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Williston graphic. (Williston, Williams County, N.D.) 1895-1919, December 12, 1918, Image 1

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VOL. XXIV, NO. 26
^-'A Hktorica! s^
HJUF Of NOMMK
MOVEO io musm
SHERIFF AND SPECIAL AGENT
MAKE SEVERAL ARRESTS
DURING PAST WEEK
A grand rush has been made by the
piggers of the state during the love
ly December weather for the little
oasis at Mondak to replenish their
supply of wet goods for the coming
prolonged dry spell. The sheriff and
the Great Northern R. R. Special
Agent have not been asleep either
and several arrests were made during
the past week and several thousand
dollars worth of whiskey now is
stored in Williston awaiting the ac
tion of the Federal authorities.
On December 6th. two arrests were
made by the R. R. -Special Agent the
first being that of Labo Tsvesteoff
from Grand Harbor who had been
sent from that place by a number of
his labor associates to procure some
of the spirits. He was taken from
the train here with a quantity of
whiskey stored in suit cases and was
taken before Justice Ludowese. He
was bound over for trial and on de
fault of a $500 bond was placed in
the county jail.
Carl Schmidt and Frank Herman
were next and were taken from the
train here with a quantity of the
amber fluid. They stated that they
had never been to Mondak before and
had only gone there this time to get
the whiskey for the flu. They gave
their home as Ray and were released
on $300 bonds each.
The big haul was made Dec. 8th.
when R. Carl a mechanic and Wil
liam Kelley both of Minot were ar
rested north of Ray by the sheriff
with about $2,000 worth of whiskey
in their possession. It is evident that
they are members of a regular or
ganized gang that have been hired to
haul quantities of whiskey from Mon
dak to Minot. They used every pre
caution possible to escape the au
thorities evading every town between
Mondak and Minot by about 15 miles.
North of Ray one of the autos in
which they were traveling broke down
and they had to come to Ray for re
pairs. The constable at Ray suspect
ed something wrong and telephoned
the sheriff who was soon on the
scene. Both men were bound over on
$500 bonds. R. W. Carl put up his
bond and returned to Minot while
Kelly is still boarding at the county
jail.
Another victim was picked up when
Leonard Retterath of Ross, N. D.,
was arrested with a quantity of booze
in his possession. He was taken be
fore Justice Ludowese and was bound
over on a $500 bond which he fur
nished.
As a result of these numerous ar
rests the Christmas business will
probably be very light at Mondak,
especially there is apt to be a scarcity
of North Dakota customers.
MORE WOMEN WANTED
BY LOCAL RED CROSS
The local chapter of the Red Cross
has put in another plea to the women
of Williston to help with the sewing
that they are doing for the boys in
service. They have quite a large al
lotment which must be shipped By,the
21st. of this month and more women
are needed to complete it. The sew
ing rooms are at the Elks Jlonif and
anyone who can help should report
there any afternoon except Sunday
and Monday afternoons between the
hours of two and five. Don't go back
on the boys now that they have won
the war. They must be clothed and
fed the same now as before.
GLASS GETS M'ADOO
PLACE ON ABILITY
Secretary of Treasurer Carter
Glass might be called President
Wilson's peace appointee. His ap
pointment was the last made by
the president before sailing to
France. Clas^ won recognition in
the drafting of the Federal Bank
ing laws when he was congress
man from Virginia. He is well
qualified for McAdoo's plnce, is
he genera) opinion.
ic
XX'
FORiEB 1MIUISTM
AMONG MISSING
Edward Nordin nephew of E. J.
Swedlund of this city and who for a
number of years worked for Mr.
Swedlund at his Jewelry store here
was reported during the last week
as among those missing at the front.
His picture appeared in the Minne
apolis Tribune last Sunday and' his
home was given as Minneapolis.
There is a possible chance that Ed
ward has been taken captive and it
has not been reported as yet. He has
been at the front for some time and
in his last letters he told about do
ing scout duty in No-Mans Land at
night and it was probably in one of
these raids that he was captured.
