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The Ocala banner. (Ocala, Marion County, Fla.) 1883-194?, August 14, 1891, Image 3

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ALLIANCE DEPARTMENT.
F. H. IATLE, A. P. BASKIN, S. S.SAVAGE, Editing: Committee.
ALLIANCE DIUECTOnY.
Otlleers of the National Alliance
and Industrial Union.
President L. L. Polk, 3tl D street uorthwest
Washington, D. C.
First Vice-President B. H. Clover, Cam
biidge, Kansas.
Secretary-Treasurer J. 11. Turner, 239 North
Capitol street, Washington, D. C.
Lecturer J. H. Willetts, Mci.or.th, Kansas.
executive board. 1
J. W. Macune,Chairman. 239 North Capitol street
Washington, D. C.
A. Wardall,... Huron, South Dakota.
J. Fount Tillman, .........Palmetto, Tennessee.
JUDICIARY COMMITTFE.
11. C. Hemming, Chairman Harrisburg, Pa.
Isaac McCracken, Ozone, Arkansas'
A. E. Cole, Fowlervillc, Michigan.
COMMITTEE ON CONFEDERATION.
Bin Terrell, 239 North Capitol street, Washing
ton, D. C.
L. F. Livingston Kings, Georgia.
R. F. Rogers, Live Oak, Florida.
W. J. Talbert, Holmes, South Carolina.
H. 1.. !,oucks..... Clear Lake, South Dakota.
Alliance Notice.
The regular quarterly meeting of the
Marion County Alliance will convene at
Fort McCooy, on August 18th, 1891.
.Secretaries will govern themselves ac
cordingly and see that their reports are
sent forward and due notice given.
11. W. Long, Pres.
Wm. Demon, Sec’y.
The Alliance and the Third Parly
Defined.
Since there is such a howl against the
Alliance on account of the third patty,
it would seem well for us to give the po
sition of the supreme council upon this
subject so that our extremely warm
friends on the outside, who endorse the
views of the plutocrat press, which is
either owned or controlled by the money
power of Wall street, should know for a
certainty the exact position of the su
preme council as set forth in its Ocala
meeting. Also there are many of our
own members who seem to take on to
this for which this is also intended.
The following is the recommendation
offered by the chairman of the execu
tive committe, which was unanimously
accepted: * * * *
“He cautioned the order as to the
greater responsibility restiug upon this
body at this time as to what action it
takes in regard to the political situation.
The order could never participate in any
partisan political effort, and in the South
it was opposed to giving its sanction to
any independent or third party move on
the part of the members, while in the
west and northwest the delegates claim
that the order will retrograde if such
sanction is not given. In this emergency
he thought he had a compromise to offer
that would meet the case exactly, and
that was for this body to hereby say
that it gives its sanction and call for a
meeting to be held about February, 1892,
to be composed of delegates from all or
ganizations of producers upon a fair
basis of representation for the purpose
of a general and thorough conference
upon the demands of each and to the
end that all may agree upon a joint set
of demands just prior to the next
national campaign, and agree upon the
proper inethoods for enforcing sncli de
mands. If the people by delegates
coming direct from them agree that a
third partv move is necessary, it need
not be feared; and that the next session
of this supreme council elect delegates
from this order to represent it in said
national conference of productive organ
izations for political purposes.”
In the first place this portion of the
report of the chairman of the execu
tive committee places the Alliance on a
square, non-partisan platform. It can
not advocate Democracy, or Republican
ism from a partisan standpoint. It
stands between the two battling for the
rights of the oppressed, from whatever
quarter this oppression may come, seri
ously to its members the rights to criti
cise the public acts of any of the of
ficials of any party, giving praise where
tleserveil and condemning in unmeas
ured terms those who by their votes have
been the cause of our preso it deplorable
i- iiiditioii. By this, it "ill be seen that
t here is to be a meeting of delegates
from all the labor organizations in 1892,
“to agree on a joint set of demands just
prior to the next national campaign and
to agree upon the proper methods ol en
forcing these demands.”
