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Devils Lake weekly world. (Devils Lake, N.D.) 1911-1914, August 11, 1911, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076523/1911-08-11/ed-1/seq-7/

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A Full Line
Of Cook Car supplies rang
ing in price from $13 to $35.
Farm Machinery Supplies
Tank pump hose, Belting, Packing, Hard
oil and Machine oil.
Cheap Enamel ware and
Tinware.
O'Brien Bros.
Grain, Fuel,
Flour and
Feed....
DEVILS LAKE,
We make a specialty of
FIELD SEED
When you want anything in our
line, call or PHONE 24
C. H. BAKER
W
DOES YOUR
ROOF LEAK?
If it does, now
is the time to
have it repaired.
NOTICE!
HENEVER you want a doctor you
go to one of known ability. I'm the
ONLY SHOE DOCTOR IN THE CITY
that you have dealt with and you know my
ability to fix shoes. I'm doing business at
Theo. Bolinger's old stand.' Give me a call
and I will guarantee satisfaction.
H. M. Bekken
The SHOE Doctor
Save the Rain!
Have your Water Spouts and
Eaves Troughs Repaired Now
before the Next Rain
Comes
See "Red" for All Kinds of Tin Work
Phone 499
H.E. JEWELL,
BOX CARS WILL BE KEPT
WELL SCATTERED FOR GRAIN
Railroads Running Out of Twin Cities
Give Orders Not to Return to
Terminals.
Minneapolis, Aug. 5.—Steps to pre
vent a shortage of freight cars for the
fal shipment of grain were taken to
day by the railroads with headquarters
in Minneapolis and St. Paul, when
orders were sent out from the general
offices of the Minneapolis, St. Paul and,
Sault Ste. Marie, Minneapolis and St.
Louis and Chicago, Milwaukee and St.
Paul roads, tj have all freight cars
held at their destination after being
unleaded.
In years nas' trains of eiap.-y cars
have been sent out hurried!
7 to take
care of the grain. This year railroad
N O A O A
THE NEW
STOVE GRATE
Hoffman Banner
AdjustableGrate
latest invention
419 E. 3rd St
Devils Lake.
officials, taking lime by the forelock,
propose to stole scores of empty
freight cars every switching yard
in tii-j Dakota?, Montana and lower
Canada.
ILLEGAL SHOOTING REPORTED
Washburn, N. D., Aug. 5.—Reports
received in this city are to the effect
that there has been considerable illegal
shooting of prairie chicekns within the
last few weeks. The regular season
does not open until in September. It
appears that the slaughter of the
young birds,' still far from the age of
maturity, has been extensive in sev
eral localities, and game wardens have
commenced an investigation M'ith a
view of stopping the practice and
bringing about the conviction of the
wrong-doers.
DOYON
Special to The World:
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Saunders return
ed from Brandon last Friday, where
they went to attend the Canadian fair.
They report a good time and crops
looking good in the King's domain.
A baby boy arrived at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. John Breen of Hope
township last Thursday evening.
Griff Jones received the sad news of
his sister's death at Madison, Wis.,
last Tuesday. He left on No. 6 the
same day for Madison.
The alarm of fire at Doyon Farm No.
1, operated by Frank Baldwin, last
Tuesday caused some quick moves to
be made in town, and in almost an
instant' C. H. Doyon had his big Velie
headed towards the farm and four
minutes later he was there and found
that fire had started from some un
known cause in the mill attached to
the big barn, but had been extinguish
ed before he arrived. S. B. LaDue and
Albert Anderson also went with auto
loads of men to render assistance if
necessary.
Tonk Ivnutson and bride of St. Paul,
Minn., arrived last week and are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. P. Iverson.
They may decide to locate here per
manently.
Patrick Norton of Bartlett was in
town last Tuesday telling the clerk
of the school district what he thought
of him because the board refused to
let him move a building which he had
bought, but the clerk made him under
stand that, even if he was the father
of the best "iddveated" family in
the state, including the secretary of
state, his money was far better than
his word, and "Old Pit" went home
and thought the matter over and
"peeped" into the "pints" of law,
and by Wednesday morning he decided
fully to give check to the president
of the board, and by doing so Pat be
came the owner of the old school
house in which the family was "iddy
cated."
POINT OF INTEREST IS ADVANC
ING TOWARD MINNESOTA—
FORMERLY MARYLAND.
The center of the population of the
United States, as enumerated in the
census of 1910, is 1 1-2 miles south of
Unionville, Monroe county, Indiana.
In the last decade it moved westward
31 miles from a point six miles south
east of Columbus Indiana.