E
APPOINTED ON BOARD
At a meeting of the Williston
School Board held the first of this
week George A. Gilmore was ap
pointed to fill the unexpired term of
the late Edwin A. Palmer. Mr. Gil
more will hold this office till the next
election which is held in July. Mr.
Gilmore is an old resident of the city
and has always taken an active in
terest in the welfare of the commun
ity and we feel sure he will fill this
position in the best possible manner.
CATTLE MEN TO
HOLD STOCK SALE
To arrange for a sale to be held in
the pavillion at Williston the direc
tors and officers of the Missouri-Yel
lowstone Valley Shorthorn Breeders
association met at the office of the
secretary, A. F. Burke, December 3rd.
It was decided to hold the sale
about the middle of March, the ex
act date to be announced later. At
that time a large number of, the
purest short horn stock will be' sold
from the Williston pavillion. It is
hoped that in this way farmers and
stockmen will become interested and
be encouraged to buy stock of this
high grade.
A sale to be held at Sidney Dec.
20 was also arranged. At that time
two carloads of purebred stock will
be taken from near "Williston by
members of this breeders association
to be held. The sale will be boosted
by every member of the association
to get this pure bred stock circu
lated as much as possible.
Embrace Large Area
The association embraces the fol
lowing counties in North Dakota:
Williams, Divide, McKenzie, Moun
traill and the western half of Ward
county and Sheridan and Richland
counties of Montana.
All residing within that territory
and identified with the breeding of
shorthorns are eligible to become
members of the association.
"We want to make stockraisers see
just why good purebred shorthorns
are the most profitable kind of stock
to raise," said Mr. Wegley. "If they
stop to realize it, feed for a good
animal costs no more than feed for a
poor animal and a pure bred short
horn is worth from $250 up while a
scrub is worth from $35 to $80. In
these days of the high cost of feed
those figures may mean much to
farmers and stockraisers who are
good business men."
The membership of the association
at present represents about 450 head
of purebred shorthorn stock.
SMALL TOWN TALK WHAT?
It may be a joke but the people who
live in Williston do not think so, that
is the flu gossip that is going around
about Williston.
One man came to town the other
day from Minneapolis and asked how
many cases there were here of black
diphtheria. Of course there are hot
any but he said a friend had written
him stating that there were several
cases here. Some outsiders have is
sued the statement that the trains
are not stopping, here on account of
the epidemic and that the town is
under strict quarantine. One farmer
came to town the other day and ask
ed when so-and-so's funeral was to
be held. The person he was re
ferring to is one of our best known
citizens who is far from dead and at
no time has been seriously ill. Cut
out'his propaganda and do not pass
these rumors along unless you know
they are absolutely true. The condi
tions in Williston are as good if not
better than anywhere in the country
and no one is in any more danger of
catching the flu here than they are
at any other place in the country.
MERCHANT MARINE! WORLD
TRADE!—NO 10 CENT CORN!
This article by Mr. Hurley with the
after-war phases of our rapidly grow
ing mercantile marine now here Mr.
Hurley hopes to stimulate the inter
est of farmers in our merchant ships,
indicating how ships and internation
al trade are of di.vct interest to
farmers. Intelligent teamwork in re
storing the \rneriean Hag to the
routes of the world, is the aim.
Written Especially for
THE WILLISTON GRAPHIC
By EDWARD N. HURLEY
Chairman of the United States
Shipping Board.
Thousands of farmers through the
west remember the times the
eighties and nineties when corn was
worth more to burn than to sell.'
Our manufacturing output then
was roundly $150 per capita for the
whole population of the United Stal
es that is, in 1890, the corn-burning
period.
The value of a farm in 1890 to
each farmer tilling the soil was $2,
000. The value of products that each
factory worker made in 1890 was$2,
000. The average wages of the fac-1
tory worker were $490 per year.
Then came the great industrial ex
pansion, beginning about 1898, which I
has paused only once or twice.
In 1914 nobody would have thought
of burning corn or. any other farm
product, for farmers were prosper
ous along with the factory workers.
By that time we were making $246
worth of goods per capita, or $3030
per factory worker. The factory
worker's wages had risen to $660 a
year, and the result was clearly
shown in the value of a farm whicn
was then $3400 for every person en
gaged in tilling the soil.
