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The Ocala banner. (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.) 1883-194?, May 08, 1891, Image 2

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TneOcalaßanner
F. E. HARRIS, Editor.
MEMBER OF
FLORIDA PRESS ASSOCIATION.
AFFILIATED WITH
NATIONAL EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION.
■iMBMBMBtMMMEEggg- L-L. — -
IRIDA Y. MA Y 8, 1891.
ONLY ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM
The president had a very extended
and successful tonr.
“Old Hatch'’ it seems h in Florida and
his son says that he is solvent.
Mr. Bartola Thebaut, one of Jackson
ville's oldest citizen died last Saturday.
A thundcboit from a clear sky killed a
young fanner near Emporia, lias. last
wetk. _____________
The steamer Mascotte, of ttie Tampa-
Havana line, is at Jacksonville, undergo
ing repairs.
Young George Seaton of,Denver, 111.,
whilf crazed from an attack of iagrippe,
nearly beat his father to death and then
cut his own throat.
The defalcation of President Hilll of
the Nin h National Hank may reach $6Qd.-
000. Hi- suave manners gained the eo. fi
deue# of all who knew him.
It is no longer that field officials die
and none resign. Gort on, Edmunds
ami Reagan have in a few’ years given
up seats in the U. S. senate.
Impeachment proceedings ag inst Judge
Botk n began in Topeka, Khs Last week
one witness te tided that he saw the
Judge drink four times during oue term
of tourt.
A# unknown Mexican cut a woman nmn
ed .'anchez to pieces with a hatchet at Del-
Kio, Tex., and then wrote on the wall with
the blood of Ids victim the words: “Fresh
beef for sale.’’
Richmond D. Young, a New York per
fumer, and .Melano I>. Richmond, his
clerk, were convicted of conspiracy to
iuin the reputation of Mrs. Young so her
husband could get a divorce.
Miss Edith 'peers of New York has se
cuted the release of her wealthy lover.
Confectioner Ransley, of Ciucinnate, but
they are having a difficult time to get a
license to marry and have diappeared.
W. I?. Snooks died in Cincinnati from
the effects of food eaten at hi' wedding
feast in Lydon Ky., two weeks ago. lie
is the sixth pe son to die. No clew of the
poisoners, if there be any, has been found.
The Eailv Bird Mining Company arc
constructing a tram railroad from Le
Roy to their rich mines some six miles
west of that place, which will enable
tiiem to ship their roek, of which they
have 1,000 tons on the dump.
Many of the voters and tax payers of
Key .West are dissatisfied w ith their
present form of city government and de
sire to go back to the city, allowing to
govern itself by (ho direct vote oft be
people instead jof by_ eomuiissioucrs ap-
It is said that tl.e I’ell River Packing
Company, of Chester, cleared SIO,OOO
during the oyster season just closed.
The Amelia River Company, of this city,
were not a whit behind the other. The
people of Nassua county are justly proud
of their two canning factories.— Reman
dina Mirror.
Peoples’ Press (New Castle, Ind ) says:
The supreme court of the United States
has decided that congress has the right
to say w) at shall be a legal tendei; wud
what* is the. use of sheep headed poli
ticians butting their brains out against
the decision of the highest judicial tri
bunal in the land?
A most ieteresting and valuable con
tribution to the literature of the firms
is an article, in the May Forum from ti e
pen of the eminent Spanish statesman,
Etytilio Cast Hur, entitled: “F| ai, a
Democratic Natioq." All seholais and
others who desiie to be posted on the
current history of the times should read
it.
A Georgia gi and jury of a county no
larger or weahhier than ours recently
recommended that $23,000 be expended
in enlarging and remodeling tiie court
house. Our grand jury might with pr. -
priety make a similar recommendation.
Our court house is too small for the
transaction of tho necessary business of
the county.
Mr. J.B. Douglass, one of the enter
prising merchants of Fnmmerfitld, has
recently sold one of his two tine orange
groves to Mr. W. L. Finger, ol Bronson,
for a consideration ol $2,300. Mr. Doug
lass is m>w tilting up the house in the
Teague grove, which lie recently pur
chased and will hereafter reside the:e.
—Btllcvieu Blade.
Hon. linger Q. Mills, no great Texas
statesman, contributes a very telling and
effective article in the May Foium on
Mr. Blaine’s reciprocity scheme entitled:
“Reciprqpity, Why Southward Only?”
It seems tons that the article is con
viiicing that, “Free Trade” is the true
principle of government and its adop
tion by the nation’s of the world cannot
be far off.
Mr. John N. G. Stockton, national
banker and senatorial trainer, lias been
taught a very important, pointed, punc
tured and necessary lesson, and it will be
some time before lie undertakes the job
of running another legislature. As he is
yet a vonng man the lesson he has re
ceived may be very valuable to him.
He and Jeema Alexander and the T.-U.
“carrier pigeon” should retire, temporar
ily at least, from the political arena.
Editor Hanlon, of the Quitman Pres?,
is jubilent over the prospects of the Quit
man and Tampa road:
The Vmp road is coming,
Theeiitone's round the curve:
We hear the wheels a-hu mining-
She’s straining every nerve.
She skins across the grasses
And skirts the forest* wide:
Ther 'er making out free passes,
And we'll ail take a ride!
Annua) Convention of the National
Educational Association.
The annua! convention of the National
Educational Association of the United
States for the present year will be held
at Toronto, Canada, July 14th to 17th,
and as it will ou this occasion be of an
international character, it promises to
be the most successful meeting of the
series. Most of the railroads have agrw.
to give half rates, plus s2l>o membership
fee to all who attend the meeting, this
rate being open to the public generally
as well as the teachers. The Canadians
are making great preparations to wel
come and entertain the visiting teachers,
and numerous cheap excursions are be
ing arranged to all important points on
the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence, arui
the sea-side, afler the convention, which
will afford to teachers the best oppor
tunity for enjoying their summer holi
days they have over had. The official
bulletin, containing program for the
yieeting, railway arrangements, and all
oilier particulars, is read, and will be
sent free to any one desiring it, on their
dropping a post card to dr. 11. J. Hill,
Secretary I/tcal Committee, Toronto.
Bhuttii o trtUti diTTERS
Cures Indigestion, ltiliousnefs, Dysrcpsla, Mala
ria, Nervousness, uuJ General Debility. I’hysi
uiaua recommend R. All dealers sell it. Genuine
has trade mark and crossed red linesou wrapper.
• SHUTTING BLAINE OFF.
Young Russell Harrison, one ol the
proprietors of “ Frank Leslie’s Idus
trated Newspaper,” writes as if he was
Mr. Blaine’s keeper, and is attempting
to forestall the eminent statesman from
any Presidential aspirations he may en
tertain. No bees shall buzz in Mr.
