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The Ocala banner. (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.) 1883-194?, August 14, 1891, Image 2

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The Ocalaßanner
F. E. HARRIS, Editor.
MEMBER OF
FLORIDA PRESS ASSOCIATION.
AFFILIATED WITH
NATIONAL EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION.
FRIDAY, AUGUST U. 1891.
ONLY ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM
The Banker seems to be “in it.”
The convict lease system is on its last
legs in Tennessee.
Eminent writers claim that com
mercial union with Canada will soon be
followed by political union.
A perfume lamp, which burns cologne,
and spreads a delightful scent about the
room, is the latest household novelty.
The Duval county tax eales cover
“about twelve pages of the Times-Union.
What’s the matter with Dural? She
seems to be all wrong.
Ralph Beaumont, one of the most pop
ular of the Alliance lecturers and well
remembered in Ocala, is campaigning in
Ohio and Michigan.
The Tallahassean sayß that Judge Me
Lean has purchased steel rails for his
road, the Florida, Georgia & Western,
and the work will bo pushed lorward to
imrnediatecompletion. This road passes
through the famous Bteenhatchie
country.
They have a unique way of advertis
ing Sam Jones in Texas. Here is a
sample poster: “Blood, hair, and the
ground torn up about a mile around.
Sam P. Jones from July 15th to July
19th, Send for catalogue. Call for ex
cursion rates.”
The Rev. Dr. T. W. Moore has under
taken to discover the Florida volcano
for the Century Publishing Company.
The Doctor is determined to find it or
else ascertain what causes the wonder
ful phenomena of this pillow of fire at
night and pilow of smoke in the day
time.
Truth seems to be everywhere fet
tered and seems impossible to make the
least headway. For instance so reliable
a paper as the New York Times says of
the Florida senatorial election:
The Florida case la one of peculiar turpitude,
because the game was played between members
of the same party, and the defeated men repre
sented a railroad company.
When Campbell was renominated for
governor of Ohio even Democrats,
that is, those who were opposed
to him, predicted his defeat by 25,000,
and Republicans thought that they
would have an easy walk over. But
they sing now to anew tune.
-wgmnlng grounu every day.
Colonel Alex K. McClure, the most
polished of newspaper editors, began
life by first working in a tannery. His
next step was the publication of a
weekly newspaper. The Philadelphia
Times, of which he is now the editor,
has long been recognized as one of the
ablest metropolitan ‘journals in the
country.
The Green Cove Spring is the authority
for the statement that a firm in Macon,
Ga., recently shipped a few watermelons
from that city to Liverpool. England,*
and the melons Btood the trip so well
that but two were injured en roufe and
the others reached their destination in
l>erfect condition and were sold at 75
cents each, if England should become
a market for Southern melons the crop
may become far more profitable than it
has been In the past.
In tbe appointment of Mr. John W
Malone Judge of the Second Circuit,
made vacant by the death of Judge Da
vid S. Walker, Governor Fleming has
done himself infinite credit. Mr. Ma.
lone is a lawyer of excellent capacity
and is the kind of man that just judges
are made of. He is a Florida raised boy,
and one the whole State may well feel
proud of. He was born in Florida, rais
ed in Florida, educated in Florida, mar
ried in Florida, or, at least, married a
Florida girl, and is a thorough-going
Floridian. He possesses a fine physique
and is strictly temperate.
Seventy-five million dollars is con
tributed yearly in the United Statee to
the sustenance of tbe church, $31,000,000
more being given for purposes purely
devotional. Within tiie century now
drawing to a close 150,000,000 copies of
the Bible have been printed in 220 dif
ferent languages. Fifty years ago there
were 502 missionary stations in foreign
parts; there are now 5,705. Fifty years
ago there were 053 ordinary mission
aries; to-day there are 0,690 such serv
ants of tbe Lord. Then there were but
1,226 other laborers and helpers abroad;
now there are 40,552.
Tom Sawyer’s Cruel Advloe.
In a recent article in the Florida Dis
patch, Farmer and Fruit Grower, our
’steemed “sand-spur” plilosopher, Col.
Tom Sawyer, gives substantially this ad
vico to fathers: Establish around your
firesides a sort of lecture room where
yon can get yonr boys and girls around
you; explain to them the theories of
government; the growth of parties and
“all about the tariff." We earnestly and
most vehemently pretest. Lock them
np in dark cloeets; take them through
dismal places ana frighten them by tiie
recital of ghost stories; let them plead
in vain for Ice-cream and keep them
away from the circus; do anylhing to
them that will mar the delight* of child
hood, but don’t torture them with dis
cussions on the tariff. Don’t do it. The
insane asylums are already full.
