .
an later it was discovered to contain j
imond fields, the Transvaal was j
jrcib!v annexed to the crown of En-'
land by Sir T. Slicpstone. This oc
irred in 1877 . Other encroachments
pestill going on, and within the com
ghalf-century it is quite probable
at the British flag will wave over the
ost valuable and salubrious portion
tlit African continent, namely, the
tire table lands from the Cape of
Kid Hope to the line of the Aambesi
d Congo. Nor is this result to bo
plored. The Arabian, the Portuguese j
id the Dutch have all failed to develop '
e natural resources of Africa. The
■itish alone have scorned to enslave
e natives and gone to work with 1
fir own stout hands and hearts.
re
Nor is it to be supposed that ita '
■eater proximity to to the equator !
fillers South Africa less fit for Anglo- j
kxon colonization than Europe or
forth America. The mean altitude of
,11 Europe is hut 971.41 feet above the ;
til and this, I believe, is greater than ;
forth America. On the other band, 1
[fries has a mean altitude of no less
■then 2 169 98 fret So that the cHmata i
■wan 41b. ..».y feet bo that (he climate .
the table lands in latitude 20 in |
■South Africa is as bracing anti healthy
■uthatof latitude forty in Europe.
■ Mr. Salt was among the earliest at
■English explorers in South Africa;
Itten followed Captain Botclor in 1823,
■Livingstone in 1857, Hartley in 1865
|ud numerous others since. Hartley's
iKploratlons led to the re-disoovery of
K\ (, !n H Te 9 , ) r W J ie I d, A 0 ^ i *
■lode 28, latitude 21.30, and to them*
Itestigations of Karl Manch in 1866.
llid the mining bubble of 1869-70.
■Among the failures of this period was
■the London and Liverpool Mining
■Company, headed by Sir John Swin
Iburne, Burt This venture was in th«
I Tati region.
I After this, about 1871-73, a new line
I of re-discoveries led to other bubbles.
iDydenberg and Pilgrims' Rest dis
Itricts, both on Baneto's old line of
I nurch, and both explored by his one
thousand greedy followers, were
opened to Anglo-Saxon enterprise. In
1873 this line was pushed northward to
litua (Zumbaoi), and it has since
been pursued to the Zambesi river,
kot year, 1886, a letter from this city
tu published in the London Timet,
which gave a marked impetus to the
Bining boom. Concealing tho fact
that the whole of Sofala and Mono
Botupa has been repeatedly explored
for gold—first by ancient civilized
or races; second, by the Arabs, and
" : fd, by the Portuguese—and bestow
"S new and unpronounceable names
•poa well-known localities, tho latter
K°*wded to show how much gold was
Mug and was going to be shipped
•torn these places through Capetown
Ji Eoglnnd. It predicted an export in
>887 of little less than 64,000,000, equal
~ shout one-third the entire product
™ California. So enormous and sud
® e " • production as this promised
inerited investigation, and it was with
"i* view that I came to Capetown. So
have been as yet able to ascer
Jsia. the ZYmes letter has but small
•osndation in fact. However, the
wontry U extensive and tho mining
•"•Wets numerous, and much remains
fit to be seen_ Alex. Del Mar, in San
f'meUeo Chronicle.
race
Don't Be Guilty of Babbling.
There is nothing more destructive to
Be happiness than oonfidants. The
wppsnlng* of Home life which concern
one's self and husband should be
J* **«redand inviolable, and no true
*«• will rob them of Uwlr saorodness
^'■parting them to any person, no
tn !ir ow MM * Wo® 4 Th ere »»
"ttls snnoyanoes and mlsnndsr.
rj"®* 1 that are beat forgiven and
t^PHon, and one's own oommon
Jooan bsstdsetdo what ta tha trua
— — in npiu to raw jan
" — Usw. Oonfidants am always
Brsijr on* may rest as*
Tjw that offsrsd advio* has bnt ons
Jwt, to mnks mbohtat and ons ta
"***itho«t than with suchfrlsnds,
IKtanu,
SAND MANUFACTURE.