Blaine’s bonnet, if young Russell can
prevent it. Here is tho young man’s
wonderful pronunciamento:
“ When Mr. Blaine wa* called to the
most important placo in the Cabinet, he
wrote in reply to the President’s letter
tendering the appointment (which let
ter clearly outlined the _ President t
view*) a statement that distinctly im
plied in the clearest terms unquestioned
und undying fealty to the head of the
Administration, and by no act, word or
imitation has Mr. Blaine at any time
since left ids loyalty open to the slight
est suspicion.
The loyalty of Mr. Blaine as a vassol
is assumed, and voung Harrison says:
“ Mr. Blaine, by virtue of his po-ilion.
is the chief and most intimate adviser
of the President. If the latter will ac
cept re-nomination, he will have no
stronger, abler and eonstant supporter
than his Secretary of Slate.”
Thus the “voung son of his pa” as
Rum 8to“shoo ofl” any presidential bees
that may attempt to buzz in or near
the bonnet of the eminent Maine state
man and “shut off” the Maine states
man himself from any longing looks in
the direction of the White House.
Young Russell don’t want him to get in
pa’s way and concludes his remarkable
editorial in these words:
. ‘‘Mr. Blaine will, in duo time and m
his own way, utterly, financially and
absolutely dispel that doubt.” To make
assurance doubly sure on this point,
vonng Harrison adds that “he is teady
to do so now.” _
But Blaine is a mas'er of expedients
and may surprise the voting man.
His Friends Accomplish What His
Enemies Could Not.
No man ever made better headway
in a campaign than did Senator Call as
long as lie had foes to tight, and particu
larly as those foes were the head of
liati-d corporations —railroads and na
tional batiks; but while he overcame
his enemies almost by a wave of the
hand, his great |>opularity and prestige
could not overcome tbe friendship ol
the Times-Unitin and its “ carrier
iiige<>n ” service; Ji e Haddock, Jeeins
Alexander and that new and peculiar
Keely-Motor force in politics, Mr. Jno.
N. C. iSo'kton. The “combination”
proved disastrous to Senator Call’s bril
liant chances of success and his down
tail is attributable directly to his friends
and not to his enemies. If any man
ever had just cause to exclaim in an
guish ami bitterness- of spirit from the
very bottom of his socks, “Save me
from my friends!” that man is Wilkin
son Call. How a man of his political
experience submitted to being butch
ered in such u stupid and rootless man
ner, is beyond the judgment of sensible
men.
Harry Clark, ex-Postmaster at Jack
sonville, is a handy man to have at. the
capital during a heated Senatorial con
test. Harry was an eye-witness to the
Harvey Alexander difficulty and when
Tom S'oektuii made Ins rush on Ben
Harrison, lo! Harry Clark was there!
While Harry is handy and serviceable
as a peacemaker, he does not seem to be
the best witness in tbe world, as he is
either affected with strabismus or looks
only in one direction. He was quick to
See Col. Harvey’s weapon, but did not
catch a glimpse of Jeeuis Alexander’s
big revolver as he and it went glistening
through tlie hotel corridors, and in the
other encounter he saw “Stockton give
Harrison a right-hander blow over the
left eye;” he saw “Harrison stagger,
and but lor the wall would have fallen.”
He t hen saw some blows on either side,
when the two men clinched aud_ Stock
ton threw Harrison and had him pin
ioned to the tloor, when they lay and
fought for some little time, Mr. Harrison
struggling to release himself and kick
ing vigorously and Mr. Stockton holding
Mr. Harrison’s right arm.” But he
didn’t see Mr. Harrison put “both of
■ —■■■! Nt 1 “^ruumintr.l’.
Don. i }
Coupcr, Millar & Co’s Report on
the Fertilizer Market of the
United Kingdom.
Dear Sirs:— The market report du
ring the past month has been extremely
quiet so far as phosphates are concerned,
buyers being in favor of waiting to see
how affairs go in Coosaw and Florida,
whi st sellers ate firm for slightly ad
vanced prices unless they can get the
equivalent out ol freights. Offers lor
Florida phosphate at prices ruling a
month ago have been emphatically de
clined, and we learn from our partner
who is on the spot, that raisers there,
l>eing fully aware of the deaulock at
Coosaw, are evidently determined to
make the most of their opportunity.
Complaints are mede on this side of the
delays in obtaining deliveries under
contracts which have hern implemented
sometime ago, and so far as our infor
mation goes these complaints are likely
to incicase, so it is not to he wondered
at if Ei gtish buyers fail to be tempted
by the few offeis of enoim us quantities
at low prices which still survive and are
wandering round at intervals. The ma
nuie trade in America is exceptionally
good and the demand for phosphates
rapidly Increasing. One manufacturer
has we hear, just bought 10,1)00 tuns of
Peace river rock, and as prices in tiie
stales are generally better than those
ob:ained here, the sellers are feeling
pretty independent. From' South Caro
lina we hear that the Coosaw stoppage
may last for six months, and if tins
proves correct the effect must necessarily
he far reaching as the outside raisers are
already working at their full capacity
and cannot increase production to any
appreciable exlent.
Mineral Phosphates—South Carolina
nominally lOjd. to lid. perunit. Florida
75 per cent, at 12d. to 14d., but very littie
• tiering. Siomecau sii Ibe bought for
early shipment at 14jd. on basis of 70
per cent. e. i. f. Lauuou or parity. For
the lower qualities of Fomme, as also for
Osso and Belgian phosphates, we will be
glad to quote on learning buyers’ re
quirements; prices vary accordiag to port.
Yours faithfully,
Couper Millar & Cos.
Bellevlew Blade.
Belleview Phosphate on a Boom.
The Blade is not inclined to boast nor
boom matters of local interest unless
there is some good foundation for the
assertion.
Before us are letters from T. D. Gib
bons, of Jacksonville, secretary of the
Belleview Phosphate Company, to Jas
Pennfteld, of Belleview, general man
ager. We cull from them the following
information.
The analysis given by Prof. Maly van
in regard to the solubility of our soft
phost hate in citrate of ammonia is very
flattering. He gives the follow ing analy
ses: ‘ One sample runs 48 per cent.,
soluble in citrate of ammonia, the other
51.40 per cent.; total of 99.40 per cent,
bone phosphate of lime for two analyses,
or an average of 49.70 per cent. This
average of 49.70 per cent, is equivalent
te 22.00 of phosphoric acid.”
Aside from the cost of the lands
owned by the couqiany, nearly $2,000
have been laid out in mining operations,
buildings and tools at the mines. Iu
addition to this several thousand more
are to be extended in the near future.
Anew phosphate storage shed 100x20
feet is to be built adjoining the side
Hack. Lumber, shingles, etc., have been
ordered.
