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Williston graphic. (Williston, Williams County, N.D.) 1895-1919, July 10, 1913, Image 1

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VOL. XIX NO. 3.
GAVE A GOOD
DEMONSTRATION
LOCAL MAN USES AUTO TO PULL
DRAG OVER STREET—OTHER
/. THINGS
There is a plenty of good roads
talk on every hand. A demonstration
is what does the work. The Graphic
M.n saw a real demonstration one
evening this week when a well known
gentleman had a drag hitched behind
his auto dragging the street -which
runs past his home, and for several
blocks toward town.
The demonstrator was L. O. Hig
ley. Mr. Higley is busy for about
ten hours a day registering deeds.
The rest of his time he puts in at
something. If it is not in fixing up
the neatest lawn about town, or build
ing something about his place, he gets
out and fixes up the street. There's
always something doing.
Well, Tuesday evening Mr. Higley
hitched an ordinary drag behind his
Hup runabout and made several trips
over Fifth avenue west, from his
home down three blocks.^ The street
has been rough and the improvement
by this dragging was very noticable.
After he got through dragging he
went along the street and picked up
the stones. The little car handled the
drag very nicely, and while watching
this something in this line that we
have noted before came to mind.
This happened in southern Minne
sota. Between the towns of Madison
Lake and Mankato there used to be
perhaps the worst piece of gumbo
road that ever existed. The distance
is about fifteen miles. It used to be
so bad that after a rain it was impos
sibele to get wagons or rigs of any
vsort over the road. The wheels would
get so full of mud that an empty
rig made a load and Mr. Geo. W. Al
lyn, the good roads enthusiast of
Madison Lake, told me that he had
counted dozens of rigs pulled out be
side the road to wait better condi
tions. Now then here is what hap
pened. They went to work and grav
elled a few miles of it at first.
It was such a success that they soon
graveled the entire stretch, anL a
I trip over the road last summer re
vealed the fact that it is a better
piece of road than any of the streets
of Williston.
After they graveled it they did not
stop. They then put the road drag
into operation via the auto power.
Several medium weight road drags
were provided and when^ any of the
auto good roads enthusiasts had a
little time they went out anddraged
this stretch of road by hitching one
of these drags to their machine, after
the manner demonstrated by Mr.
Higley, on Fifth avenue.
Now the people in the vicinity of
Madison Lake and Mankato have
been greatly rewarded. This piece of
road is to become a part of a great
highway to be built through that sec
tion from Minneapolis and St. Paul
south. This piece of road proved a
-strong drawing card toward the loca
tion of the highway through that sec
tion when that matter was up to be
settled.
John H. Hohman, of Mankato, is
another great enthusiast. He told
me also that in building this piece of
road very little gravel was used at the
start. He said that the common mis
take of using too much gravel was
often made in graveling streets or
roads. Two or three inches was all
that was used at first. This was al
lowed to work into the soil of the road
and was kept well dragged. A lit
tie more gravel was used occasionally
in weak spots, and now there is a
roadbed of permanency. If the prop
er amount of gravel is used it will
work in with the heavier soil and make
a binder that will turn off the water
rapidly. Mr. Hohman also said that
-by all means gravel put on any road
^should be screened and nothing larger
than the end of your finger allowed
to go into the work.
The little demonstration by Mr.
Higley could be carried out to some
proportions if every auto owner in
this section would provide himself
'. with a small road drag and put in an
-/hour or so occasionally leveling up
gome of the roads or streets.
LaBERGE CASE
BEFORE COURT
CASE ON CHARGE OF CRIMINAL
OPERATION BEING HEARD
IN COURT
The case of the State against Dr.
P. U. LaBerge, of this city, charged
with performing a criminal operation
upon Laura Rolley, has been taking
up the time of the district court for
the past few days.
The parliminary trial in this case
was held before Justice Field some
few weeks ago when the defendant
was bound over to the district court.
The testimony of a large' number of
witnesses is being heard, among them
that of several physicians of the city,
and nurses at the hospital where the
woman was taken for an operation
made necessary as a result of the
Supposed criminal operation.