Public School Notice.
All school supervisors and teachers
will take notice that the examination
for white teachers will be held at An
thony Friday and Thursday August 20th
and 21st, 1891.
The Board has fixed the days for the
opening of all schools September 6th
and 13th and October 4th.
Supervisors are required to notify me
at an early day as possible which of
these days the patrons of their respec
tive Bchools wish them opened so I can
send out contracts accordingly.
Bv order of the Board.
2t’ M. L. Payne, Snot.
THE SENATORSHII’.
GOV. FLEMING’S ADDRESS TO
THE PEOPLE OP FLORIDA.
Who Will be Mr. Call’s Successor?
The revised statutes of the United
States provides that it shall be the doty’
of the Executive of the State from
which any senator has been chosen to
certify his election under seal of the
State to the President of the Senate of
the United States, and Governor Flem
ing, not believing that Mr. Wilkinson
Call was constitutionally elected a Sena
tor from this State, gives his reasons, in
a very able and carefully prepared
document, why he does not believe he
was elected, and why, therefore, be can
not certify, under the seal of the State,
to his election.
The Governor covers the whole
ground ; he gives all the arguments on
the subject, those holding that Mr. Call
was duly and constitutionally elected,
and those holding that he was noi so
elected, and reaches his conclusion after
deliberate and careful consideration,
and we do not believe that it is possible
to controvert bis position without dis
torting the plain meaning of words and
doing violence to the plain construction
of language.
Tiie Governor cites the case of Mr.
Harlan, of lowa, as a case directly in
point, amt with a remarkable similarity
as to the number of votes both Mr. Har
lan and Mr. Call received. The cases in
every way are almost identical. The
Governor quotes the convincing argu
ment of Senator Bayard on this case,
which was so clear that the Senate de
cided that Mr. Harlan was not entitled
to his seat. The following is the quota
tion:
"On this state of facts, the question which I
suppose to arise Is, whether the Legislaiure of a
State, under the language of a Federal Constitu
tion, delegating to the Legislature the right to
elect Senators of the United States, is to be taken
to mean the Individual members of the Legisla
ture, or the body or bodies of which the Legisla
ture Is composed. I suppose the term as used in
the Constitution means the bodies of which the
Legislature is composed. The honorable Senator
from Georgia, if I appreciate his argnmeut, in
sisto that the power being delegated to the Legis
lature is vested in the members of the Legisla
ture, and that whenever a majority of the mem
bers of the whole Legisleture, under a law as
that existing in lows, vote for a man, he is
elected, though one of the co-ordinate branches
of that Legislature may not vote for him, and
may, as a body, refuse to go into an election.
Sir, I hold it to be a principal of law which has,
I think no exception that where two integral
bodies are authorized to do an act, it cannot be
done without the consent of those two integral
bodies. They must both be present and act in
the matter, or there can be no validity in the
act done. This is a universal law. I can call to
mindjno case where a contrary principle pre
vails, whether relating to legislative action or
corporate action. Indeed, in reference to corpo
rations, It has been decided over and ovei again
that where there are two integral bodies who
must concur in an act, they must both be present
and act upon tbe matter as bodies, not as indi
viduals.’ •
In the face of this language, so strong
ly and forcefully put by Senator Bayard,
and the numerous other authorities
cited by Governor Fleming, the Times-
Union pretends that the Governor’s ar
guments are weak and his conclusions
absurd, and endeavors to bolster up its
own position by a contribution from Mr.
A. W. Cockerell, in which that gentle
man seeks to show that a majority of
botii houses does not mean a majority of
both houses, but that itjsimply means a
majority of tbe two in their joint ca
pacity. But Governor Fleming shows
the utter absurdity of this forced and
distorted meaning of words about which
ordinarily there would be no misunder-
SMTrarmg. rr trrese woras mean tnat to
elect a Senator it requires simply.fifty
one, that being a majority of all the
members of the Legislature, as that body
is composed of an even hundred, wbv
the necessity of the two houses meeting
in joint assembly at all? The lower
branch of the Legislature is composed
of a greater number than fifty-one and
that body could have acted independ
ently of the Senate in the matter of the
election of a Senator. But the Consti
tution did not mean, in saying a ma
jority of both houses a majority of one
house and less tbau a majority of the
other. See how clear Gov. Fleming
makes this point:
li the construction contended for iu the argu
meut for Mr. Gall is correct, it would follow as a
logical sequence that the House of Representa
tives, which in the number of Us members con
stitutes a majority of all the members elected to
both bouses,, ts competent to elect a Senator
without participation by the Senate: and, in
deed, witb 51 members of tbe Honse present and
voting, aud no member of the Senate, and 26
votes cast for a l individual (being a majority of
51) would elect a Senator. Would it be con
tended by any one that snob an election would
be the choosing of a Senator by the Legislature,
as required by the Constitution?