Anew pit of large dimensions is to be
opened up immediately, thus employing
a large number of men.
A six'inch drive well is to be sunk.
In addition to the drying kiln now in
operation day and uiglit, four more are
to be built. These are to be of rock and
one-fourth inch sheet iron.
Several steam derricks, rigged with
wire ropes and large iron buckets for
hoisting the phosphate to a staging are
to be placed where most needed. An
engine, boiler and grinder have been
ordered.
No delay in the work is to be tolerated
as plenty of money is back of the enter
prise. ___________
Tbe Tavares Herald wants the Demo
crats of 1-ake county to demand the
resignation cf Hon. Wm. A Hocker un
less he will vote for Call. The sublime
cheek of a county Call editor it appall
ing.
Musical Courier.
The Music of Waguer.
It is probable that I was selected to
s. cak ab ut music because, not knowing
one note from another, 1 have no prejudi
es on the subject. All I can say is that
I know what I like, and to tell the truth
I like every kind—enjoy it all—from the
hand organ to the orchestra Knowing
nothing of the sc cnce of music, 1 ant not
always looking for defects or listening for
discords. As the young robin cheerfully
swallows what Comes, I bar with gladness
all that is played.
Music has been, I suppose, a gradual
growth, subject to the lawof.evolution, und
nearly everything, with the po-sible excep
lion of theology, is under this law
Music may he dtv ded into three kind-:
First, the music of simple time without
any particular emphasis—and th s may be
called the music of the heels; second,
music in which time is varied, in which
there is the eager haste and the delicious
delay—that is, the fast and slow, in accor
dance with our feelings, with our emotions
—and this may be called the music rf the
heart; third the music that includes lime
und emphasis, the hastening and the delay
—something in addition I hat produces not
only sta es of feoling but states of thought.
Thi- may be cubed the music of the head,
the music of the brain.
Music expresses feeling and thought
wi hoot language. It was below and be
fore speech, and it is above and b yond
ait words. B- fore man found a name for
any thought or thing he had hopes and
fears and passions, and these were rudely
expressed in tones.
, Of one’thing, however, lam certain, and
that is, that music was brn ol love Had
there never been any humn affection
there never would have been uttered a
strain of music. Possibley some mother,
looking in the eyes of her babe, gatfs the
first meloily to the enraptured air..
Language is not subtle enough, tender
enough, to express all that wc feel, and
when language fails tho highest ahd deep
est longings are translated- into mude
viusic is th.- sunshine, the climate of the
soul, and it floods the heart with a perfect
J une.
I am also satisfied that the greatest
music is the mo*t marvelous mingling of
.ove and death. Love is the greatest of
passions and deutn is its shadow. Death
gets all its terrors from i ve, and love gets
alljits intensity, its radiance, ts glory, and
its rapture from the darkness, of death.
Love is a flower that grow s on the edge ot
the grave.
The old music for ihe most part ex
presses emotion or feeliing through time
and emphasis and what is known a- melody.
t[ost of the old operas consist of a tew
melodies connected by unmeaning recita
tive There should he no unmeaning
music. It is as though a writer should
suddenly cave his subject and write a
paragraph consisting of nothing but a rep
etition ol one word line "the,” “the, ’’ “the,”
or “if,” "if,” “if,” varying the repetition of
the-e words, but without meaning, and
then resume the thread of his article
lam not saying that great music was
not produced belore Wag er, but lam
endeavoring to show the steps that have
been taken It was necssary that all the
mus e should have been written in order
i bat thejgreatesi might be produced the
same is t ue of the drama. Thousands
and ihousands and prepared the way for
the supreme dramatist as millions prepared
the wuy for the supreme composer.
Wbeu 1 read Shakespeare 1 am astonish
ed that he lias expre. sed so mu. h with com
mon words to which he seemes to give ih-w
meaning, ands. when l hear Wagner lex
claim: is it possible that all this is done
with common air.
in Wagner's music there is a touch of
chaos that suggests the infinite
The tneiodies seem strange and chang ng
forms, like summer clouds, and we rd
harmonies come like sounds from the sea
brought by fitful winds, and others moan
like waves on d> solate shores, and mingled
with signs and sobs and ripples of laugh
ter and the wondrous voices of eternal
love
Wagner is the Shakespeare of music
The fuueral march for ‘ Siegfried” is the
funeral music for ab the dead Should all
the gods die, this music would be perfectly
appropriate. It is elemental, universal,
eternal. The love music in “Tristan and
Isolde” is Iko “Romeo and Juliet,” an
expression of the human heart for all time,
to the love duet in “The Flying Dutch
man” has in it the consecration, ihe in
finite sell dei.ial of love. The whole heart
—t * I - i -—
sound.
When I listen to the music of Wagner I
see pictures, forms, glimpses of the perf ct
—-he swell of a hip, the wave of a bre. st,
the glance of an eye I am in the midst
of great galleries. Before me are passing
the endless panoramas I see \ ast land
scapes with valle;- s of verdure and vine,
with soaring crags, snow crowned. lan
in the depths of ihe caves ’oerwalled with
mighty Lags, while through some rent I
see the eieri.al stirs.
In a moment the music becomes a river
of meh dy flowing through some wondrous
land, suddenly it jails in stiange chasms
and ihe migh-y c-ataract is changed to
seven hued foams
Great music is always sad because it
tells us of the perfect, and such is the
difference between what we are and that
which music suggests that even in the
vase of jay we timi some tears.
The music of v\ agner has color, and
when I hear ihe violins the mo ning seems
to slowly come. A h rn puts a star above
the horizon. The nt.ht in the purple hum
of the bass wande s away lik>- some enor
lnous beu across wide fields of dean clover.
The light grows winter as the violins in
crease t olor comes from the o her in
struments, and then the full orcliesra
floods toe world with day.
Wagner seems not only to have given us
new tones, new combinations, but the mo
ment the orchestra begins to play his music
all the instruments are transfigured. They
seem to u ter the sounds that they have
been longing to utter. The horns run not,
the drums and cymbals join in the
general joy. The’cellos throb wi b love,
the violins are seized with a divine fury
and the note rush out eager for the air as
paidoned prisoners ior the roads and fields.
The music of Wagner is filled wish land
scapes. There are some strains, like mid
night, thick with constellations, ana there
re harmonies like islands in the far seas
and others like palms on the desert’s edge,
tiis music satisfies the heart and bruin.
It is uot only lor memory, not only for the
pr.se.it, but for prophecy.
Wagner wao a sculptor, a painter in
souud. When he died the greatest fouu
tain of melody that ever enchanted the
world ceased, but his music will instruct
and refine forever.