'WV Vi
X\ -,
KID TRAILOR
IN CUSTODY
CAPTURED NEAR FROID IN MON
TANA AND TAKEN TO
PLENTYWOOD
Kid Trailor has been captured and
is now in custody at Plentywood,
Mont. He was arrested near Froid,
Mont., by Ki Mathews the first of the
week.
Sheriff Erickson and his deputies
were looking for Trailor in the west
ern part of this county a few weeks
ago, as it was thought that he was
responsible for the disappearance of
some horses belonging to local peo
ple. He was not found. It appears
that no horses were taken in this
county but that he is charged with
taking horses in Montana.
Trailor has had a habit of finding
a perfectly good rope with horses at
tached1 on jiseveral occasions, for
which he has paid the penalty by
serving time.
MAY ATTEND
ROADS PICNIC
THREE HUNDRED AT THE GOOD
ROADS MEETING HELD MON
DAY AT GROVE
The postponed Missouri Ridge Good
Roads Picnic, which was to have been
held July 4th, *as held Monday at
the Gromatka Grove and considering
the postponment was a great suc
cess. More than three hundred peo
ple from the surrounding country
gathered for the day.
Owing to the fact that it was not
generally known that the meeting had
been postponed, there were few in at
tendance from town. Many had plan
ned to go out to the doings on the
Fourth, but the rain prevented the
holding of the annual good roads
gathering.
This annual meet has become a fea
ture looked forward to each year with
a great deal of interest and in addi
tion to affording a day of pleasure
for the folks of the ridge an oppor
tunity is also afforded to get together
and talk over matters of general in
terest, particularly good roads. The
good roads woji*. day, held on the
ridge a couple of weeks ago had very
noticable results.
A number of talks were made at the
meeting Monday by some of those
present from town'. Plenty of "eats"
and refreshments were on hand to
satisfy the inner portions of the pic
nicers*
The next annual will be looked for
ward to with pleasure, and remem
brances of the one Monday will with
out a doubt insure an increased atten
dance, if J: Pluvius does not again
temporarily interfere with the plans
of the progressive citizens of the
Ridge.
RAN INTO A
BARBED WIRE
MOTOROYLIST HAS CLOSE CALL
WHEN HE RUNS INTO WIRE
ACROSS OLD ROAD
While riding his motorcycle Wed
nesday evening, July 2nd, C. Henry
was painfully injured when he ran in
to a barbed wire on the road leading
out of town toward the experiment
station. He was badly cut about the
face and neck and was thrown from
his machine by the wire. A physi
cian dressed the cuts in his neck and
patched up the wounds.
There is a big mudhole in the main
road where the accident occurred, and
wagons and teams had been going
through the field around this. Dur
ing the day the owner of the land
where the temporary road was lo
cated stretched a barbed wire across
the road to close it up. It appears
that no other signal other than the
wire was put up showing that the
road was closed.
The closing of a road with barbed
wire without a signal that can be
plainly seen is a dangerous practice.
Had Mr. Henry been riding fwt he
would doubtless have been killed, and
as it was some of the cuts were in a
very dangerous place.
TAKEN UP NOTICE
Came to my place Monday, June
9, 1913, one white horse, weight about
900 to 1000 pounds. Branded C. R.,
rifrht shoulder, on left shoulder, in
verted and on left hip. Owner
may have same by proving property
and paying expenses. Herman Carl
son, Sec. 22-156-101, Star Route, Wil
liston, N. D. 3w-3pd.
NO MEETING
The city commissioners did not hold
a meeting Monday evening. There
was no quorum present and the meet
ing was therefore automatically ad
journed until next Monday night.
Besides Ajax defying the lightniftg
there are the fans on the bleachers
defying the sunshine.
