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The Grenada gazette. (Grenada, Miss.) 1885-18??, January 10, 1889, Image 4

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THE GRENADA GAZETTE.
R. T. PAYNE, Editor and Manager.
l-Mwstr-ri
rtl'PWT'A. ■
KING SOLOMON AND THE BEES.
When Solo
hi* priory.
i«nm£
* his throne the Queen of Sheba came,
the Talmud you
« —
y read the stroy)
Prawn by the magic of the monarch's fume,
To *e* the splendor
Some tit ting tribute
und bring
the mighty King.
of hi* c
Nor this alone: much had her Iliffhn©** heard
What flower* of learning graced the royal
speech';
What gems of wisdom droppod with every
word;
What wholesome lesson* he was wont to
teach
In ploasing proverbs; and she wished in sooth,
To know if rumor spoke the simple truth.
at
Besides, the Queen had heard (which piqued
her most).
through the deepest riddles bo oouid
Ho
spv ;
How all the curious arts that women boast
Were quite transparent to his piercing
And so the Queen had come—a royal guest—
To put the sage's cunning to the test.
And straight she held before the monarch's
view.
In either hand, a radiant wreath of flowers;
The one, bedecked with every charming hue.
Was newly culled from Nature's choicest
bowers;
The other, no less fair in every part,
Was the rare product of dmnest art.
"Which is the truo, and which the false?" »he
said.
Great Solomon was silent. AH amazed,
Each wondering courtier shook lus puzzled
head.
While at tho garlands long the monarch
gazed,
ho !
For very rupture, ne
<1 fain.
Ah
He-a
ild speak again.
"Which is the true?"
asked;
sed at th" fond ,n
se a head should
Hi liege.
50 more the wi
to
azement of tho King;
nt ho hardly tasked,
with such a trivial
"
"So wi
Most lea
hmg"'
11 tho sago was silent ; it
s plain
plexod the royal brain.
Hut '
A deepening doubtp
While thus ho ponde
Hard by the casement—so the story gc
A little band of busy, bustling bees.
Hunting for honey in
arch smiled,
(1, presently ho sons.
a withered
ask
The
»od his royal
head;
"Open tho window!"— th;
Tho wind
Within tho
'as all he said«
h 1 at tho King' 1
•pc
tho
Sheba's dcxtci
And s
ight the flo
ha i
as
And so the King and all the c
n
baffled
wreath
Quco
the
tell th<
dors she had
!
V talc should boa
My story
liul
hat the w
'y
th" :
In trifh
light as
isefullw
n to enrich the mind;
1 to profit or to please—
he i
Sot
truth desi
1.4 :
In.
As Israel's ICC
let
od
bees.
:
-,John r,
\ in .V. )'. I^dqer.
AX UMBRELLA'S STORY.
had
I "it
it."
bit
i
fta Adventures With Ario and
Dolphy Told in Confidence.
Clothed in rags too dilapidated to be t j
called picturesque or even artistic, j ma<
with broken ribs and warped back- j s
bone, it is no wonder that I lost my
head; and all through the abominable j
taste of Arethusa and Adolphus, who I
chose "the king's highway" and a ! t0
trio vole on which to murmur sweet
i you
nothings, instead of the vine-covered j
porL-li ..«• summer-house of pood uliD
fashioned times. Adolphus was lean
ing so much to our side that he ap
(
j ride
; I
f drawi
pea red to be "all
ut
-■
aiMvas of the bright- j
1 : i 1 » - Arethusa',
>se pink, and her left dimple i
rer she
est
full play; more
unconscious that the sunbeams had
.....
disputed possession of her fair face and vou
to abuse their advantage ,
r of freckles upon her j oan
I
j take
ras perfectly j
in
sure
- T ere
by
showei
Grecian nose.
In vain the wind tu
>il at mr, and I
lie would
T tugged at Adolphus.
lot
and the result
be
•arned,
a
mingling of girlish shrieks and strong
masculine language, and a general
set condition.
As for me, I was so
eil that had it not bee
phll:
the
ip
completely crush- ,
n for the habit of I ,cI
had the !
a lift:time I should never havo
energy to observe and comi
"What fools th*
! rei
mortals be.' 1
promptly to hin I > ll,,s
much mortified, I ilnd
sprang
foot, very red, very
very anxious to find somebody o»some
thing to blamo besides his own care
lessness
1
ing
me?
And there, peeping out through the
big wheels, completely caged, sat
Arethusa, looking îis sweet and quiet
(now that she hud found terra finira)
the
» a "sucki
"The
retched machine! my poor
Are
he
that
darling! that horrid
are not hurt? A
loose!
shall never forgive
hurt!" exclaimed Adolphus all in a
breath.
"But I am not in the least injured,' 1
lisped the caged pigeon sweetly, "and
if I had been, it never could have been
your fault; it wan just some weak spot
in the machine, just an unavoidable
accident that no one could help."
A hole in the horrid road!