Wow SUlea I, Ground D..wa and Wa.had
for GlatcWakias Purpo,«.
The manufacture of sand is an im
j portant industry, which has Pittsburgh
; for its headquarters, although the sand
; is not made within the limits of the
city. There is considerable traffic in
! Monongahela sand, which is scooped
j up from the bed of the river, to be used
> for common building purposes; but tha
manufacture of sand is quite another
j affair, and the product goes into quite
a different commoditv, which is glass,
; Practically glass " is almost pure
sand, other substances used in its
manufacture for fluxing bring con
; * nn,ed whi '* ,h ® *»" d is 'ranformed to
| a greater or less degree of transparea
; cv. The sand used in glass-making is
! .? .
almost pure silica, so neatly pure that
; there is less than one per cent of iron,
j magnesia and aluminum, ti ninety
! nine X per cent of the other. And of
this sand, which is quarried out of the
| hills and ground down to varying de
, grees of whiteness, eight hundred tons
are manufactured daily, four hundred
. . . . , ,
tons being consumed in and about
. Pittsburgh, and four hundred tons go
j ing into Eastern Ohio and West Vir
j ginia to Wheeling, Eellaire, Columbus,
and all points within a circuit of one
hundred and fifty miles from Pitts
burgh.
In selecting, a darkish sand Is found,
containing more foreign substances
than the ninety-nine per cent, silica,
which inferior grade goes into green
or "black" bottles, and a still darker
and baser earth which is used for
sanding fire-brick molds; another and
liner dark grade, which is used by
j crucible-steel manufacturers; and still
' another quality, the whitest and gritti
est, which becomes "flint." or what
might be called absolutely transparent
1 glass,
An inferior quality of white
sand is used for prescription-bottles.
' but the very best is for the higher
! grade of flint-ware,
j Looking through the flat surface of
window-glass, whether plate or blown,
| t appears colorless; but. if the sight is
; directed through the edge, it will dis
; c i ose a se a-grocn tinge. Flint-glass
1 proper is not so. It is absolutely col*
i "7** ? he " C ", t °I
. prisms, when it reveals the eolors of
| gpoctrum.
-pile cost of a ton of sand to glass
[manufacturers of West. >rn Ponnsvi
V|llli .^ Kasiern Ohio or West Virginia,
i9> of cour9e , dependent on the dis
tance i t j, hauled from the quarry; but
taking the eight hundred tons daily
manufactured and consumed, it will
not avcrage a bovo 62.25 per ton.
Dried sand will average 62 50
per ton. Of course, it costs a little
] eg3 than those figures in Pittsburg,
and ft nttle more in Beilaire. Ohio; but
eTon at t hj 3 last-named place, the cost
of the sand which goes into the manu
facture of a box of common window
glass, containing tho regulation fifty
feet of surface, is about five
cents; that is, the box of glass consists
merely of five cents' worth of silica.
transmuted to a state of transpar
ency- s .
The sand used In the glass industry
in Western Pennsylvania, Eastern
Ohio and West Virginia, comes from
three quarries; one on the Pennsylva
nia railroad, overlooking the Juniata;
one on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad,
near Connellsville; and one on the Me
Kcesport A youghingheny railway.
twenty-five miles south of P ttsburgh. '
It is quarried out l.ke buildlng-stone,
passed through a quartz-crusher,
further reduced undor immense iron
wheels, and finally ground and washed
in an endless screw. The washmg re
leases some of the foretgu substances,
but streaks of iron which are some
square
times found running through the stone
knocked off to undergo thc mill
ing process for the inferior quality ol f
sand, some of which goes into mortar j
er specially fine and durable wall
building. The railroads use large
quantities of it in the construction of
retaining-wails for embankments j
And so all grades of the sand are util
ized .—Popular Science Monthly.
are
He Wes s Gsntlsmsn.
