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The Grenada gazette. (Grenada, Miss.) 1885-18??, February 21, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88067090/1889-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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The (KrENADA ©AZETTE
/o
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FARMER*' ALLIANCE OF CRENADA COUNTY.
K. T. PAlTfE,
. Editor and l'«ov ru ' ,w ''
VOL. IV.—NO. 27.
GRENADA, MISS., THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 21, 1889.
GOODS FROM
ciisrciisraiT-A-TT
Queen City Club,
Spring Water,
Ladd Ôc Heath, Billy Moore,
Sole Agents.
John lleorgt'i Old Stud, SUM, KBS.
Satisfaction Guaranteed in every instance.
e^ALCOHOL IN ANY QUANTITY.
JUGS FREE.^f
B. hi. GORDON,
-DEALER IN
Choice Staple and Fancy
oceries
"C?
3
Canned Goods, Candies, Cigars and Tobacco
Goods Delivered in any part of the City Free of Charge.
3. p. LcKsgPOLtD,
South Side Square, : Grenada, (Hiss.
-ssALsa xar
Fine Watclies, Clocks, Silverware
and «Jewelry,
l^EPAirçiNG op Pine Œaifghes a Specially,
J. F. MOSS,
-SEALED X%T
Staple and
Groceries
Cigars, Tobacco, Canned Goods,
Candies, ZF'ru.Its, ISTu-ts, Etc.
DEPOT BTEBET, *ÆISS.
Money to Loan!
OUT
IMPROVED FARMS
Containing not less than Eighty Acres, in
cultivation. From 3 to 7 years, at ten pei
cent, per annum. No shipments of Cotton.
Apply to a ij._ :E=a3rn.e.
Illinois Central R. R,
THE POPULAR
Through Car Line
BETWEEN THE
North and South.
Buffet Sleeping Cars on all the
Through Trains.
Connections at Chicago with all
Buffet and Dining Car Lines
TO THE
North, East and West
At St. Bonis, in Union Depot, fo*r all
POINTS NORTH AND WEST.
At New Orleans with Southern Pa
alflc for all pointa In Texna, Mexico
and California.
With L. & N. for Mobile, Montgom
ery. Jacksonville, Flu.,and al) point«
. in the South East,
I. W. Coleman, A. G. P. A.,.New Orleans
.Chicago
A. H. Hanson, Q. P. A.,
T. J. Hudson, Traffic Manager, .
M. T. Jeffery, General Manager,.
Granite, American
■and
1
1!

TOMBSTONES!
Of every imagiiiHhle design and at
almoflt every price, from $2 up
Thane Gravestone« and Monument«
*re nmd» of the very best Marble, by
•ompetent workmen, and present a
handsome finish.
I am prepared to aupply the public
with monuments of any description,
ft! prices below those »tiered by »ny
«tbsr agency . Respeotfully,
ti. a ausoR
LOUISVILLE,
New Orleans «Texas
RAILWAY,
(MISSISSIPPI VALLEY ROUTE)
THEPOPULARLINE
-BETWEEN
Memphis,
Greenville,
Vicksburg,
Baton Rouge
and Mew Orleane
TRAVERSING A MAGNIFICENT
AND EVEN PICTURESQUE
COUNTRY.
The Rlee end Btigar Plantation* and gréai
massive Sugar House* and Reflnertea eontfe
of Raton Ronge are e sp e ci ally in tore* tin*
the observant
and never patl to pi
passenger.
Between Memphis and Vicksburg ths ttm
posses through some of the finest Oottos
Plantations In the Yasoo-Mlsalaslppl Delta*
the most fertile agricultural ssstlon of<
try on earth.
The Equipment and Physical Condition «I
the line are flrst-etaas In every particular
permitting a high rate of sp«sd and insuring
the oomfort and safety of passengers.
Magnificent Pullman Buffet Sleeping Cart
run between Loulsv and New Orleans via
Memphis without change.
(MF* Passengers should pursbaes Tickets vie
title Hue I It la emphatically the moet a tira»
tlve route In the South to-day.
For Time Table* Map* Folder* end Fiioet»
Ticket«, adrtreu,
Uen'l. Troy. Pua. A (ent, Memphis, Tens., ea
K. W. Bow,
Oen'l. Pu* Agi
V B. MAURY, Ja,
P. R. Roacas,
Ass't. O. P. A.
