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The Ocala banner. (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.) 1883-194?, April 03, 1891, Image 3

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ALLIANCE DEPARTMENT.
U. n I.YTLE, A. r. BASKIN, M. I.
PAYNE, Editing Committee.
ALLIANCE D l RECTOR V.
omcerts <I - the National Alliance
anti lmiustt'ial Union.
L L. Polk, North Carolina.
first Vice-President B. H. Clover Kansas
vice Presidents—Mississippi, B. T. I ove: North
i aroliua, 8. B. B. Alexander; Alabama, H P
l one; Louisiana, I,inn Tann; Arkansas W 11
Moore ; Kentucky, 8. B Krwin; Missouri a‘ b'
Johnson; Tennessee, J. H, McDowell: Texas'
M. i>. K. Taylor; Florida,Oswald Wilson. ’
Secretary ; j. H. Turner. Georgia.
Treasurer 'V . H. IHckman, Missouri.
chaplain .J. c. Jones, Lonisina.
Lecturer . B en Terrell, Texas.
Assistant Lecturer I. A. Tctts, Louisiana.
Doorkeeper I. N. Gresham, Alabama.
Assistant Poorkeejicr H. C. llrowiK Kentuekv
Sergeant-at-arms T. K. Groome, Mississippi.
OFFICEISS OF THE FLORIDA ALLIANCE.
President ..R. K. Rogres, of Ruwauec
Vico President I). W. Adams, of Orange;
secretary A. P. Baskin, of Marion.
I reasurer C. 8. Young, of Citrus.
Lecturer... 11. w. Long, of Marion.
Assistant Lecturer J. 1). Wolfe, of Escambia.
< heplatii ...11. C. Martin, of Marion
Doorkeeiar •• j. j. Carlton, of Taylor
Assistant Doorkeeper C, IL Baker, cf Baker.
Special Notice.
Notice is hereby given that the Farm
e>s’ Alliance will meet in the Masonic
hall, in the Gary building, on Fatuftlav
tlie lliii and 25th of this month, and
every member of our order is not only
respectfully requested hut urged to meet
with iiie brethren on those days.
\\ e have matters of interest that deep
ly concerns every farmer ana laborer
coming before m at our meetings.
\V e hi.ve brethren in the legislature
w ho wish to hear from us and know our
wishes on legislative matters. It is our
duty, privilege and interest to take
counsel together and send up our con*.
■ ■•nitrated views that our brother legis
liios i ay govern themselves accord
ingly.
We have taken upon ourselves a bitiil
■obligation to meet, counsel and work
together for the mutual benefit of our
< iikr and the promotion of the interest
■ i our !;il ors and the good of our
< ountry.
We have assumed a herculean task of
■ ('trend.ment and reform in govern
ment;.! matters by remedying and correct
ir the existing evils and wrongs that
have been perpetrated upon the toilers,
..nd almost prostrated tho agricultural
ir.duslry, by class legislation to the bene
n of the few and the detriment, of the
many.
We have also undertaken to firmly
!' ant. and vigorously maintain the fun
: imentai principles of our order—equal
vlits to all special favors to none.
All the.-it! things we can do if we will
• un.-el together and be true to our
■•■der and true to our country, ourselves
. i;d our God.
We are anxious to greet and be greeted
■ c. :r next and ail succeeding meetings
by .v full attendance of warm, generous,
ue and noble hearted Alliancemen.
T. the slumbering coals will again
; indie am! the fire burn brightly as of
me. Allianceman.
The Sub-Treasury Plan.
We e iiinjeuee this week a series of
. ti-Ics on the sub-triasury plan—cx-
II n<! s from good authorities—from men
ho have ;l.i interest o I the people
, n tmdly at heart. We publish the
ame ’.•■< ause we think it our duty to
; !ar.- be.'o: •• cur readers a good and
sound i . ’ f . ihe ‘faith that is in us.”
Too mi’ -Teasury .-. heme is a measure
. h pled v.;;d ieeommended after serious
thought by the Grand Council, compris
ing the Farmers’ Alliance and Industrial
i ni not St. Louis and again at Ocala,
at. ! bv almost every sub-AHiance in the
U. and Stater It is a measure we are.
not ashamed of, and one that deserves,
had, a thorough investigation, by all
fair minded men. It is a measure of re
lict from one class and for another class
of citizet who form the base and are
!he corner stone to all wealth. It is a
measure ami kin to oilier measures of
vital inten .■; ; a majority of the people.
It is n measure we think much misrep
resented by a certain class of politicians
who strain at a gnat ahe) swallow a
camel, who call it unconstitutional to
build warehouses for the poor farmer and
vet vole two hundred million dollars tg,
help very iieh capitalists to build a Nie
iraugna canal; a measure misunderstood
by a class of good citizens, honest in
their opinions, and to this class in par
ticular we address ourselves and ask a
careful petusal and study of the extracts
presented. i..
Farm, Stock and Home.
There has Been a Change
I'anneis of lb • United States are at
. Utkin; an interest in politics at the
light on ! of llio political campaign.
Herwoforo, when they liad voted they
completed their share of the duty that
ritiz-'ichip'm; ; sand look 110 further
nib. tin matters political until the
: u.n: campaign, with its party ticket to
ini'v. :tli Mien song the farmer to the
i• h . Rut now the situation is radically
•-3J- i.59 after political campaigns,
it the time when politicians, capitalists
.md quasi s' de.nnen expect the farmer
‘ hack to his acres, his cows and his
if nips, foigdful of politic, and every
dug pertaining thereto, behold! ho rc
nnins in the field as active, aggressive,
earnest and enthusinstic :c ever.
Vv'hat does it mean? lt means that j
• irm imlf the voting strength of the
■ "•nntry, propose henceforth 10 have
2. 'bin : to s y about how government
ba:i he min; tliey are henceforth going
| lake an interest in the matter 365
■'rt --in a year. And every really good
cipzen is clad of it, for it means a more
; litahly distributed prosperity and
lighter sunshine fur 4 he masses, ?e
--g.i id less <d their avocation.
ii'irul New Vorkcr.
An Income Tax.
•Iu fou mors’ Alliance of Illinois has
out Ld!dly in favor of a graduated
' m. tax. The idea is spreading like
lir,.* among tho farmers of the.