All that 1 know about the operas of Wag
ner 1 hare learned from Anton Feildl, and
I hole, e that he is the noblest, tendei est
and most artistic interpreter of .Wagner
that has ever lived [Tremendous and
long-continued applause.]— lngersoU.
Wants the State to M etc an A
* preprint ion.
Gailesburg, 111., May 1, 1891.
71) the fdiior of the Banner.
I enclose SI.OO for renewed subscrip
tion to the Banner, piga-*e 6end the is
sue of 17th and 24th.
lam interested in Florida, having 20
acres of grove property and other land,
and hope the legislature will appropri
ate a nice sum, say $50,000 SIOO,OOO for
the World’s Fair. It will be the grea'-
est show on earth. California will
whoop her up, and we must do a little
of it too.
Very .respectfully,
W. M. Driggs.
A Startling Prophecy by a Yale
Professor.
Professor Totten, cf Yale University,
in an editorial contribution t Frank Les
lies Illustrated Newspaper this week, pre
dicts that the Millennium will arrive early
in 1899. The visit of he Massac' usetts
Sixth Regiment to Baltimore; the coke
strike in Pennvlvania; Von Moltke’ death
and scenes in Lis can er; breaking ground
• for the Grant Monument; the laboratory
or Edison, the electric magicim, and the
Pres deut’s visit to the Pacific, are ail sub
jects of profuse illustration, Leslie’s is
printed in English and German, Price
ten cents. Get it of your nesdealer.
Owing to Mr. Mills’ magnificent record
in *he lower house of congress, it was
generally believed that he wonld be ap
pointed to succeed Senator Reagan, but
Horace Chilton was appointed to the
vacant place. Governor Hogg was asked
why he appointed Chilton instead of
Mills and this is what the Governor
said: “Horace Chilton and I were bare
footed printers’devils together, toiled up
together, studied law together, were ad
mitted to practice together and have
been lifelong friends.” His explanation
is manly and ought to be satisfactory.
The place for Mills is sneaker of the
Fifty-second Congress.
THE OCALA BANNTft, FRIDAY, MAY 8; 1891.
THE INDIAN RIVER COUNTRY.
The Land of Pine Apples, Bananas,
and Oranges.
Eden, Florida, May Ist, 1891.
To the Ed t'.r of the Banner:
Ab the interest of the inhabitants of
the Northern slates seem to tend so
strongly to our “sunny South;” aid
knowing that your paper has a large
circulation, I,cannot refrain from writin*
a few words’in behalf of what is known
as the “Ind’an river country.” To
those who have never given a thought
to the geographical location of this sec
tion, and the unquestionable advantages
which it affords from a standpoint of
healthfullness and remuneration for
money or labor invested, I will ask theii
special attention.
The average man who desires to ecme
to Florida is often deferred from doing
so because ho does not know what he
can do. Those who come here for
pleasure only, can do as they please, for
they are not dependent on the resources
of the country for tiieir support. There
are many good citizens of the. Northern
states with a limited amount of means,
who would be only too glad to come
among us, if they felt assured that they
could benefit their condition. It is fi
(tie benefit oi this c ass of people tl a'
I pen these lines, but no one is exclude.)
front reading, or acting upon what I
write, for all are alike benetitt.-d, in a
financial way, according to the amount
of .money or labor expended, for the
licit gtow richer, and the poor get rich.
No man, no matter how poor tie may be,
if he will only go to work in a judicious
way, will surely succeed.
As an indicator or pointer of the ex
emption from cold that this country af
fords, I will rav, that the Southern half
of Indian river is used almost exclus
ively for the growing of pine apples,
bananas, and all kinds of winter vege
tables. This s a very significant fact,
and one which is attracting more atten
tion every season.
- This past winter has been a practical
test with me in raising winter vegetables,
and while there has been fearful dam
age done ,iu other portions of the state,
I did not have a plant of any kind kiiU-d.
From four to eight hundred dollars per
acre is w hat can be realized per acre.
Beans ami tomatoes are the principal
crops, but as soon as the business is
fully understood, the crops will be di
versified, the cnlliva'iou more judicious,
and the remuneration greater. The
vegetable giowing is confined to a strip
of land lying between Indian river
and the ocean, which is'nisinlv cabbage
palmetto hammock and very rich. The
elevation varies from one to eight feet
above the river an.! retains moisture
well. A failure in crops is as yet un
known
The western chore of Indian rirer
is more elevated and-tlie Southern Ha If
is confined principals to growing pi te
apples, which is a very iacralive busi
ness, as they give a large profit on tiie
money or labor expended. Bananas
grow well, but are not as extensively
raised as a crop for commerce a- pine
apples and winter vegetables. Pint*
apples have to ha replanted about every
seven s'eti-s. Toe amount of land sus
ceptible of profitable cultivation in pine
apples and winter vegetables is very
limited, being confined to a narrow
strip on each side of the liver, the cost
strip being for bananas and. cocoa
nuts; the west for pine apples, guavas
and other tropical fruits. The river
averages about two miles in width and
abounds in fish and oysters.
For a man with small capital, desiring
to make a start in Florida, this is un
questionably the place; for the mat of
large means, who wishes to escape the
terrors of winter in the north, he can
combine both pleasure and profit by
coming here and enjoying the liny fish,
sailing and investing in eitli-r pine
apple or vegetable culture. Ether of
these industries has a fascination about
them that no one comes here without
being most favorably impressed, and in
most instances, where tiieir bust nos
will admit of it, locating, if only for the
winter.
The sight of n pineapple farm ora
winter garden, in fall vigor of growth,
customed to the ther mounter at zero,
that he is at once captivated, and if lie
is in quest of a home, he needs no
further persuasion, but settles at once.
If he is merely a pleasure seeker, he
needs no invitation more than whit
nature offers him to return the next
winter.
Invalids suffering from asthma, con
sumption, any kind of lung trouble i r
rheumatism, find this climate in every
way suitable to tiieir condition and im
provement.
I fear if I continue to set forth too
many of the advantages of this favored
part of Florida, that my communication
will in some accidental manner, find its
way to the waste basket, so I sill (icsit,
but if any one doubts but what this is
the garden spot of Florida, and will
come down, and after looking the
country over, say that what I have
written is not true, I will load them
down with cocoaiiuts, bananas, pine
apples and such a variety of tropical
fruits a-* they never saw and send them
hack to tiieir Northern home to eat
“Boston baked beaus” and “mess beef,”
while we enjoy tiie oc. au breezes and
indulge in the luxuries of homegrown
banana and cocoanut pies, fresh pine
apples of our own planting, fresh fish of
our own catching and many other things
tha’ are too numerous to mention.
Now, T.3r Editor, if you are a “doubt
ing Thomas” just step this way, for
“seeing is believing” and I can certainly
show you even more than I have
mentioned, but I believe I promised to
stop, so “here goes.”