I
with
of
y Keif if y
are
1
at
all
the
to
such
"How Mveet it is of you to say so,'
cried Adolphus, going to
moving the turned-over tricycle; "but
I shall not have ;■ second's peace till I
see you on your feet again; then, if
you really are unharmed, I can not be
altogether sorry for the accident, for
it has shown the exquisite amiability
of your disposition in all its perfec
tion. I don't believe there is a girl in
a thousand, no, nor in the world, that
would have borne such a trial without
-ork at
losing her temper. "
This style of conversation proved so
agreeable to both parties concerned,
that it would doubtless have been in
definitely prolonged, but Adolphus
finally moved the wheels, and disclosed
to the view of the amiable prisoner the
crushed remains of her new heliotrope
hat! Then, indeed, came a change
o'er her mobile face; the features
sharpened, a stony glare fiilod her
liquid eyes, there was a perceptible
stiffening of the whole frame, and the
«traightest, sliffest, tallest uprising
that I ever beheld in my life. When
she had finally reached her highest
possibility, she inquired in a voice
not loud, but as clear and cold as cut
glass: "Will you he kind enough to
tell me, Mr. Radcllfte, what that ob
ject isP"
"I am sure I don't know," said he,
with one puzzled look at her changed
aspect, and another at the object indi
cated, going a step nearer as the truth
flashed upon him, but unfortmu*tqiy
oil ludlcm» -ildd,
ga
of
mal
him
she
lead
shall
on
had
and
him
this
ness,
just
"Why, Arie," ho shouted between
peals of laughter, "it's—it's your new
hat." And crushed, battered and ut
terly demolished, ho presented it for
nearer inspection, which proved quite
too much for Arie's cool dignity.
•'You mean, unfeeling creature," she
burst out, "to s|K)il my hat, and you
had no business to tip that tricycle
over. I)o you suppose I would have
risked that hat if I had known you
were experimenting? Oh, yes! it may
be a laughing matter to you, very
amusing, doubtless, but are you aware
that that hat came from Paris; not only
that, but it was made to order to match
my suit, and not till this very morning
did I receive it?''
Long before she had finished Adol
phus was feeling remarkably limp.
"But Arie —but, my dear," he ex
postulated, "you know it was all an ac
cident; don't you think you are a little
unreasonable? What is it all about?"
"I thought I had explained with suf
ficient clearness what it was all about,"
with a return of dignity. But a glance
at the wrecked splendor freed her
tongue again.
"I da
say it would give you pleas- j
ure, yes, actual pleasure, to see me | be
make
dr
guy of myself by wearing a |
hat that didn't match this suit! but I
won't sir! No, i'll burn the suit first."
"Arethusa, don't bo a goose, and all
about a hat, too!" and Adolphus now
looked distressed enough to suit the I
most exacting fair lady. But not Are
thusa, for there were tears in her eyes,
and my observation has taught me that
those tears must fall before the temper
subsides.
"Hoi
hire you call me names; I
tell you it was a mean, contemptible,
cowardly—"
"Arethusa!" interrupted Adoiphus,
very deep and very strong, and he
didn't look at all limp
going too far; I shall have to ask you
to take that back."
my
my
and
a
he;
me
, "you are
"That I altogether decline to do,"
replied Arethusa.
ask me to ride when y
"It was cowardly to
didn't know
th«
to
Now, if Adolphus had observed fem
inine nature of the round and rosy kind
would have
ild have seen
as closely as I have, he
held his tongue, for ho
the two tears just trembling on Arie's
eyelids, and known tho tempest was
l.v ended; but being a duly
that
new
ox us
cold:
Derated
ho said,
mai
"Mnce that is your
i derson. I will release you from all
me, as you would hardly
pinion, Miss A
the
that
will
: promises t
eure to bo tied to
•oward fop life."
"Oh. thanks,
ry much," responded
and calmly ils if she
Arie, a
■tl'
had been ;
"it was very kind of you to think of
it." and she busied herself removing a :
bit of mud from her dress.
•pting a glass of w
The sud- 1 tion
of voice an^ expression j be
, for ho looked new
s were still the
frigid as he inquired: "Do you prefer
walk home. Miss Anderson, or will
t j en
ma< j e
s
dentlv did Adolphus
puzzled although his
t0
change
ray head swim (alth
gh I had j
Irop), and it evi
the t'
tear«
e
a
you trust yourself again to the trievelo
m , iueffi( . i(<n) , •
,. ()h j thin | t it would be better to
ride since the tricycle is here; it would |
seem n pity to get nil heated and dusty | the
alk, don't you think?'
from the
and
was
Thon dra
wing a blue silk handkerchief !
from her pocket, she tripped
Adolphus snd observed, in th
my possible: "Would
vou mi[ul Mr Rf ,' (k , am ,. jtl9t ,. vin „ this
unf]er my ( . bin; th( , on(3 , are ,
oan - t e ,.\ Ilt them? , am 901TV t0
trouble you. but I am afraid I shall
take cold if I ride with nothing
up to
most
matter-of-fact
bask
I
first
the
and
and
there
but
in;
my
head.
"Yes.
certainly," answered Adol
'kwartlly, and he tried still
phll:
more awkwardly to tie a knot under
the remarkably-prcUv chin that was
, ,,
,cI ' 1 for Ul ° D'^potse. I he
lashe,i w, ' r " *« he 11:1,1 ara I' ln
itv to observe that it was a
oyo
•t
larkably-pivtty chin, with quite an
ont of dim
rei
usun
ly alluring a;
> ll,,s nround th "
ilnd 8ora|,tl0w ' «* 1,0 look " d - ,h "
sod away from bis face, and hold
corners of tho mouth,
was
his
1
and
ing the bl
de head straight toward j back
and very firmly by the knot he hod
ce ceded in making, he said, gently: 1 ally
"Arie 1 would you mind looking at | love,
me? -1
the
sun I her
"Oli, not the least in tho world,"
the demure answer,
hurts my eyes,"
ras ! for
"only the
!
"Caution is a very
■xcelcnt trait,"
he answered, dryly, "but I do not know
that I over knew it to d<
closed
11'
elop so sud
ilcniy. You mitflil shield
with your hands if you aro really afraid
of permanent blindness."