• ’ry. Is is notorious that over 75
c-.-nt. of the internal taxes of the
1 ,9 is paid by real estate, although
uiiisof 11 operty are about equally
lablc in the aggregate. Our present
-unfairly help the rich get richer;
!. shouldn’t they compel them to
■ 1 :cmlcr to the public treasury a part of
Uv pi cider they have accumulate 1 by
partial legislation, and thus help to
• ;ua!i e taxation, now so outrageously
I. foist to the holders of the soil? The
• iicf objection appears to be that while
tl: • honest would pay the dishonest
would, even at tho cost of perjury,
• L> it. Stringent laws would mini
'•n ■ this evil.
IV following resolution was passed
by the! muse of representatives in the
"late of Kansas.
it , Tlvt ills gold aud silver Uallara aud half
1 i- coined by the United States shall be and
- : ;ie ar. hereby declared to be a full legal
l r for all debts and dues made and entered
;u!<> by any persons, corporation, company or co
irutership within this slate, and all contracts
'.•.cully made ami entered into by any party
parties in violation of this acts, whose con
".l sarc to be enforced under the laws of this
'.iii', arc hereby prohibited and sball be void
fhi is good states right doctrine._ It
itulepi orient of the millionaire United
> ate.- senate. A little mure of the same
ci of legislation will make these gold
' ''s.'s iH homo genus regard the wishes of
Ihe people rs so clearly expressed last
November. So forget not the ides of
November. “Hayseed” is patient long
suffering, slow to* move, but wake him
up and then he is indeed a power behind
the throne.
■ • Memphis, Mo., Farmers’ Union
.iv: •• fhe Missouri legislature have in
-- i the Ocala platform with the ex
, ep;:: i;f the Milt-treasury clause aud
tin c::;,,-c relating to government con
ti. lof railroads. The legislature might
.is well have denounced the entire plat
-1 nii." Upon which the National Kcon
' :n:c, muients as follows: “Iff®
,’t .ve holds good everywhere. The two
id parties are willing loconcede to such
as can be manipulated to seem
•ue ono thing and mean another. But
hen it comes to a frank, open reform
. ure that can only boused fo( one
; pose, and that oho "a source of benefit
to labor in production, the result, is the
tame as shown by the Missouri legisla
ture Tha next legislature in. that stale
will pass a different resolution, without
doubt, as the Allance is about done wi li
rmh treat men 1.
Put not yor trust in princes, nor lis
t 11 ;dways to the voice of the charmer.
And vet the the vilest sinner may_ re
turn, but received only on probation,
:tt:d then after many days trial.
ALLIANCE DEPARTMENT.
Mr. Goss Revicwes Messrs. Spencer
amt “MV Article on Legisla
tion.
j It is truly gratifying to see the inter?
I pt Dr. Blitch is taking in the people he
} has the honor to represent. He is ask
j jug their aid in suggesting such changes
in the laws as they deem proper in the
general interest of economy and reform
by lightening and more equally distrib
uting the burdens of taxation; and it is
none the less gratifying to see such able
and advanced thinker as Messrs. Spencer
and “M” coming to to the front and pre
senting their views on this important
matter of retrenchment and reform in
legislation.
Mr. Spencer savs, and it is true, that
economy rests with the legislative de
partment and not so much with the ju
diciary and executive. It is therefore
most important department cf the gov
ernment, and the one from which re
form must first come. He further pays
taxes should never sacrifice the conven
ience of the many to the luxury of the
few. A few county ofiiciais should not
receive from $3,000, to SIOOOO per au
uum whilst the burden of taxation is
heavy upon the many who receive less
than sooo per annum for equally as ar
duous and less desirous work. This is
not only wrong in theory but it is an in
cubator of corrupt methods. “M” has
wisely suggested that adequate falaries
be allowed and the excess turned into
the treasury.
The unwise law against gambling in
its operation was fully illustrated by Mr.
bpeneer; and he might with equal force
have illustrated the useless and im
proper law against carrying concealed
weapons. In its operation it only bene
fits the prosecuting attorney to the fi
nancial injury of the state without
taining tbe_ evil. It produces stealthy
cunning with one class of men, anil
reckless daring with the other. Many
of the latter class in the labor camps
and sometimes on the streets carry
.Winchesters openly (allowed by law)
and as this law is enforced against the
weaker class, ere long I fear hundreds
of men will be armed with these deadly
weapons. The enforcement of the law
against those who unlawfully use these
concealed weapons will do more to abate
the evil eflect than all tlie laws against
carrying them.
Mr. Spencer has properly suggested a
change in the convict prison system.
Something should be done in that re
spect. Could not all of each county’s
convicts be worked in their county upon
the public roads especially where
counties have an annual average of eight
or more convicts aud thereby save five
or six thousand dollars annually and be
uuder the watchful care of those who feel
an interest in them. Would not that lie
both economy and humanity?
“M” is right in other suggestions such
as allowing attorneys’ fees in suits
wherein it is stipulated; it is bad policy
and works great injustice and hardship
to the. weak and unfortunate defendants
in mortgage and other similar suits.
Qur present jury system must be re
moddled. It is now but little better
I than a sort of special license to those
able to pay attorneys to commit the
highest crimes known to the law with
impunity. Twenty pre-emptory chal
lenges and challenges for causes virtu
ally gives defendants tho selection of
bis jury or at least enough to prevent a
verdict, though the proof of his guilt is
beyond a reasonable doubt. Hence the
lawless riots arid killing in Gainesville,
Atlanta, Cincinnatti, New Orleans and
other places. The court should be em
powered with the aid of competent com
missioners furnishing the names of
proper person from which to select and
furnish an impartial jury to try all
cases. “M” is away off in the matter of
mileage and per dim allowed witnesses
and jurors, their mileage should not be
reduced; the per dim of jurors should
not be less than two dollars, that would
not pay expences and nothing for loss
of time. The idea of farmers without
adequate pay for expenses aiding the
court on patriotism would apply with
better grace to some of the high salaried
officials.
“M” might with propriety have said
the law of marriage license should be
changed.
Where is tho wisdom or policy, in ex
acting taxes for doing that which so
much conduces to the moral upbuilding
of a people and bettering the condition
of stale and church than marriages?