This gives you the position of this Al
liance, and the action of said committee
depends entirely upon whether the next
congress will grant relief to the farmeis
as demanded by the Ocala platform.
To say that the Alliance as a body does
not endorse this measure is but to ex
pose to public view our ignorance of the
sentiment of our people. That they are
terribly in earnest is evinced by the fact
that the organization is still alive and
growing, its members meeting semi
monthly all over tins country shows
they have not given up the struggle, or
in the least abated in their zeal for the
bettering of the condition of them
selves and future posterity.
The people are moving and for once
they are ahead of the leaders and all
the abuse, ridicule, and anathemas
hurled against them from those who
think they have by Divine authority
the right to live off the sweat of other
men’s brows, together with the false
hoods, lying suppression of true facts in
me reports of the associated press dis
patches, the perversion of facts in regard
lo this movement and the coloring of
speeches made by Alliance men, in
order to misrepresent .them by a set of
editors who wear a live dollar hat on a
live cent head, and who through fear or
favor of the money power seek to sow
seeds of discord so as to divide us as
sunder, cannot deter them from press
ing on to that coal that promises to
them that financial freedom they so
lunch stand in need of. B
".Speak the truth of the king in the
hearing of the people. And of the peo
pie in 1 1 e hearing of the king.”— Curran.
An out-spoken journal may expt otto
make euemies, but the good opinion of
an individual is a small exchange for the
public gcod.— Economist.
Many of the partisan newspapers
need rather strong doses of purgative
pills to work off the accumulated bile.
They need a liver regulator.— Economist.
Our postmaster has an Almond tree
in bis garden from which he picked
nearly half a peck of full grown almonds
of which he sent some specimens to the
agricultural depot at Washington, and
according to the reply received from the
above depot this is the first time that
the almond was known to bear nuts in
this state.— Hawthorne Sun
PRINCIPLE ONLY DEMANDED.
Congressman Livingston Fully Ex
plains the Farmers’ Demands-
No Need of Government Ware
houses—-One Snb-Treasury to a
State.
In demanding measures in harmony
with the Ocala platform, the farmers do
not insist upon the passage of the origi
nal sub-treasury bill as introduced in
congress. They simply demand that
its principles shall be made operative.
The bill involves the building of mul
titudinous warehouses at tremendous
expense, the employment of number
less government afficials. who would
gobble up a great deal of profits, and in
numerable small details difficult to he
carried out.
The plan simply means that tiie gov
ernment shall advance money on land
and the imperishable products of land
at a low rate of interest. The plan is as
simple as the bill is complex. The plan
retains the essential principles of the
bill, but does not trouble itself about
the details.
The following interview with Presi
dent L. F. Livingston, of the Alliance,
shows that the farmers have simplified
their demands, and are willing to en
trust all details to their representatives
in congress.
Said Colonel Livingston this morning:
“The sub-treasury bill, introduced
into congress at the last session, was in
tended to make operative the St. Louis
demands. Since we have added real
estate as a security for loans, necessa
rily a bill will be drawn different from
the old one.
“We have never planted ourselves
upon the sub-treasury hill exclusively,
but have always contended for the plan
or principle, and so stated when before
congress. Now we stand upon the sub
treasury plan as adopted at Ocala, and
demand of congress a bill in detail to
make that system operative.
“ This can be done, as we declare, with
one or more 6ub-treasuries or deposito
ries in each state, with or without gov
ernment warehouses. The present fa
cilities for warehousing will answer
without the expense of government
warehouses or apparatus.
“In othor words, if congress will
enact a law authorizing the issue of
notes to he deposited in the states, and
to be loaued on non-perishable farm pro
ducts and real estate at not more than
2 per cent per annum, we will be per
fectly satisfied. This is the Ocala plan.
We will and can take care of the ware
housing and all necessary details with
out any help from the government
whatever. All that we insist upon is
thus briefly stated.”
“ What is the sub-treasury plan ? ”
“We demand that the government
shall establish sub-treasuries or deposi
tories in the several states, which shall
loan money direct to the people at a
low rate of interest, not to exceed 2 per
cent, annum, on non-perishable farm
products and also upon real estate, with
proper limitations upon the quantity of
land and amount of money.