Some amusing atorie* are told of the
wit and wisdom of London school
children. A class of boys in a Board
school was being examined orally in
scripture. Tho history of Moses had
for some time been a speoial study,
and one of the examiners asked:
"What would you say of the general
character of MosesP"
"Ho was meek," said one boy.
--Brave," said another.
"Learned," added a third boy.
piped forth a pale,
faced, neatly dressed lad, "he was,
gentleman."
"A gentlemanff" asked the examiner.
"How do you make that outP"
The boy promptly replied. In the
r e thin, nervous voice: "Pleas*
when the daughter* of Jethro went
to the well to draw water, the (hep.
herds came and drove them away; and
Moses helped the daughter* of Jethro,
and said to the ehephenla, 'Ladies first,
please, gentlemen.' "—London (Vis.
Uan World.
"Please, sir,
A Square 9tAt#m«nt r a Carpeat.r.
jinoaK:ng17noth!r.'/>b «of (VilfumpuOB 6
I M « bow ethers ia ke too.i.uon had beer.
TPI? b >' > h ' ! of ] >r. P rve'a u-.iilen
Taerw: " ,eal
as hardly torequii ? a i ■ ■ or aav
° Vi° l t *I ? f ,/ J
npporli and strenrjt^na where others
(a "-" He od.-.- ■ My recovery, w h.cn is
C^ASrf&o ■
having tried o-.her remedies w.thout a i.
ofre;et "-_- :
Food for reflecti-n-taegccd Jinaer that !
you missed. — H'UMaf fima
mak „ Bieo* makes
Beauty. Improper digestion of food neces-BL
sariiy produces bad blood, result-tj in a
JS2^ W ^J^JaSlsf*iSd l Mh«"dS
peptic symptoms A cloeely confined life ;
causes indigestion, constipation, btlious-;
ness and loss of appeute. To remove taese
troubles there is no remedy equal to Prick-1
ly Ash Bitters. It has ten tried and
Its
Ls are ^
A dijld giveaway— And I bequeath my ;
morUl remains to tbe c^use of science." j
Do ot Haw^apm cou*h.
lu jf er dizziness, mi.gestion. inflammsuoj
of the eyes, headache, lassitule, taabdUj
to perform mental work and indisposiiioit !
forbodily labor, and annoy and 'disgust
four friends and' aequaistances with your
Jurft e?or:f to elefn yournoS^d tbroat
when Dr. Sag- s •• Catarrh Remedy" w-.il i
promptly re.ieve you of discomfort acj
"g and'n^SiessmflSimM 2f voSr tow" 1
some disease,
4, a t
Scott's Emulsion of Pure Cod Liver Oil
strength upon it is very wonderful. K->a t :
the following: "ihave used Brott's Emul
tongsliSdfng, and°bave*^'en ^m'« than
pleased with the results,
^ r p> v °XoivVork
' '' 1
A lurjsd passion—the desire to b« presi
!
For Rickets, Marasmus, anil Wasting DIs
orders of Chlldreo,
, m :n everv case
marked.''—0a M.
Thr policeman should watch that others
Day not prey .—Phiioddphia J&roUi.
The Experience of Mrs. Petera.
Mr*. Peters had ill*.
Mrs. Peters had chfllfl.
Mrs. Peters was sure she was coiag
They dosed her with pills.
With powders and squill?.
With remedies wet and with remedies dr*.
Many medicines lured her.
But none of them cured her.
Their names and their number nobody could tell;
And she t*v!» ai'jht ba -» .ii*t
•• Pelle.
to dk;
But
- tried.
That acted like magic, aud then she got well.
pS!5Wfw5fpilbu r# jthS'
Little Liver Pills). Th?yc :rod Mrs. Petera.
and now she wouldn't be without them.