Governor Fleming’s opinion is upheld
by the ablest lawyers and the ablest
statesmen of the country, and there
seems uow but little doubt that his
opinion will be accepted by the Senate
as conclusive, and Mr. Call’s so-called
election, not being as prescribed by tiie
Constitution, tiie next question to be
settled is, who will Governor Fleming
appoint to supply the vacancy caused
by the constitutional failure of the
legislature to elect his successor?
Of course the Times-Union and its
following wants him to appoint Mr.
Chipley. But Governor Fleming, hav
ing done himself and his administra
tion supreme credit so far, he will
hardly now do that which his bitterest
foes would rejoice most to see him do.
And we say this in no disparagement or
disrespect to Mr. Chipley. He has ren
dered valuable service to the State; the
State perhaps owes him a greater debt
of gratitude than any other man in it.
He is an active, pushing citizen and a
sound, faithful and zealous Democrat;
but his own deliverance on this subject
makes his selection out of tiie question.
Mr. Dunn, in our opinion, wonld
make a devoted, laborious and faithful
officer, but his appointment, after his
letter of renunciation, would make his
position an awkward one, so iiis selec
tion is also out of the question. So of
others that we might name.
It occurs to us that Gov. Fleming not
only owes a duty to himself by main
taining and upholding the credit ol his
administration, which up to the present
time has been so non partisan and able,
but iu the selection of a proper peisou
for this office he owes a special doty to
the Democratic party. His selection
should be one, other things being equal,
against whom there should be the least
feeling.
It is a patent fact that the Democratic
party is uow torn by dissensions and
factions, and is further disturbed by the
occasional mumblings of the organiza
tion of a third party, so tire Governor’s
appointment should be a man who,
more than all others, could bring all
discordant factions together and present
as solid a front in the next campaign as
the exigency of things will udmit of.
We believe that Mr. Wm. D. Blox
ham would, more thau any other man,
do this. We were not the best pleased
in tbe world with the manner of his
withdrawal from the Senatorial race, but
his very attitude in that race makes
him the man who would be the beat
pleasing, or at any rate, the least dis
pleasing, to either faction. There is no
disguising tbe fact that he is still the
popular idol of the Democratic party
and that his popularity is not confined
to the boundary line ol either faction,
and be, more than any other man, will
bring these factions more closely to
gether.
Tne appointment of most any other
man will intensify, rather than soften,the
feelings that now se| arate these factions.
There now remains bat little doubt
that tbe appointment of Gov. Fleming
will be seated, and we are sincere in tbe
belief that Mr.. Bloxham's appointment
will be a long step in destroying the bit
terness of these factional feuds which
for tiie Eecurity of the Democratic party
in the next campaign is all important.
It is agreed that it should be unified and
strengthened, and wiiose but Bloxham’s
appointment would have that desirable
effect ? The circumstances of the times
and the turmoil in which the Demo
cratic party finds itself, and the dangers
which encompass jt, makes nis tbe most
fitting appointment.
THE TICKETS FOR ’Ol2.
Ur Ift of Political Discussions by
Leading Journals.
Boston Globe (Detn.): Gov. Pattison,
of Pennsylvania, seems to be worrying
the Presidential slate-makers a good deal
by his clean and vigorous administration
of the State’s affairs. This is one of the
penalties of attending strictly to business
nowadays.
Knoxville Tribune (Dem.): It is an
nounced that Gov. Leon Abbett, of New
Jersey, is an active candidate fcT Vice-
President on the Democratic ticket. It is
said that the New Jersey delegation will
be solid for Cleveland and Abbett. The
West will probably have something to say
about that ticket. New York and New
Jersey are too close together.
Providence Journal (Ind.) : Governor
Boies will, of course, be hailed as a Presi
dential possibility if he carries lowa again
this year, but it is decidedly premature
for the enthusiastic Democrats of that
State to be shouting for his nomination at
this early day. He has the prestige of
former success and present possession in
his fight for re-election, but lowa is far
from being a Democratic State beyond a
question.
Boston Herald (Ind.) : After the list
of the alleged anti Cleveland Democratic
leaders of Massachusetts is lessened by
subtracting those who have not been
Democrats of late years, those who dis
claim being in sympathy with the move
ment against Mr. Cleveland and those
whose names have been used without their
knowledge, it will be found that the men
left then are confined principally to un
successful applicants for office while Mr.
Cleveland was President.