I think this shows pretty clearly
that the farmer's market and
prosperity are
our industrial
Williston Graphic
OH JOY, A WHITE CHRISTMAS!
A SHIP FOR EVERY FARMER
WITH CARGO OF FACTORY 6010
CHAIRMAN HURLEY OF U. S.[SHIPPING BOARD IN EXCLUSIVE
STORY-FOR WH»LIST0N oVfePniC SHOWS COGS WHICH
TURN FOR OUR GREATEST PROSPERITY
linked closelv with iand
prosperity! I
in 1918 an extension of production
WILLISTON, WILLIAMS COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1918. $1.50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
IMtBlCAh ttoOSiHtves
(III,
new banking laws and other recent
lefgislation which will help us to put
our ships on new trade routes all
over the globe.
As a business man, the farmer has
both a direct and indirect interest ia
these ships, besides his investment as
an American.
Direct benefits will come to him
through direct sales of his products
to foreign countries, breeding animals
EDWARD N. HURLEY
lieve 20 years fr.om now the statisti- .* But the indirect returns of
cians will be able to compare the American merchant marine to
factory output and wages and farm farmer will be even greater.
values of 1893 with those of today By selling our factory goods
and show perhaps even a more re- abroad, we can increase the output,
markable increase.
to South America, fruit and dairy
products to Europe and Orient, and
the like.
Indeed, the farmer, through his
co-operative marketing organizations
his
have
quoted these figures because I be-
government, can do much di-
rectly to promote new world mar-
s"
When
Stand at Threshold of Greatest I a factory, in most cases, you are
Prosperity able to reduce cost of production, and
We are now on the verge of an also prices.
even greater industrial advance than For increased output means that
1
tile
the
you increase the output of
people have steadier work and that performed by
and commerce in world tradp to the overhead expenses, such as rent, in- state. The dentists of Williams coun
.•»merican merchant marine and tho (Continued on page 3)
I
HICK SMI RAISES COMMUNITY
LARGE SUBSCRIPT!
local high school raises large sum
Monday and Tuesday was Victory
Boy and Victory Girl day at the Wil
liston High School. A Victory Boy
and a Victory Girl club was organ
ized amongst the student of the senior
high school for the purpose of rais
ing funds amongst the students for
the United War Work Campaign now
on in the county. Monday and Tues
day were set aside as the days for
this work and some worthy work was
done by the students.
A sum of $376 was pledged during
these days of which $130 was paid in
cash. Sixty of the students pledged
$5 each. This sum will be added on
to the sum raised here in the city of
Williston which is now over a thou
sand dollars over the quota.
LOCAL RED CROSS
PLANS AUCTION
The local chapter of the Red Cross
is planning to hold in the near fu
ture an auction at which blankets
and many other articles that were
donated to them when they were run
ning the influenza hospital will be
auctioned off. These articles have
been cleaned and fumigated and there
is no danger of catching the disease
from them. Just what dates this auc
tion is to be held will be announced
later.
XMAS R. C, DRIVE
TO START SOON
The whole American people will be
invited in the week preceeding Christ
mas to enroll as members of the
Red Cross. It is confidentially be
lieved that there is need be no fur
ther campaigns for Red Cross funds,,
but, instead an annual Roll Call will
constitute the foundation of '.he Red
Cross.
Wherever our soldiers and sailors
may be, the Red Cross will stay with
them till they are demobilized. Noth
ing which we may do will be left un
done, either for the men in the war
zone, for those returning, for those
in the camps and hospitals, or for
their families at home to whom will
continue to be devoted the ministra
tions of the Red Cross Home Service.
A good example of the wonderful
work done by this organization at
home may be had from the observa
tion of the work done by our local
chapter during the influenza epi
demic when hundreds of people were
cared for in this county alone and
had it not been for this worthy work
many more deaths would have re
sulted.
The roll call of the nations is thus
to be called at Christmas time, that,
through enrollment in their Red
Cross, the American people may send
a message to our soldiers still over
seas and to the peoples of the world
that we are not merely content with
seeing our arms united with our Al
lies in victory, but that abiding pur
pose is that the love, the sympathy
and the intelligence of ail America
shall be rededicated to the permanent
service of mankind.