They should be encouraged not embar
goed, premiums offered, not taxes
levied. A sworn certificate by the per
son authorized to perform the marriage
ceremony, with two attesting witnesses,
giving their names in full, ages, height
complexion, nativity and nationality;
their parents and near blood relations,
their names, etc, this to be properly re
corded in the probate’s office and paid
out of the public funds aud a reasonable
fee to the person performing the cere
mony and making out the certificate.
This would be a useful improvement
and better to all excepting the official
who receives under our present law two
dollars for tiling a blank license or per
mit to marry.
I desire to call your attention to an
other very important matter affecting
the stability and perpertuity of our in
stitutions that can be measurably reme
died by legislation. The reckless man
ner in which the homes of the people
are being taken from them by “Shy
locks” under force sales which tjie peo
| pie are powerless to prevent, and they
i hivve no legal remedy to recover, no law
to stay or soften the merciless blows as
they fall from the hands of'.greed and
avrice upon their homes. Thus left
homeless with a dependent family with
out any remedy to recover, hope gives
way to despair, local attachments, pride,
self-respect, love of country, changes to
indifference; they soon become tramps.
Communism takes the ‘place of patriot
ism; the tinge of anarchy soon develops
and they soon become reckless, defiant
and riotous, ready to co-operate with
aad aid the worst elements that infest
the great cities, mining and manufac
turing districts.
The law in the interest of public pol
icy outside of the higher considerations
of humanity should be changed so that
property sold under forced sales could be
redeemed by the owner, heirs or assigns
within two years by paying only costa
and lawful! interest on the amount of
the sale.
J. D. Goss.
Texas all Bight on the Snh-Treas
ury Bill.
Read the following:
At a recent meeting of the fourth con
gressional district of Texas, held at Sul
phur Springs, the following was passed
unanimously:
Resotred, That this, the Northeast Texas Dis
trict Alliance, in session assembled, in tbe city of
Sulphur Springs, indorse in full the Ocala plat
form and the sub-treasury MU, and a copy be
sent to D, B Culberson demanding him to accept
the same and do all in his power to have it en
acted into law.
The sub-treasury promises to give the
producer a chance' to get something near
the value of his products. What chance
has he under the present system of getting
it? Yet some fools stand up and argue
against it and still offer no substitute.—
Sulphur Springs ( Tex.) ALianee Vindicator
President Parkinson, of the Wisconsin
State Agricultural Society, in a recent
annual address spoke upon the subject
of “Tbe Farmer in Politics.” Mr. Park
inson held to the belief that one of the
farmer’s first duties was to be a thorough
politician and use his utmost efforts
politically to the suppression of evils in
politics and the production of higher
principles an I better goverumer.t iu the
interest of the masses. He warned
farmers of the danger arising from the
grasping of land by monopolies and cen
tralization of the wealth of the country,
made possible by unjust legislation. He
predicted that unless tlie legislation in
the interest of the masses was soon had,
iuilf of the wealth of the country would
be controlled by ten thousand men by
tho end of twenty-five years. He urged
the election of farmers tu state legisla
tures and to congress, and deplored the
fact that there were scarcely enough
farmers in congress to eors itute an agri
cultural committee.
There are 2309 sub-Unions in the
Farmers’ Alliance and Industrial Union
I in Kentucky, with a total membership
Sof 125,000.' W’hat is the matter with
Florida ? Wake up farmers and laborers
of our beautiful peninsular, and show
our friends abroad that you haw cour
age to face our enemies and demand our
rights. Be freemen and acquit your
selves as such.
ALLIANCE DEPARTMENT.
The Farmers’ Movement.
A writer iu the American Farm News,
who lives at Topeka, Kans., among
other things has the following to say ic
garding the farmers’ movement;
“The political upheaval of Kansas is
frequently referred to as a revolution,
but it may more pronerly be said to be
an evolution of public sentiment. The
formative influences of the movement
have long been in operation in the
minds of the paople*anfi at last they
have taken shape in the state and, made
themselves manifest in the late election
in which the 80,000 republican majority
was utterly wiped out. History does
not show a more complete and sudden
revulsion of public opinion in-so brief a
time. Naturally people who think,
here as well as elsewhere, are asking
what dors it mean? Wfuit caused the
upheaval and will the movement con
tinue to go forward, or will It soon pass
away aud bo numbered with the things j
that were? As to the causes many here :
assert it to Lie the tariff and transporta- :
tion. Doubtless there were other irri- j
tants local, state and national, that ha 1 '
their influences, but the people task I
here largely of these two points, the '
tariff and transportation.
Conversing with a republican here i
w ho recognizes the situation but 'aments j
it, he said :
“I expected a change in public senti
ment, but I was not prepared for so
complete a reversal. This state seemed
only two years ago to be the fortress of
republicanism, the very Gibraltar of tho
party iu power. But iu two 'brief years
see bow great the change.”
My republican friend seemed to warm
up as he looked upon as the past, and he
continued; ‘‘The truth is the republi
can party has somewhat abated its high
protective ideas in Kansas. The state is
an agricultural district and the farmers
have concluded that they have been
paying taxes to keep up Eastern manu
facturers without receiving any of the
benefits of the law themselves. My
opinion is that the protective policy
in politics will never again hold rhe
same jilace in the politics of the state
that it once occupied. Oa this point the
farmers have revised their opinion aud
1 cannot say that they are in favor of
free trade, but certainly they are no lon
ger in favor of high protection. That
era has gone by iu the Sunflower State
and the sooner the fact i3 recognized by
Republican politicians the better it will
be for them.
A Democrat in Kansas, and they are
more outspoken now than ever before,
says: “I do not see much in the late
change in Kansas that can give aoy spe
cial comfort to the old Democratic party.
In other states the men may
co-operate with the Democratic party.
But here it is not so. They show no
symptoms of any such affiliation. They
seem to hold the Democrats as much in
derision as they do the Republicans.
Their hatred of Ingalls seems to be deep
and bitter. They do not regard him as
one of them, but look upon him as one
in sympathy with the money powers.
I cannot judge of their future duration,
but certain it is that they are here now
and they announce that they Have ‘come j
to stay.’ Perhaps they have. Time will
show if in this they be right or wrong.” I
After hearing from the two old parties j
1 fell in with an Allianceman who was
full in the faith. He was free and posi
tive in his talk. Said he: “The Alli
ance will be a factor in politics for years.