Richmond Times (Dem.) : The Times
has always from the very beginning of the
rivalry between ex President Cleveland
Governor Hill, or any other Democratic
aspirant for political honors, recognized
the bad policy of censuring one at the ex
pense of the other. For apart from the
fact that such a course has a tendency to
foment dissensions in the party, the paper
or the political leader who indulges in it
lays itself or himself open to gross self
stultification. If it or he is a loyal Demo
crat they both must give their support to
the their party.
Chicago Nows (Ind.) : Whether or not
Mr. Blaine’s name will be brought before
next year's Republican Convention will
not depend upon, thia-vooifaroug. iitantitm’’-
in his behalf by the Wolverines. There
is a distinct public impression that Michi
gan’s anxiety to see Blaine dragged into
the Presidential race is that Alger may
climb on the shoulders of the man from
Maine to get within hailing distance of
any office in sight.
Philadelphia Ledger (Ind.): The im
pression still prevails that Mr. Blaine’s
health will not permit him to be a candi
date, and that he will so state if occasion
renders it necessary for him to do so. In
that event there can be but little reason to
doubt that Mr. Harrison will be Ihe first,
best found choice of the Republican party
Kearney (Neb.) Hjib (Rep.): Blaine
and Paddock will sweep Nebraska like a
whirlwind. With Blaine and Paddock
there will be no fear of a doubtful Repub
lican State in the Northwest.
St, Paul Globe (Ind. Dem.): The
friends of Cullom are generally personally
hostile to Harrison. They are looking for
chances to work in the dagger between his
ribs. Cullom has never been anything
but a politician, and has acquired the
oleaginous habit of those who slip into
nice things all the time. His cause has
al ways floated on prosjierous waters, and
he has faith in his star. He has the per
sonal popularity of a genial fellow, and
has never been caught in any political
scandals. It may be that his boom will
be worth watching in the quiet hours of
leisure before the political storm.
Delightful Resorts.
Our readers who are desirous of find
ing pleasant places to spend the Summer
should bear in mind that the Chicago &
North-Western Railway furnishes every
facility for a rapid, safe and comfortable
journey from Chicago to Wankesha,
Madison, Lake Geneva, Neenah, Mar
quette St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth,
Ashland, Lake Minnetonka, Yellowstone
National Park and the mountain re
sorts of Colorado and the far west.
Fast vestibuled trains, equipped with re
clining chairs, parlor cars, palace sleep
ing and dining cars, afford patrons of
the North-Western every luxury inci
dent to travel by a first-class railway.
Excursion tickets at reduced rates and
descriptive pamphlets can be obtained
upon application to any Ticket Agent or
by addressing W. A. Thrall. General
Passenger and Ticket Agent, C. & N. W.
R’v, Chicago, 111 7ang3m
The Weekly Newspaper.
“It must not be supposed,” says the
St. Paul Pioneer Press, that rural
newspapers are mere conduits through
which the news and opinions of the
metropolitan press are distributed in the
ratal districts. On the contrary they are j
the critics and censors of the great city !
dailies. They have more time to ttrnk
than the writers for the latter, wiiose I
often hasty and superficial editorials are i
frequently of lees real value than the
productions of the man who has a we ek
in which to mature his reflections upon
the topics of his choice. The esuntry
newspapers are in many cases the sources
of much original thought that gets into
the city dailies; the nurseries of ideas
which are transplanted in the city hot
houses.”
Standing, with reluctant feet,
Where womanhood and.cbildhood meet
Tis a supreme ’moment. Tis a critical
period! No maiden should attempt passing
this boundry-line without the aid and
assurance of Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescrip
tion. Its helpfulness in tiding over the
perils incident to young womanhood, is
universally acknowledged! No mother
can put within the hands of her daughter,
anything that will prove more valuable in
meeting all her requirements! Dr. Pierce’s
Favorite Prescription Is made expressly
for all diseases peculiar to woman, and is
the only medicine of its kind, sold through
druggists, and guaranteed to give satisfac
tion in every case, or money refunded.
THE OCALA BANNER, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1891.
FLORIDA AT THE WORLD’S
FAIR.
Should not be Outdone by Cali
fornia.
Chicago, Ills., August 2, '9l.
To the Editor of the Banner.
Though I am fanned by tbe breezes
from Lake Michigan instead of thoee
from the Gulf or Atlantic, your valued
paper still reaches me coming by way of
Washington, D. C., where it is first read
by my partner, Mr. J. T. King, and then
forwarded here; and I was much phased
to see in your issue of tbe 17th instant
that Putnam county bad selected dele
gates to a proposed convention, sion to
be held at Orlando, for the purpose of
devising some plan to have Florida rep
resented at the World’s Columbian Ex
position. I hope Marion and all the
other counties of the state will be well
represented at this gathering and that
there may result from a full discussion
of the question some extensive and
practicable arrangement by which Flori
da’s many advantages may be properly
set forth at wbat is to be destined the
“greatest show on earth.” In my judg
ment, the legislature pursued a short
sighted policy in failing to make an ap
propriation for this purpose, always sup
posing it had the constitutional authority
to do so; and now the next best tiling to
be done is for the enterprising people of
tbe state to come together in convention,
Lave a free exchange of views, and re
solve that the state shall be represented.