N. D. COW CLUB
IS GROWING
THIS ORGANIZATION IS MAKING
GREAT STRIDES IN THE
STATE
The North Dakota Cow Club is one
of the most promising young organi
zations in the state and working to
ward an end which is of vital interest
to all the citizens of the state. It is
backed by many of the most promi
nent men of the state
The following men are the officers^
of the club: C. E. Batchelor of Grand
Forks, President Prof. J. H. Shep
ard, vice president W. F. Steggie, of
Medina, J. D. Bacon of Grand Forks,
Mr. Phealan of Bowman and Charles
F. Leonard, Fargo, directors.
The Cow Club is a branch of the
state dairy organization which has as
its purpose the helping of the farmers
of the state in the matter of stocking
their farms with dairy cattle.
One way in which the club hopes to
be of benefit to the farmers is in low
ering the amount of interest the far
mers have to pay for the money bor
rowed by them from the banks for the
purpose of purchasing cattle with
which to stock their farms. The club
proposed to affiliate the organization
with the banks of the state in such a
manner that the farmers will be able
to obtain money for the purpose of
buying cattle at the minimum rate of
interest and to build up dairy farming
all over the state.
It is also suggested by the officers
of the club that every possible pres
sure be brought to bear on the farm
ers to prevent them from killing the
young heifers for veal.
BETTER FARM
SUGGESTIONS
MR. HALL GIVES SOME GOOD
ADVICE ON SUMMER TILL—
PLOW WELL
E. W. Hall the. Better Farming
Association expert for Williams coun
ty has som'e good suggestions to of
fer relative to summer tilled land.
Mr. Hall advises:—
The recent rains, and especially the
heavy rain of July 4th, have put the
soil in excellent condition for plow
ing. All the moisture that has been
added to the soil by these last rains
should be carefully conserved to help
make the crop of 1914, should that
season be a dry onfe. A good deal of
plowing has been done in the coun
ty, but there is still a large acreage
to be plowed. The sooner this is ac
complished, the easier it will be to
conserve the moisture that has fallen
and to commence to prepare a good
seed bed for next year. Any plowing
that has been done should be drag
ged thoroughly to keep the surface
from baking and cracking. Care
should be taken, though, in the use of
the drag, not to fine the surface soil
to such an extent that it may blow
or drift.
Plow well and deep. Land that is
only partly plowed cannot be expect
ed to produce good crops, nor wiH a
method of this kind conserve mois
ture as it should. The depth that
land should be plowed depends on
many conditions. Under most cir
cumstances, however, our summer
fallow in this county should be plow
ed at least 8 inches deep. Use a rule
and see how deep the plowing is. It
may surprise you if you have been
guessing at the depth. If shallow
plowing at the same depth has been
practiced for many seasons past, the
old plow sole should be broken up. A
large amount of new ground, however,
should not be turned up. Use a pack
er immediately following ihe plow or
at least pack each days' plowing be
fore you leave it at night. If you do
not have a packer use any implement
that will help to pack the newly plow
ed land and to check the evaporation
of moisture from it. If the plowing
is to be done with an engine, do not
try to finish the job in a day. Use
fewer plows, put them down^ and at
tach a harrow or drag behind the
plows so that the soil may be packed
immediately after the plows and a
mulch formed to prevent the escape
of any moisture. Keep a mulch form
ed and prevent weeds from growing,
after the ground has been plowed.
It requires as much moisture to grow
weeds as it does to grow a crop.
The principal cause for a failure
on summer fallowed or summer tilled
land is lack of work on it and the
resulting loss of moisture *nd growth
of weeds. Remember this: our rain
fall is 5 inches and the aporation
is 30 inches, or better. It
rr¥ \r
•N
W1LUSTON, WILLIAMS COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1918.
tr
kes work
to retain the moisture. As long as
we have vacant homesteads that are
growing up to weeds and un-worked,
non-resident land, and no fences, we
will have the Russian thistle and oth
er weeds rolling over the summer fal
low in the fall. If the moisture is
properly conserved, though, it will
give the crop a chance to get ahead
of the thistle the following season.
Retaining the false whiskers of the
highwayman who got her purse, a
Chicago woman finds her courage but
meagerly rewarded. Men are deceiv
ers you know.