“ We demand that the amount of cir
culating medium be speedily increased
to not less than SSO per capita.
“This is the Ocala sub-treasury plan,
differing from the St. Louis plan in that
real estate is added as a security upon
which to borrow money.”
“What is the simple analysis of this
plan ? Give it so the people can under
stand it.”
“It means that congress shall autho
rize the issue of treasury notes, good
for all debts, private and public, suppli
menting the gold and silver currency ac
tually in circulation, owned and con
trolled by this country, to equal the de
mand. It means that this currency
shall be based upon tho credit of the
government. (Fiat money.) That
means that this currency shall be based
upon all the taxable property of this
country, whether taxed or not; also
upon the light and power of congress to
declare war, and enlist, for the defence
of the credit of the government, every
citizen subject to military duty. In a
word, every dollar’s worth of property
and the life of every man subject to
military duty would stand pledged for
such a currency. This is a much better
basis for an issue than gold or silver.
Lands and citizens cannot be secreted
when pay <lay comes; gold and silver
can.
“ This plan means a currency accord
ing to demand. This is a law of nature
that is stamped upon everything that
has left the hand of a wise and benefi
cent God, and should ho recognized in
every business arrangement put forth
by man.
" Who has the right or the foresight to
estimate the amount of currency needed
in a country like this in a given period ?
Who can tell to-day what will be the
output of the fields, shops, mines and
manufacturers of the United States for
1891. A currency should he useful as a
medium of exchange of products. Such
an exchange as wilt facilitate and help
on to prosperity and well being all
wealth-producers. Who beside those
interested should settle the question
whether they need this facility or not?
“ The sub-treasury plan means to de
clare that the United States congress is
legally and morally bound to furnish
the amount of currency necessary to
successfully carry on the business of
this country, without let or hindrance,
to any calling (legitimate) or section.
The constitution reserves to congress the
exclusive right to coin money and fix
its value. Congress has gone further,
and to protect this exclusive privilege
has taxed all state corporate or individ
ual issue of certificate or bills of prom
ise to pay, to be used as a circnlatirg
medium, ten per cent This plan means
to decl.ire tl at a< long as the constitu
tion prevents, through eougres-', the
stales or cmporal'ons helping them
selvison this line, that iungri-ss shoil'd
amt shall furnish the currency needed
upon demand.
“The sab-treasury plan means that
the goturnment credit shall not he a
source of speculation between her citi
zens, thereby placing the weak at the
mercy of the strong, or, as Calhoun,
John C., stated it, ‘ why should the peo
ple be charged interest upon the govern
ment credit when that credit could be
sent to them without charge ? In other
words, direct to the people is onr plan.
This plan evades premiums, interest and
commissions and gives the people cheap
money—which the government is bound
to do, or turn the people loose and let
them supply themselves.
“This plan secures to the largest num
ber of the people the facility for borrow
ing money, or the use of money in the
exchange of products—not for specnla-
tion.
It savs “ on non-perishable farm pro
ducts and also on real estate.” You ask
me, why not upon stocks and bonds?
For the simple reason that the people
have not and cannot obtain such collate
ral. In other words, our plan is intend
ed to benefit the people, and, therefore,
must rest upon such collateral as the
people have—lands and crops. It would
be perfect mockery to offer the farmers
of this country money upon any other
security, and every intelligent citizen
must either agree to such a plan or take
the position of a “gold-bug”—let the
people labor and let capital manage the
currency, or in a word, take the em
phatic position of Vanderbilt, “ damn
the people.”
“ This plan means that the govern
ment shall continue to do just what it is
now doing—only substitute the people
for the capitalists, and instead of an is
sue to meet the demands of the banks
an issue to meet the demands of the
people.”
“ What are some of the advantages ?
“ This plan would give U3 a currency
to fit the business, and not the gambling
and speculative propositions of our peo
ple.
“ This currency could not be cornered
or interfered with by the government,
and the borrower alone would be or
could parties to the contract.