J. M. BDWAR11S,
Vlce-Pree. A Oen'l. Man'r. Memplil*Tens
0. J. Austin * Co. htvo * vary
largo »took of misiei' and children* 1
Double-Knee Blockings, tho boo
manufaotwod, at astonishingly to*
SUN SHADOWS.
ly
is
Gloomily fall the shadows.
Darkly the cloud* come down;
(Verhandln# all, like a somber pall,
The valley, bridge and town.
Only a moment it lingers.
Edged with a living light.
Then floating away to the mountain* gray,
It lose* itself from sight.
So to us are our sorrows,
So to us is our pain;
Moments of care laden the air
And tear-drops fall as rain.
Low hangs the cloud of trouble,
Low sighs the weary heart;
Yet soon glad gleams of sun-bright beam*
Show where the storm-clouds part !
It seems so hard to remember,
When rain-clouds drearily lower,
That there's always shining a golden lining
As brightly as ever before!
And when our grief is saddest.
And anguish darkens the
If we only would know that no shadow of woe
Could bo save the light were there!
—Eva Best, in Detroit Free Press.
DO HEARTS EVER BREAK?
Acute Miseries Often Memorized
into Chronic Grief.
a
to
in
Ambition
Even Duty May Assuage and
Indeed Quite Heal the Wounds of
the Slighted Lover-The Wor
ship of Realities.
Since Washington Irving wrote hl§
story of "The Broken Heart," no one
else has ventured to write one bearing
a similar title. Wo have grown more
cynical and literal. It has been shown
that anatomically speaking, hearts do
not break—at least, they very seldom
do—and wo refuse to accept the
phrase in its metaphorical implica
tion. Probably no burlesque was ever
more enjoyed than "Camille; or the
Cracked Heart. 11 Its enormous ab
surdity was indorsed as a just satire
upon the facility with which that or
gan was assumed to be shattered. At
very long intervals we read in the
newspapers of a heart that has liter
ally burst from excess of anguish in
the person whoso life blood it pro
peled. Such a physiological phenom
enon is sure to awaken interest at a
period which worships reality so much
that when Joshua Whitcomb in the
"Old Homestead, 11 washes his face
with actual water from a bona
fide pump, the audience breaks
into a rapturous applause. But in
hearts that metaphorically break there
is little belief. The world is apt to
turn up its nose at them and say it is a
pity they had nothing bettor to do.
Tho world believes in being amused
when it is not at work; and there is no
amusement in discovering that here and
there a human being is so worried and
stricken with life's bewilderment as no
longer to be capable of holding up
against it bravely.
There are a good many strong and
coarsely healthy natures, incapable of
feeling pleasure or pain with extreme
intensity, who take the ground that
nothing is worth that abandonment of
sorrow which leaves mind or body too
weak for battle. Take, for instance,
one of the deepest of all griefs, the
treachery, perfidy and ingratitude of
one whom we have long and profound*
edly loved, in whom we believed more
completely than in ourselves; for whom
we would have laid down, if necessary,
almost all that the world esteems good.
Whence is tho compensation to come
that shall be balm to tho wounded
spirit, cause it to feel any thing like the
happiness which once is felt, and pre
sent to the imagination aught where
with memory will not interfere by call
ing back tho presence that has so won
ton ly departed? What is tho secret
which explains tho fact that we still
cling, perhaps through years, perhaps
through a lifetime, to tendorest recol
lections of those who have repaid love
with insolence, devotion with indiffer
ence, generosity with selfishness, mag
nanimity with meanness? Is such
tenacity weakness? Then it is a weak
ness in which some of the best women
excol and some of the best mon are
proficient. Is it explicable on the as
sumption that those who are as faith
less as they are fascinating have an in
defectible charm of temperament and
manner which is the rarest possession
of the most invincible virtue? Ho the
false and the treacherous bind us by
a spell which honor might bo glad to
own? Does Lothario remain potent,
even to those he has abandoned, be
cause his magnetism is sweeter, finer,
subtler than Chevalier Bayard's?
Then again, do hearts really break?
always in the metaphysical meaning.
Is the shock over so violent and per
manent that life loses forever after a
considerable portion of the comfort
and happiness it formerly had? l)ocs
not tho deceived friend, when the
frenzy of tho first twenty-four hours is
over, soon recover from his disillusion
and not only conduct his business
though nothing important had hap
peued, but eat with undiminished ap
petite and sloop dreatnlossly and well?