"Why, surely," cried Arie, "you
f res
when,
UK
am
but
that
once,
bly:
your
■yes
1 ways aro so full
co in
an
:mor<feney, arid covorinff both pink
palms over a pinker f:ree, she looked
at him with an expression of infantile
so bright and warm that it
would almost dry a wet umbrella! At
all event«, Adolphus was not proof
against it, and a simultaneous burst of
laughter broke from them that startled
the robins In the branches overhead,
which suggested to Adolphus that he
secure tho perquisites that belonged
to the occasion before any further in
terruption occurred.
This having been satisfactorily
ranged he asked: "Now, tell
frankly, Arie, aren't you a little bit
ashamed to break your engagement for
such a trifle?"
blow
«"y
off
the
such
pretty
so
ar
me
quick
ing
be
'Then
all
full
is a
those
to
of
left
some
the
Hu
tint.
"I?* 1 she exclaimed, "I break an o
ga gement! who
of such «
taughttha
■ ï •
uld ever suspect me
thing. I've always been
man was a danger
dangerous to contradict
ani
mal and it w;
him when he was in earnest Besides, 1 !
she added still more meekly, "it might
lead to a quarrel."
"Well,"
said Adolphus, highly
pleased with this sally, "I suppose I
shall be just fool enough to get you,
sphinx as you are," and he seated her
on the tricycle i
had been
carefully
Dresden china shepherdess,
and thus for tho first time his
if she
eyes
dropped upon in« where I lay in the
gutter, wondering what quality of tho
masculine mind was that which led
him to prefer to bo made a fool of in
this way!
"That umbrella is past all useful
ness, 1 he observed, indifferently; "wo'll
just leave it where it is."
But A rethusa did not think so. She
wuutwj uio "as umoutentoof theif flrat
new
ut
for
she
you
you
falling out." So I was brought along
forthwith and enjoyed the privilege of
listening to various plans for my
restoration to strength and beauty, bo
sides a great deal of conversation quite
too delicate to bear pen and inkl
The next morning I was handed over
<o the tender mercies of an umbrella
surgeon, and his face was certainly a
study as he examinod mo. My fractured
ribs, my warped backbone, and gen*
e rail y broken-up condition, evidently
made a groat Impression upon him,
for, adjusting his glasses, ho looked
searchingly at Adolphus and asked,
dryly: "You didn't make a mistake
and bring the wrong umbrella? This
isn't worth mending."
"Possibly Pm the best judge of that,"
with his most lordly air.
"All right, all right, sir; If you don't
mind paying twice as much as you
would for a new one, I'm sure I've no
ex
ac
objcctlou to put my work on it." And
thou followed a discussion as to my
s and equipments, that was in
tensely interesting to me. for I knew
how much depended upon it. If some
delicate color wore chosen my life
j would indeed he a gay one, for 1 should
| be reserved for full-dress
dr
300810119,
a | but, nias! how soon it would end! as
I fade 1 must., and so bo thrust aside into
some dark corner and forgotten! »So I
was thankful enough when Adolphus
decided (being of a literary turn) that
I should be thoroughly red.
"Remember. I want it as soon ns
possible," was tho last direction; and
the surgeon, looking after his retreat
ing back, observed, "a screw loose
somewhere in that head; cranks arc
thicker thaï
I
fear." And
then ha fell upon m«, und such a
wrenching, and pulling, and straight
ening of ribs never happened to one ?!
my family before, I am certain, and I
squealed and groaned at every pull;
but it was done at last., and then came
my dress, which went on comfortably
and fitted to a charm, and I should
have been quite satisfied if tho surgeon
had not discovered at tho moment a
fuel that I tried vainly to hide, namely,
a crack in my head.
"This is the mischief to pay," said
he; "my crank will make it hot for
me if I don't make
this. 1
over und over i
wual this
bettor job than
And he turned me thoughtfully
his hands.
"There
is no use to try and glue
that head up; thero'll just have to be a
new head, and I know where there is
the very thin", at my neighbors, tho
pawnbroker's, on that broken cane
that l saw there the other day, that
will be just tho style to suit my iludn
customer."
ed
jet
war
eolt
had
that
him
of
ing
■in
any
lie
out
in
Sh:
1900
and
aro
I'll
ment.
utes
year
is
in
that
will
that
up.
after
each
in
tho
ance
than
one
:
I felt this to bn a fatal move, toe
iv would the cane-head ever accom
modate himself to his reversed posi
1 tion i n life; and by the time my would
j be friend came ambling back, I
depressed, although I
'alized at the first glance that my
new head was much handsomer than
the old; and In spite of the fact that
vas
j thoroughly
regularly joined together by
e were
a massive gold ring, nothing could
change my foreboding that the union
would never be a happy one.