The posters and other materials to
be used in the drive have arrived and
the local committees will have them
around town soon. It is the duty as
well as an honor to enroll in this or
ganization of mercy at this time and
every man, woman and child in the
county is asked to join and should
join. Back up the boys at the front
and care for those left at home.
Paul Leonhardy has been appoint
ed chairman of the Christmas mem
bership drive here in Williston and
II. K. Brown assistant. The Wester
gaard-Blair office on Main Street will
be used as the headquarters during
this drive. This campaign starts De
cember 16th and runs till December
23rd.
COUNTY DENTISTS
ARE NOT SLACKERS
EVERY DENTIST IN COUNTY DID
WORK FREE OF CHARGE FOR
DRAFT BOYS FROM CO.
North Dakota dentists lead the na
tion in work pei formed for draft
men. Some 12,000 operations being
the dentists of the
(Continued on last page)
FIRST OFIIEXT WEEK
Two Evening and One Afternoon of
Splendid Entertainment
Three Big Events
On Monday evening, December 16
and Tuesday afternoon and evening,
Dec. 17, there will be staged in this
city at the Orpheum Theatre the first
of a series of four entertainments to
be offered by the Federated Commun
ity Association, a state organisation
conceived and launched by North Da
kota people. The purpose underly
ing this movement is the creation of
a finer and more healthy community
spirit, the absence of which, in many
places, is a distinct handicap to com
munity progress.
The entertainments, all double num
bers, will be given by an entertain
ment company and a lecturer, the
latter of whom will give short snap
py talks
on
As the Theatres of the city had
decided to remain closed until Dec.
21st it was through the courtesy of
the management of the Orpheum Co.
that this theatre was secured for
these attractions.
Seat sale is limited to 350.
dren under 14 not admitted
accompanied by their parents.
KfW i*1
subjects of general com­
munity interest. In every case, how
ever, the entertainment feature will
be given special emphasis. The var
ious companies, which rank among
the best on the platform, have beien
selected because of their fitness for
this kind of work.
A most unusual feature of this
whole undertaking is the extremely
low price of admission (ten and twen
ty-five cents.) Nothing equalling
these programs in quality has ever
been offered before at less than fifty
and seventy-five cents. These ex
traordinary prices have been made pos
sible by the contributions to the work
made iy the Williston Community
Club.
This Club some months ago com
pleted arrangements for these events.
M. H. Gaham, advance representative
of the association has recently spent
two days in the community attend
ing to details of advertising and ar
ranging for* a Special Market Day
sale by the local merchants, on De
cember 16 and 17th.
For the afternoon program all lo
cal business houses will be closed
from 2 P. M. to 3:45 P. M. in order
that business and professional men
and, their employees may take ad
vantage of the occasion. The evening
programs will begin promptly at 8
P. M.
The program for the first Com
munity Entertainment will be given
by Carolina Jubilee Singers and John
G. Duling, lecturer.
Remember the dates Dec. 16 and
17 and prices ten and twenty-five
cents.
i?
'..
MUM
Chil-
unle88
RUTH'S CIRCLE
0R6ANIZED TUESDAY
An auxiliary club of the First
Lutheran Church called Ruth's Cir
cle was organized at the home of Rev.
Geo. S. Natwick on Tuesday evening.
The club will have a membership of
about forty girls and will hold bi
weekly meetings. A constitution and
by-laws were adopted and officers
elected. The following girls will serve
as officers: President, Miss Helga
Peterson Vice President, Valborg
Mjilde Secretary. Agnes Westby
Treasurer, Magna Monson. After the
business meeting the girls were serv
ed with a delightful lunch by Mrs.
Natwick.
SAILS PRESIDENT TO
PEACE TABLE.
Americans have Imposed a great
responsibility on this man. He is
Captain Edward McAuley, U. S.
N., in command of the George
Washington, the ship assigned to
take President Wilson's peace
party to Europe and return. The
crew for the ship was drawn en
tirely from the navy.
VI [.
illI'1

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