Ycurs very truly,
W. R. Hardee.
ATTEMPT TO STEAL A POST
OFFIUE.
Repablican Misrule Even at
South Lake Weir
lb the Editor of the Banner :
The peacefulness and quietude of tiie
classic shores of South Lake Weir
belched forth a volcanic eruption of
righteous indignation to-day that shook
the place with excitement from center to
circumference.
It leaked out through Rufus McMa
hon, one among the many, ot the hon
est and conscientious Republicans of
this p ace, that partial success attended
the efforts of one of our narrow minded
business men who is not alone fa’isfied
With having two post offices within a
radius of one mile from his hou-e, but
now wißhds to put the old institution
over original South Lake Weir, iu his
back yard, Foster Park, and if we are to
believe the reports—and they come
from a reliable source—he has succeeded,
in conjunction with j**Hy officials, in
doing it in the smallest aud meanest
protests ever invented to outrage a pub
lie necessity.
One hundred citizens promptly re
sponded to a cad meeting and forwarded
a telegram to the Postmaster General to
stay proceedings until the people could
be heard from. A committee of three
was appointed to take matters in charge,
also the “peop’e’s favorite” exponent,
the Ocala Banner, was designated to
publish a'l the details of the meeting.
Sister Bessie B. Ricker, that beautiful
example of energetic womanhood, de
serves the thanks of the entire commu
nity for the prompt manner in which—
upon hearing that our postal faculties
were threatened, she dispatched a mes
senger on horseback through the neigh
borhood with claiiou notes of warning.
Alliancemen, uncompromising Republi
cans and Republicans assembled and
voted on a unit that the South Lake
Weir post-office must stand w here it is
or they will know the reason why.
Wm.J Forster.
South Lake Weir, Ann 129,1891.
report of committee.
The citizens of South Lake Weir as
sembled at the post-office April 29 h
at only a moment's notice, and a com
mittee was appointed to dial! a suitable
petdion to the post-office department,
and the following denunciations were
adopted, the same to be published in the
Ocala Baxner:
We, the citizens of South Lake Weir,
assembled, denounce in the strongest
terms of condemnation the sneakiug
and cowardly attempt to remove our
post-office to Foster Park, and thesneak-
mg and ur.Jhanded manuer in which
it was made?
We also rider the authors unwortbv
of our confifnce or patrmage. All cit
izen of Soutlßtke Weir who knew the
attempt wafLeing main and, failed to
give the alait, is abo unworthy of our
confidence ikl regard.
N. D. Falncb*
A. L. Port eh,
R. E. McMahan,
Committee.
=i. I ±=
Some Anedotes of Tom Marshall.
The effected an orator depends far
h ss on what|e says than how he says it.
Voice, ge'ui, facial expression, the sub
tle emiuanc of individuality* consti
tute his triutphs He must be heard to
be appreciate* He conjures the eye and
ear, not the cjm critical understanding,
which, indeeclie does not address. It
wa3 particular so with Marshall, whose
gifts were enjreiy oral, as I have been
told by my filers, excellent judges of
his remarkale jiowers. I knew him
only in his la%- years, when his habits
had impaired iim physically and men
ially. He isijid to have culminated at
forty, and a Howard to have steadily de
clined.
H<* was nned for his par.-asm and
repartee, for wich he had unquestioned
latent, many specimens of which are
still cited in *:lt Blue Grass region. He
-aid of his kintaan, the Rev. Robert J.
Brei-kenriilge, who had been a lawyer,
that, after thin-, Bob took to tiie Bible
and he to tlie Lttle. ‘‘And people t ay,”
he continued, that I have stuck closer
to my text that he has to his.” Brock
enridge was ailicted to intense bitter
ness of speech toward his adversaries,
in spite of his clerical catling. Having
violently attack'd Robert WtckUffe, yin
aged citizen of Lexington, held in wide
esteem, he ponounoed him a hoary
headed slanderer and Rio ner ; but hoped
that the Lord would forgive him as
he (B ) did. Jfawhall considered this
rather Pitaris.tiii, and meeting his kins
man in the 6trset, jeja>Mt*'d slyly, “H
the Lord forgives aw wickliffe as you
forgive him, B)b, won’t be catch hell,
though?”
Ii waa Marshall after his election
to Congress in 1841, arose while a dnzan
members were asking for tecognition,
and roared out amid general laughter
(the Sto.iv i- now veiy familiar), “I have
been in Washington six weeks, and nave
caught evervthifi|~bitt the speaker’s
eye.”
Some one‘.old hm t hat lie destroyed
his influence as a temperance speaker by
so frequently breaking hi? pledge. ■ Not
at all,” was his reply. “After 1 have ad
vocated the grr at benefit of abstinence, 1
phow in my own p'-rson tire deplorable
evil of drunkenness. I preach temper
ance eloqnentjv ar.d then illustrate in
tempeia ice still more eloquently by a
terrible spree.” —Junius Henri Brome, in
Hay B /ford's
“German
Syrup”
J. C. Davis, Rector of St. James’
Episcopal Church, Eufaula, Ala.:
“My son has been badly afflicted
with a fearful and threatening cough
for several months, and after trying
several prescriptions from physicians
which failed to relieve him, he has
been perfectly restored by the use ol
two bottles of Bo-
An Episcopal schee’s German Syr
up. I can recom-
Rector. mend it without
hesitation.” Chronic
severe, deep-seated coughs like this
are as severe tests as a remedy can
be subjected to. It is for these long
standing cases that Boschee’s Ger
man Syrup is made a specialty.
Many others afflicted as this lad
was, will do well to make a note ol
this.
—I.Jg. Arnold,. Montevideo, Minn.,
for a Cold on the LufJgs. I have
never found an equal tp it —far less
a superior. j Q>
G. G. GREEN, Sole Man’fr, Woodbury,N.J.
W. C. JEFFORDS,
-3 Real Estate Dealer, □—
Has a Large and Attractive Line of Improved and Unimproved Property, Orange
Groves and Phosphate Tracts in this and adjacent Counties. For Particulars
Call on or Address,
W. C. Jeffords ------ Ocala, Florida,
iIARBLE DEALER AND
UNDERTAKER,
Have a fall stock of Colins, Caskets, and Burial
Saits of every description. Special attention
paid to burial services.
Embalming to Order.
All orders from tbs country, either by iet.er ■>:
telegraph, will receive prompt attention.
Also a complete ltue of Monuments and Head
stone®. For any work or material indicated
call on or address.
D. E. MeIYER. : : : OCALA. 'FLA
lyfian
Don't forget to visit the cheap shoe
store of Neely & Cos. 31oct
For Sale—Near Dunnellon.
