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Williston graphic. (Williston, Williams County, N.D.) 1895-1919, July 17, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076270/1913-07-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XIX. NO.^4.
FAIR VIEW MILLS
IN NEW HANDS
JENNISON ft SON OF WILLISTON
ARE THE NEW PROPRIETORS
—MAKE IMPROVEMENTS
A recent issue o£ the Fairview
(Mont.) Times gives an account as
follows regarding: the change of own
ership of the mills there.
The Fairview Mills has been sold
to Jennison & Son who will take pos
session July 15th. The new firm in
tends to make extensive improve
ments in the mill, enlarging it and
adding more up-to-date machinery to
increase its capacity to at least
barrels per day. They will also add
a 40,000 bushel elevator and be in a
position to handle all the grain that
is brought to this market, paying top
notch prices for the best grades. The
motive power for both mill and ele
vator will be electricity, a sixty horse
power motor for the mill and a 15 h.
p. motor for the elevator. The Jen
nisons understand their business, they
have been in the milling business all
their lives and the flour which they
have been making, "World Best at
Rugby, N. D., and "Opportune" at
their Williston Mill is positive proof
that Fairview Mills will place on the
market a grade of flour that will
have no superior. This is the only
flouring mill in the Yellowstone Val
ley below Billings and will supply ttus
large territory for many years to
come, and being located at Fairview.
the most advantageous shipping point
in the state it is not immagination
when we say that in a short while you
will see Fairview flour for sale in
stores in every town in Montana. We
welcome the Jennlsons to this city
and know that when they selected
Fairview as their permanent location
they used good judgement and will
never regret it.
WILL RETAIN
OLD RATE
COMMISSIONERS DECIDE THEY
CANNOT PUT NEW LIGHT
RATE IN EFFECT
One of the important matters com
ing before the city commission Mon
day evening was that of electric light
rates. As previously stated it was ex
pected that a new rate, as recommend
ed by the old council, would be put
into effect on July 1. This was dis
cussed at length at the Monday night
meeting.
During the discussion Mr. Brueg
eer, commissioner in charge of that
department, said:—"I do not think
that we can stand to keep the plant
in operation under the proposed new
rates. The rates now are as low as
any in the state. This is the only
source we have to obtain revenue to
put in a water filtering plant, and we
w&nt to do this next spring. The
present government arrangement has
not been in force long enough for us
to obtain sufficient figures and an
everage to tell just how the revenue
will come out. If a person reads the
report of Mr. Storrs carefully they
will see that it is based entirely on
probabilities of the revenue of the
electric plant for the next three years.
If later the figures show that we can
make a reduced rate then it will prob
ably be satisfactory. I think the best
way to have this matter thoroughly
understood is to call a mass meeting
of the citizens and let them come out
and get a complete understanding of
the situation."
Just how the present electric rates
were established was looked up. It
was found that the rates Here estab
lished ty ordinance. President Cra
ven stated that inasmuch as the rates
were established by an ordinance,
they could not be altered by a resolu
tion but to make a change a new or
dinance would ne necessary, and
therefore the present rates would
stand until another ordinance fixing
the rates is prepared, introduced and
passed.
Munyer Brothers, proprietors of the
Arcade pool hall, by attorney, reg
istered a written protest against the
Salvation Army meeting in front of
their place of business of evenings.
The protest stated that they did not
obejct particularly to the army, but
to the condition of the walks after
their regular evening meetings. They
stated that the crowd which collect
ed spit upon the walk and left it in
bad condition. They asked why the
army could not be directed to meet
at some other place at least part of
the time, and that they would not ob
ject to their holding meetings in front
of the pool hall occasionally. Nothing
was done in the matter, the commis
sioners being of the opinion that they
could not, or did not care to try to
dictate as to where, and when, the
army should hold their meetings.
Commissioner Gooper introduced the
electric sign ordinance and petition
prepared and presented by S. H.
Dorothy. The ordinance was discuss
ed and it was decided that the com
missioners should each be provided
with a copy of the ordinance before
it was placed on readings.
The bill from the U. S. Reclama
tion Service for $1022.68 for electric
Williston
ss
current delivered during the month of
June was read and ordered paid.
The appointment of a successor to
C. C. Mackenroth as superintendent
of the water and light depaVtmentwas
taken up. Mr. Bruegger read the ap
plication of George Bissell^ of Minot,
and recommended his appointment at
a salary of $125.00 per month, the
amount asked by the applicant. No
final action was taken however, as the
resignation of Mr. Mackenroth has
never been accepted and the council
wanted to be sure just when Mr. Bis
sell would be here before accepting
the resignation and making the ap
pointment. The head of this depart
ment was directed to communicate
with the applicant at once and find
out just how soon he could^ be on the
job. Mr. Mackenroth desires to be
relieved by the 20th.