Does Werther, even if he abstains from
suicide, always live on with a heart
which simply performs its muscular
duty in a manner more or less im
paired, to bo sure, but which never
more beats to passion, because passion
can never more be felt? Are there not
Camilles who forget their Armands as
they conquer their consumption and
settle down into unremorseful and
demi-respeotable middle age? Do im
measurable .disappointments always
make existence a desert? Is there not
such a thing as forgetfulness of
acute miseries instead of mem
orizing them into chronic griefs?
Does not the expectant treatment often
cure the most bruised and bleeding
soul— expectancy that still looks for
happiness, both in this world and the
world to comeP I» there ue true j
in
as
of
be
of
of
is
1
philosophy in that vulgar maxim which
reminds us there are as good fish in the
sea as ever were taken out? Can it lie
possible that any two souls, in spite of
vast divergences, are so made for each
that when sundered by imperative fate
neither again can ever find a twin?
We are not wise enough to answer
all these questions which we so blithe*
ly profound. As year after vear multi
plies one's experience in human lives
he meets at distant intervals
perament so lovely in the warmth of
its sunshine, the brightness of its beau
ty, the sweetness of its inhalations, the
purity of its labyrinths, and the tan
talization of its mysteries, that to yield
is as natural as for the plummet to seek
the bottom of the sea. Who shall define
the magic of a touch, the secret of a
tone, the enchantment of a look, the
mesmerism of a caress? Nay, who shall
explain the sorcery of a presence, the
witchery of an in Hue»»? Shakespearo
says
tera
To keep an adjunct to remember thoe
Were to import forgetfulness
»beautiful exaggeration which only a
poet's heart could invent. Yet who
that has ever loved does not keep an
"adjunct, 11 docs not cherish a portrait,
a handkerchief, a tress, a flower, any
thing in which is blent the aroma of a
pÄ'sonaüty passionately loved, irre
vocably vanished?
There is a good deal of • nvoiced suf
fering in life—the suffering that is due
simply to dispeled ideas. It is shallow
to hold that such suffering is morbid
and easily remedied. Sorrow of this
kind is morbid only when it is so self
encouraged as to paralyze action.
Whatever remedy exists is found
in the line of constant effort
Un fort
17th i
-
j Journal.
healthy
directions,
unate are they who, unable to make
effort themselves, have no one to
in
arouse them. Sympathy acts merely
as a sedative if given in too large a
dose. There comes a time when change
of medicine is necessary. The platitu
dinous author of "Proverbial Philoso
phy 11 never said any thing falser in its
moaning than "If the love of the heart
be blighted it bloometh not again."
The same love, of course, does not
bloom again, any more than the flower
reblooms that is trampled in the mud.
But a fairer flower may burst its petals
and a sweeter love evolve to speech
through passionate silences.
It seems cold and hard to turn from
precious possibilities liko this and
maintain that ambition, to say nothing
of the russet-gowned virtue, duty, may
occupy the energies which for
merly thrilled to more palpi
tant vibrations. Yet ambition is
practically a good substitute
for love, when faithlessness of lover or
sweetheart has left the feelings arid
but yearning. Duty is a better substi
tute still; but ah! one must fall in lovo
with duty in order to do one's duty
with content Such love is passion
less. Duty is kissless and caressless.
Our hands, our lips, our hearts do not
thrill beneath her touch, unless, in
deed, she holds a martyr's crown be
fore us and we reach to it through
flame. Still, let us take kindly to this
sad-suited duty, who generally wears
no garb but hodden gray. If we can
take to her kindly and make of lier a
lifelong friend, she will reassure the
heart which feels that it is breaking
and give it a foretaste of happiness
perhaps when it shall really break at
last.—Home Journal.
AN AID TO MEMORY.
I'rof. Lamoroux ami the Ruler.* of England
In lUiy
Prof. Wendell Lamorou:;, of Union
Collego, son of tho late Judge Lamo
roux, of Albany, is constantly doing
kindly things which have the merit
of usefulness. Several years ago ho
rearranged the well-known lines that
give the rulers of England, from Will
iam the Conqueror down to Victoria.
Tho arrangement is simple, the lines
being easily committed to memory by
observing that each century (except
the seventeenth, which has two lines),
is represented by a line, and that an
upright dash in the line indicates the
middle of tho century as nearly as may
be. For tho benefit, of our readers, es
pecially our younger ones, who are
studying English history, we reprint
Prof. Lamoroux's arrangement, with
his explanatory notes. Prof. Lamo
roux deserves the thanks of all stu
dents for thus making English history
easy.