The south half of the south half of the
southwest quarter, sec 35. twp 16 south,
of range 20 cast. Also, the west half of
the northeast quarter, and the northwest
quarter, sec 19, twp 19, range 23 ea-t,
mile sou h f Wildwood. For perticu-.
lare address, G. P., Box 45, Greenwich,,
Conn. *loapr3m
gpeciat Notice.
OTFICE or ULtVEU. COIKISSION Cos. \
Chicago, 1u.., Jan. 21,M51. j
A. B. Girardeau, Savanna#. Go. :
DzarSib: My son. a man of 30 yesrs, was a
tanked with La Grippe. and, believing it to be
ot malarial origin, took your Johnson’s Tonic
as dlrreo.-l for Chills and Fever. rii ris ilt was
be escaped the Fever w uch follows the seveie
aching, and was able to bo at work the second
day. I was taken with the disease. Every bone
in me began to ache, and my suffering was great
I was compelled to go home and to t <l. I ftilly
exported to be there a week. My son told me of
hisexoerier.ee, and urged me to take Johnson’s
Chill end Fever Tonic. I did so, took it with
regularity all through tha night, ftnd was sgrea
bly surprised to see that no tevv came. ;l con
tinued until I ha 1 eight doses—felt weak and
exhausted, but no fever, and aching disap
peared. Next morning I had a good appetite
for my breakfast, felt quite well, ,at.d; we_it to
my bcslness as well'as I ever was. Since then I
have tried it with like results on. two other
cases. Your truly,
W. W. CALDWELL,
President and Manager.
La Grippe corresponds very nearly with our
Broken llone Fever or Dengue Fever. Johnson’s
Chill and Fever Tonic is & specific lor any mala
rial trouble, hence it cares La Grippe.
For Sal# by all Druggists, and one 50 cent bot
tle guaranteed to euro in every instance, or
money refunded.
NOTICE OF INCREASE OF CAPI
TAL. STOCK.
VTOTKEIB HEREBY GIVEN THAT AT A
IN| me.'lnr of'he st.rf-kho'dews of the Grata A
Hlue River Phosphate Company, held on the 22nd
day o' Det-emuer A. D. 1890 au election Was then
and there held bv said stockholders to increase
the capital stock of sanl comoany to t'>e
sum ot Three Million Dollars, that said
election was held in conformity with the by-laws
of said company and a majority ot the stock
then and there present voted for said increase
of said capital stO‘-k : and that subsequen l ly, to
wit ton thetWth day of January, t. 1).. 18" 1, the
directors of said company in conformi'y
with the action ot aatd stockholders, did by their
votes increase th< capital stoek of said company
to said sum of Three Million Dollars; that said
increrso of said capital stock wus then and there
i . oe in shares of One Hundred Dollars each and
m. .1 up in lands described, in general, as follows.
Pi wit:
bANDS IS Sttw ASSES COI’STY, ri.OftlDi.
i township 4 south, range 11: 120 acres in sec
lion 4- loji ecr. sin sect! tSs•' aercsin sec'ion 8;
o*,i acres in section 22; 800 acreE.dn section 14; 570
< >■■* in section 18; 69 acres in section 23; 40 acres
p.- suction 15: 220 acres in section 24; 40 acres in
sonon 3; HO acres in section 9; 682 acres in sec
lloua to, 21 and 28.
--! townshipsouth, range II: 449 acres in sec
tions 1, 8 and 17.
township iiitb, range )2: 160 acres in fcc
tiou <4O. „ ,
. township 4 south, range 12: 2‘o acres in sec
111... I.'; 4*o acres ip. section 19; 360 acres in section
Is i ceres in s ctionlfi; 120 acres lu section 8>; 4 •
ai-iwt tn section 21.
,SP3 IX 1 A F IYRTTB COUNTY, Fhr RIDA.
.-o hundred and forty acres in section 36,
tou.tKU’P 6 south, range 10; 640 acres insect'onU;
320 cres tn section 22; 40 aer s in taction 1; 40
aei.v, in section 12, in township 7 souih. range 10:
1.. mwnshipO south, range 11: sec ions 35 and
36-. i acres in section 21; 120 acres in section 32:
su s. res in section 13; 10 lacres lu section 19; 160
am -■. in ction 2"; 320 acres in section 21. 321
act in section 2t; 280 acres in section 2!; 120
aco-atn section 24; 160 acres iu section 2>; 820
suits' in section 26; 8.20 acres in section 27; 240
r ch in section *; 220 acres ill section 29; 240
aco-, in section 30; 80 acres in section 31; 32u
BCK". in section 32.
j owusnip7 south, range 11: 10 acres in sec
tion 32) acres iu section 20 sections 28, 81 and
30. j-i acres in section 16; 160 acres in section 20;
so H--.es in s-ctii n 30.
<i oiwnship Gsouth, range 12: 480 acres in sec
tioi >: 200 acres in sec'iou 17:400 acre* in section
IS ~:tion 19; 360 acres iu section 20; *6O acres in
•eci .tt 21; 320 acn s in sect on 22; 320 acres in sec
tion acres in set lion 29- section 30; 67 acres
in ss. uou3l; 360 acres n secion 16; the whole
agg -gating 18,t00acres of laud in said LaFayelte
aw. iwanne- Counties.
\i . t h .aid land is valu<l by the corporators of
i.aii> .impauy at the sum of S2 20",000. that being
ihe oouut of the increase anove the original
-imis. it of capital stock ol SmOiUOO and said lands
Peiu, additional to tlp.se embraced and describ and
inn - original Artfcles of Incorporation of said
Ooioiwny; that the stink or shares o! said c >mpa
ny. Che sum of -2,200,000, is issued lor the pur
,-ha. -of said land* herein, forming the said ia
cret •, of said capital stock of said Company.
Office of )
TH iI.A an Bi.ue River PHOSriIATE Cos. V
-cai a, Florida. AraiLß A. D. 1891. }
1 ..scpli T. Lancaster, Secretary of the tuala
and ue River l‘hophte Company, do hereby
cert iv that the foregoing notice is a true copy of
itso"Cnal now of ti cand record in the office of
sai<- ompanyand that it gives the true date,
amc u*i and subscription for the increased capi
tal Hueii of said C ompany as authorized astherein
set loim. . , , , ,
Witness my hand and the corporate seal of th#
said company. Q WPI(jHT . PrM .
J. T. Lancaster, Sec. 4-l7tf
In the Circuit Court, Fifth Judicial Circuit of
Florida, in nud for Marion county—lu
chancery.