“This plan would equally distribute
the currency to every section and to all
the people, thereby enabling all to pros
per, or at least an equal chance to pros
per.
“ This plan would take the producer
out of the hands of speculators and ena
ble the producer and consumer to deal
direct with each other and thereby
benefit both.
“ This plan would enable the poor to
reach cheap money, and if there was no
other reason to commend it to the pa
triotic Christian and statesman, this
should.
“ This plan would encourage owner
ship of real estate, and thereby encour
age and stimulate good citizenship.
This plan would encourage farming
and planting for the reason that non
perishable crops would become a basis
for financial transactions at a much less
cost to the producer than now obtains.
“ This plan, and only this plau would
stop gambling in futures, corners and
combines upon the necessities of life.
“ This plan would help the merchants
and manufacturers in that merchants
could realize at least the advance upon
the crops or the whole debt due upon
the land security. Manufactures could
purchase for monthly deliveries at less
expense.”
The Coinage of Silver and Gold,
Section 9, of an act approved April 2,
1792, provided for the coinage of both
gold and silver.
Section 11, proportioned gold to silver
in all coins as 15 of silver to one of gold,
regulating the fineness of each.
Section 10 made them a lawful tender
in all payments whatsoever.
Section 14 of the act approved Janu
ary 18,1837, provided: “That gold and
silver bullion brought to the mint for
coinage shall be received and coined
by the proper officers for the benefit of
depositors.”
This was the rule to give to silver the
same right as that of gold, so far as
coinage was concerned, until the act of
1873, which demonetized silver and
made gold the unit of value.
The same act that demonetized silver
and depredated it, gave the authority to
coin what was known as the trade dol
lar, which contained 420 grains and one
half a grain, while this trade dollar con
tained more than the legal tender dollar
by eight grains it would not pass for a
dollar.
I have given the law as to the coinage
of both gold and silver, and to those
who want to know how they w ill be
benefitted by the free coidage. of silver,
I would a?k, how will you ha benefitted
by the free coinage of gold? If silver
has served the purpose of money for us
si long, how will you be benefitted by
having it taken away? And are not the
men wno work in tho silver mines en
titled to the fame paternalism as those
who dig out the gold? Is it not class
legislation to coin the gold of our mines
and so refuse to coin the silver? The
free coinage of both would not more
than meet the demands of the annual
increase of our material prosperity, and
when you proscribe silver by refusing it
free coinage, you take from that increase
in our circulating medium that we so
much need, and add to the wealth of
those who own the gold by making the
purchasing power of the gold dollar
greater.
The world’s production of gold and
silver in 1887 was, gold, $100,826,800;
silver, $125,346,310, of this amount the
United states produced of gold $33,000,-
000 and of silver $53,357,000, total, $86,-
357,000, of thi3 amount produced, there
was used in the manufactures and arts
for the calendar year, 1888, $16,500,000
gold and $8,100,000, silver, which would
leave for coinage in the United States of
its own production $61,757,000 which
would not appear to be too much to
meet our increased demands. Silver
will increase our circulating median),
and there never was a time it did not
suit the poor man and the farmer.
Tlte Tillman-Terrell Debate.
The attention of Feeble Witt Haw
thorne, editor of the Florida Times-
Union, is called to the discussion be
tween Bro. Ben Terrell and Gov. Till
man, on the sub-treasury plan.
The Charleston News and Courier
says that “Ben Terrell * * * com
pletely took the wind out of Gov. Till
man.’’ Why don’t Mr. Hawthorne say ]
something about this in his piper? If
the argument had been in favor "f Till
man, can any one doubt I ni wlint lm
would have spread the news a- frr as
the circulation of hi* paper goes? I.et
U. S. Hall, of Missouri, o|<co his mouth,
and the little fellow goes into ecstacy
over it.
We further call his attention to the
fact that after the discussion, when a
few minutes after, upon a vote of the
AUianccmen, the Ocala platform was
unanimously endorsed. Say, Friend
Hawthorne, does that look much like a
split on the sab-treasury rock ? You
paraded the so-called Texas State Alli
ance meeting when the sab-treasnry
plan was denounced. What will you
say when the regular State Alliance
meets on the ISth of this month and
ratifies it? The world knows the so
called Texas meeting was not regular,
and there is no use in trying to stuff it
down its throat. The South Carolina
Alliance voted an endorsement of the
Ocala platform. Do yon hear” B.
