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New farmer. (Winona, Miss.) 18??-1???, May 14, 1890, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88067115/1890-05-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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To
son
ing
we
we
our
Announcements,
-0
We are authorized to announce
Hon. C. L. Andebson
as a candidate for re-election to Congress
from the 5th district, subject to the action
of the Democratic party.
We are authorized to announce
Hon. G. A. Wilson
of Holmes county as a candidate for Con -
gress from the 5th district, subject to the
action of tho Democratic party.
It HOTHEß BROWN'S VIEWS.
He wants to Dispose or the Surplus In
tlio United States Treasury.
To (he Editor of Tho New Farmer:
l see many propositions to dispose
of the surplus in the U. S. Treasu
ry. My plan would be to donate
$10,000,000 more or less, owing to
population, as a special school fund;
let the principal ever remain and
only use the interest on same, each
State to have control of said fund.
Let it be divided among tho counties
in proportion to educable children
or population, such money to be
loaned on real estate security, and
only to actual settlers at a lawful
per cent., and let such interest be
used for school purposes only.
This plan would greatly increase
the facilities for education, and
would put at once $400,000,000 in
circulation, or about $7 per capita.
Pass tho silver bill and sub-treas
ury bill and we will have money
plenty, and with our free school
system, we, in the near future, can
boast of a free America in the true
sense of the word.
ing
a
' to
i
M. A. Bkovx.
B ai ley, Mi;
'
"Tlie Lecturer."
Owing to t he falso education of |
producers in regard to economical j
questions which touch their inateri
al interest, ' The Lecturer" holds,
perhaps, the most important office
of our order. I fc being his special
province to aid in the destruction of
those relics of barbarism, those an
cient idols whereby the many are
enslaved for the benefit of the few;
as also to teach the brethren the su
perior advantages of a currency
based upon the real wealth of the
nation, and made the only legal ten
der for debts and taxes; and to
show them that their first duty to
themselves, to their children to
their brethren, is a true allegiance
to the principles of our order, upon
the success of which the prosperity
of the country depends.
Now, seeing that so great a
weight hangs upon this office, the
organs of the order cannot do a
better work for themsel ves or for
the order than to stir up these, their
most efficient aids, to the proper
discharge of their official duties.—
J. II. Robertson, Mt. Vinco, Va , in
the National Economist.
,
.
Hill N ye on tlio Grippe.
Ah! the grippe! the grippe! We've
sure enough had it. It needs no in
troduction. You will know it when
it grips you For ten days our limbs
were converted into a tram road
over which the locomotive of this
dreadful disease passed, using our
head for its bumper, finally side
tracking us at the junction of pros
tration, and left us feasting on Bill
Nye's soothing restorative which is:
Little grains of quinine,
Little drinks of rye,
Make lagrippe that's got you
Drop its hold and fly.
This may quickly help you,
If you'll only try;
But don't forget the quinine
When you take the rye."
To the Editor of The New Farmer;
In reply to J. H. McGehee I will
agree with him in some of his selec
tions for delegates from the State at
large, hut I ask him, and all good
citizens to pick oat good clean men
from all classes whose past reputa
tion is without blemish and select
no man who has sold his birth-right
for a mess of porrige. It has been
said that if we are not careful in our
selections the Louisiana State Lot
tery will be moved to Mississippi.
The love of money is the root of all
evil.
..
F. M. Walker.
Topisaw, Miss.
Brotner Raynor's Appeal.
To tho Editor of The New Farmer:
I nm a subscriber to our paper. The rea
son I say "our" is that I think every alliance
man ought to take it, as well as every labor
ing man in tho State, for it is advocating his
oatfse and trying to help build him up. If
we do Dot rend our own literature, how can
we expect to be able to secure our rights?
Fut your shoulder to the wheel and keep
pushing. Wo must know what is going on,
and what paper can we rely on so well as
our own ?
There is a great deal of talk about tho con
vention. I hope we will get none but good
people to represent us, and I trust we may
never regret changing the old Constitution.
B. J. Raynee.
1
New Albany. Mis*.
TWINKLINGS.
A good sized sinking fund will help to
keen a corporation afloat.—Epoch.
The victims of tight lacing furnish strik
ing examples of waistedlives.—Washington
Post.
Political Economy.—''Never buy any more
votes than you absolutely need."—Washing
ton Post.
"That is a speaking likeness of your wife,
Gnrrill."
"It couldn't he any kind of a likeness if it
wasu'l.— N. Y. Sun.
Toro Tucker—Why is a kiss like a ser
mon ?
.Tack Horner—Because it requires two
heads and an application.—Boston Herald.
On a tomb in a Blairville, Pa., cemetery
may bo read this curious epitaph: "A.