James Cribbctt, Complt)
vs. > Foreclosure of
Green W. Hector, et al. ) Mortgage
BY VIRTUE OF A FINAL DEGREE OF THE
Circuit Court of the sth Judicial Circuit of
Florida, i and for Marion county, in chancery
sitting bcaripg date. March 16th. 1891, in above
MOt,'DA 1' THE UTU DA YOFBAY, A. D„ XS9I,
during the legal hours of sale, at the couit bouse
door in Ocala, Marion county, stale ot Florida,
off' r for sale at public outcry to the h ghost bid
der for cash, the following described prop rty,
to-wit:
That certain tract or parcel of land situate in
Marion county, state of Florida, and mine par
ticular!} des.-ribed as follows, to-wtt: The south
half id "the southeast of section elevt .
and the southwest quarter of the southwest quar
ter of section twelve and the northeast quarter
of the north ast quar er of section fourteen, in
township seventeen, south of tansro tweuty-iwo
east comainiux ICO ac es of land more or )e—, or
so much thereof a* may be sufficient to sati.’y
said decree and costs. O. T. GREEN,
Special Master in Ccancery.
March 27th.
In the Circuit Court, Fifth Judicial Circuit, Mar
ion C unty Florida.—lu Chancery.
Wright & Frazer )
vs Bill to Enforce Lien.
T. Brigham Bishop et al )
IT APPEARING BY AFFIDAVIT APPENDED
t > the bill tiled in tho above state 1 causa that
1 BKIGHaM BISHOP and S\ AH A. BISHOP,
the defendant therein named are non-residents
of the State of Florida and are rest entsot 1 lif
ion. Star! of New Jerv.y, and over the age of
twriity-one years, it is ttnr._f.re Oidercd Hist
-aid non-resident defendants be and they are
hrebv required 10 answer or <leuutr to the bill of
complaint ii:ed in seid cause on • r tiefore
iIOXD.I V, Tim UTll DAY OF MAY, A. D. ISOI,
Otherwise the allegations of said bili will be
taken as conf.os ti by suid a- fendant.
It is further ordered that this order be publish
ed once a week tor four consecutive wee's iu the
Ocali Banner, a news. apur published iu said
county and .State. Thisb’sttt March. 1891.
I I D A. MILLER, cletk.
( SLil ' [ l;v 8. T. StSTKt'NK, D
Bullock & Burford solicitor for l omplaiuaut.
Saprlltd
NOTICK OF SALE.
EY VIBTCE CF A DI3TRES3 WARRANT
> issue t By Richard McCouathy, county
judge for Marion couniy. Florida, iu a certain
CHitso pending before -ai.l county judgo, wherein
Robt. 8. Clark is piaintld and 8. s. Bnyder Is de
feudant.. I have levied upon, and will, in pur
suance of law, on
MOXOAY, MAY iTIf, 1331,
within the legs! hours f sale, in front of the
south door of the cou t house, in i>ea!a, Florida,
sell fir cash to the highest bidder, the following
personal pi ope-tv, to-wilt
One (1) bat-rack, five <5) barber chairs, three (3)
-how-e.ises, one (l) comb nation case for mugs,
six (r>) spri g bottom ciutli chairs; all now located
iu the northwest corner room, ground f! .or < 1
the Montezuma Hotel building, in ocala, Marion
county, Florida.
E. T. WILLIAMS, Pheriff,
L Marion County, Florida.
Apr 24
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
LAND OFFICE AT >
Gaintsviu.lt, Fla., Apr. 11,1891. |
Notice is hereby given that the
following named settler ha* filed notice of
her iutestion to make final proof in support of her
claim.and that said proof will be made b fore
D. r . Miller, Clerk Circuit Court, at Ocala, Flor
ida, on
JUNE 10 TIT, 1831,
viz : MARGARET COOS, widow of Mack D.
O ou, deceased, of Candler, Fla , homestead No.
19123 for the of uejqand u% of sec. 7, twp.
17 -outb. rauge 22 east.
She names the following witness s to prove her
continuous residence upon, and cultivation of
said land, viz:
Marshall -hii gier. Wade Gibson, Walter Glymp
Calvin Booth, ot Hellevicw. Fl.
4-17 A LEX A N DER LYKCH, Reg ster.
Executor's Notice c pplication For
Final Discharge.
Notice is hereby given that on May 7th, 1891, I
will present my cocoa ius and apply to the county
judge of Marion county, Florida, for a final dis
charge. MILES J. MIXON,
Eiewct/ r of the will of Charles J. Mixon.
Sloctfim
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
All perscu having claims or demands against
the , stale of Harvey Knight, deeea-ed, late of
Bellevtew. Florida are notified to present them to
me without delay.
EI.LIEG. KNIGHT.
Aa Administrator of the EMateof Harvey Kulght, .
IWKvfcw, Fla.. March 30.139 L Ap 3gw j
Notice of Application for Final Dis- |
charge.
Notice is hereby given that on the 23rd of June I
1881. I will make my final settlement and apply i
to the County Judge of Marion eoanty, Florida, j
for final discharge.
Francis A. Brasxi l
Adm. of estate of Thomas C. Mnnroe, dec eased. ’
ldecfimos
roRHEN mm\
LOST or FALUNG kLANEOOTi :
tMn’rnir" 1 — 1 uiinYoti sskutys
fii'ia l M||.! Weakness of Body and Xisd. Ejects
MldSil'llll ->f Rrrorsor Zxocesea is Older Young.
ScMc BASKOOaS folly klntantl. Ha* ttwhifj# e*d
WIAS, CSOITItM)P£I>OR*%VB* PARTS OF BOJUf.
AbooMtotr uMUoc BOSS TREATSIn <Uy.
Ben tnm AO WMm znd Fomifn Costrl#. fTrtw tWau
Beocrlo'.i-* Bssk. *y-laai.*.': a anA pnof% bbll-8}
aadres. ERIE MEDICAL CO., BUFFALO, N. Y.
Cedar Pests for Sale.
W. al. Martin, lumber dealer, at Flor
ida Southern freight depos has another
car load of the everlasting cedar posts
for sale cheap. 4-241 m *
bhyvlclaos.
JYHO9. P. GARY, M. D ,
PHYSICIAN ASD SCRaeON.
Rooms. Agnew * Gary’s Block, OCALA. _
Twenty-seven year’s, experience in Frerida
Diseases. dsjan3m wlanlo,B7-lj
T. J. MYERS, M. D„ O. A. DWEL £Y, Jt. D-.
Lake Weir, Fla. Ocala, Fla
MYERS & DWELIEY,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Office Banner Block.
udeefimaa
JJR. T. P. LLOYD
—PHYSICIAN AND St'KOEON—
Office Loyd Block, CorTpond & Expo. St. Offlco
Hc-’TS 2tolla. M 2 to 4P.M„BtoIO P. M.
Riftn by Peniiunion to Frank P. Godson and B. IF.
ljanly Chandler.
J AMES CHACK.
DENTIST.