It has a mission and will not retire" until
that has been carried out. What is the
mission? See our various platforms, and
from them you may gain some idea of
the work the Alliance has been sent to
work out. Before its task has been exe
cuted it will have to Lave control of the
national government. And so swift has
been the rise of the Alliance party that
l believe that it in conjunction with the
labor elements in the cities and in the
factories will elect a president iu 1892.
Heretofore the capitalists of both parties
have been able to keep the farmers and
the town, factory and mine laborers
apart in polities. Bui tint day is past.
Now all these laborers and farmers can
unite, and will unite, and there is no
reason why this combination shall not
drive both of the old parties otft of the
field in 1892, and have a president who
will respect the middle classes. Such is
the vision of politics as I see it.”
From these talks you may judge some
what of the recent political change in
Kansas.
In a speech l3fore tho convention of
the National Farmers’ Alliance of lowa,
President L. U. Polk said : '‘The farmers
ought to elect more farmers to congress,
because the petitions ot farmers for re
lief had been disregarded. The Alliance
intended going into politics but not ptrfi
sin ism. He suggested the possibility of j
another party in the next presidential i
campaign and said the principles of the j
Allif.nce would triumph as early as 1896, I
if both the old parties had to be swept
away.”* General James B. Weaver and j
labor commissioner Sovereign and Con
gressman-elect Otis, of Kansas, delivered j
similar addresses. The Farmers’ Alli
ance will play an Important part in this
year’s campaign in lowa. *
It is a privilege often granted by the
capitalist to let the producer ea! bread
from the crop lie ha? raised, and it is a
privilege some men are grateful for. It
is difficult to get some men ft) tuulcr
stand that they have any l ights, nntl to
discern clearly what those rights are.
Until the masses do see it and exhibit a
determination to defend it, the over
throw of any tyrany by which they . dif
fer can only be of temporary duration.
There are plenty of people aciing auto
matically with" the exploiting classes
who see the wrong of the present sys
tem, but they will let the exploited
classes suffer so iong as they stiifor Wil
lingly and without resistance.— Porter*
viile, (Gil.) Farm View.
One of the demands of the Farmers’
Alliance is that United States senators be
elected by a direct vole of the people.
This demand is worthy of a careful con
sideration, aad we know of no good
reason why it should not be granted. And
thei-e are many reasons why senators should
be elected by the people. It will prevent
tnilhonaires from buying seats in the sen
ate or bribing members of tlie legislature.
It will place them in nearer relationship
with the people, and have a wholesome in
fluence upon their official acts.— Arcadia
(La.) Herald.
Would it not be advisable to take
steps for the organization of a district
Alliance? Wake up, somebody, and
don’t sit like a bump on a log. “Let. us
work while it is day', for the night eom
eth, when some will not have the power
to work.” ___________
The Alliance in Maryland is on a big
boom. *
*■ 111 fares the land to hastening Ills a prey,
While wealth accumulates and men decay :
Lords or princes may flourish, or may fade,
A breath can make as a breath has made ;
But a bold peasantry, our country's pride,
When once destroyed can neer be supplied.’ ’
—Cmdmdth.
YOUNG MOTHERS
We offer you a remedy which if
used as directed, insures safety to life
of both mother aud child.
MOTHER’S FRIEND
Robs confinement of its Pain, Hor
ror and Risk, as many testify.
My w ife used only two bottles of Moth
er's Friend. She was easily and quickly
relieved—is now Hoinsr splendidly. ‘
3. S. Morton. Harlow. N. C.
Sent by express, charges prepaid, on re
ceipt of price. $1.50 per bottle. Sold by-all
driu. gists. Book to Mothers mailed free.
Bbaldfixld Ei.GUs.ft.xOß Cos., Atlanta, Ge.
SHERIFF’S SALE.
UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF AN EXECU
tion issued out of the Circuit court, in aud
for Marion county, Florida, bearing date, the Mih
day of March, A. D.,1891. wherein Montßoion At
kinson is plaintiff and Edward Atkinson, is de
fendant, I have levied upon and will sell at pub
lic outcry to the highest bidder for cash, before
the court house door, in the eity of O cals, du
ring the legal hoars of sale on
if osda r, -V.4 r I, tit, mi,
the same bring a legil sale day of sud month
all the right, title, interest, claim and dsmajui
of whatsoever kind that Edward Atkinson has
in and to the following described lauds lying
and being situate ia Morion coautr, Florida: e
J4©f nwMtecSO, to 16, r 18, aad ne 7, of sf* : ,
sec 25, tp 16, rlB e and s\v > t of sw % of s-c 36.
tp 16, rIS and sw l i of sw sec 7, tp 16 rl9 aad
nw M of nw H sec IS, tp 16, r 29,
E. T. WILLIAMS,
Sheriff' of Marion county.
Jno. G. Reanion and Miller A Speneer.plaintttTs
Aitomeys. Apr s
*1 iiK OCALA BANNEB, FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 1891,
! pLORIDA CENTRAL
r<& PENIN3UAR R R.
1 FORMERLY THE F. R. A N. CO.
Standard Time used.—Dee. 13ih 1890.
South _ Xoatn
‘ 8 1 7 _ foouTn run a r vision j_B | 4
6do p 10 ib a i.v FcruandinaAri 2 S p 5 40 a
840 pit 8S alt Callahan Ar] il> p 7so a
9 So p 11 40 a Lv Jacksonville Ar! 1 85 p 0 IS a
JO 35 pI2DO pfv Baldwin Lvj 100 * 545 a
It 37 p 145 par Starke Lv; 11 IS a 4 02a
12 54 a 2 41 p Ar Hawthorns i.v 10 41 a 2 35 a
1 30 a Slip Ar Citra Lv.lo 15 a 1 58 a
3 43 p ArSllvlr tfpriagaLv 5 4, a
221 a ItiOpAr OCALA Lv 9al 03 a
7 05 pAr Hnmosassa Lr! 7 99 a
435 a 530 p Ar Leesburg Lvj 759a10 31 p
525 a 600 pAr Tavares Lvj 730 a 9 80p
945 a 735 pAr Orlando Lv! 605 a 800 p
340 a 457 pLv Wildwood. Lv! S3B alll5 a
5 18 a 017j> Ar Dade City Lr: 055 a 945 p
0 25 a 7 35 pAr Plant City Lv 567 a 8 35 p
745 a 840 pAr Tamp* LVi S' Of* a 73J p
220 p Ar Waldo Lv IJ 23 a
258 p Ar Gainesville l.v l 20 a
_J* 45 pjAr Cedar Kay Lv 0 31 a
| Nos. 7 and 8 daily: 3 and 1 dally.