Upon motion Pres. Craven was di
rected to assist the City Attorney in
the damage suit of Campbell against
the city, now being tried in district
court.
MACKENROTH
GOES TO SPOKANE
WILL HAVE CHARGE OF MOTOR
DEPARTMENT FOR BIG ELEC
TRIC COMPANY THERE
C. C. Mackenroth, who for the past
number of years has been Superin
tendent of the Williston Water and
Electrical Department, has accepted
a position with the Inland Empire
Electrical Railway Company, of Spo
kane, Wash. He will have charge of
the motor department for this com
pany. He expects to leave here for
Spokane about the 20th.
Many people will regret to see Mr.
Mackenroth leave the city permanent
ly. While in this city he has been ac
tive along other lines than that
his duties in looking after the city
utilities. He has been a member of
the city school board and has acted
as secretary of that body for some
time.
It is understood that the new posi
tion holds considerably more in the
way of financial compensation than
the one just resigned in Williston.
We have heard of "Dry Land Farm
ing" but we saw a demon.si ration of
dry land fishing the other day. Of
course it was some youngsters. There
were three in the party. One had a
long pole with a string on it and the
other two were the "fish.' ^be fish
crawled about in the grass while the
third angled. Pretty soon the angler
got a bite, and then one of the
nsn
came to the rescue and helped him
pull his catch onto the imaginary
shore., Young America always for
devising ways of amusement.
Joel Underwood, of Pierceton, Ind.,
nephew of Mrs. M| S. Phillips, of tins
city, left last week for his home. He
has been visiting here since March.
I
HOTEL TRAIN.
NATIONAL RELIABILITY TOUR
AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE ASS N.
"TWIN CITIES TO
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK.
J, -V
TOURISTS SPENT
NIGHT HERE
ARRIVED ON TIME—BEST ROADS
BETWEEN WILLISTON AND
MINOT FOUND ON RUN
Striking the best roads which they
have encountered on the entire trip
between Williston and Minot, the
Glidden tourists arrived here Wed
nesday evening covered with dust and
grease,hot and tired but happy.
Arrived at 4:30
The first cars arrived about 4:30
and they kept coming every few min
utes from that until shortly after six
o'clock, when a few of the cars which
got off the road and were thus delay
ed, checked in.
Special Arrives
The special hotel train of eleven
coaches arrived just about the same
time as the advance cars of the party.
After the water tanks were filled the
train backed up and pulled into the
siding beside the freight house for
the night,
where
WILLISTON. WILLIAMS COUNTY. NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY. JULY 17, 1913.
supper for the tour­
ists was soon prepared and served.
Cars Parked
The cars were parked in the square
in front of the Great Northern pas
senger station, where each reported
to the checker as they came in and
took their places in the line around
the lower edge of the square facing
the station. The drivers immediate
ly busied themselves making a few
repairs and adjustments, oiling up,
etc.
Ahead of Time
The first car to arrive was a Marmon.
which was considerably ahead of time.
Despite the
fact
that this car had tire
trouble on the road, it came in first.
Other cars followed closely, a num
ber of non-contestants being among
the first arrivals. Some of the cars
to arrive late were also non-contes
tants and a couple of them had join
ed the touring party at Minot, Devils
Lake and other towns. In all thirty
cars were in the party.
L. W. Hill Here
Lewis W. Hill, of the Great North
ern, arrived here in his special car
attached to Number 3, which came in
on time and about an hour the arrival
of the first cars. Mr. Hill's private
car was cut off from number 3 and
it was taken on from here attach
ed to the Glidden Special. Mr. Hill
spent about an hour visiting among
the tourists about the station and
among the crowd assembled. He has
a car entered in the tour.
The Special Train
The special hotel train accompany
ing the tourists consisted of eleven
coaches. Two of these were diners,
Ohe was a repair car and the printing
engraving and newspaper plant occu
pied one car. The other cars were
sleepers, appartment and observation
ears. The newspaper car was aa in­
teresting place. There was every
thing there necessary for the produc
tion of a modern newspaper, includ
ing a Merganthaler Linotype machine,
which was in operation setting the
type for the daily paper published
each day. The newspaper men of the
city were invited by special wire
from Stanley to be on hand to be
shown through the train, which was
done.
Set Hot Pace
From Stanley to Williston a hot
pace was maintained. The drivers
said that the roads were the best in
this stretch that they had found and
that it was a great relief indeed, as
through Minnesota and the eastern
part of North Dakota much mud had
been encountered. They left Stan
ley, the noon control, about 2 o'clock.