1 ith. First, I William th*-.Norman amt William
his
12th. Henry, Stephen atiA I Henry, with Rich
urd, come
13th. John and Henry | the 3d nnd Jst Edward
then reign.
Hth. 2d Ed I ward, 3d Edward nnd Richard
again:
15th. Then 8 Hen | rys, 2 Edwards, Dick, Henry.
I guess,
16th. 8th Henry. 16th Edward, Queen Mary,
Queen Best.
Next do Jamie, Charles, 1 Cromwell,
come on :
James the 2d; good William and Mary
as one ;
18th. Until Anne and 2 Georg 1 es retired from
the scene,
19th. With 4th George and 4th William, Vtc
to I rla's Queen
Fach line presents exclusively the
record of the century whose number is
before it—a couplet, however, being
given to the 17th.
The upright dash in the line marks
the middle of the century. When di
viding one name, it shows the King or
Kings of that name to have reigned in
both halves of the century.
In the fifth line Richard III., the
usurper and murderer, is nick-named
thus, not more for rhyme than reason.
In tho seventh line, James 1st is
.»ailed thus, to indicate hia Scotch de
:
scent
In tho eighth, William and Mary
tire mentioned "n* one," because both
were called to reign jointly.—Albany
J la
. A !
flow the l.lvinz Skeleton Woood and
Won Flo«*:*, tu* F;»t L »dy.
"Floosie, 1 yield to the magic of I
tour charms. 'i lav my heart and my
*i
DIME MUSEUM LOVE.
fortune at y
The eager, passionate voice was that
of the living skeleton. He was ad
dressing the fat woman.
"I would cherish you. 0 so tenderly,
Flossie,' 1 he went on, pleadingly. "Give
me the right to shield and protect you
from the perils of life's tempestuous !
' of
in
journey—to stand bet ween you and the
barbed shaft of malice, the venomous
tooth of slander and the stuffed club of
injustice. 1 '
"Lycurgus,
replied the fat woman,
with downcast eves and a tremor in her
rhile
voice that shook th*
blush suffused her fair cheek and east
a
room,
the cage of per
a pinkish glow
forming snakes, "this c
so unexpectedly, so
that I scarcely— 11
"Flossie, 11 said the living skeleton,
es upon me
embarrassingly,
gently, "forgive me if I have shocked
you by the suddenness of my avowal.
Yet you must have seen that I have
appeared more ill at ease in your pres
haughty and dignified, if I may so ex
press myself, for some months past
than you formerly kno.v me to be. "
"I have observed it. Lveirgu»,
she
replied, "but I attributed it to—to
liver complaint—or -or <••
so inexp rienced, you kr
gus, 11 she continued,
used to the ways of men that I —I -
"My darling:
startling energy, "your maidenly Hesi
tation, vo
it.v, onlv deepen the passion that p<>»- j
• so entirely and eon 11
the resolve to win you.
j
I
v, I
!
j
i
•ith !
hi
nr artless and innocent timid- P'
. !
Permit
me!"
With an effort that swelled the vri:
n his forehead and nearly broke his j
lrgus picked up one of her :
, ,, , ,, , |
fallen to the floor and
I
back, le
gloves that had
replaced it on her lap. j
fat woman thanked him with a !
. ,
quivering sigh that appeared to lift :
him from his feet, but he went
T!
un
j
daunted:
j
"Flos.-ie, in my profession;
have accumulated acompet nee that is :
ample for us both. My financial re- I
pardon, did I step on j
i
beg
sources
your too?"
"! think not, Lycurgus." she mur
'd did not feel it."
h,
|
'
ured.
—Are ample to any demand that
is likely ever to be made upon them. I
My personal expenses for clothing and
-blister that hairless dog! Get out, |
you mangy brut*-: lie shall not harm !
you. Flossie —be careful, my darling!
on the tail of
i
, .
(
Y<
arc about to st
that stuff".1 otter and make a beaver j
out of the animal-my personal ex- ;
are natur- !
• is far lieavi
I
scs, I was about to sa
pc
ally heavy, but my inc
It may require a whole bolt of
an entire
cr.
6ilk t<
make you a dre
calfskin"—his voice faltered slightly —
• for you. but I can face
all this cheerfully, bravely-"
"Say no more. Lycurgus!" sin
with shy. bewitching
• manly devotion has w
heart! I am yours. But O. Lycurgus!
Be kind to me.
"to make a sin
said.
tenderne
"V.