I fekxaxdis* & ccacgjELAV n route.
j ,sfo. 60 NorG for Bsrtis-wics Ko. f> Ko. Cl
110 09a 4 IS jl.v Jacksonville t sSO a 215 p
H 05ft 5 50 p'Ar ’Femandin* Lv: 7 15 ajt*> 45 p
7 GOfi for Brum.wick Lv j 8 00a
All daily except j-iturtay. Daily steamers
('between Femandmi and Brunswick Connect
i with all points, North, West and Northwest.
! Sunday tr-dns leave Jacksonville 8:40 a. m.
! j | KLYX.NO cdtCKKR ) i
1 Ifi? 35 *. exU-t Sng. j. N0.7.1
9 oeaiLv-Jar kr >nvdfio Art S'-ilp Z
1 Olp ArßllverSprings Lv' 1 10|.J
' 2 04p,Ar OatJa Jbv: 12 sort
9 )*1 ’ WSSTKBK XaTHttONd 2 j I ~
i> 3o pj 7 30 n;l,v Jacksonville Ar< 1 85 p s is a
817a! 818 a!Lv Baldwin Lv 12 53 p:5 S') a
4 05 a: l 25 p Ar Monticello Lv! 8 20 a 8 40 p
508ai 223 p ! Ar TsßrinWW Lv 745 a ; 7 09 p
Sis a 319 p Ar Quincy Lv 65t a t 2 p
10 00 a* 4 05 pjAr River j’a’u Lv (i 35 a 3 00 p
730 pj"o 10 pAr Pensacola Lv VlO a; 39 a
j 2 20 aLtr Mobile Lr 750 p!
! 7 00 a ArNew Orleans Lv, 3 L 0 p
,8 50 a' Ar Montgomery Lv 7 30 pi
2 27 a Ar Louisville Lv 12 if*!
C 52 ftiAr Cincinnati Lv 7 59 pt
725 p,Ar St Louis Lv 735 !>'
It! SO aAr Chicago Lv BSO pi
~~ MONUCELLO A~ THOJl
_[ 5 J[ ASVIH.E LIMITED, j 5 j
7 09 a:Lv JaehsratvilleAr 9 (w pi
It 28 a'Ar Montccello Lvj 3 59 pi
12 18 a |Ar Thoinasville Lv 3 o:l'jf]
800 p Ar Montgomery Lt’7 00 aj
tl 15 p: Ar Birmingham Lvi 8 29 a,
, 5 55 a;Ar Nashville Lvj 885 p' ;
12 07 li; Ar Louisville Lv; 28 p
408 p!Ar Cincinnati Lvi U o a;
745 jplAr Si. Louis LY 7 5 c
7 15 a.|Ar _ l.#H lt_p;
2 _ j 10
6 30 pj 7 30 Si Lv Jacksonville Ar, 9 00 pr 0 15 a
800pj 834 aiLv Baldwin Lv. 817 p 585 *
10 20 p' 9 55 a Lv Lake I'itv Lv 700 p 3 00 a
12 07 a1053 a ,vr Jasper' Lv 7 (*0 r> 163 a
113aIt 53 a'Ar Valdosta Lv 501p12 50 a
647 a 532 pAr Macon Lv 11.00 a 700 p
11 01) a : 939 pAr Atlanta Lvi 055 a 235 p
No*. 3, 2,5, 0,9,10, daily; 1,2, Dolman cars to
New Orleans; 9, sleeper to M aeon; 5,0, bleeper to
Cincinnati.
The Flying Cracker gives
NO minutes for Dinner at
Silver Springs f and vow on
the Lakegoing and re
ftirning.
Ticket office SOW. Bay street, corner Hogan.
Pcpot foot of Hogan street, Jacinsoimlle.
W. 11. jfOI’KINS,
Ticket Agent, Ocala.
A. O. McDONELL, C.| P. A,
N S. PENNINGTON, 'fc sf.
Florida Trunk Lino.
THE TROPICAL TRDBK USE.
J. T. & K. W. SYSTEM.
Covers One Thousand Miles of
TBQPICAI. TEH HIT OH Y,
Extending Southward from Jactbonville thro’
the central portion of the Peninsula and skirting
both the East and Wert Woasts, passing thro' the
orange groves, fruit and vegetable farms, and is
the only line reaching to ihe
COCO AN CT GROVES & PINEAPPLE PJ.ANTA
" % TINB
Otthe Indian Rire’r ar,j, Lakv Worth country.
TRAINS'LEAVE OCALA GOING KOtiTir at
7.00 a. m. daily, except SSunt'nv, and 1 155 p.
m.daily. GOING SOUTH 2 20 p. tn. dally, ex
cept Sunday, aad 5:55 daUy. ARRIVE FROM
NORTH 9:03 p. m. daih - , except t andav, and
5:85 p. m. daily. FROM SOU'PU 7:00" ft. m.
daily, except Sunday, and 1:35 p. m. dally.
The best equipped l ice iu the South. For full
Information, maps, schedule, rates, etc., address.
i. N. STROHIIAH, AGX.NT
G. D. ACSKKLA,
Gen Pass. Agi.
Ill; T.Ui;.
■0 FAST TRAINS
EYKRY DAY TO THE
North, West and East.
(DAILY SCI IF. mi LI. I Daylight Ohio
tIN EFFECT JAN 15 1891 { Express Special
Lv* Jacksonville, 3F A W Ry... 7.00 am 8,09 pm
Lv Callahan, 8F& WKy 7.35 lira .8.55 pm.
Lv Wayeross, SF & WUy....... 9.15 am. 11.40 pm
Lv Jessup,'*E T V and GUy 10.45 am 3.20 am
Ar Macon, ET V andG Ry 5.00 pm 0.47 am
A r Atlais tn, ET -V and G ] s .y 5.35 pm 10.35 a ,r.