Left This Morning
Shortly after 7:30 the tourists re
sumed their run westward, the spe
cial train pulling out about the same
time. Poplar, Montana, is the noon
control. The end of Thursday's run
will be at Glasgow.,
Facts About The Tour
Minneapolis to Glacier Park station,
Mont.
Distance—1,233 miles.
Date—July 11-19.
Average daily run—154 miles.
Great Northern hotel and cafe train
of twelve cars, costing $2,500,000.
Purpose of tour—For sociability,
to promote good roads and to demon
strate touring abilities of cars enter
ed.
Prizes—Glidden trophy for club
team of three Anderson runabout
trophy for individual runabout en
tries Daily news trophy for run
abouts special prizes for winners in
seven prize divisions for touring cars
an drunabouts, respectively.
SURVEY REPORTS
ON N. DAK. COAL
RECENT BULLETIN GIVES SOME
STATISTICS—VALUABLE IN
GAS
The production of coal (lignite) in
North Dakota in 1912, according to E.
W. Parker, of the United States Geo
logical Survey, amounted to 499,480
short tons, valued at $765,105, com
pared with 502,628 short tons, valued
at $720,489, in 1911, the latter ton
nage being the maximum output in
the history of the state. The decrease
of 3,148 short tons in 1912 was so
small as to possess no significance,
while the increa'se of $44,616 in the
value of the,product indicates a satis
factory condition of trade. It is not,
however, in the comparatively small
production of coal in North Dakota
that the importance of the State as
a fuel producer lies. The vast lignite
deposits of North Dakota must be
considered as an enormous potential
resource.
On account of its heavy percentage
of moisture and rapid disintegration
on exposure lignite does not stand
transportation as well, and conse
quently its field of usefulness has been
thus far limited. Its principal use
has been to supply fuel to the set
tlers on the treeless plains in the wes
tern part of the State, and for that
purpose it has been mined in a crude
way in almost every county in the
lignite bearing area. Commercial
mines are situated on the lines of
railway and supply the towns of the
State with fuel for domestic pur
poses and for use under steam boilers.
But lignite has been found to be an
excellent fuel for the generation of
producer gas, and with the develop
ment of manufacturing industries in
the State, the extensive deposits of
lignite in North Dakota will receive
more attention as a source of power.
It has been found that 1 ton of lig
nite in the gas producer will yield as
much horsepower in the internal-com
bustion engines as 1 ton of the best
bituminous coal under boilers. As the
gas producer and internal combustion
engines in large units come into more
general use in the West, as they are
rapidly doing in the East, the hun
dreds of billions of tons of lignite
known to underlie North Dakota will
be found to possess great potentiali
ties in the settlement and economic
development of the State.
DIED
The funeral of Rowena Skinner,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Skin
ner, was held from the family home on
4th Ave., Sunday afternoon at five
o'clock. Miss Baldwin and Mrs. Shaw
sang a duet and Rev. E. S. Shaw had
charge of the service. Rowena was
born May 5th, 1907 and departed this
life July 11th, 1913 after a very brief
illness. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner are
recent comers to Williston but found
kind neighbors and friends in their
hour of sorrow.
DOES IT AGAIN
The fair weather gods certainly
have been keeping close tab on the
Williston band and evidently look
with disfavor upon that organization.
For the fourth time their picnic was
spoiled Tuesday evening. They say
that they are going to abandon the
idea of holding a picnic, as if they
keep on, an Omaha cyclone will surely
be visited upon us.
RAIN AND HAIL
A heavy rainstorm, accompanied by
some hail, passed over the city Tues
day evening. Reports are that there
was a heavy hail storm north and
west of us, and the indications at the
time of the rain here that a heavy
storm of some character passed north
of here.
CONGREGATIONAL
The services next Sunday will con
sist of the regular quarterly com
munion service with introductory ser
mon by the pastor and reception of
members. Bible school at 11:45.
At 8 P. M. there will be a report
of the State Sunday School Conven
tion at Grand Forks by delegates and
members present with special music
by the choir.
There will be a welcome for you.
Edwin S. Shaw, Pastor.
SOLDIER BOYS
ENJOY CAMP
COMPANY E. AT DEVILS LAKE—
THE DAILY CAMP DOINGS
SPLENDID OUTING
The men of Company E. N. D. N.
G., of Williston, are enjoying camp
life at the annual encampment at
Devils Lake. A letter to the Gra
phic from the camp says:—"Company
E. arrived at the camp in due time
after an uneventful trip. We have
thirty-six men and officers in camp.