B——— was a good son, a loving husband,
a fond father, an able lawyer, but an honest
man."
Smart Pupil—You say there is hair ou all
parts of the human body. Now, is there
any on the heart?
Professor—Yes, a kind of a down. You
must have seen people who were downheart
ed.— N. Y. Herald.
Mrs. John McWilliams, a Nebraska wife,
petitions Ibo court to restrain her lawful
husband "from patting her on the head,
poking her in the ribs and talking habv talk
' to her."
i Women as a rule are behind tho age. Of
'
| Women as n rnle are bobiud lho og o. Of
j course it is not necessary to mention whoso
v '~
a
They fail to mention it themselves,
and in this they certainly don't claim even
as much as they are entitled to.
, »RO
\Y hysliouKl not tlio Government Loan
to 1,'armors;
Ou tho subject of loans to farmers by tho
national Government, Lecturer Mortimer
Whitehead of tho National Grange says:
How many huudreds of millions of dollars ,
has our government loaned to nnother class
"of tho people" to help thorn build railroads
that are now too ofteu used to oppress the
farmers?
It simply makes a difference who is doing
1'. S. Senator Stanford, of California,
has within a fow days introduced this mat
ter in (he Senate, and tho world moves and
farmers are awaking and commencing (o
move with it.
"All citizens shall be equal before the law,"
says our National Constitution, and that
means finauce lows, tariff laws, and all laws.
Let us think on these things.
To this the Prairie Former of Chicago re
plies: "Tho Prairie Farmer asserts, on
broad grounds, that the government should
not go into the business of loauiug money
at all; certainly not to one class to tlio ex
clusion of others."
Wo should like (o have an explanation
from the P. F. on two points; why should
not the government loan money; and if it
loans to thoso who invest their money in
bonds why should it not loan to thoso who
have their means invested in land?
The custom of all organized governments
is to take charge of tho whole scheme of fi
nance. It issues the money and controls
and regulates it in all regards, permitting no
individual to have anything to do with it,
and since it so controls and regulates, and
can make or mar individual fortunes ac
cording as it expands or contracts the cur
rency, why should it not assume the further
function of loaning, and thus put itself in a
position to afford relief to those who are li
able to suffer loss from the government ma
nipulation of the national finances?
As lo not loaning money to one class to tho
exclusion of another, that is just what this
government has been doing for a quarter of
a century, and now we want to see the other
class havo a show. But oven if the gov
ernment's loaning of money was confined to
one class, and that class the farmers who
own their own farms, such a system would
result in great benefit, because upon the
prosperity of the farmers depends that of
every other class. If farmers have plenty
of money every other business in tho coun
try, even that of banking, flourishes. No
sane man ought to bo opposed to such "class
legislation," if it may be so called, as would
redound to the general good.—Ex.
8500 .
How often we have heard our
friends say they would give that
amount if they only had a photo
of some deceased relative. Don't
put it off any longer. Go right
down to S. B. Terry's studio, south
end Front Row, and have yours
taken.
.
ii.
at
our
all
THREE-YEAR-OLD'S IDEA OF KISSES.
I showered upon his dimpled cheeks
Sly kisses by tho score.
Then hugged my darling to my heart.
And stole somo twenty more.
He did not murmur or oppose.
But still and passive laid;
In thoughtful mood he asked me then:
"Of what are kisses made}''
"I cannot tell you, precious One.
Just make a few yourself.
Perhaps you then cun answer, dear.
Your query, you sweet elf.'*
Up came two ruby, rosy lips.
On neck, and check, and brow,
Ho-tnado some kisses; then said 1,
"All. can't you answer now?"
With thoughtful mien and winning smile,
lie turned his eyes above,
Thon said, "Why, mamma dear, I fink,
They're made, just made of love."
—Ladies' Home Journal.
nig wolf.
Young Cant. Nelso Vallcaux.a youth
between 15'and 10 years of age, per
formed a feat that stands unrivaled in
the history of prairie exploits. Mount
ed on his trusty and sure footed Mon
1 tana horse he essayed to capture ''
tho lariat an immense gray won.
Twice tho beast's neck was encircled
by the rawhide lariat and twice tho
animal's sharp teeth severed the
strands as the young horseman was at
tempting to disable the savage beast.
The third time Noise caught the young
wolf around the middle of the body
and started on a run, dragging it near
tlio edge of a cut bank until lio tum
bled it o\. r tho edge. Nclse then held
tho wolf suspended in the air over tho
edge of the cut bank by fastening the
rope to tho pommel of the saddle. He
then dismounted and stoned the ani
mal to death, the well trained horse
standing perfectly still during the
operation.—Fort fie a ton Press.