.Lv Atlanta, LTV and G Ky... 13.15 pm 11.40 am
Ar Rome, E T V and G Ry 2.15 am 2.30 pm
Ar Chattanooga, K T V and G . tiJj am 5. o pur
Lv Chattanooga, Q ami € route 7.20 am 6.30 pm
Ar Cincinnati, Q and C route... (3.20 pm 6.40 am
Lv Rome, K T V and U Uy 2 88 pin
Ar Knoxville, E T Vnnd i; Ry 11.50 am 7.05 pm
Ar Morristown, ET V and .!. l.yrnm 8.10 pm
Ar Hot Springs; K and l> Ky .... 10.10 pm,
Ar AsUvil!c,K <t D Ry 11.35 pm
Lv < 'luoianooga, M and (.' Rv.. 7.10 am ' mm pm
Ar Decatur M and CRy ...... 12. 39 urn 12.00 .in
Ar Memphis, M and CUy 6.40 pm f>.y am
E ASH TENNESSEE EAST MAIL carries elegant
Pullman Buffet Sleepers from Macon to Chatta
nooga, Chattanooga to Memphis, Chattanooga to
Cincinnatti, Atlanta to Knoxville and Knoxville
to Asheville.
OHIO SPECIAL carries elegant Pullman and
Mann Bleepers, day coaches, baggage, mail and
express ears from Jacksonville to Cincinnati with
out change; also from Chattanooga to Memphis,
Rome to Morristown, and Morristown to Asheville
For complete schedules and rates to all points,
and berth reservations any number of days in ad
vance, apply by wire or letter to
F. M. JOLLY, W.M. JONES. "
List. Pass. Asrt., Trav. Pass. Agt„
75 W. Bay St,, Jacksonville, Fla
B. W. WRENN. ( HAS. N. KNIGHT,
Gen. Pass. Agt., Asst Gen. Pass. Act..
Knoxville. Tcnn. Atlanta. Ga
MARBLE DEALER AND
UNDERTAKER, -
i
Have a fall stock of Colons, Caskets,■ and Burial
Suits bf every description. Special attention
paid to burial serviC's. *
Embalming to Order.
All orders from the c.mntrv. cither l y letley or
telegraph, will receive y rompt attention.
Also a completo Hire of JJcnumeirt® av and Head-
Stones. For any wk nr rtaierisl i; 'lcetM
call on or addr,
D. B. McIVER. ; OCALA. FRA
' lyrjajl
J. L. SMOAS,
—BUii.rr.R dt~
] Wagons antt Carrlajrcs.
j ALL KINDS OF REPAIRING BOS'!-
Uptc.r.'-.-.
' Plaml)hi#..WcU Bofiu;: and Irrl-
Sai Istg.
1 The under.igi.rd is jireparc lou short
notice to make estimates anti fake oon-
I tracts for any work ia his line, whfoli ia
] eliples tha draining rtf prarie?.
: Janefi-ly. W. F. Hamilton
; Notice, of Application for rinal D.s
charge.
; Notice Uhereby given that on U e 23rd oS Jutte
1 lS9i, I Will make ray thud rettieasent a"d apply
j to the twenty Judge of Mariou -nntv, Florida,
; ibr Ru U dlajharge.
Fr. -.xe*s.\. Pa yt tn.
; Aden, of estate of Thomaa C. Shinroe, dec.-0.1.
1 Ide tfstos
,* H,111,... 1t.., ,Maine
; FLORIDA WINES.
FROM SAN LUIS and ANDALUSIA
VINEYARD, TALLAHASSEE, FLA.
E. DUBOIS, Manager.
Claret, Saateraes. Kock, Port, Sherry
Send for price list.
SERGE MALYYAN,
Agent for Marion county, Ocala.
JOHN CLARK, SON & CO., Jacksonville.
W. J. McCTRATH. Ocala, retail agents.
FOUTZ’S
HORSE AND CATTLE POWDERS
FOUTZ !)
T
Ho Hwi will (tie of Colic. Bots or Lcxo Fe
ttsk, if Fdatrts Powders are used in time.
Foote's Powderswfllcnre and prevem 800 Cholxt!*.
P:ite's Powders wit: prevent Gapes is Fowls.
Fonte"* Powders will Increase the quantitv of roillt
snd cream twenty per cent, and make the batter Arm
uid sweet.
route's Powders will emu or Prevent almost Eviar
Dtsnae to width Horses and 1 attle are subject.
FoCTiPS Powrmss waa. gitk Satisfaction.
Sold everywhere.
DAVII3 E. FOUTZ, Proprietor,
BALTIMORE. MD.
COLD KESAL, PASIS, 1878.
(§ Baker & Co/s
Oreakfast
Cocoa
ju* which tho excess ot
|yi j|l oil has been removed, is
f 111 Wfdb&oiutely Fare
is Soluble .
No Chemicals
arc used in its preparation. It Ims -
more- than three times the strength of
Cocoa mixed with Starch, Arrowroot
or Sugar, and is therefore far more
economical, costing less than one cent
a cup. It is delicious, nourishing,
fetrengthening, easily digested,
and admirably adapted for invalids
ijs well as for persons in health.
Sold by Grocers everywhere.
W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Miss,
- JAPANESE
W iii- L
" -■ fo-;:4:’r v rrasxa
Z~’ fo \ HJej
A " ; ' .' r .' 7C
O" E\ . •- . r.t . : -;t- or
>i .: c ..... . 3- ' ' .00.
i.. .. .. ■ ...-j -i' 9Tiee.
Wo i" : i'O V 2 V .t' Piles.
Gaaract u :,2.d v: •;
St. Paul, Mixn., July 15tb, 18u0.
Japauese Remedies Company—Gentlemen : I
have been a f.T -.t sufferer front both external
aud bleeding Ides for the Inst IS years. I have
employed t! o best medical skill with little or no
relief utull of late my li'o was despaired of.
From the loss of blood I have become so weak
and debilitated I was almost entirely unfit for
business. Four weeks ago I was advised to try
your Japanese Remedies, and am happy to say
the first box stopped the hemorrhage, and al
though I have used but two boxes. lam almost,
if not enthely cured. 1 think it a wonderful
remedy, and would recommend it to all suffer
*c?pw®iny jrwwi. vr.s. Lrcws,
Millinery, 189 E. Seventh St.