IYomptlv on tho following morning
| Adolphus called and hastened
| the
Ï to
bode of the fair Arethusa. who
reived mi»
nth delight,
pressod her admiration in most el
"»Just fancy
and "How awfully jolly!" (Oh, \
was very English indeed!) a great many
times in all her choicest tones. This, of
!
juent terms, saving:
slip
course, was very soothing to my feel
hut I was not long allowed to
bask in the honeyed words, for pick
nicking was the order of the day, and
I was immediately called into requi
sition, and my troubles began. At the
first whiff of wind my head made a
violent effort to resume his natural
position, and drag my pretty dress in
the dust, an effort which I resented
and strained every bone to prevent:
and in the commotion that ensued
there was another hat
but this time it was Mr. Kaddiffe who
in;
Mitastroplie.
was the sufferin', and much diversion
his antics afforded us, as he ambled,
and leaped, and scrambled, and climbed
j back and forth
vail in his
a stone
pursuit of it, and made himself goner
1 ally ridiculous in full view of his lady
| love, as she stood e
)1 and sore
in
the rosy shade which, in my gratitude
• firmly aloft, I shed over
I her in profusion. I am sorry to be
! for holding
! Hhligod to state that his race wan r
neu by occosif
ns, to
closed our ears
11'
al breezy expres
hich Arethusa and I politely
"Why, my dear," wild she, swootly,
when, red and disgusted, ho
UK bearing captive tho muddy hat, "1
am afraid m much exorcise must have
fatigued you so »oon after breakfast."
The words were sympathetic enough,
but unfortunately there w
twinkle in her eyes utterly at
variance with them, and it was this
that Adolphus' quick glanco took in at
once, and to this he responded irrita
bly: "Oh, I quite understand. I dare
deliberately pushed my hat
rejoined
a full
blow
•ear
«"y y
off with that detestable umbrella for
the sako of seeing mo mako myself
ridiculous."
"Why, Dorphy, how can you say
such things! I'm sure it was very
pretty to see you play with the wall
so nicely. I had no idea you were so
agile!"
Dolph's vanity was touched to the
quick now.
"Oh, I dare say you would have been
equally diverted if I had fallen and
broken my neck," he returned, acridly.
"Since that is your opinion," mimick
ing very successfully his manner of the
previous day, "I give you back all
promises, as you would hardly care to
be bound for life to a murderess!"
'Then she remarked, absently: ''And
all about a hat, too!"
ihen it was that I appreciated the
full meaning of tho saying that "two
is a company and three is none,
those two ungrateful wretches agreed
to call poor, inoffensive me the sotirco
of all disagreement, and between them
left me without a shred or character,
actually deciding to do
protection for all time.
"But, we'll keep it, t„ lend to trouble
some cullers," and with this pleasant
prospect before m« I was returned to
the umbrella stand with a pari»!—
Hu rid Lamon, in America A&t'ff.
tint. - .
for
ilhout my
he.
1
»
of
a
THE MULBERRY BEND.
Pm rietars of On« of Now York OH/'S
Most KrpuUtve Spots.
Within a stone's throw of the City
Hall, and the offices of tho great news
paper», midway between two of the
busies^ thoroughfares of this busiest
city of the new world, is an eddy in
tho life of the city whore tho scum
collects, where the very offscourings
of all humanity seem to find lodgment.
In the great ''domb-bcll" tenements,
in tho rickety old frame buildings, in
tho damp, unwholesome cellars, on
tho sidewalks and in tho gutters reck
ing with tilth and garbage, is a seeth
ing mass of humanity, so Ignorant, so
vicious, so depraved that they hardly
seem to belong- to our species. Men
and women, yet living, not like ani
mals, but like vermint Every door
and allèy-way is a sewer from which
pour Invisible rivers of foul gases,
pestilential odors and germs of dis
ease. Villlanous-looking men lounge
about tho doorways and scan every
strange face with that suspicion which
is hern of a senwo of evil-doing; black
omen, some of them scarcely
past tho ago of girlhood, and others as
wrinkled, ugly and repulsive-looking
as tho witches of our story-books, sit
upon the curbstones, unconcernedly
nursing their babes and earning a
scanty livelihood by retailing stale
bread at two and three cents a loaf.
Jew peddlers, vicious and vociferous,
sell spoiled fish, tainted meats and de
caying- vegetables from rickety wagons
drawn by skeleton horsos. Drunkards,
thieves of every nationality. Hulking
youths lounge around the entrances to
the liquor-shops, the last successors ol
that all-powerful "gang" which took
its name from its warning cry ol
"Wy-ho;" and here and there is a blue
coated policeman, with club in hand
and revolver ready, alert for the stil
lctto or siung-shot, which is bound to
come to him sootier or later if he re
mains on the post and does his duty.
The Bend is not a pleasant neigh
borhood by day, in the dim sunlight
which straggles down between the tall
tenements and renders visible the side
walks reeking with filth, the gutters
choked with decaying garbage and
animal matter, and the wretches who
arc compoiod to live lier») and who
make tho place what it is.— Allan for
mai:, in American Magazine.
eyed
SHERIDAN'S STEED.
Tho Clcneml*. Account of flow Ho (lot
HU Fiunim, 111
Shortly after the affair Captain
Archibald I'. Campbell, of tho Second
Michigan Cavalry, presented me with
tho black horse called Kienzl, since
made historical from having been rid
den by me in many battles, conspicu
ously in the ride from Winchester to
Cedar Creek, which has been celebrat
ed in the poem by T. Buchanan Head.
This horse was of Morgan stock, and
then about three years old. He was
jet black, excepting three whlto feet,
sixteen hands high and strongly built,
with great powers of endurance. He
was so active that he could cover with
ease five miles an hour at his natural
walking gnlt, The gelding had been
ridden seldom; in fact, Campbell had
been unaccustomed to riding till the
war broke out, and, I think, felt some
disinclination to mount the fiery eolt.