The boys are enjoying their work and
their time is very well taken up with
various camp duties. The instruc
tions we are getting will greatly bene
fit the company so that when Wil
liston gets that new armory we will
have a military company to occupy
it of whom Williston can well be
proud in rank with any other com
pany in the state. Company E. has
the neatest and best
appearing
bunch
of men in camp this year. Camping
as we are on the splendid^ camp reser
vation the men are enjoying their
outing.
MANY AUTOS WERE IN LINE
A few more than seventy-five cars
were in the automobile parade Wed
nesday evening, arranged in honor of
the Glidden tourists. There were sev
eral cars on the side streets which
did not get into line, and a few turn
ed off at a side street before they
reached the point where the count
'was taken. It was a splendid show
ing. The parade was headed by the
Williston Band, which occupied five
Hup touring cars.
A certificate of incorporation has
been issued by the secretary of state
to the- Blossom Syrian Society of
Williston. The incorporators are,
David Kalil. Chas. A. Zein and J.
Munyer. The society at present has
a membership of about forty.
i*
$1.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
C. A. ANSFIELD
IS NOMINATED
PRESIDENT NOMINATES HIM ASr
RECEIVER OF LOCAL LAND
OFFICE
An associated Press dispatch front
Washington, under date of July 14,
says:—
"Charles A. Mansfield has been
nominated by President Wilson as re
ceiver of public moneys at Williston,
North Dakota.
When shown the above dispatch Mr.
Mansfield said:—"I have no further
news of my appointment other than
that contained in the dispatch. How
ever the appointment has to be con
firmed by the senate, and I presume
this will be done in regular order aar
there is apparently no one else up for
the office here. I will probably have
conformation direct in. a few days.**
When asked how soon he would as
sum the office of receiver under the
appointment, Mr. Mansfield said that:
he presumed as soon as the red tape
could be gone through with, which
will likely take about three or four
weeks.
Mr. Mansfield is appointed to suc
ceed M. S. Williams, who has held the
office of receiver for the past four
years and three months.
HAUGES LUTHERAN CHURCH
The pastor will be out of the city
for about ten days.
There will be services by a visiting"
pastor Sunday the 20th, in Ploom.
Creek church at 3 p. m., and in Wil
liston at 8 p. m., both services in the
Norwegian language.
A. E. Distad, Pastor.
Residence 705 2nd Ave. West. Phone
389.
FAILED TO
REACH VERDICT
JURY IN LaBERGE CASE OUT
MANY HOURS—NO VERDICT
—JURY DISCHARGED
After being out for more than twen
ty-six hours, the jury in the case of
the state against Dr. P. U. LaBerge,
tried in district court last week^ fail
ed to reach a verdict.
The case went to the jury about
4:30 Saturday evening, following the
presentation of the state's case by
U. L. Burdick, states attorney. The
attorneys for the defense made their
pleas to the jury in the morning.
A few hours after retiring the jury
reported a disagreement to the judge,
who sent them back for further de
liberations. After being in sessioa
until Sunday evening they reported
a hopeless disagreement and were
discharged.
It is reported that the jury stood'
eight to four for conviction, and at
another time it was reported that
they stood evenly divided.
MARRIED
Walla^-Sandwick:—A very quiet
wedding occured July 2 az the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Adolphson near
Trenton, N. D., when a son of Mrs.
Adolphson Bert Wallace and Miss
Inga Sandwick, were happily united
in marriage. Mr. Wallace is one of"
our enterprising young men of Tren
ton and Miss Sandwick is from Nor
way wnich gives her the true stamp
of energy and success| The marriage'
was solemnized by Rev. J. K. Nelson,
of Tre/iton. A fine dinner was served
by Mrs. Adolphson aided by Mrs_
Charles Wallace.
WILL GIVE DANCE
The Degree of Honor lodge will
give a supper and dance in the I. O.
O. F. Hall on the evening of July 18.
Good music will be provided for the
evening and a very enjoyable time
is assured.
A representative of the Dakota
Farmer was badly beaten up in Bis
marck. He does not know who did
the deed, or their reason.
BLAZE IN R. R.
COAL CHUTE
DANGEROUS BLAZE STARTS IN
G. N. COAL STATION IN LO
CAL YARDS
The department was called out
Monday at noon to put out afire on
the roof of the Great Northern Coal
chute in the local railway yards. Just
what started the blaze is hard to tell»
but it appears that a cinder from a
passing engine must have landed on
the shingle roof and set the blaze
going.
Being nearly at the top of the high
roof the blaze was hard to reach and
it caused the firemen considerable
trouble before they had it completely
out. Some irregularity in sounding
the alarm caused a little delay also,
and it was fortunate that the fire got.
no better start than it did, or the big
chute would doubtless have gone up
in smoke.

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