THfc OCALA BANNER, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1891.
1 L. & N.
LOUISVILLE & NASHVILLE R. R.
To the North
IN
Through Cars
FROM
New Orleans, Pensacola,
Jacksonville, Atlanta
and Memphis.
C. P.ATMORE, J. A. BOYD,
Gen’ Pass. Aoent, Ass’t Gen’l Pass. Aoent.
LOUISVILLE, KY.
Physicians.
JJR. T. P. LLOYD
—Physician and Surgeon—
Office Loyit Block, Cor. itmd & Expo. St. Office
Hours 9 to 11 A. X.,2t04P. M.. 51010 P.M.
Rtjert by Permission to Frank P. Gadtonand 11. IF.
Haul; Chandler.
JAMES CHACE.
DENTIST.
Special attention given to Crown Brldgework,
GolUplates, and all first-class operation pertain
ing to the Dental Art. Gas administered for the
painless extraction of teeth. Office in Firt Na
tional Bank Building. 50ct tf
■yyy H. MAREAN,
homeopatumT physician.
Chronic Diseases a Specialty. Electro Vapor and
Medicated Baths. Office hours 9to 12 m, from
2tosp. m. Office one square below Ocala Housa
opposite Dunn's Park. lfeblv d&w
J NO. M. THOMPSON, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
Having located permanently, offers his profes
sional services to the citizens of Ocala and sur
rounding country.
OFFICE: BANNER BLOCK,
Formerly occupied by Dr. R. U. Thompson.
•21feb-90
V. NEWSOM, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Offliceat Mrs. Reddick's, on Ocklawaha Avenue.
Ocala Flor id*
27sept6m
JJR. VICTOR LAFOSSK.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office, Room 3, First National Bank Building
OCALA.FLORIDA.
Specialist for Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat. juns
Attorneys.
N. GREEN.
ATTORNRY-AT-I.AW.
Land matters a Specialty. Office in' Union
tjulyly Block.
B. BULLOCK,
ATTORNKYS-AT-I.A .
Gary Block, Ocala, - Florida.
April 11-tf.
gAMUKL K. MARSHALL,
ATIOKNKY-AT-LA W.
lAfayettce Block, Ocala, Florida.
27sepUy
K. ZEWADSKI,
ATTOKNKY-AT-LAW.
Room 5, Gary Block, - - - - Ocala, Florida.
6Septly
W. 8. BULLOCK. K. A. BURFORD
JJUI.LOCK & BURFORD,
LAWYERS.
Will practice in all State and United States
Courts.
Banner Block may2-l-
J U. REARDON,
ATTORN RY-AT-LAW.
Union Block,
Ocala, • ... Florid
feb4,B6-ly
I,. ANDERSON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Rooms 9 and XI. Marion Block.
Ocala, Fla
pr 8,1887.
BLAKESLEE.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 8, Gary block Ocala, Florida.
May2-189l
J R. MOORHEAD,
CITY AND COUNTY SURVEYOR.
Residence at Old Methodist Parsonage.
29mch89
IJI J. FLOOD,
SUPERVISING ARCHITECT,
Furnishes plana, specifications and estimates
Office over Merchant’s National Bank.
marstf
V I F.LLIC'OKi
ARCHITECT AND CIYIL ENGINEER.
Plans made and specifications drawn np for
any class of building, contracts for every clau
of engineering work supervised in any part of
the State. Address—Leesburg, Fla.
jull7 Onsos.
Subscribe For
The Cedar Key Commercial.
Published at Cedar Key, Florida, on the
Gulf of Mexico, by
J. IB A GO BE.
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CALL AND SEE.
Clothing Department.
This Department on the second floor has
our special attention and is well stocked
with the novelties of the season. School
pants 35 eents and upwards, School suits
for boys from four to fourteen years,
Jilaited fronts and backs. Dress suits,
ight and dark paterns for boys from 5 to
17 years.