Campbell had an affection for him,
however, that never waned, and
would often come to my head
quarters to seo his favorite, the
eolt being cared for there by the
regimental furrier, tin old man named
John Ashley, who had taken him in
charge when leaving Michigan, and
had been bis groom over since. Neoing
that I liked the horse—1 had ridden
him on several occasions—Campbell
presented him to me on one of these
visits, and from that time till tho closo
of tho war I rode him almost eontln
sly in ovory campaign and battle In
which I took part, without once find
ing him overcome by fatigue, though
■in many occasions his strength was
severely tested by long marches and
short rations. 1 never observed in him
any vicious habit; a nervousness and
restlessness and switching of the tail,
when every thing about him was in
repose, being the only Indication that
lie might be untrustworthy. No one
out a, novice could he deceived by this,
however, for the intelligence evinced
in every feature, and his thoroughbred
striking that any
accustomed to horsos could not
misunderstand such a ïioldo animal.—
Sh: rida n's A utohiography.
Concerning Leap Years.
The following explains why tho year
1900 will not ho counted among leap
years: The year is flfi.i days, fi hours
and 49 minutes long; 11 minutes
aro taken every year to make tho
days long, and every
fourth year we have atl extra day.
I'll is was Julius Ctcsar's arrange
ment. Where do these 11 min
utes come from? They come from the
future and are paid by omitting leap
year every 100 years. But if leap year
is omitted regularly every 100th year,
in tho course of 400 years it Is found
that the 11 minutes taken each year
will not only have been paid back, but
that a whole day will have been given
up. So Pope Gregory XIII. who im
proved on Caesar's calendar in 1582,
decreed that èvery centurial year di
visible by four should be a leap year
after all. So we borrow 11 minutes
each year, more than paying our bor
rowings back by omitting three leap
years in three centurial years and
square matters by having a leap year
in the fourth centurial year. Pope
Gregory's arrangement Is so exact and
tho borrowing and paying back bal
ance so close that we borrow more
than we pay buck to the extent of only
one day in 3,80fi years. — Cleveland
Leader.
. Iti
rl.
is
ppear.
ce, were ho
•ear %,->

It
A Most Unkind Cut.
They hod pirouetted for about throo
minutes, when sho signified In the
usual way her desire to stop.
"I'm very fond of tho waltz," said
he.
"Indeed? I should think you would
liave learned it, then."
And the silenee that came over the
room was so deep that all attempts to
measure it by throwing (be land wer«
(Utile. -„Warpe/''» Wtuar,
live and Kellowereft.
In tho oilloo of the grand secretory
of the Grand Lodge, in the Mosonio
Temple, hangs nn oil paiuliug of a
woman dresaod in Masonic regalia. It
wee presented to Colonel Killers, and
is a portrait of Hon. Mre. Aldworth,
the heroine of this legend. She U said
to havo received, about tho year 1735,
the first and second dogreos of Free*
masonry in Lodgo No. 44, Donoruite,
Ireland. Tho cireumstancos of this
initiation were first published in Cork
In 1807, and it was claimed that they
were substantiated by nn eye-witness
to tho ceremony. Subsequently they
appeared in a memoir published by
,Spencer, tho celebrated Masonio
bishop, In London.
Mrs. Aldworth, nee Elizabeth St.
Leger, was the youngest child and
only daughter of the first Viscount
Doneraile, of Ireland. The lodge in
which she was initiated was an aristo
cratic lodge, consisting principally of
the gentry and most respectable and
wealthy inhabitants of tho country
around llonerailo. The communica
tions were usually held in tho town,
but during tho mastership of Lord
Doneraile, brother of Mrs. Aldworth,
the moetings were held at Donerailo
House, his residence.
Spencer relates this story of the af
fair: It happened on this particular
occasion that tho lodge was hold in a
room separated from another by stud
and brick-work. The young lady be
ing giddy and thoughtloss, and, de
termined to gratify her curiosity,
made arrangements accordingly. With
a pair of scissors, as she herself relat
ed to tho mother of our informant, she
removed a portion of a brick from tho
wall and placed herself so as to com
mand a full view of every thing which
occurred in the next room. She then
witnessed the first two degreos in
masonry, which was the extent of the
proceedings of the lodgo that night.
Becoming a waro from what she heard
that the brethren were about to sep
arate, she felt alive to the awkward
ness and danger of her situation, and
began to consider how sho could retire
without observation. She became
nervous and agitated, and nearly
fainted, but so far recovered horoolf as
to be fully aware of the necessity of
withdrawing as quickly as possible.
Being in the dark, sho stumbled and
overthrew something, a chair or some
ornamental piece of furniture. Tho
crash was loud, and the tyler, who
was in the lobby or landing, on which
opened the doors both of the lodgo
room and that where the young lady
was, gave tho alarm, burst open the
door and, with a light in one hand and
a sword in tho other, appeared to tho
terrified and fainting lady. He was
soon joined by the members. Her lifo
would havo fallen a sacrifice to what
was then esteemed her crime.
The first care of Lord Donerailo was
to resuscitate tho unfortunato lady
without alarming the house, anil en
deavor to learn from her an *rplana
tion of what had occurred. Having
dono tills, many of the members being
furious at the transaction, she was
placed tinder guard of tho tyler, and a
member in the room where she was
found. The members reassombled
and deliberated as to what was to ha
dono. For over two hours she could
hear the angry discussion and her
death deliberately proposed and sec
onded. At length the good sense of
the majority succeeded in calming in
some measure the angry and irritated
feelings of the members. It was re
solved to give her the option of sub
mitting to the Masonic ordeal to tho
extent she had witnessed (Foilow
craft), and if sho refused, the brethren
were again to consult. Miss St. Leger,
exhausted and terrified by the stormi
ness of tho debato, gladly and unhesi
tatingly accepted tho oiler and »as
initiated. Sister Aldworth, as she
was called, camo Into a large fortuno
by her marriago, and the poor in gen
eral and tho Masonic poor in particu
lar, had good reason to be thankful
for lier numerous and bountiful acts ol
kindness.— N. Y. World.
in
in
on
a
of
my
Is
If Guilty of Assault and flattery
Upon your Stomach with blue pill, podjr
phyllin or other rasping purgatives, posi
tively despair of helping your liver. Vio
lence committed upon your inner man will do
no good. Real help, prompt and thorough,
is to be fourni in tho wholesome anti-bilious
medicine, ^Hostettor's Ktomnch Bitters,
which is, moreover, productive of happy re
sults in malarial disease, rheumatism, dys
pepsia, nervousness and kidney troubles.