^of thefkfn vizfctlen
, . teller—a -ossiDine woman. :
_r«u.' P
--- „. ,
f or\^T°^^y^ruggUta*
j
atin? local dis- !
Hill's Hair aaj tVhisker DnSL*** \
A LorowoTivs that blew* to pieces is s
new mechanical toy.
Paris green—the American tourist in
Cua**-—11 a'hiHcion Critic.
, —The best process of steaming
woolf , n cloth is fonnd in thc following:
j.| )e cloth is tightly wrapped on a per
foratcJ iron cylinder.
g team ; 9 a ftorward admitted througli
^ t gj g cylinder until the
§team p as , c8 freely through thc cloth,
w i,j c i 1 w m re quitc about ten minutes,
In order to submit every part of the
j ece to t i 10 aame exposure of steam,
t y g p rocpeg j g generally repeated with
^ gamc cloth tightly beamed on a
second similarly perforated cylinder,
The part of the cloth having been he
fore on thc outside will this time b«
inside .—Dolton Bud get.
_ ft j( mM th#t while R B . Hayes, of
r 0 was living in the Whits
^ J* Ui wif#
D " UB « «
t nan)e> Utt , 9
. .,8 , wa ,' th e reply. "Well,
Haves, "I am very
„ ..yju'd be gladder."
said the child, "if you know I was from
Ohio."
morning saw a little girl gazing about
in the East Room, and went tip to her.
_
_Xn important antiquarian discov
tr y {. announced in the Chnmique dtt
^ r f,. While making some excavation
at p ors t, in Germany, a workman un
earthed tbe skeleton of a man and a
hone. By the side of the mnu had
been buried bis dagger. Coins buried
In the tomb prove the find to have
dated from the tenth or eleventh cent
a
nry.
—When the calf does not got enough
sustenance from his mother he atirnu*
In .?- her with a milk punch.
Weak aad Weary
Describe# the condition of many people EebllUated
§f the warm weather, by dt*eaae, or overwork
I2ood'« Sarsaparilla I# Just Ui# medicine needed to
build up and strengthen the t»«dy,pnrlfy and quick
en the sluggish blood, end restore the lost appetite.
If you neod a good medicine be Bare to try Hood's
^SSwlng*the aummer I wa# feeling ell ran down,
lag thinking I needed some!lilac to tone wp my
system, 1 took Hood's HaruparUIn and fell mnch
better. I bed also been trouble4 with dy#pep#ta,
aad Hood's Sarsaparilla helped me more then any
tbtagelee." #ambs R. Da show. Port Weyae. lad.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
MS br ill Srasttus. I): •« ft>r N. Prepared b;
* L BOOD A OO., ApotMcwIM, Umi, Mm.
IOO Ooeea One Dollar
mmM&asm
iftdbmr
/wMIFUSft {^/^ANACEAX
I ™ r I 3.StctfEDtfU. | PURIFIES }
Y CHILDRfN'SA+-USE _, ^SYPHILITIC/ -
VjEDlCIIOcBiyJfe^BLOQO.
1 l
m IIrESTCRER j ^
w \t4»Swao./
I ■■ k V "5, 7 #, HP j
U| l| ■WTj ^ I) 8
■ BW rkf ■ II g
611 g MBLol •
. _w ■ ■ WH _
flE SKAT ■" CURE FOR
lumimMn ■ jw Mm ■ ■ wn
ITCHING PILES
i
;
!
!
I
!
y
A lUflB
N^IV^^liiFTOhll^jllllll
Sg
|JLkre»**- • r-r»t.-; »e-iVy.*....:o-*,nSs5||
}Sr if Ailoweuto t> a iauatumorsi.«nn•aieir'ti
On^
hli'AnFh
U N LY *
THE CADEST MEDCINEsTm USkSOtSfiV SKSs'lSTS
O I > T 31 r N t
SWA V N t.
■.'A'
-Ui/
i
j • t
j
,
;
.