I have no Florida land to sell and so
am free from the suspicion of being a
“boomer,” but I have traveled over tbe
state from one end to tbe other, and
from its eastern to its western limit, be
coming well convinced uf Its many ad
vantages that two years ago I decided to
make it my future home; and this, too,
after having seen something of more
than half the stales of the union. But
while it is apparent to one who has
traveled over it that the state has many
advantages and almost boundless re
sources, these advantages and resour
ses must be made known to the world if
they are to be made useful, and iu no
way can they be so thoroughly and
widely made known as by a giand dis
play at the World’s Fair. It was my
good fortune to visit the exposition at
Ocala twice last winter, and while I
know that if the people of the whole
state will unite, they can make a greater
display than was there exhibited, that
aggregation of the products of the state
was a magnificent testimonial to what
could be done and was being done on
Florida toil. Such a display l.ere in
1893 will do more for tiie advancement
of the state in material prosperity than
it will cost, ten times over.
There are two things which Florida
very much needs; first, men and money
to develop her natural resourses and im
prove the many advantages with which
nature has blessed her; and second, a
market for her products. Judicious ad
vertising will secure both of these, and
the World’s Fair will be an advertising
sheet spreading all over this continent
and having supplements for the conti
nents beyond the seas!
The best class of emigrants that
ever come to America are those from the
old mother country, England, uo mat
ter what may be said of German thrift
and Irish pluck, and that England will
take a deep interest in the World’s Fair,
make a grand display, and furnish a
large quota of visitors to it, is now as
sured. Commissioners from here have
recently arrived in England and their
retention has been most flattering in
deed, and the interest manifested by
English capitalists and journalists in the
Fair clearly Bhows that England is alive
to her best interests and will not let pass
unimproved so good an opportunity to
advertise tier wares, while at the same
time her enterprising sons will be “spy
ing out the promised land.” But how
are they to know where lies the “garden
.of the gods” unless the inhabitants of
the garden points out tbe way? Much
English money is already invested in
Florida and some of her best citizens
were once subjects of queen Victoria,
and it is a s'mple question of whether
we want mote of the same sort.
Bat we not only want men with
brains and money to develop tbe re
sources which we have in plenty, but
wlieu these resourses are made fruitful
we want, or wilt want, a market for our
products; and just here we should not
forget that Florida lias competition all
along ihe line. South Carolina com
petes witli her in ric? and in her newly
discovered treasure of phosphate; Louis
iana competes with her in sujar, while
California is entering all her markets as
a rival iu fruits and early vegetables.
But Florida has two advantages over her
rival on the Pacific; which it is tasking
the energy of the latter to overcome.
First, Florida is nearer the great mark
ets of the east, and second, her vege
tables and fruits, where known, have
preference in the market; but what
California lacks is natural advantages
her peoplo make up in persevcrence
and energy, so that in this market,
which is in Florida’s legitimate terri
tory, I find the products of California
crowding the stalls and shops, while
Florida seems to have modestly taken a
a back seat. So much is our Pacific
rival alive to tbe importance of adver
tising her wares that the last legislature
in that state made an appropriation of
$300,000 to be expended in an exhibit at
the Fair. And Florida l.as appropriated
nothing! A recent dispatch from Sacra
mento, however, says that State Comp
troller Colgan doubts the constitution
ality of the appropriation act, and will
nse none of the funds until he has ob
tained a decision from the state supreme
court on that point.
There is mncli activity manifested in
World’s Fair matters, a great deal of
work is being done and it appears now
that all will be in readiness for the for
mal opening in October, 1892, when the
buildings are to be completed, though
the Exposition proper will not open till
May, 1893. Bat while that seems a long
way in the lutnre, the time is short for
preparations on so grand a scale, and if
Florida expects to secure desirable space
ami make a creditable showing, she has
not a day to spare. Then let every
county in the state send able representa
tives to Orlando instructed to devise the
best uteaus of showing to the assembled
multitude which will be here from every
part of the inhabited globe, what a
grand country we have between tbe At
lantic and the Gulf, where extremes of
heat nor cold never come, where the
poor find remunerative employment,
tbe man of means profitable fields for
investment, the invalid restored healt h
and the sportsman a paradise. To be
come poetical:
He can swing his hammock neath the orange
tree*,
While his brow is cooled ly the soil sea breeze.