This announcement has been made
by the census bureau on the basis of
the official computation of the center
of the population made by Charles S.
Sloane, the geographer of the bureau.
The figures of the geographer show
not only that the march of population
is still westward, but that there has
been acceleration of that movement
over the record of the decade between
1890 and. 1900. The center of popula
tion during that decade moved west
ward only 14 miles. The cause of the
acceleration of the westward trend i:i
the last decade is the remarkable in
crease of population in the Pacific aid
southwestern states.
The advance of 31 miles in tlu
movement of tlie center in the last de
cade, while more than twiee greater
than the decade before, is less than
I it has been at any other census taking.
I The 14 miles it advanced in the previ
ous decade was the smallest movement
ever recorded. It has advanced stead
ily along the 39th degree of latitude
ever since it stood in the vicinity of
Baltimore in 1790.
The following table shows the posi
tion of the center of population at each
previous, census:
Census year, 1790: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 23 miles
east of Baltimore, Md.
Census year, 1799: IS miles west of
Baltimore, Md., westward movement
in miles during pending decade, 41.
Census year, 1810: -10 miles north
west of Washington, D. C., westward
movement in miles during pending de
cade,
Census year, 1820: 16 miles north of
Woodstock, Va. westward movement
in miles during pending decade, 50.
Census year, 1830: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 19 miles
west-southwest of Moorefield, in the
present state of West Virginia west
ward movement in miles during pend
ing decade, 39.
Census year, 1S'40: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 16 miles
south of Clarksburg in the present
state of West Virginia westward
movement in miles during pending de
cade, 50.
Census year, 1850: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 23 miles
southeast of Parkersburg, in the pres
ent state of West Virginia westward
movement in miles during pending da
cade, 55.
Census year, I860: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 20 miles
south of Chillicothe, O. westward
movement in miles during pending de
cade, 81.
Census year, 1870: approximate lo
cation by important towns. 48 miles
east by north of Cincinnati, O. west
ward movement in miles during pend
ing decade, 42.
Census year, 1880: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 8 miles
west by south of Cincinnati, O. west
ward movement in miles during pend
ing decade, 58.
Census year, 3890: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 20 miles
east of Columbus, Ind. westward
movement in miles during pending de
cade, 48.
Census year, 1900: approximate lo
cation by important towns, 6 miles
southeast of Columbus, Ind. west
ward movement in miles during pend
ing decade, 14.
NEW FOUNDLAND MAN HAS UN
TIL CHRISTMAS TO WIN THE
SUM OF $10,000.
Superior, Wis., Aug. 5.—William
Brown of New Foundland has traveled
almost around the world in a cart
drawn by a dog team. He lias until
Christmas to get to St. Johns and will
win $10,000 when he arrives at his
destination.
KICKED IN THE FACE BY COLT
Stanley Lad Seriously Inured While
Rounding Up Stock.
Stanley, N. D., Aug. 5.—As the
adopted son of Thomas Cuffe was
rounding up some stock in a pasture,
lie rode along side of a 2-year-old colt
and as he went to strike it with a gad
which he held in his hand, the colt
kicked up, striking the boy full in the
face, causing injuries that may result
in the victim's death.
The boy's nose was broken and his
face was otherwise badly lascerated
so that it was necessary to take a num
ber of stitches across the face.
DUNN AND BRADSTREETS HAVE
ENCOURAGING OUTLOOK IN
REPORTS THIS WEEK.
THE GOOD FALL BUSINESS IS BE
GINNING—COTTON CROP IS
HELPING SOUTH.
Moderate Betterment in Trade Circles
Appears—Dry Goods Timid Yet, but
Wholesale and Retail Conditions are
Reported to be Much Better—Still
Further Improvement in Sight.
New York, Aug. 5.—Bradstreet says
that caution is the rule in trade cir
cles. Condition is based on present
affairs, but improvement is in sight.
The big cotton crop leads to great im
provement in the south. Good fall bus
iness is beginning.
Dunn's View.
Dunn says a moderate betterment in
trade circles appears this week. Dry
goods are a little timid yet, but both
wholesale and retail conditions are
much better.
SPLENDID ARRAY OF HOME TAL
ENT WILL APPEAR IN BENE
FIT ENTERTAINMENT.
GREAT PREPARATIONS ARE BE:
ING MADE FOR THE COMING
ATTRACTION.
The Quartette Will Be the Feature
Card—Mellums and Blondes and Mr.
Blessum Will Perform—Chorus From
Sunday School of the Church Will
Make Apearance.
Arrangements for the vaudeville per
formance to be given by home talent
for the benfit of the Guild House fund
of the Church of the Advent, are going
along nicely and when August 16 ar
rives everything will be in readiness
for the production.