No matter how big and stout a presti
digitateur may ba he is always slight-of
hand. — Trrai Siftings.
All disorders caused by a bilious state ol
the system can be cured by using Carter's
Little Liver Pills. No pain, griping or dis
comfort attending their use. Try them.
A canal-lock is a sort 0 / • navi-gate.«
Putt
I
—One day a little girl had been sit.
*ng foi some timo with one foot doub*
led under bar in a rather cramped po
sition. When sho got up her foot was
evidently "asleep;" she came to mam
ma, Inquiring In a puzzled way:
"What's the matter with my footP" ''I
don't know," said mamma; "how does
It feel?" The little one stood for a
moment in deep thought, evidently
cudgeling her small brain for a word
that would describe the sensation.
Then she replied slowly: "It just feels
—buzzy."

"I can only be a sister to you,
"I'm afraid
George; nothing more,
that won't do, Miss Clara. I have five
grown sisters already, and, to tell you
the truth, they »re not favorably dis
posed toward you; they think a match
with you would be the mistake of my
"In that case, George," said
the girl, drawing herself up with
haughty grace, "you may name the
day."— N. Y. Sun.
life.
—Bobby was at a neighbor's, and in
response to a piece of breatl and butter
politely said: "Thank you." "That's
right. Hobby," said tho Indy,
like to bear little boys say 'Thank
you."' "Yes, ma told me I must say
that If you gave me any thing to eat,
even if it wasn't nothing hut broad and
butter."
—A physician, hastening to n pa
tient, was met by an acquaintance,
who, notiolng a* hole In the doctor',
coat-sleeve, remarked that the wisdom
«tps pooping out. "And fooliihnoes
poopluf V replied (Ue douter, ouully
"1
When a hundred bottles of
Othor pretentious specifics UillomÿMM
in born scrofula or oonUglou« wood poraou,
remember tta»t B. R B. (BoUnw Blood
Balm) has gaioed many thousand victories,
in as many seemingly incurable instances.
Bend to the Blood Balm Co., Atlanta, Oa.,
" Boole of Wonders," and be convinced.
It is the only true blood pvhifibe.
O. W. Messer, Howell's X Roads, 0a.,
write«: "I *u afflicted nine to«» with
«ore«. All the medicine I could take did me
(rood. I then tried B. B. B., end S bottle*
cured me »ound." _ „ . ,
Mr«. B. M. WllROn, Round MounUln,
Tex««, writes : " A lady friend of mine wee
troubled with burnt» und pimple» on her
face end neck. 8he took three Dottle« of B.
B. B., end her »kin got »oft end smooth,
pimple» disappeared, and her health mb
proved greatly. " _
Ja». L. Bosworth, Atlanta, Oa, write«:
"8omo year« ago 1 contracted blood pol»on.
X had no appelito, my digestion *»» ruined,
rheumatism drew up my limb» so I ceuld
hardly walk, mv throat waa cauterised n. -
times. Hot Spring» gave me no benefit, and
my life was one of torture until I gavé B.
B. B. a trial, and, surprising as It may aeem,
the use of five bottles cured me."
The young clerk whs goes ebont full
jeweled should le watched.— Jtwttat'
Il'erWy.
Tint first steam engine on this continent
was brought from England in 1753.
11 'Bkows's Bnoscntii, Trocbu' art ex
cellent for the relief of Hoarseness or Sore
Throat. They are exceedingly effective."—
Christian Il'orld, London, Hug.
Mart people i.nro good aims, but they
never pull the trigger. — IFfci/em Plowman.
pEon.a Are Killed by Coughs that Hale's
Honey of llorehound and Tar would cure.
Pike's Toothache Drops Cure in one minute.
for
no
w
Vbrt tew person* can hold their own on
their first soa voyage.
Taosa who wish to practice economy
should buy Carter's Little Liver Pills. Fort?
pills in a vial; only one pill a dose.
Slbxpino oar porters gonorally fir« ft
fat man a wide berth.
EW* THE ONLY
Brilliant
Durable
Economical *
Are Diamond Dyes. They exwri all othvri
in Strength, Purity and Fastness. None others
are just as good. Beware of imitations—they
aro madr of cheap and inferior material* aad
give poor, weak, crocky colors.
36 colors ; 10 cents etch.
Send postal for Dye Book, Sample Card, directions
for coloring Photon., making the finest Ink or Bluing
. a quart), etc. Sold by Druggists or by
WELLS, RICHARDSON A CO., Burlington, VU
(
For Gilding or Bronzing Fancy Article*, USB
DIAMOND PAINTS.
Gold, Silver, Bronze, Copjttr. Only io Centn.