Be tender
gentlemen!" yelled the
excited manager, appearing at theout
and waving his arms wildly
at th" crowd of pass
street, "tho livin' skellenton, tin*
remarkal.il
that ever drawed the breath of life, is
at this dientleal moment a-sparkin'of
sie, the mountain of flesh, the
most colossal hunk of humanity that
ever lived! Together with forty thou
sand other curiosities. Ten e>nts ad
side d<
tin*
uv
St
and bones
Big K!
mit s to all. Pass right in !" -
Times.
TWO KINDS OF RESINS.
\mmig the Au
la r
ruMit Egyptian*.
Those Hint \V
Among tho minor incidents of recent
explorations in Egypt is the unearth
ing of two
previously known to have been includ
ed in the materia medicaof the ancient
The first of these was
; which were not
Egyptians.
found in a small jar that was disin
terred in a perfect state from a heap
of rubbish among tin* ruins of Nnu
cratia. the site of a Greek colony, and
attributed to the Sixth Century B. C.
This resin, of which there was about
, ,
,i.dU ounces, was opaque and of a
tuwn color on the sur acc, but under
neath was partly of a clear golden yel- |
low color and partly of a darker tint, j
though still transparent. When chewed
it softened in the mouth and tasted
like mastie. but it had also the
pemlar flavor of Chian turpentine
and gave off the elemi or fennel-like
odor of that drug when rubbed be
tween the lingers. It also resembled
C.'liii
in solubility in alcohol,
other considerations this ancient resi
turpentine, but was not mastic,
For these and
pronounced by Mr. Holmes,
of the
has bee
the curator to the muse
Pharmaceutical Society, to be identical
with Chian turpentine, although there
does not appear to have been any
previous evidence that the drug was
known to the ancient Egyptians,
earliest extant mention of Chian tur
pentine is by Theophrastus, who lived j
from 370 to 285 B. C. The discovery
of this pot, therefore, if the identifica
tion be correct, carries the history of
Iho drug back another two centuries.
The second resin, which has ulso boon
I
i
The
reported on by Mr. Holmes, occurs on
ii mummy cloth found in a cemetery, in
the Knytim province of Dower Egypt,
and supposed to date from the Second
Century. When burnt it guvo off
vapor* of Veuftoie uetd, with i).» vault.
J la odor peculiar to Siam benzlon.
! There i*
, ..
zoin was known to the ancient Lgyp
I tiano. but lignum aloes, which is f re
quently mentioned together with it in
later records, was known to the Jews
ï that t
direct evidc
a
! partly on account of the resemblance
' of the tint and opacity of the white
tears of benzoin in the human finger
nail. At any rate, the Eceiesiasticus,
wisdom is compared to the "pleasant
odor yielded by galbanum, onyx and
sweet storax, 1 ' but it is quite certain
that th" opereula of certain shell-fish
with which onveha hr
in the time of Solomon, and it may bo
that Benzoin is identical with
dian frankincense
corides. But Mr. Holmes seems to fa
vor the identification of benzoin with
the onvx or onveha of the ancients,
In
entioned by Dios*
in
U*r
V
•rally been
either to
>r to giv-' off
fragrance while burning. -British Med- j
ical Journal.
can not bo said
identified,
1 ,
EARLY ENGLISH MELODY.
The Kind of Song'» Siiiijj in the Halcyon
Days of Minstrelsy.
The earliest specimens of English
National melody
in the now v
'•Sumner i.» a c< •
•e believe to be fourni
1-known
! i
it 63
about 1:
Ono n
j
part song for
p'meats wj
j men. but it is
I that this was
Mr
ial
led
an
! national
j the custom of the time as a ba
s f.
I
Its
i bar mon v
is pu
!
ral.
Ui
• i' a
P' 1 '
a TV i
the
must l
! which i
[eed is O!
ith tl
j
:
| tioj.al muse
Na
I me
attain
It is
j mi)Mn , u wh( .
! ,
the time of "ï
:
•e to d<*ai
ith the harper
prov
d in
reded and fob
ummer is
cornu
in.
,s, no doubt, held a
intores
j position.
j being suing by them; b
art has conic d<
the
:
I
j
if printing in Eu:
i tablishment
as the
signal for their dccadci
nu
cd to care to listel
h,
yarns
mg
| little
' "Garland
fur thei:
I
1
|
!
i to sa v that in th
of
ent
prom in
and important
ic: nr
. ment waf
( rd nan
have h
j
;
!