PROFESSOR SAYS
WORM IS BENEFIT
PROF. WALDRON SAYS WORM
RECENTLY FOUND ATTACKS
RUSSIAN THISTLE
According to Prof. C. B. Waldron
of the Agricultural college the pe
culiar worm that is just making its
appearance about the Missouri slope
and as far north as Williston, is to be
looked upon more as a blessing than a
curse.
The worm was noticed a few
weeks ago and it has made niost of
its attacks on the Russian thistle and
in that it is doing good work.
The worm is about an inch and a
half in length and is of greenish color
and about the size of wheat straw
around.
It has made its appearance in Bow
man, Hettinger and Williams coun
ties, where it has as yet not done any
thing in the way of being destructive
to graii), but on the other hand has
attacked the thistle alluded to. Its
favorite diet appears to be the thistle,
but-if iv cannot get this it will tackle
the rag! weed and will try at other
kinds of weeds, and whn these give
out then it will go to the flax and
lastly to the wheat
The worms work in the same man
ner as the well known army^ worm
and in a measure resemble it, and
Prof. Waldron says that they are of
the same family. The army worm
made its appearance in the eastern
states some years ago and destroyed
all vegetation in its path, but the
present worm has tackled nothing but
weeds.
In case it should attack the grain
it can easily be destroyed by spray
ing, Prof. Waldron says.
FARMERS ARE
I ENTHUSIASTIC
MUCH PLEASED WITH MOVE
MENT—PIONEER HAS SOME
THING TO SAY
Ray Pioneer:—E. W. Hall agent of
the State Better Farming Association
which is also allied with the Williams
County Better Farming, Association
with headquarters in this, county,
spent Wednesday afternoon and
Thursday in this city and vicinity.
He is looking over the field of the
work of getting the plans lined up.
Mr. Hall is now taking a general sur
vey of the county and will soon have
the work well under way. He has
visited a number of the farms near
Ray and is very enthusiastic over the
prospects of the future.
The farmers here are'all greatly
interested and are taking a hold of
the proposition in away which prom
ises great benefits under the instruc
tions of the association.
This move on the part of the state
and county organizations is securing
Mr. Hall to come out and assist the
farmers to get the best possible re
turns out of the grain raising and
stock is a very commendable one and
will have lasting results.
Mr. Hall's services are r.t the dis
posal of the farmers and he is at all
times anxious and willing to confer
with them to outline plans and ren
der suggestions. At present his of
fice is at Williston, but in the near
future he will open headquarters in
Ray also.
HAAG SHOW COMING
Advance agents for the Haag Rail
road Shows were in the city the first
of the week making arrangements
for the appearance here of that or
ganization on July 22. The show is
just returning from a trip into west
ern Canada. The exhibit at Culbert
son the day previous to Williston and
at Stanley following the Williston
date. The advance agent reports that
the show met with poor business in
Western Canada, owing to not the
best of conditions prevailing in that
section. The agent gives every as
surance of a first class show, and says
there is no resemblance between his
organization and the recent band of
Gypsies that camped here for two
performances recently. The Haag
shows are reported to carry a splen
did menagerie.
TEMPORARY MOVE
The consolidated First National
Bank has moved into the old quarters
of the First National Bank temporar
ily while extensive improvements are
being made in the permanent bank
building. The bank will probably oc
cupy the temporary quarters for a
month while the improvements are be
ing carried to completion.
NEW SALE STABLE
E. R. Brownson and M. S. Williams
have opened up a feed Bam and Sale
Stable near the Farmer's Elevator, in
the barn formerly owned by E. E.
Tooley. Mr. Williams returned from
the west yesterday with a fine bunch
of horses which are now on sale at
this barn. Mr. Brownson and Mr.
Williams will keep horses and cattle
for sale at ail times. They have a few
choice cows for sale at this time be
sides the bunch of horses. Parties
interested will do well to look oyer
this stock, and will be assured of lib
eral- treatment.