Special attention given to Crown Bridgework,
Goldplates, and ail iirst-class operation pertain
ing to the Denial Art. Gas administered for tha
painless extraction of teeth. Office In Firt Na
tional Bank Building. SOct tf
yy 11. MAREAN.
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN.
1 ’hruuic Diseases a -pecimty. Electro Vapor and
Medicated Baths. Office hours 9to 12 m. from
2tosp. m. Office one square below Ocala Hons*
opposite Dunn's Park. lfeblv dAw
P. IZLAR, M. D.,
—PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON—
'.oice;—Legal Row, - -' - - Ocala, Florida
iimay tf
J NO. M. THOMPSON, M. D.,
Physician and Sukoeon,
Having located permanently, offers his profes
sional serv ces to the citizens of Ocala and sur
rounding country.
OFFICE; BANNER BLOCK,
Formerly occupied by Dr. R. D. Thompson.
*2l tab-90
yy v - NEWSOM, M. U.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Offilce iu Gary Block, up stairs. Room 7.
Ocala Florida
27sept6m
Attorneys.
N. i BEEN,
attcrney-at-law.
Land matters u Speclaltv. Office over Hood A
ljulyly Nash’s store.
RAYMOND B. BULLOCK,'
ATTORNEYS- at-law,
Gary Block, Ocala, - Florida.
April U-lf.
SAMUEL F. MARSHALL,
kJ
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Ijifayettee Block, Ocala, Florida.
27septly
yy K. ZEWADSKI,
ATrORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 5, Gary Block, .... Ocala, Florida.
Cdeptly
W. 8. BULLOCK. B. A. BCRFOIIP
gULLOCK A BURFORD,
LAWYERS.
Will practice iu all State and United Stales
Couits.
Banner Block may 2-1 •
J~ G. REARDON,'
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Ocala, ..... Florid
febi^6-ly
lb. ANDERSON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Rooms 9 and 11. Marion Block.
Ocala, FLA
pr 8,1887.
■ -it* ■ wsrir rn - .
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 8, Gary block Ocala, Florida.
May2-lvr.
J R. MOORHEAD,
CITY AND COUNTY SURVEYOR
Residence at Old Methodist Parsonage.
29mch89
rp J. FLOOD,
BUrEf.YISIM; ARCHITKOr,
Furnishes plans, specifications and estimates
Office ever Merchant’s National Bank,
marstf
HulM tt lliifdiill
Call your atten
tion to their ex
tensive stock oi
Stoves, Tinware,
Crockery, Doors
Sash, Blinds and
Hardware. Call
and see our stock
of wheelbarrows,
shovels, picks&c,
&c., before buy
ing elsewhere.
Our prices and
goods are guar
anteed to give
satisfaction.
HUBBARD & MACDUFF.
Tutfs Pills
This popular rcmtdy mtw fall* U
effottuaily car*
Dyspepsia, Constipation, Bick
Headache, Biliousness
And all diseases arising from a
Torpid Liver and Bad Digestion.
The natnral reenlt la wood aopetlto
and solid Hash. Som snail i ,i(,ap
Ijr suar coaled and easy to swallow.
SOLD EVERYWHERE.
|=p. a f^glrs§|
; O—O e :
fci!iEpErMi*ilEpGTiiEEfi]
| MARION BLOCK, OCALA, FLA. j
i id year* experience in Railroad, Gauze and i
Government work in the State. |
!- LOCATING PHOSPHATE AND MINERAL !
LANDS A SPECIALTY.
i 27deetd *
OCALA PLANING HILL,
mm, sash and Blind Factory,
Building and Contracting.
Doors, Sash, Blinds and
Mouldings made from Kiln
Dried Lumber.
Lumber.
Lath.
Shingles.
Flooring.
Ceiling.
Siding.
Shelving.
Newels.
SA W MILL BILLS CUT TO ORDER.
W. T. TAYLOR, Proprietor.
Lock Box N, Ocala, Fla.
CHEMICAL LABORATORY,
<x\ SERGE MALYVANtx>
Room 5, Gary Block, - - - Ocala, Fla.
Over Hubbard ifr MacDuJf’t Hardware Store.
CHBMICAL. ANALYSIS OF SOILS,
PHOSPHATES : FERTJLIZEKS : KAOLINb
3)an6m
PALACE DRUG STORE
WRIGHT & FRAZER,
“Wholesale and Retail Dealers'
Pure Dxiigs, Illuminating and Lubricating Oils, Lamp*,
Stationery of all tirades and Kinds, Toilets ami
Fancy Article*.
CSTFine Brands of Cigars and Smokers’Articles always on band.
Specialties; Heeds of all kinds; largeet Hock and hm-m prKv*—warrut*-d
V/ ALL PAPER
Beautiful Patterns Elegant Hesigua; prices very low. PKESCHII’TION>
Carefullv Compounded. Reraenal>er
jn3-lv THE PALACE DRUG STOHK.
xm. SEEDS. im
NEW CROP SEEDS, TURNIP, CABBGE AND BEET SEEDS.
A FULL LINE of PURE DRUGS and MEDICINES
STATIONERY, TOILET ARTICLES, ETC,
—oooooooooo | 0000000000—
AGLN'I fOR CRAB ORCHARD SPRINGS WATER, THOMPSON’S ItUOMIM
ARSk.SIt SPRINGS WATER , AND IHE Si AR OF
DETHELEM MINERAL WATEh
AL GOODS SIL.D \S I.OVV AS THE LOWEST At D THE QUALITY
l— —GUARANTEED.— |
Hawke's Celebrated Spectacles,
W m. ANDERSO.%
Wholesale and Retail Druirgist and Opting.
R. E. YONGE & CO..
THE
OCALA PLUMBERS
WORK
Orders for Tin and Sheet Iron work Filled Promp tl>
MAIN ST., OPPOSITE MONTEZUMA HOTEL.
dec24tfdw
AP Qfs9 l c>l !
peninsula j
l! MARTINS
6j _ Sil(£To cue myt
t JVSCb; £/-' or
a |
ORANGE GROVE,. -2. Ti&Z j J
phosphate lands
OCALA CITY PROPERTY.
LARGE BODIES OF RAILROAD AND DISSTON
LANDS. ALSO SOME FINE
PROPERTY AT McINTOSH.
SEVERAL TRACTS OF
PHOSPHATE LANDS.
I HAVE SOME FINE
THAT WILL PAY HANDSOME INTEREST ON
THE INVESTMENT. ALSO SOME SPLENDID
BARGAINS IN
Call on or address,
J. H. LIVINGSTON,
Rrom 6. Marlon Blook. Ooala, Ft*.
lijantd
Doors
Sasli.
B ind
Mouldings
Brackets.
Turning
Saving.
Balisters.
LARGE TRACTS OF TIMBR LANDS.

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