A large variety neatly gotten up, spring
suits in cheviots and Tweed.
We also have SPECIAL BARGAINS
in Black and Blue Diagonals in frocks and
sacks. These goods are soft finish, and
with a selection of styles in light, medium,
and dark shades in coats and vests for
summer wear. This department will stand
the closest inspection.
C. Rheinauer & Bro.
Ocala, ----- Fla.
Health isWealth!
Db. E. C. West’s Nerve and Bb.un Tbeat-
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Premature Old Age, Barrenness, Loss of Power
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send the purchaser onr written guarantee to re
fund the money if the treatment does not effect
a cure. Guarantees issued only by
M-Monopoly Drag Store,
Sole Agents, Ocala, Fla.
20febwly
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PAWnifi! Waaknoss of Body and Kiad, Effect*
Mlddlllllk Error* or Exomm* in Old or Y onng.
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tniITIMNFEMALE UNIVERSITY
OwU I nillll FLORENCE, ALABAMA.
Fall utrenitT carrtrelum. Fire diatinet enan tire* sMefc
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to wwle and art. Bantowwat and waateoMleia athcalaiiScti
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MARBLE DEALER AND
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Hare a full clock of Coffin*, Caskets, and Burial
Bolts of every description. Special attention
p*M to burial service*.
Embalming to Order.
All orders from tho country, either by tetter or
teleg~*ph, will receive prompt attention.
Alar a complete line ol Monument* and Head
stone. . For any work or material Indicated
call on or address,
D X. McIVKR. OCALA. FLA.
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Trade in Their Line.
C. Rheinauer 1 Bro.
All Dry Goods, except Domestic, bought of us
will be forwarded to any accessable point in the
United States free of all Mail or Express Charges.
This will enable persons ordering of us by mail
to receive their goods at exactly the same prices
they would pay if buying in person at our count
ers. Remittances may be made by Draft or Post
Office Money Order. Very Respectfully,
B“av4t C. RHEINAUER & 880.
V N .v 4
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IfffßlMll Thorough, Practical Instruction.
U| 111 K•Hl* ■■ |*| ml_ Graduates assisted to positions.
nUUH RLLIIRUI to?*catalogue free. Write to
® BRYANT & STRATTON BUSINESS COLLEGE, LOUISVILLE, KY.
S. R. BIROSEY. ALBERT H. BIROSEY.
S. R. BIRDSEY & CO.,
MILLER BLOCK, MAGNOLIA STREET.
Also n complete line of Cooking and^Hrating
Stoves, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Paints, do.
HARDWARE & GROCERIES.
Mays— 9
BURNETT—
THE WATCHMAKER
DEALER IN
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Optical Goods.
WATCH REPAIRING A SPECIALTY
PALACE DRUG STORE. - - - OCALA, FLORID
LIYERY, FEED STABLE.
THE OCALA TRANSFER COMPANY,
(Successors to E. ROOT & CO j
Offer the finest stock,Jthe best vehides,'excellent. saddle horses ami the nobbiest turnouts
in’the county. Polite'and attentive drivers,
GEN t;l*e and safe teams.
Vehiclesjand harness of all kinds for sale. All needing anything in our line please call.
SMaytf Isaac Stevens, Manager.
CHEMICAL LABORATORY,
*4 SERGE MALYVAND*'
Room 5, Gary Block,- - Ocala, Fla.
Over Hubbard & MacDufi ’* Hardware Store.
-ttttwwmwwttwm-
CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SOILS,
PHOSPHATES : FERTILIZERS : KAOLINS
Silver Springs, Ocala & Gulf R. R.
TIME TABLE NUMBER 17
[ln Effect May lOtli.]
S= STATIONS s| 82
- e 2 a SC; • Jj Rv
****{ 5S| £ it
J__|. .. 6 30a 4'Op Lt. Ocala .. 9 aST"iSQp ~
' 7 00a 4 20p “ Martel. • 9 95a 6 20p
5S2p 9 00a * “ Ellistoo •• 330 p 7 37a IZT
A. P. Mann, Jr., Gen. Manz’r. G. N.Sauasy, G. P. A. O. G. Finch, Acting Sup
0. A. FA It HIS,
P'.iA e TIC AI. BOILER MA K E It.