RAIN SPOILED
CELEBRATIONS
HEAVY DOWNPOUR PUTS STOP
TO INDEPENDENCE DAY
DOINGS
Despite all predictions to the con
trary it rained on July 4th. The heavy
downpour, starting about four o'clock
in the morning and continuning lit
several hours, put picnic grounds and
roads in such a condition that all
gatherings in this section were called
off. The band had gone to consider
able expense and labor in preparing
fer the picnic at Wilsons grove. How
ever not to be outdone the committee
got busy and arranged a big dance at
the Gates Hall, which was well at
tended. The Missouri Ridge Good
Roads picnic at the Gromatka g^ove
was postponed until Monday. The
local weather bureau registered 1.19
inches of rainfall during the early
morning hours.
COLE CIRCUS
GANG IN FIGHT
GREEK LABORER USES GUN
WITH TELLING EFFECT AT
ANDOVER, S. D.
Aberdeen, S. D., July 8.—In a bat
tle between circus men and railway
hands last night at Andover, a sta
tion east of here on the H. & D. divi
sion of the Milwaukee road, three men
were fatally shot and a fourth man,
who was struck over the back with a
crowbar, was severely injured.
Two of the dying men, Ed Oakley
and N. Jeffers, were brought to an
Aberdeen hospital. Both are employ
ees of Cole Brothers' circus. Oakley
wds shot in the back at the base of the
spine and a bullet penetrated Jeffers'
right lung. Another circus man
Whose name is not known, is dying
at Andover as the result of a bullet
wound in the abdomen.
The trouble commenced when the
railroad men charged the circus, em
ployees with having stolen a suitcase
from their bunkhouse. The circus
force charged the railroaders, who re
treated to their bunkhouse and closed
the doors. As the circus men drew
near one of the railrtad laborers, a
Greek, known as Tom Stevens, threw
open the doors and fired repeatedly at
the attacking party.
Stevens then ran uptown and into a
butcher shop. The proprietor, not
knowing of the shooting, but seeing
the revolver in the man's hands, per
suaded him to give it up. Stevens
then continued his flight. The au
thorities started in pursuit, but lost
the track about midnight.
The circus management took charge
of the wounded men, chartered a spe
cial train and hurried them to Aber
deen. The country is being scoured
today for the missing Greek.
FARGO COMPANY
BUILD CHURCH
CONTRACT FOR CHURCH HERE
AWARDED TO FARGO FIRM.
COMPLETE IN 1914
The building committee of the Con
gregational church last Monday night
awarded the contract for building the
new church to the Anderson and
Smeby Company, of Fargo, N. D.
The contract awarded is for the build
ing complete, with the exception of
the plumbing and heating plant. The
amount of this company's bid was
$26,250. A number of details remain
to be worked out between the con
tractors- and the committee, but it is
expected that the laying of brick will
be started by August 15.
Hebron pressed brick will be used,
the thirmmings of stone. The new
church in dimensions will be 60x90
by 32, with a seating capacity of 350
in- the main auditorium, which is in
creased by Sunday school rooms and
galeries to about 1000.-
It is planned to have the church
completed and ready for dedication
and use in the fall of 1914. at which
time will be the twenty-fifth anniver
sary. The state conference will be
invited to meet here at that time and
take part in the dedication.
The completion of this building will
give the city a church of which it
may feel proud, and the auditorium
will afford adequate room for large
gatherings.
OFF TO CAMP
Company E left last night for the
annual National Guard encampment
at Devils Lake. They will go into
camp on the splendid camp grounds
at the Lake, where they will remain
until July 21. There will be about
600 men in camp for the twelve days
that the encampment will last.
A new boat in New York had as
sponsors fifty red-haired school girls.
The boat must have been launched
with vim enough to last two ordinary
lifetimes for vessels.
2
'.*$$'.•
$1.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
REALLY NOVEL
ENTERTAINMENT
ORCHESTRA COMIQUE MADE A
DECIDED HIT—INDIVIDUAL
NUMBERS GOOD
The Orchestra Comique made its
first and only appearance in Willis
ton on Wednesday night at Library
Hall. After the processional in which
the costumes of the performers and
their unique instruments showed to
full advantage, the following pro
gram was given under the skilled
baton (usually known as a feather
duster) of Miss Dolly Randolph.