I ni**st li
ent s
flute,
and
Abut:
he
d in tie- wor
vhich both Bunn
-li
most important characters
ith
in* skill in
it cd
music.
• f the day.
testifying h
The min-tivl's dress, v.
fashion
later a
Kendal
courtesies he cleared bis voice w
hem wiped his lips with tin* hole
Ti i s hand, tc
with his wi
warbling on his harp for pro!ml
forth with a si
know that tin* minstrels
it
•after thro«
■ t.
a
'cedinglv. ' iml"<-d. t
toward the end of Elizabeth'.» :
!gtl.
as a!readv far :
vlicn their de
m-had «1
of Par
adopted the calling tha
Lament was obliged to bo pa»»ed de
ciding that minstrels wandering abroad
rabonds and sturdy
an act
iv rogui
be punished as such."—
beggars, t.
Murray's Magazi
Refurnishing a Small Parlor.
valnut and
Stain your lb
get a rug of mixed c
material you can afford. Those of
American make imitating Persian rugs
are good, and
if as muel
the walls v\ ith a medium shade of olive (
green, with small pattern of a darker
shade of the same eolor.
harmonize with the w
v i 11
)st more than.
as. a Brussels carp t. Paper
This
ad-work. Y 1
• u r
walls are too low for a frieze, but von
mi!;ht hivvo :l wim pl- l,o, d
col()r u , an , ho fi ,/ M
|
j
• of a ligbt-T
a
s j
In your
have sash curtains of India 0
vimb
:• Per
silk of a soft shade of yelk
curtains of Madras muslin
light olive-greenish tone. Youre"n
shelf may l>o ebonized as y»
with the addition of a curtain <>f IVr
silk running on a nan
g» st.
;
I
Turcoman striped portiere would do :
>er\ well if judiciously selected. liy
and get one with olive ground ,
stripes of deop blue. red. old gold j
white, with perhaps a thread of gold j 0
running through. Throw i
of harmonizing colors over
rod. matching the sash curtains.
A
l
j
I
sightly sofa, if you 0;
your mind to remove it fr
Cover the rush-bottomed arm-chai
I with tho rich dark stuff resembling old
i tapestry which comes in quaint de
signs; this is better than the spun silk
you suggested. Cover the small chair
with "old gold" plush and ebonize tho
frame. Do not think of such a thing
as painting your "ginger-jar." Leave
it as it is. Put a few peacock feathers
in it. and stand it on your corner-shelf.
-—Art Amateur.
an not mnko up j
' ' 11 e room.
.
j
France, with n population of .IS,
(00,000, uses ns much wheat bread us
the United blutes with (13.000,000.
FULL OF FUN.
Rat!-;
vhat struck y<
during
B
a grin th:r
Pro*,.
— If th.
from the a
nf
•re intelligen
in the hi"
• r bran
right e 1
U*r finds it sorry v •
Bingham'"!! lh ;• '■
Mins Ethel,
little
< t<
V h < I
in
••N"
['.•••I
\Mincr\a
1 ,
h-ard t!.a'
•T..V.M U ••
M. -- W
••I
Mr V
I w 11 iX: ' ■ M'.»» \Y
■ il
in XeV'
Mt N
nu
l : .
• a M : v
Hat .
W v
g 11 a L
it to In
I
• W- ..
Lin't "
«1
leave court t(»j<
an. 1 ti'ii»' '.
Hnr
An Interesting Industry.
Making
:» one o!
the
man,
about on
*
( jm
The
into !
another large
i'd Hirsh
trod'
lb
t Six
.
a nunm. v
j gland.
Bri
day.
very
It
that pig s
; but it is too much Inn;
I save it. 1
evaporates :
: n ,,
Nome of it i»
, 8ome dark, aeoording to the cl
j 0 f
lit in color, and
it.
treatment :
dried blood a
thei
en
* ready 10 be
I up. am
us shapes and sizes. Not
j are buttons
mad" from V».
fais
•aw but tons of oar-rings, breastpin».
and trinkets a
j belt-clasps, coml
annually there from b!
Phrenological ») ournai.
d
made
In Fashionable Society.
hard to find
"Is there any tiling
ns a needle in it IniyMnek? In: said,
lliir.Ii nf meteoric brill
vith a suddet
iance.
"Yes,'
iled, Hoftly, "it is
she rests
liuystie • inn
quite as lined to
Did you ever try to tint! . hay.
needle,
stuck in u noodle. Mr.
iugtun Crltlo.

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