'
j
;
j
I
'
i
[»j
O.A11
c 0.
^SfiLjmafnl
9
I
rrisavuMurv £ set« u eeimibVlM
sssiVRsm
SENNA-MAN0RAKE-8UCHU
axz erica c^iAayEJT.cfur Rtrnjtis
It hag steed tha Test of Yean,
Lin Chris# all Diseases of the
BLOOD. LIVES. STOM
ACH, KIDNEYS,BOW
ELS, At. It Purifies tha
Blood, Invigorates and
Clsansesthe Systea.
i
I
j
t
IBITTEHS

!
' I
DYSPEPSIA, C05STI
PAIIOS, JArJiDICE,
SICKHEADiCHE.BIL
IOUS COMFLAINIS, 4c
ilinppesr Kent, under
iu te nezcial infl uence.
It is purely a Medicine
as its catisnic proper
ties forbids its use ss a
beverage. It is pleas
ant to me taste, aud as
easily taksa by child
ren as adults_
PRICXLY ASH BiTTERS CO
8c*l* Proprietors,
St.L ouis tti'.d Kanaa 8 Crrt
CURES
ALL0ISEASE5
cmtEi
LIVER i
KIDNEYS 1
STOMACH


w ,_
CUT 8
CREAM BALM
AND
BOWELS.
AliDRUGfilSTSj
IpWICEBoUAP 1
!

!
;
1
j it
CatarrH
IpIh
i
|
.
1
Cleanses the
Heml. Allay
Inflamm a t i o n
Heals the Sores.
Restores the
6enscs of Tastc«
Smell. Hearing.
A quick Relief. ^ _
A positive Cure. HAY-FEVER
IN
A wirticltf t» Applleil into each i! 0 »tr»l and i« A^n^Abir.
Prtc« .V) cents, at bniMist-*: by. m ul. rv*v»ten*,l. • cto. <
Circular* tree. ELY HKOS.. DnitfRifit*. U«C|fv>, >. T. |
FOR at.I, DISORDERS OF THE
Stomach, Liver
Ikf* and Bowels
—taki:
LIVER
PACIFIC
PILLS
STRICTLY V.EXJLTABLH.
ent* roxrrtPATio
PlLtf
OP AFi'fcittB. BiLioi'aistM. Xekvoi'sm vyw. Jai .v
PKK K, 9.1 ccut«.
PACIFIC MANUFACTURING CO.,8T. LOUIS,M0.
IXDhlESTIOX. DY8PKMIA,
Complaints. Losa
K HlADAi'HK.LlV
WCfc ETC.
ROPSY
D
14T TREATED FREE.
Have treated »r,p.y andlUcomplu ationi
with most wonderful »uco««m: use ve«eta
Me remedies, entirely harmlee?. Remora
ms of Dropsy tn B to 90 day*.
Cure nat lent* pronounced hopeless by tn#
beet oursU-ians. Krom 11 ret dose symptom#
rapid!r'd»'*apj*ear. and lutendarsat least
iwodhtrds of all symptom* are remored. Borne may
try humbusi without knowing any thing atK'Ut it Re
member U costs you nothing to reaHio the mem of
ourtreatmenttoryourself. wearecon»Untly curing
ease# of long standing-cases that have been tapped
a number ofUmes amlthe patient declared unable to
lire* week, litre full htstorr of Mse.name. age, #e*.
how long aHlcUtel. etc. Bend for free pamphlet, con
Ulntng testimonials. Ten day a'treatment furnished
free by mall. If you order trial, you must return
this advertisement to us with id cent# in stamps to
pay postage. Epilepsy (Wta> positively cured.
H. M. OKBIN a SON*, M. O*., Atlanta, Cm.
all #ympto
A
i
KO-KO TULU
J
The Beet Medici*# la tb# World, sad a
DELICIOUS CHEWINB DUE.