CELERY
COMPOUND
Paine's
CUR Eg
PROOFS
"P»ine's Celery Com
pound cured my nerv
ous sick headache*/'
Mrs. L. A. Du kst* I*,
San Jacinto, Cal.
Neuralgia
Nervous
Prostration
"After using six bel
lies of Pal tie's Ceteft
Compound, I am ettfed
(I rheumatism."
Samvbl Hutchinson.
South Cornish, N. fi.
Rheumatism
"It has done _ _
good for kidney disease
than any other medi
cine." Gao. Aasorr,
Sioux City, Iowa.
Kidney
Diseases
"Paine's Celery Corn*
pound has been of
benefit for torpid
indigestion, and bilious
ness." Elizabbtn C.
Udall, Qtiechee, Vt.
«
AND
g"«
All Liver
Disorders
SÏS.S
:<
<
• 7
u'
Swift'# fneefflo cured
after I ostl been
dies of Hen-ury and Potash. 8. 8. 8. not only cured th*
Blood Poison.but lellerod the Khrnmatlsui «hieb
caused by the polsnno
of malignant Blood Poise*
with old so-called
cd in rain
GKO. BOVKLL.t4StMArcnoe.il.T.
Nino years ago Scrofnla attacked two of my childr**,
and they were bndly afflicted with that disease, which
mststedthe treatment of my family physician. I *m
persuaded to n*e Ss ift's Specific by seelnr an aiwr-unt
of cures In my county paper. The Improvement waa
apparent from the first few doses, and In a short fUM
my children wero cured, and are still sound and welL
JOHN WILLIAMS, Iaaxinirton, Va.
Bwirr-s Srrctnr is entirely a vegetable remedy, and
•nJ y medicine which permanently cures Serofa*
>u llu mors, < 'nnrer and ('ontagiou* Blood Poison.
_ ott lHOod and Skin Biseases jnatled fra*.
THK BWIFf 81'KCIFIOCO.
DRAWxa I. Atlanta, oa.
MARVELOUS
m m iSmi■ ■ Anil
at ID B ■■ n mm
MM I ■■ 11 II V
HR mm ■■■■ ■■ Bf W
mi r IK h n ï
III ft* 111 II 11 I
0I80OVERY.
Is Ol
. m
Scad fur buoka
.
Aajr hook learned la
Mind wandering cared*
Rpeaking without mat—
Ora.t I.«...
1'rospectu*, with opinion* of Ihr. Wh. A. HbhmA
ha world famed H|trcialtst In Mind Plsrasas, Im M
UrrciilfNl I hampMR, the great Psychologist, J. 1.
Iluckley, It. Dra Ed.tor of the Chri* on Adrocatt,
Richard Procter, the Scientist, Ilona. Judge (Bl h saa ,
Judah P. Hcujnmtn, and other*, sent |>ost free by
Pror. A. IX>1S i:TTK, *i!7 Fins A,.., ». T
•rS*Mk THU part» mry ti*M|M*«(W*.
tS
FOREMEN,
TIMEKEEPER8,
MACHINISTS,
MANACER8
and at] aonnectad with l*nr* establishments, will* It
in reference to sellinf
^ riQ II Hi. SPECIALLY BASE PILLES
5DO ocold watch
PAYABLE SI.00 PER WEEK ,
b» rar lmproTM) Club Kralem. It
working time and will p*j you handaon .
60 dwts. Foil It Jewelled moTemanta of p
and well-known makes, auch aa Ftetn* w olthjNM,
*prln/xflMd, Kork ford, Ac. Yrc refer to any Coo*.
merciaiAfeney. A|iat Wasted in each place. Addraa
NAECELE WATCH * JEWEL* YOO
Originator* of Club System of selling Watches,
20 North ninth 8t. Philadelphia.
40*80 Maiden Uni. Ntw York.
RÇATARRH
LY*!
Ely's Crum Bilm
Goldin Asad
ILT BROS , M warn* IL. v. V.
situs,».ts
For Box* or Ktpr art
VT AND CAUNflAf
PUT up. Addrcaa
FLOYD <i MOONEY, aEMNl*
wunuanm«««.»,«» *

W
mH oar p«ii by ■*•*!•
(a «te f N iMbMO»
Mil trad*. LBrgMUMM*
iZJ.w. wTâga* 15 FaTb'ay! Pw mS* îyMltlM^
t«Mal* MEwarart, "Mtto*y Mvwod'fcf im, M»*rU«4w, «M.
Centennial Manufivtunns Oo., Cincinnati, Ohi*>
The Plain Truth
me
B.
-
B.
\
Is that Bood-s «snap a ells k«a ««rad tko«sads of
poopl« «k« »«Mrad Mvsratp wttk rtraamsilam. II
■Mtraltiss U» Isatis acid la Ika blood, wktak
caaaea Ihoaa tar rib I a peina and aekse, and bits
vualisas sad aartekaa Iks Mood, thaa pravarainp
tka reoarrenea of the dtsaaae. Tb«M taeta narrant
tea, If jroa lafvr nub rbeumatiea, to
Sarsaparilla a trial.
plea Hood's
"I had rbsamaUsB so «bas nbaa I sat or Isa
dona 1 eoald ksrdlr «at ap. Bond's ksrssparmt
hss stnsl earad
* F. Cabnb*. Gallon, O.
n. B. If 70 « Mil ap your m\né to try Hood'*
Sarsaparilla, do not bo Induood to toko ou/ other.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
■oldbfalldratflsts. MieUforN. Preparad ont,
bp a 1. HOOD A 00., Apotkeadrlas. Lonall, Mu«
lOO Doses One Dollar
A Planters Experience.