STA>r sale by Wright, & Frazer, Gary Block.
Hsalth is Wealth!
C.IT, .n.u. ,
Dn. E. C. Wust’s Karp Atm Bbath Treat-
MENT, a guaranteed speeific for Hysterio, Dizzi
ness, Convulsions. Fits, Nervous Neuralgia,
Headache. Nervous Prostration, causod by thenso
•of alcohol or tobaciM, Wakefulness, Mental De
pre ion, Hofteningof tho llrain, resulting in in
sanity end lending to misery,decay and death;
Premature Old Ago,Barrenness,Loss of Power
in either sex. Involuntary Jjosseiimd Bpermator
riioM, caused by over-cxertion of tho brain, eelr
or ovor-indnlgeuco. Each box contains
o at’,"s treatment, §l.ooa bo?, or six boxes
for 1 5.00, tea t by mail prepend on Receipt of price.
VE GFABAXm SIX4IOKLS
I\> cure any case. With eachorderreceived by us
for six boxes, iiccomrttniod with *5.00, wo will
send tiia purchaser our written ganrantcoto re
fund tho money if tha treatment does not effect
acu re. 0 at; rautoes Issued onlptiy
ißtMonopoly Drug Store, •
Sulc Atrciils. (Mlat Flu.
eoffhwiy , - -
A A'M X Tl'.Atl S I vnjcrl.ke In brVR,
3 IBIS n *v iutelligeikt person of ciihor
Bfi 11 I | x ' vrlw < .write, and who.
Ei 11 3I 3 1 lari >fjus|yuction,wlil work induatrioubiv,
WVO Wi.,w4j V>m THIW Thousand Bnltar.
Year hi their own will nlio furnish
the situaUott or b-aiph\rnunt,at wliiet you cn eary tlmt eiru tmr.
No moner for me tmlrss tuci'eMfal a* above. Eerily ami quickly
Icorued. I tlosire hut ono worker from each district orcoullty. I
have a|rea<l/ taught; provide# with employment a large
number, who are making over a yare('h. It s A JoW .
>4 SUI.IU. lUi ntrtltrularsFUEK. Addresst Anoti
n. A1.1.r.V. Hot 4*o, Augusta,.,>lnill*.
0, GROTHE, P|,D,,
iSuc-ccssist tu tt. R. .
Analytical and Consulting Chemist,
liABOR&ponY
CORNER POND STEETS,
OCA Fa, FLORIDA -
Auaiyiloal done wltlrkJjjeS
Dr. Groihe’s recognized jn
Europe, and may 14 tiseif n*? a basis lor sale of
p hate r. .fc. 7 s®ecwtl'
a A. FARRIS,
PRACTICAL MOIL Elt MAKER,
Call <> or address fc ’
K IINDIUCIh - - - - Fls A.
Gfeblvr * -M -
.... ———-4-
Job Carpenter Shop,
COE. I'7XD in/EXPOSITION B*B.
J. L Smeak’s New Building.
All kin Is Of biu!Bi:;and repairs promptly
and .ocaHy done. Charges reasonable,
2fcbd tv •!'. i. Bt’RNETT;* CO.
THE OCALA'LIHE CO.—
MAKU FACTU REES Of:— %
Finest Quality of Rock
Lime
A: : nil Au. ,:i Finishing Work,
Ad raci igvs te-iand Gnaraatoed; also
Can pi, .js 1 brae at low figures, reborn
'.".'.'nde- 4 . c-rywhoK for orange trees sndfcru-
Uasrs. nS-lyr
—-—- —-—n ——— • - j
TERRI M’F’BCOm HASHVILLETENM.
Orange Trees.
ICO, "XI oraage trees ftoai three to six
ytiirs old ; 15,000 budded, from one to
four years old, oji tour stocks. Very low.
Apply to or address, R A. Iloyd, Red
dick, Fla. * 5 ( 14iiovfim
A. E. DELOUEST.
HARDWARE.
o * o o o o —.
FARMING TOOLS,
SASH AND DOORS,
STOVES,
FAINTS,
&C., &Cs
OCALA, FLA.’
LOOK !
The I’a a L'S at the Ocala New< Depot include a full line of
Sehool Books, School and Office Supplies,
Blank Books, Lodgers, Day Books,
EVERTHING IN THE STATIONERY LINE.
Also Baskets. Fancy Goods, Dolls, Games,
-Wagons, Velocipedes. Toys of All Kinds.
COM EARLY TO THE
THE OCALA NEWS DEPOT,!
*
NECK & SANDERS.
There is an art in buying and selling- real estate, only
acquired by experience, what is that? Knowing just the
want of your client, whether it be-for home lot, farm,
vineyard, fruit, orange or phosphate lands. We have
years of long residence in Florida and can practically
demonstrate wliat can he done with money and brain’s
This experience we gladly impart to anyone whoesires
and for investment or immediate use.
Our selection of lands for every special business, embra
ces many thousand acres, improvedand w and. Send for our
'Circular. New ideas of selling, new methods of buying that
‘will reach us as never before towardssuccess. *
NECK & SANDERS, Real Estate Agents, P. 0. Box 358, Ocala Florida.
(AGENTS FOR ARMOUR CO., FERTELIZERS)
OFFICE, ZE BUTT BLOCK AND SEMI-TROPICAL EXPOSITION. skhn
P UI R N imU R El
IS! YOU!
|R ! Should sea THE OCALA FURNITURE
COMPANY’S
|yj NEW STOCK OF FURNITURE
hr! Our Prices are LOW,
n! Our Terns are LIBERAL,
jpj Our Goods are RELIABLE,
;jjr What More can You Ask ?
It. R. SNOWDEN, Treasurer B. Z. SNOWDEN, Manager.
2Jan td
S. R. 3IRD3EY. ALBERT H. BIRDSEY.
S. R BIRDSEY & CO.,
MILLED BLOCK, MAGNOLIA STREET.
Also a complete line of Cooking and Beating
Stoves, Sash, Boors, Blinds, Points. \k
- HARDWARE & GROCERIES.
2iaj3- t
SEEDS. -
NEW OKOP SEEDS, TURNIP, CABBGE AND BEET SEEDS. *
A PULL LINE of PURE DRUGS and MEDICINES
STATIONERY, TOILET ARTICLES, ETC.