(Reglstoved Ub#l and Trade Nark.)
-OUR
lad if ret lee, Coa#tlpaD«». Djiyepl*. fool Breath.
WILL LAST nva VC A*#.
dealer,
If aet In hand# of year
(which ceataias tw#lvt $
•ample package, er 4 mats la ataap# for a
air, le MOL COLEMAN, MenapbU,
id 40
far a hot
rtn# Matt
Tom.
I
vCo.
391 Main itiwst, Memphis,
nm AsaoaraD aura or
BUSS IBB QBEEBSWME.
}
-
OlHlf UriiliPIi^
Offil — - ■» fegJL
Billons Headache. K. A}-,
j /ifej
£hSt£5"laarerr- "• ■** ''■sfi'/r'
ly relieved and perron:
cured br the use of Dr.
Pl«ree*s Pleasant Furpaitv
In explanation o<rherenu-d^l |s»
HMtiBr'
escaping their
i druoriSW.2> •■ent*
; Chemical L*bo
Medical Ajs*.
p.
i^l \o?c©*s , ,.f T j E
! - \ e » s a wt , [ '
'k'ipfi* \ivisV\uo LIVEH
©\\OtS PILLS.
!
jkl. JT.4 1 •
I nrwjRS or i mita nos
! ASK IDE />/?. riFHrrs J\
l i itl t: sro iR-cv a j id nr:
Being ♦ntJpely TcftetnHf.
itaout disrubimc - -
ipauoQ. Fat ul -
>aivxL Alw«y?i frx
y lavaiivc, alieraii
Ttileas j?iv
saujiac^ion.
E/TI, Of.
rh*-s
I
U-o u.
little
r "
i
H
tit IV
Pell.
mti
V
ml. >1
. ,it Wo
XllATlON, Uulhu*'. N. V
.
'OSAHY
I $500™
t!» offcrt'tl bv the tnunr.fHa.Tur
cf Dr. C'atnrrh
'A J Remedy, for s» c*we af
// Chronic N.l^i
they cuiinot c
SY^IFTO^IS OF CATAHRH.-r'uIL
i heavy headache*, obstruction «t the n.tsJ
j • t vvv'*aisr» i 5. di>« bargee fal!u»g
j mto the throat, ecanetimef* pr»
, and acrid, at others, thick. tenA,
; purulent, bloody and putnd,^
. weak, watery, and iuftametr: t
' in the pars, deaf new. backing or
the throat, ex pectoral* u <
r. together with seal'e fi« ■
<• oh an red aud has a la
j breath is offensive: sn.« ii an
; pain'd; there is a senauti. r. c
j mental depression, a backing
I oral debility. Only a few or th»
' svmptoms are iikely to N- p:»x
vuso. Thousands of on*
i manifesting half of tl" .
suit in consumption, one
is so comm* n.
or !<« umierst
I
b
arru
ad
the
mucous
eyt
e
h
to
•f off
.
r
nattv

.
th
!
, ;•« d
■j
i*n
N
!> '
I l
danjre
By its uiiM.SkKvthniA'.
i Dr. Safe's rntarrh W« *>•> *
I ease's of Catarrh, colti is
j Coryza, and Catarrhal is
t by drugFiste everyw
i
it:e tread.
'Uiiache.
" I'ntold Agony front Catarrh
• Prof. W. n vrSNKR, the f
! of V.Kocck y. P* vntes:
' I suffered untold oirciiy
catarrh. My family rhyst
incurable, and m i I uiu«
•uch a bad one, that ever
so?, my voice would mvr
barely spv'ak above k
my coughing and clearing of
almost srranvle mo. Lly tt*'
Catarrh Remedy, in three months, l was a
man. and the cure has been peiuranent.
i n
D
; -V'
hronie tun
. me up :
t dll'. Mv u.
.
fi


ai
'
l
id
hi tU> UV.vf
> tcn.'ftt w ,n
i of Dr. Sii*r
i3
"Constantly Hauktn# aud Spittln*.''