Common Suit for Neuralgia.
It is not generally known that com
mon salt is an admirable remedy for
neuralgia. Dr. George Leslie gives
details of thirty or forty cases of facial
and other neuralgias, odontalgia, etc.,
which have been cured, in most in
stances instantaneously, by the in
sufllatiou of common salt. Tho salt
was cither "snuffed" or blown up tho
nostrils. He said he had been unsuc
cessful in only two cases;
these were eases of old standing, which
had been treated frequently by mor
phine injections.—New York Com
mercial Advertiser.
nolilng
n
e
at
45
both of
Was Oolitic.
«1 ml:r
The Armenians, who believe bell
and limbo to be the same place, say
Judas, after having betrayed tlicLord,
resolved to hang himself because ho
knew tlint Christ was to go to limbo
J. deliver all the souls that ho found
there. J ie thought by killing himself
io limbo in time tobe released
with lho other wrong doers, but the
devil, knowing his intent, hold him
over limbo until the Lord had passed
through, and let him fall into the
ub\
,
it
a
li
of
to
the
of
No
our
an
t >
dicll) below.- St. Louis Ih.qiub
ne.
I
ig liimk.
i:
a
The most singular material for book
making is proposed by Professor Cas
tagiiatta, and partially carried out by
Professor Pnrkham, of Brunswick.
J lis idea was to make, a book indestruc
tible by printing in gold or silver let
ters upon thin leaves of asbestos, the
binding to be <»f a thicker sheet of cs
Noitlier time nor tire could
bestos.
have any effect upon a volume of this
kind, and it might well merit the title
of "the book of eternity."—New York
Tel
■ram.
Knulish IVoplo Clmngiiitf Color.
There is no question that the Eng
lish people, as a whole, arc darkening
fast. This is duo to the influence of
town life. In country districts "lint
white" children succeed to lint white
parents; but they drift more and more
to tlio great centers, where in the sec
ond generation they become brown
and in the third or fourth develop those
mongrel hues which distinguish a
city population. And this means that
they* deteriorate.—St. James Gazette.
, Chapped Hands anil Taps.
Chapped hands and lips are a com
mon complaint. The best preparation
I ever found for the hands is: Three
ounces of lemon juice, three ounces of
white wine vinegar and one-half pint
of white brandy. For the lips: Oil of
roses, four ounces; ono ounce white
wax, and of spermaceti one-half an
ounce. Melt in a glass vessel and stir
with a wooden spoon. Pour into a
china cup or glass.—M. E. Cousin's
Letter.
Proof by Flower*.
"If every human being in the
American continent were to be taken
out of existence," said the late Pro
fessor Asa Gray, "and the whole work
of his hands were cleared away, so
tha^ no trace remained, subsequent
historians could prove that the Cau
casian race existed by the flowers that
would be found growing here."—Chi
cago Times.
Wliat Pri
Rev. Di. Primrose—God will re
ward your having deterred your hus
band from fighting that duel. It was a
true Christian act.
Mrs. Saintly—Yes, my husband is
an awful bad shot.—Epoch.
A Brute.
"This bread of yours, my deal', is a
contradiction of the laws of gravity."
"Indeed?"
"Yes. It's as heavy as lead, but it
won't go down."—Chatter.
ipted He-.
!
A
7<
r/
GO
CjO
ÜlP
CO
;oc
i
if 3
reel fliese
& ft
: That's what we mean, ana here arc facte and figures that
will compel you, in seif-defense, io hand over your greenbacks
to^iis. [Prices that iell their own tale of Cheapness, -
ROARING. RATLING, ROt'PIXG BARGAINS,
which the man who secs will surely seize:
n
e
Men's extra wide brim wool hats
at 70c. worth $1.25.
Men's extra wide brim black fur
50 at $1.40.
hats worth
Men's unlaundritd shirts 30,
;0
45 & 50c.
Men's fine dm
1.60, 1.75 A 1.05.
Ladies' vests 10c each and up.
Men's suits $2.60 and up.
White pearl dress buttons 2-4e
dozen.
Torchon Lace 10 &. 15 cis per
dozen yards.
New Van Dyke f.aco 2-4c per yd
and up.
Real linen hand-made torchon
shoes at $1.40,
lace 3, 4, 5 & 10c yd.
Torchon lace 3, 4, 5 A 10c yd.
S. A. Hammons & Co.
& 3 -VBMU
prrrx.vr
GEORGIA
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
RICHMOND d CAMILLE RAILROAD CO. ;

DiVJSiOH
—T1IE CHEAT—
SOUTHERN TRUN5C UWE. ,
DIIIECT IlOUTE—
EAST „-^21X33 "CA7'J353 , Z'.
tending irom tho Totomae to the Mis
sissippi. I rum Washington. U. ''. und
Kit Innond, Va., to Greenville. Miss,
and Arkansas Uiiy, Ark.