—OOOOOOOOOO I —oooooooooo—
AGLN'I tOK CRAB ORCHARD SPRINGS WATER, THOMPSON'S BROMTNP
ARSENIC SPRINGS WATER, AND THE VIAR OF
■ BETIIELEM MINERAL WATER
AL GOOD S SOLD. ATS LOW AS THE LOWEST At V THE QUAT.ITV
„ 1
Havvke’s Celebrated Spectacles,
. Hk. ANDERfeON,
scp2 Wtiolesale.and Retail Druggist and Optician. ;
—— ■* k* 1 . * •' i ‘
I — —---~L. 1. . 1
P. B. ' "*■ G. D. COURTNEY.
DUKES & COURTNEY.
The Comer Grocery,
Specialties.
FLORIDA CABBAGE | |TOMAToS7^^
STRING BEANS. ; KIT MACKEREL,
BEETS, - ' I;' ■. DUTCH IIERRING,
CARROTS. ' CHEESE,
PARSNIPS, - ' CREAMERY BUTTER,
TURNIPS, I KEROSENE OIL,
l CELERY, | PIG’S FEET,
.POTATOES. TRIPE.
ALL KINDS OF CANNED GOODS, ARMOUR’S CANNED MEATS, PICK
AND CRACKERS. j ELED BEEF, ETC.
HAFELE’S FRESH BREAD, PIES AND CAKES DAILY
Highest Prices Paid for Country Produce,
Hides, Etc,
FREE DELIVERY.
DUKES a CCURTNEYc^^WpBfcP^ARE
v uIU u Vk vvvmuuij OCA LA, FLORI I>A.
12Jaad.t\Vtf.
UnAi Ebaton v INE9
*i„ -rtfcw SHAM. r bCITS. S*v netefcUrt Ctutoxikt Trtt. T. S. UI'BBAUD CO., FRF IK) Mi, Si T.
Silver Springs, Ocala & Gulf R. R.
TIME TABLE NU M B E R 17.
[ln Effect February loth.]
- S B” S’* l STATION’S a 5 *' g" S
i !e Sj JO).
Z MX MX- **{ XX ; a * i*
fIS 4'<lft"Lv".F„.„_.3ZFZ... oc*i ...7..L .. ly ¥im slip .......
9 CSa: 7 55a 4 o*p •*_ „ Agnew 5...,.,.... *2a ffip 7 2>p
9 m -BM4 3* “ -Martel *♦ 4.v 4 syp 7Wp
9 33a 8 37ft 4 33p ‘ Leroy _ “ 8 37* 4 33t> 6 57p
9:50a ■*a 4sop “ - - ” 8 3>a 4 oup 6 40;.
10 00a 3 lOp 2o* 5 top “ Dunnellon 8 10a 345 pSUU (> Z*)p
10 99a | a 15p 9 40* 5 01’p “ Jimettoo... *• S 01& S :;0p 7 .03a t2lp
* 'Op “ E!lp-toc “ ! Z. 7 42*
I 5 40p “ Anita “ j __ 7 30a
ISS S“• 4 —“• }® • * “ - —CUroneUe *• Ti'.’i ’ j wip i!™.'
10 37*. 10 20s 5 :7p ” Park Place ♦' 7 33a, 2 tip s f 3p
11 00**.. 11 M* 6tp - -UoiicMasa % 7 10*; 2 Pip ." L. S3op
A. P. Mr 3r. Gen. Msng’r. G. N Sau.w. G. P. A. O. G. Finch, Acting Supt
ITlfi MM National Bail
I EEEOF OCAI(A=E
NO. 3,815.
SURPLUS - $12,500.
OFFICERS • .Iso- K Pr-' -ißnt. If. c. Wriuht, F-Pir*. R. n. MoComont, OuAirr
INO. F. DUNN, E. p. DISMUKES,
CITAS,RHF.INAUEK. J.A. ROWELL.
HARVEY KNIGHT. \VM. ANDERSON
ILC. WRIGHT. * R. B, \Lt ONNLIL. _ J„ M. THAYER,
CORRESPONDENTS:
Nclimnl Park fterJt of New York. Mat ■■'nos -j: Iferxt 0/ fb/tviti
.Vrj/iono? /' •' of S iitinnak Georgia.
. ' T.n-,3 "Hie Gawking i any, lAKaei tile, Ky
Has Hie largest indiviunal tleposlt nf unv !>a>,k in Florhla. See sw'da report to
Comptroller of Currency, December 19tU, IS9O.
iiwlt) -9 *
E. W. AGNEW, Pres. \Y. H. COUCH. Vice Pres
The - First National Bank
OF OCALA-
Paid up Capital $50.000 . Authorized Capital $150,000.
A- M C INTYRE, CASHIFR.
Surplus Fund - S26,OOO.OI^^—^
Undivided Profits - s2,2G^^g
Fully Equipnea io ■ i\r:y jM
male 8.-uikiuJ
„%jf r
- . y.: V'-!' . ,U *
\E 4 V;
-'
vV - r :
o- <
* '
The Anti-MonOpoly Drug Store
UFA DOCAKTKIiS FOB
DRUGS,
J6ILET SOAP •
' Tf IciicrYofl*" „, '
AND ART MATERIALS-
- H. C. GroYos, Ph. G.
AT COST I AT COST 1
Coninieneing Januaiy 15th to February 1f t, I will sell my entire stock of
Men’s Boys’ and Youth’s Clothing
-EAT COST! E==—
. * This is to make room for my
SPRING STOCK,
Which will soon be arriving. These goods have been carefully bought
and good values will bo given every tirno.
SS£?~ Call Early before the lines are too badly broken. ~Wi
WATERMAN & FULLER,'
r“~~TIIE
OLDEST, LARGEST BEST
Equipped Livery, Feed and Salo Stable in South
Florida. Don’t forget the old ::
RELIABLE LIVERY STAND
E. B. RICHARDSON,
I7jan td Ocala, Florida.
PETER I NCR AMT
Has a, complete line of all kind- of Suitings, ana guarantees -
work and fit at REASONABLE RATES. .
A'SPECIALTY MADE OF REPAIRING, CLEANING AND ALTERING
Merchant Tailor, Ft. King ave
CAPITAL STOCK, in) $lO ,000.

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