As perennial Bowers the air doth scent
With odors of plenty and sweet content
Very truly,
D. F. Arthur.
Milk and water politicians and news
papers are no longer in demand.
Every public man mast have deciued
views and the courage of his convic
tions.—Economitt.
Those "Good Old Times.”
The gloomy vies given by political
agitators and reformers are no worse
now than they were in that period of
our country’s history which is generally
referred to as the “good old times.” As
early as 1823, then a member of the
lower house of Congress, Mr. Henry
Clay gave this distressing picture of the
condition of the country, which lor ac
tual lamentation and distress beats
many of the Alliar.ee talks of our day.
Listen to Henry’s “ tale of woe:”
“In casting our eyes around us, tiie
most prominent circumstance which
fixes our attention and challenges our
deepest regret, is the general distress
which pervades the whole conntry. It
is forced upon us by numerous facts of
the most incontestable character. It is
indicated by the diminished exports of
native produce; by the depressed and
reduced state of our foreign naviga
tion ; by our diminished commerce;
successive uolhreshed crops of grain
perisiiing in our barns for want of a
market; by tiie alarming diraunition
of our circulating medium; by the nu
merous bankruptcies ; by a universal
complaint of the want of employment,
and a consequent reduction of the wages
of labor; by the ravenous pursuit after
public situations, not for the sake of
their honors and the performance of
their public duties, but as a means of
Crivate subsistence and above all,
y the low and depressed state of the
value of almost every description of the
whole mass of property of the nation,
which has on an average sunk not less
than about fifty per cent, within a few
years It is most painfui t o me to
attempt to sketch, or to dwelt on the
gloom of this picture. But I have ex
aggerated nothing. Perfect fidelity to
the original would have authorised me
to have thrown en deeper and darker
hues.”
The Development of the North
west.
“The. Great Northwest” becomes a
very indefinite phrase as the frontier
moves westward with each decade.
The new states that have recently been
admitted to tbe Union have a good title
to tbe old term “The Great Northwest,”
aud the two Dakotas, Wyoming, Mon
tana, Idaho and Washington make a
great empire of new possibilities. The
Chicago North-Wertern Railway, that
once covered the “Old Northwest,” min
istered to its growth and greatness and
was a great missionary factor in the de
velopment of northern Illinois, Wis
consin, lowa, Northern Michigan, Minne
sota and Nebraska. This was the Old
Northwest, and now, by branch lines or
by its alliance with the Union Pacific
R’y it stretches out its protecting arms
and hand of help to the six new states
which have begun tiieir march in the
path of progress.
What a mighty tide of traffic is served
by th® thousands of miles of railway
that compose tbe Chicago. Union Pa
cific and Northwestern Line! Reaching
sixteen states and the territory of Utah,
and touching more than 2,500 cities and
towns, there is sure to be a wonderful
growth and development, and some
where in this mighty empire, there is al
ways the high tide of prosperity and
great opportunities for capital, brainß
and energy.
The splendid vestibuled trains of the
North-Western, which provide all the
luxuries of travel, convey the traveler
comfortably and safely to nearly every
part of the “Great Northwest.” One of
these trains runs through, solid, from
Chicago to Portland, Oregon, with sleep
ing car from Chicago to San Fransisco
without change—another conveys pass
engers between Chicago and Denver
with the loss of only one business day
en route, ana still another takes them to
the Twin Cities of the northwest (St.
Paul and Minneapolis,) or to the rapidly
growing metropolis, Duluth, without
change, in cars that represent the high
est skill and ingenuity of the best man
ufacturerers in tbe world; combining in
the highest degree, elegance, satety and
luxurious comfort.
Excellent meals in North-Western
Dining-Cars, which enjoy a national rep
utation for excellence, are served at the
uniform price of cents each, and Free
llroHiritig Oilnti C%m an? run OH llmwgtl
trains between Chicago and Council
Bluffs, Omaha, Denver and Portland,
Oregon.
Tne comfort and convenience of pas
sengers desiring to travel at a small ex
pense upon second-class tickets is pro
moted by the provision of accommoda
tions for their use in Tourists or Colo
nists Sleeping Cars, which are supplied
with every requisite for comfort, and in
which completely furnished berths may
be procured through from Chicago to
Portland, Oregon, or Chicago to San
Fransisco at tne nominal rate of $4.00
per bertii.
All ticket agents in the United States
and Canada sell tickets via the North-
Western, and time tables and fall in
formation can be obtained upon applica
tion to any of them, or by addressing
Mr. W. A. Thrall, General Passenger
and Ticket Agent, Chicago, 111.