Thomas J. Rrsnuut, Fxv. **'* Pine
Sf. L-'tiiA .Vo., wrinv: " I f ^ .1 JXl
fmn catarrh for three years. At l
! hardly breathe, ami was censtartiv hawking
■ and spiiiilia, and for the fevst tigrht nronto#
! could not oreatho through the nostril®. 1
; thought nothinc cotild lx* done tor nu\ Luck
1 ilv. I was •dviSA'd to try Dr. Sigo s Catarrh
Konitvlv. and I am now a well wan. I benox-e
j it to be the only sure remedy fer ratarrh m w
manufacture!, ami one n *
fair trial to experience Mteuiittoj resuiw
i apevmsneM
Three Bottle* Cove Catarrh.
Eu Boasiww. Ii'mjon P. O..
| Pti.. says: "Mv daughter h *i„'* t *rjL *p?
she was live years eld, «ry >T;
. Sages Catarrh Hcnu.ly lk \ v ' l '-'*^i ^ , h J I ,,
cured s bottle former, snd tern .saw "
h.-vlrwad hs^r ' A third iH'tth' ftI«Vtt'U S y* «>••»"
1 nenTcure. '?be is now ekjbtivn jmrs old am
•ound and hearty."
JOSHES
PAYS thr FR EIC HT
9 Tsb tU... Nrslr^
Tw« Hub &ih 1 B. act Box ter
060.
■myMAttakte hfre*prteeU«
■BIM Ui* psK! aad aJdrrea
/•id •» •IBIHAMTIR.
BINGHAMTON. N. V.
<
|
3H«MH»EnKSE
COSES WHISf «U a St tAiti
Ttflottv trvx'J. Cte
D««t ^r;iL'.
In tiTuP. Ns>M|
WliFl'IiMBWli
FLOYD'S S 5 &IW*
CANDIES!
H«r»i Almond*, Nou
M ■■•) BON-B.»MS.
AleWA TB FT HK A YD
VTKY A BOX.
970 ZA*\ I>T ST. #
miMl'KlB.
D. C* MOONEY,
WM. FLOYD.
CHICKASAW
IRON WORKS.
Farm and Jill! W«. bluer?, IIoum
C asting;*, Cotton I'untB, Atlas
Fnclnra and Bolh'ra, Elo.
TENN.
MEMPHIS,
$100 to $300 •
A MONTH
an be made a t*rk
lug tor
Age
preferred who can furnish tlwdr own h
give their w hole time to the bastners. Soarnfmo
ments may be prt'fltabTY emplnvetl a.sc A lew > p
can.ies In towns and cit-te*. H. ft\ JOHNiHtM
A tu, 1018 Ml,la NMreet. Rlehmoud. Y#.
i
ARXSHORN's
hadeRoi[ers,fit|
riKK. WIND. WATER sad I.INHTNlhl) TROOP
IRON ROOFING
for any kind wfflf or Pit* dallAlag*.
Write for testimonial# IVom «*uv But# Addrem
PORTER IRON RlHiriNtt <V, IWUwatk OWK.
AMO WIMIKIV HABITS
II UII> AT noMB 8MW
h at
ATLANTA, BA. Mw
P ENSIONS n^?*dN 6 i[i«rt reli
Jl year*'practice. HiMwwsr no fee^ Write
for circular# end new lawn. A. W. MvVoh*
mice k Sox, L'loelnaatl.O.i Washington, It. C.
pro*
eved;
New and ns-wad-hand. Send tor
eaisiegaa. tNiK'M a##w Bii vclb
Amuci, Meiuphte, Ten*.
BICYCLES
rirwzsn ^
I Washington. Cleveland. Detroit and Chicago.
A. N. K.. F.
114
WHEN WEIT1NO TO hDTKRTIRFKS 1M.CSSV

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