"Mr plsatstlsd »«*■•> ■alariaMl«
Irlat, wkara r„waada|MpmalM.
"SraSSa
w
Tutfs Pills
TM« result waa msmllass. «J
kKssMstrsai Sk* """Yt*"!'!*"
MmI aw farthir trsakls. With thaa*
ZlllsTl m»M not Mr «• II« !■ •«/
tasap." I.BIYAJ.Baf»kis»Sil-a
Sold Everywhere.
Offlom. 44 Murray 8t» New York.
CAUTION
Beware of Fraud, •« my nam* and the price ere
•temped on the bottom of ell my edvertlned »hoe*
before Irarln* the factory, which protect the
i axai nut blah prices end Inferior cood*. If * deal
offer* W. 1*. leRgl*« *boe* *t n reduced price,
or ray* he hue them without ray name end price
Umpta oa the bottom, pvt him down u n fraud*
er»
er
fm
j
M.
LAS
FOR
■ GENTLEMEN.
The only calf M RIANI* EUE Shoo smooth In*
•Id*. NOTACKA or WAX THREAD to hurl
thefeet, easy* b hand-sewed and Will NOT KIP*
W. I*. OO tJOl* AS 04 SHOE, the original and
only hand**ewed welt 94 oho*. Equals custom-made
w! £?'1 Î&ÎjλÎ.A» b.H POI.ICR «HOB.
Railroad Men and Letter Carrtarft nil wear them.
Smooth Inside a* a ljand-8ewed 8hoe. No Tack* or
Wirsifcoïaïür
$3 SHOE
MHOK I* nn«xo0lletf
t Calf Khoi* tor th** prie*.
Aft H.M WORKING
Us best In ».h* woi M for rough
Vn'ÜZViïK
„IfiWTHS* Yor-iH'«
five* Ulf smell Box* n nfinnoe to
r»r th* best ahoefl Iff llff trnrM.
All med* In CongreM, Bntlcm *nd Lee*. If not
•old by your dealer, write
W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, Mas«.
fqjha.jr
MAN'S «HOB la
yiamsto
wasr.
BOY* !•
IckMl Mi
SCOTT'S
EMULSION
OF FEE COD UT£E OIL
Almost aa Palatab le as Milk.'
IR only preparation of COD MVFIt OIL tfi«t
ran b* Ukan readily *d 4 tolanted for * long U»f
hi jl fHcfte atoraactia.
AWD AS A REBEDT FOB fO^tUPTIOlf,
« maun;« kfmms r as s i n rbw.
itin.iTt. hMiiPiVD ' TOftfl f r -
i l l mni III WAWM biM WT^
It Is wmll— I» If» c—lts.
l and endorsed h, tks Ust Fbysiclsn*
ï
EtTI
Us tbs eomtflea of IDs world.
Im (•«■!• ky»l Dranlffs»
MOTHERS' FRIEND
ib « ää«»
Ii.r. Kt-atn. a*u*tr » . »«»r
vMd NO I0TUEI GIVEN AWAY I
—1 I.) imrailnta XamtKau. In.lamp.
■ ■ÄaVrÄi'rJi;:
ÜM1CHILD BIRTHS
M> UftlO WOM CON FINMMftNT,
Book to u Mothxk* m MailkdcFrkk
BRAItriELP R EOT LATO R O»« A TLA AT A, 64
Bold bt all Duron unm.
M edicated Ele c tricity!
THICK.
ASSORTED LAMPS IN BARRELS 1
JUBT TUB GOODS FOU KKTA1L TRADEl
V^Vö^ÖL Co.
—WHOI.KSALK I>KALBHS Ilf
GRIM, GUSS MD QUEERSWARE.
Nn
Oyster ft haï la,
_ •« Fl« nr dr L'oru. In th*
HIK HARD Mill 'VtaST*
JOOjwr«rulrmnro mad*
tS MtJDlnffFDrttiTr. A l*o FOW KB MILLS and
FARM FKED MII.I.S. Circular** te*timonlala
aantnn application . W1IJON DIOS, Boston,Ft.
aV-KAJt* nus FAFH tmj
COTTON PRESSES!
coTTo, '
FlaatatUa MII.I. >.d «t...b««t Xapaln.
RANI nil nru my WminmNIi
R0CÜRBD. Also
*flra'"AÏ*Vr.bt
■fc reference.. Ixm«
w. book. AddraH
. mittlftALft, Attarasy al Law, W*aklagl*e,.D. C.
av-SAM* mu rati* •««*. *m >m
W. T
tsBUamjsm
DRYART A STRATTON
LhIi, M*T~Hu 000 fttaArat* Tea Hr. OraAaata* ora
MMsIffi la fffttU« poaiMeas. lead for Ctreulftr.
and Timor* wad, no knife, kook
itiaroy * Bwk,
cXetenfttt, Okio.
SAUCER
frr*. Dn fir*
Mi PI*nBCr**t,
■on IMI MMft mm «MS jm
FREE fcawiiR^.E!ftGS!wa!
■ IIH Cutting. MOOll Y «00., Cincinnati, Ol
wuuih nn ,mn «a.*, m
MimC WiM. Book-kaeptnf. P#o«*n*hlp, Aritk>
IHImW rtrtle, Dborthaod. vt«*., thoroufhl;* Unfbl
W Ml. ClnmUra free. MVAIT8C0I UWE.
l.v.
MTfl limMbama,
A. X. £ T.
U*>
MM. UM I«* M« IW *4,wWM«M«t 1*1

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