Garrison on Cleveland.
Mr. Wm. Lloyd Garrison, son of ihe
early abniitionalUt of that name, in a
recent speech, said that Mr. Cleveland's
absence from the White’ lluu-e only
makes him the more cons,,icu >us.
Why this is so he said: "The reason is
not far to seek The people cannot for
get that iu a time of National debase
ment, when principles became divorced
from politics, and piety and plunder
were seeking an unholy union, Grover
Cleveland, with the courage of his con
victions, and in the disregard of re
election, cleared the atmosphere with
his brave message. It was a bugle note
of freedom that found immediate echo
in the discouraged hearts of his country
men, who believed with lowell that
“ a free people's sway
Was not the exchequer or impoverished men.
Nor statesmanship with loaded votes to play.
Nor public office a tramp's boozing ken ”
DEUMTE WOMEN
Or Dabilitata! Woawn should use
Bradfiald’s Female Rapbtor.
Every ingredient possesses superb Tonit
jroperties and exerts a wonderful infiu
:nce in toning up and strengthening her
ivstem by driving through the proper
channels all impurities. Health and
itrength guaranteed to result from its use.
My wife, who was bedridden for eighteen
months, after using Bradtield’s Feualx
Kxol'Laxob for two months is getting well.
J. M. Johnson, Malvern. Ark.
Bbaduxld Bxqclatob Cos.. Atlanta, Ga
Sold hr Druggists at SI.OO per bottle
I=67s'' ROGERS^)|
I o - - —o |
[cilEiiEEiiaOg^Ei^
| MARION BLOCK, OCALA, FLA. j
I iis years experience in Railroad, Cause and j
Government work in the State. l
i LOCATING PHOSPHATE AND MINERAL !•
lands a specialty. •
: 27 dec Id j
Parasols.
In Black and White and Grey effect. All
silk gros grain, fancy black and white bor
der. A large assortment of sun Umbrellas
at popular prices.
Corsets.
“P. P.” Corset, “C. P.” Corset. Thompson
Globe Fitting Corset, anti the “Kabo”
Corset, which is warranted not to break,
or money will be refunded.
C. Rheinauer & Bro.
Ocala, ---- - Fla
WILLIAM LUCIUS
MEAT STALLS.
Ala-ays on band, a full supply of fresh
meats and vegetables. The public are
jespectfullv invited to call. may2ot f
N. B.
Our customers will now find us
on the south side of Public
Square, in the old Van Pelt stand
We are offering ffoods very low —
Real Bargains. Some things
we are almost giving away to
make room.
Come to see us in our new home
and be convinced that we are
offering real inducements to the
trade. Remember the place.
Hood& nasH
A FULL LINE OF
Books, Stationery, Etc.,
at—
The Ocala News Depot
ZE BUTT BLOCK
R. E. YONGE & CO.,
THE
OCALA PLUMBERS
Keeps I In their Line
FULI STOCK OF TINWARE
11UUU1IU CUARANTE
GOODS
____________WORK.
Orders for Tin and SheeUTron work Promptly Filled
MAIN ST., OPPOSITE MONTEZUMA HOTEL.
deceit iw
E. L. ROOT & CO.,
(Successor* to C. H. Lord Ji Oo.)
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
FURNITURE 1! HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,
OFFICE FURNITURE, MATTINQ, ETC.
Also Coffins, Caskets, Metalio Cases and Under-
takers* Goods. 80aug9O
Fox & Nathans,
General Merchandise Brokers.
All Goods Billed and Shipped Direct from First
Hands Without Cost to the Buyer.
Agents for. D. S. BROWN & CO.’S SOAPS.
BRANCH OFFICE AT TAMPA, FLA.
Merchants when In Ocala will please call and examine samples and get. prices.
Sjunetf
MERRILL - STEVENS” ENGINEERING CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
ARE MAKING A SPECIALTY OP
Phosphate Machinery of all Kinds.
We build Dryers, Screens, Elevators and Boilers, at short notice. We keep on
hand a stock of Jeffrey Chain Belting and Fixtures, and also the Celebrate!
t leu Id and Sisco Special Sand
PUMP FOR PHOSPHATE DREDGING.
EgTWrite or call at No. 138 and 140 East Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.-flFl
29my3m
J. W. PEARSON.
FOR SALE OR TRADE.
1,900 Acres Goal and Timber Lands
IN KENTUCKY
For Sale or Trade. Address,
J. W PEARSON, OCALA, FLORIDA.
J. W .PEARSON.
“ IF YOU WANT MONEY ”
We Have Money to Loan You
At S*ix per cent., Annual or Semi-Annual interest. Payable on or be
fore five or twenty years, for the purpose of buying lote and
building homes, improving property, paying off in
cumberances thereon, or buying farms or
homes already built. We loan full
appraised value of property.