JSffIgSTORE FIXTURES. - - „ .
HUUHbkI KENDRICK, - - - - FI,A.
TERRY WTR CO., washvhae.tw*
The Wants' National Bank
EEEOF OCAU=E
NO. 3.815
■ i^-. ; " -J’ * n" ■ r
SURPLUS * $12,500.
OFFICERS; Jso. F. Dc.vn 'Yesident. H. C Weight,; V-Pnt. R. B. McConkii l, Otuhi
:BOARD OF DIRECTORS.:
JNO. F. DUNN, E. P. DISMUKES,
CIIAS. RHEINAUER, J. A. ROWELL,
HARVEY KNIGHT, WM. ANDERSON
H. C. WRIGHT, R. B. McCONNELL. 1.. M. THAYER,
CORRESPONDENTS:
Notional Park Bank 01 New York. Afavenc* Autumnl Rank of bottoti
National Bank 0/ Savannah Georgia.
LoaitMU Dankiny <oinjmny, LouxkUU, Ay
Has the largest [individual deposit of any bank in Florida. See sworn report to
Comptroller of Currency, December 19th, 1890.
E. W. AGNKW Pres W. 11. COUCH, Vice Pres.
The First National Bank
OF OCALA
Paid, up Capital $50,000. Authorized Capital $150,000.
A „ II,." C.SHEI:n
Surplus Fund - $25,000.00
Undivided Profits - $2,262.87’
Fully Equipped for Every Kind of Legiti
matelißanking.
Has the Largest Surplus, largest Line of Deposits, and k does the Largest Busi
ness of any Bank in Marion County. We solicit your Bank Account and all busi
ness in our lino, and guarantee satisfaction.
nja.it t
•G. W. Lyons & Go. ~
DEALERS IN
WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS.
Paul Jones' Private Stuck.
The Purest mid Best Rye Whiskey on the Mar
ket. No other Brand of Rye Whiskey lias
ever equaled it. Most Complete and Finest
Billiard Room in the city, and Finest Bar in the
State.
OCALA HOUSE WINE ROOMSI
PETER INGRAM,
Has a complete line of all kind-of Suitings, and guarantees
work and lit at REASONABLE RATES.
A SPECIALTY MADE OF REPAIRING, CLEANING AND ALTERING
Merchant Tailor, Ft. Kinsr ave
3jandAwam
0. C. STEVENS. IT. H. GRAHAM. J. C. McKIBBON.
STEVENS, GRAHAM * CO.
DEALERS IN
PHOSPHATE LANDS-
Brokers in Phosphate Rock and Stocks.
Included in’our large holdings of land,.the following tractsarejlhoroughly pitted and
developed and are well situated for mining and transportation:
10,600 acresin Marion and Levy Counties,
5,600 acres in Marion.and Levy Counties.
5,000 acres in Marion County,
3.500 acres in Alachua County
1.800 acresin Alachua County,
1,720 acres in Alachua County,
a,500 acres In Alachua Connty,
640 acres in Alachua County,
1 2iiO acres in Citrus County.
Room I, Opera House Block.
W. W. CONDON,
——• DEALER.IK —
Wateh.es and Oloehs,
—■—AND A VERY FINK LIN EOF
Foreign ? and Domestic Jewplry,
DIMOIDS, EIER4LDS, OIIX, HOPE STOKES, Ef(
The only establishment in the county tb at makes
a specialty of manufacturing Jewelry , and
deals in Musical -nstruments, Strings,
Electric Bells, Etc., Etc.
OCAI.A, ----- FLORIDA.
WM*
' A. E. DELOUEST,
HARDWARE.
.' o o o o O “
FARMING TOOLS,
SASH AND DOORS,
STOYBS.
PAINTS.
So.. So*
OCALA, FLA.
CAPITAL STOCK, (Paid in) SIOO,OOO.

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