1. Full Orchestra, March Fantasy..
Bassoons: Mrs. S. J. Dorothy, Miss
Grace Nelson, Mr. J. A. Corbett and
Mr. W. G. Owens.
Tuba: Miss Florence Wilson.
Cymbals: Miss Sparks and Miss
Bertha Lent.
Flutes: Mrs. Todd, Miss Mate
Olson, and Miss Nellie Larsen.
Cornets: Miss Mabel Metzger and
Miss Merle Montgomery.
Bells: Gladys Penson.
Harp: Miss Amanda McNiven.
Drum: Mr. A. J. Cunningham..
Librarian: Mr. Erwin Bniegger.
Accompanist: Miss MaggieMonroe.
The production was everything that
had been announced from the stand
point of comedy and otherwise. We
had long ago thought "there was no
such animal," but our dreams of
"Impie" and "Gulliver City" a-Ia-Sun
day comic section, have been surpass
ed. The first part of the programr
was produced from a recent issue of
the Graphic, and the last part from
the Herald, a copy of each of which
occupied the Directress' stand. This
alone assured the excellency of the
numbers rendered.
The individual numbers were high
ly entertaining also and added much^to
the enjoyment of the evening. Miss
Randolph is an accomplished violin
ist and responded liberally to the
hearty encores following her numbers.
There was one disappointment how
ever, and that was in the number in.
attendance. The audience was small:.
Those who were not there are the
Joosers for they missed a really uniques
and enjoyable entertainment.
This original musical novelty is
given by Miss Randolph only and has
been copywrighted by her. Her suc
cess with what was a happy accident*
thought out for an evening's fun at
a tennis club, has been such that she
gives her professional services to it
throughout much of the year and over"
a wide territory.
GREAT FALLS TO MILWAUKEE
Two men riding motorcycles on
their way from Great Falls, Mont., to
Milwaukee, arrived here Saturday and
remained over Sunday, going on east
Monday. They struck some heavy
roads west of us due to excessive?
rains.
WILL LOCATE
AT ARNEGARD
THEO. J. BOE OF WILLISTON TO'
OPEN BUSINESS IN THAT
TOWN
Theo. J. Boe, of this city, will in the'
near future open a general farm ma
chinery business at Arnegaard. He
is just now making preliminary pre
parations for the starting of the bus—
iness. He will erect a building at Ar
negaard to be used for that nurpose..
Mr. Boe is well known in this terri
tory, having been associated with Boe
Brothers in this city, and is a broth
er of John Boe, of Williston, and H"_
A. Boe, now of Alexander. His many?"
friends wish him success in his busi
ness in proportion to his stature ancf
genial nature.
..
What a woman can dress for de
pends to a great extent upon whons
she dresses for.
•.
Al
f3
Op. 100ft'
"Stars and Stripes''
2. Solo for Double Baas
Mrs. Van Dyk*
"Down by the Old Mill Stream"
3. Fuga Inconsequenza, arranged for
Orchestra—-"Three Blind Mice"
4. Solo Melancholique ....
Mr. Elmer Halvorsea
"Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep"
5. Duo for Tuba and Bassoon.
Miss Wilson and Mr. Corbett
Intermission Program
Violin solos Miss Randolph
Readings
Violin solos Miss Randolph
7. Full Orchestra
"Alexander's Rag Time Band"
8. Wiltfston's A, B. C. Book.
9. Orchestra—
1
"Songs you ought to know
10. Reverie Appassionate for Harp
Miss Amanda McNiveu
11. Hymn, National
Orchestra and Audfence
The different instruments were
played by the following artists: Vio
lin: Miss Boystrom, Miss Hougenr
Miss Todd, Miss Shaw, Miss Brant.
Double Bass: Mrs. Van Dyke and
Mr. Robert Mansfield. Cellos: Miss
Baldwin and Mr. A. J. Field.
Trombones: Miss Tirzah Mackech
nie and Miss Alice Borden, Mr. Her
bert Metzger and Mr. Elmer Halvor
sen.
1
1
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