—EMBItACIXO— .
Atlanta, lailapoosn, Anniston, Birmingham, :
Columbus. .Miss., West Point, Winona, j
Greenwood, Elizabeth and
Greenville.
:
Forming the short lino betweeu these
points ami
TEXAS, LOUISIANA, ARKANSAS AND THE
GREAT WEST. ALSO j
Now York, Philadelphia I
AINU Till! , 1C A ST.
I
I
For maps, time cards, rates, etc., apply to
any agont of tho Georgia Pacifia Kailway or
connecting roads. _ _
SOL. HAAS. 8. H. HARDWICK,
Traltto Manager, G en' 1 Pass. Agent,
Jlirminnham. Alabama.
I
WASHINGTON -i- SEMINARY,
ATLANTA, GA.,
Boarding and Day School for Girls. The
MUSIC SCHOOL is under the Direction of
Alfredo Barili.
MRS. BAYLOR STEWART.
Principal.
MayG 6m]
APPLES,
SOUTHERN

lOO VaBIETIESJ
A fine supply, especially.fall and winter
kinds, well grown trees.
PEACHES—Fifty kinds, incl uding lat
PEARS—A full selection, including Le
Conte, Kieffer. etc.
PLUMS—In variety, including Wild
Goose, Marianna, Kelsey's, Japan, etc.
Also Apricots, Nectarines, Figs, Quinces,
Grapes, Strawberries, Raspberries, Black
berries. Fine Roses and Flowering Plants.
BB"Orders from reliable parties booked
now for foil delivery. Apply to
W. 11. CASSELL,
Canton, Miss.
Oct 2 tf l
Lace pillow shams 2-5e per pair.
Chair tidies 2-5 & 35c each.
Neck i uching, 34c per 3 'd and up.
Indies linen cuffs, 5c pair.
Victoria lawn, 5, 74 & 10c yard.
Silk veiling, 10c per yd.
Boy s suspenders, 5c pair.
Luee bed sets, $1.20 per sot.
Ladies' trimmed hats at 70, 75e.
1.00, 1.40 A $1.75 up.
Corset steels, 4 hooks, 24c.
Bone collar buttons 34c doz.
Nickel time clocks, 00c.
Whisk broom holders 15c each.
Beautiful brass music or paper
holders, 45c each.
Brass mirror hat racks, 45c each.
Table oilcloth, 14, 20 et 25c yd.
Iiair curlers, 10c each.
EAT TRUNK LINE
BETWEE& TKc
NORTH AND SOUTH.
Tha Shortest and Quickest Route
—TO—
JACKSON,
VICKSBURG.
NEW ORLEANS,
And All Poinis in the Southwest.
Pill, MA H PALACE SLEEPING CAES
RUN THROUGH DAILY BETWEEN
New Orleans and Chicago, St. Louis,
Memphis and Kansas City.
Tlio Great - teel Bridge spanning the Ohio
height'
Ä"" 110 *" 0 "
Fust Time, Sure Connections. Fino Equip
ment. Splendid Eating Houses, All Steel
Track, Well Ballasted ltoadway, aro
some of tlio advantages ottered
passengers by this
I GREAT THROUGH LINE.
I A. H. HANSON,
Gen. Fass. Agt,
Chicago.
i. W. COLEMAN.
Ass't G. P. Agent,
New Orléans.
RAILROAD TIMETABLE.
I
HOW THE TRAINS PASS WINONA
ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD
NORTH
No 2—St Louis Express
9;27 p m
No 4—Chicago and N O Express 3:34 a m
No 8—Local Accommodation
12:39 p m
SOUTH
No 1—-St Louis Express
No 3— N O and Chicago Express 10:17 p m
11:58 a m
12:39 p m
No 7—Local Accommodation
. All trains run daily, except No's 7 and 8.
Which do not run on Sunday,
J W COLEMAN. A G P A,
New Orleans, La,
P A Dulin, Agent,
Winona Miss
GEOBGIA PACIFIC JRAILROAD
WEST
No 52—Fast Mail, passes
No 4.0—Greenville Ac'm'n leaves 6:10 a m
EAST
No53—Fast Mail passes
No 41—GreenvilleAc'm'n arrives 7:35 p m
For tickets and information apply to
F B CLEMENTS, Agent,
Winona. Miss,
4:46 p m
10:43 a m
The Old Schedule.
The photograph gallery of S. B.
Terry is still in the lead for fine
South end Front
photographs.
Row.

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