ANYONE Tfiat can PAY RENT can BORROW MONEY
Of us and own his own
Home, provided he can pay back on each
SI,OOO borrowed #25.64 yearly, or $13.20
every six months, or $6.66 quarterly, or #4.48 bi
monthly, or #2.26 per month, and six per cent, interest
on the money borrowed at SAME DATES. ADDRESS,
Israel Brown, Ocala, Fla., State agent
Fat THE IDTOiI UID UP BDILDBG SniHCiTt, ol Jersey City, I, J.
- THE j
OLDEST, LARGEST BEST
Eguipped Lir ry, Feed and Sale Stable in South
Florida. Don’t forget the old
RELIABLE LIVERY STAND
E. B. RICHARDSON,
I7jan td Ocala, Florida.
Ocala Commercial t Bazar Cos.
:DE ALE RS IN :
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
We carry a lull lined DRY GOODS, SHOES, HATS.
LACES, EMBROIDERIES AND NOTIONS.
ALSO
A complete line of GROCERIES ami HOI M 1
NIBHING GOODS.
F. P. GADSON,
Business Manager.
“ I OCALA PLANING MILL, ~o rs
Lath. Basil.
Shingles. UUUI, JjilSll <UI4 Blind ItlCtOI), Bill.!
Flooring. ZZZZZ Moulding*
Ceiling. (Building and Contracting.
Siding. Turning.
, . Doors, Sash, Blinds and .
Mouldings made from Kiln
Dried Lumber.
SA W MILL BILLS CUT TO ORDER.
W. T. TAYLOR, Proprietor.
Lock Box N, Ocala, Fla.
“ SEEDS.
NEW CROP SEEDS, TURNIP, CABBGE AND BEET SEEDS.
A FULL LINE of PURE DRUGS and MEDICINES
SmiONERY, TOILET ARTICLES, ETC.
—OOOOOOOOOO | 0000000000—
AOENI FOR CRAIS ORCHARD SPRINGS WATER , THOMPSON'S BROWN*
ARSENIC SPRINGS WATER , AND THE STAR OF
BETUELEM MINERAL WATEL
AL GOODS |SOLD AS LOW AS THE LOWEST AI D THE QUALITY
| —GUARANTEED.— |
Hawke’s Celebrated Spectacles,
' \\ m. ANDERfeOi'
. Wholesale and Retail Druggist and Optici*..
OCALA NOVELT YWORKS
MALLETT & CO.,
(successors to Yougc Bro*. & Oo.)
MANUFACTURERS OF
S>SH, POORS, MOULDINGS. NEWELS END BRACKETS.
Casings, Flooring, Coiling, Turning and
SCROLL SAWING OF ALL KINDS A SPECIALTY.
Agent for Averili’s Paints anil Fillers.
SmslLSaU and Row Boats built to Order. Estimates of all kinds of work furnishes>
BLOOD WILL TELL
And So Do Good Goods.
FOR FIRST-CLASS
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS,
NONE CAN BVCEL
CAPITOL EXGHANGE,
Opposite Florida Southern Depot, OCALA, FLA.
AL. ROGERS, Proprietor. *
SOUTHERN FEMllf CfIUEGE.
■SmWm■tfcrWin"•' - Y "
THE PALACE DRUG STORE.
F. A. TEAGUE & CO.,
rSuecessirs to Wright & Frazer.;
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
——PURE DRUGS,—
Ilium inating and Lubricating Oils, Lamps, Toilet and
Fancy Articles, Stationary of all Grades,
Fine brands of cigars and Smokers’articles always on hand. Wall
Paper a specialty; beautiful patterns and elegant designs.
THE PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT
r s under the immediate supervision of Mr. Jas. B. Carlisle, who has
CUHtoiner can be assured that all PRE
SCRIPTIONS WILL BE CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED.
22m.,U THE PALACE DRUG STOKE, OCALA, FLA.
OCALA CITY PROPERTY.
LARGE BODIES OF RAILROAD AND DISSTON
LANDS. ALSO SOME FINE
PROPERTY AT McINTOSH
SEVERAL TRACTS OF
PHOSPHATE LANDS
I HAVE SOME FINE
Mill* Iffiiß CM
THAT WILL PAY HANDSOME INTEREST ON
THE INVESTMENT. ALSO SOME SPLENDID
BARGAINS IN
Call on or address,
J. H. LIVINGSTON,
Rrom B, Marion Block, Ocala. Fla
17)ant4

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