Devils Lakers were recently enter
tained by. home talent and those in the
last performance witli many new ones
will be seen in the ten big acts that
will be offered in ten days.
Edward Flynn is again arranging a
sketch that will excell anything lie
has attempted in the dramatic line,
with the assistance of several of the
O 'Callighans.
Mr. and Mrs. Blonde and Mr. and
Mrs. Mellum are arranging new songs
for the performance and the Musical
Fosters have been induced to offer a
turn, as will Prof. Collins of the
Charles theatre. A chorus of young
ladies from the Church of the Advent
Sunday school will also appear.
The quartette, which is being guided
by Dr. Pierce, promises to be the hit
of the atraction. G. R. Blessum has
a new line of magic to spring and Dr.
Pierce will offer a musical monologue.
R. E. Austin will" apear in black face.
The quartette will be made up of Dr.
Mcintosh, A. P. Blonde, H. Z. Mitchell
and Avery Johnson.
Tickets for the coining attraction
are going rapidly and may be exchang
ed at the box office in due time. A
crowded house is expected.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
WILL FIND OUT ITS EFFECT
ON CLIMATE.
Chicago, 111., Aug. 5.—The United
States will investigate the Drainage
canal and its effect on the climate of
Michigan and Illinois.
The investigation has been caused as
a result of the protest of fruit growers.
FARMERS OF N. D. WILL NOT
HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT TEN
DERFEET THIS SEASON.
Farm hands from the south and mid
dle west will deprive the college boys
and "city chaps" who take vacations
in the harvest fields, of their jobs this
year. Instead of worrying with ten
derfoot" who never saw a bundle of
wheat lying in the stubble, farmers in
the northwest will be able to employ
young men who have callouses in their
palms and who have shocked wheat
and stood at threshers since they were
in knickerbockers, says the St. Paul
Dispatch.
At the Union depot this morning in
coming trains from the south.disgorged
possibly 200 of these sunburned farm
er boys on their way to the harvest
fields. The small restaurants and lunch
counters in the vicinity of the station
were busy dishing out ham and eggs
black coffee, potatoes and rolls to the
young men, most all of whom had used
a seat in a chair car or a coach last
night as a bed. The "telescope" was
in hand, carrying an extra blue shirt,
a pair of overalls and a bandana hand
kerchief or two and at least one paper
collar. Outgoing trains to the Dako
tas and the agricultural sections
this state took the same young men
from town.
"There's nothing to harvest down
our way," said one young man who
had traveled from Oklahoma. "Wheat
isn't worth cutting for the straw and
grain didn't grow on the stalks. The
newspapers^told about need of men in
Minnesota and the Dakotas and of $2
to $2.75 a day being paid for harvest
hands, so we came north to get work.
There are nineteen in our party. All
the way through Kansas the farm
hands kept boarding the train and we
picked up a few more from Missouri
when we reached Kansas City."
USES STOVE FOR SAFE WIFE
NEARLY BURNS THE PAPERS
Sioux Falls, S. D., Aug. .5.—The
agent at Willow Lakes for the Great
Northern Railroad company, not be
ing provided with a safe, this sum
mer converted a kitchen range into a
safe, and stored there cheeks, drafts,
currency and coin belonging to the
railroad company. As the result of
this practice lie had a narrow escape
from sustaining a heavy loss.
On one of the recent cool mornings
his wife arose ahead of him, and, not
knowing that the stove was being used
for a safe, started a fire in the stove
to take the chill off the room. The
station agent heard the roar of the
flames in the chimney and in a remark
ably brief time lie had rushed down
stairs to the stnve. By quick work
he managed to save everything but (-no
$5 bill, which was burned beyond re
demption.
4,000 MEN LEAVE TORONTO
FOR HARVEST FIELDS
Toronto, Aug. o.—Five train loads
of harvesters left the Union station
for the west today cn the first -if tne
excursions. It is estimated that the
trains carried 4,000 people. Each train
was made up of -0 coaches, including
baggage cars, and the first left about
9:30. Two uniformed railway consta
bles accompanied each train, and two
car cleaners were detailed to keep the
coaches in order. Special trains from
Windsor and St. Thomas brought addi
tional excursionists to west Toronto
station, from which they took the wes
tern train.
REGISTER'S OFFICE HAS BEEN A
BUSY PLACE FOR REAL ES
TATE TRANSFERS.
SOO RAILROAD SECURES NUMER
OUS RIGHT OF WAY DEEDS
WHICH ARE RECORDED.
Property in Three Sections is Practi
cally Secured by the Prospective
Road Right of Way Purchasers—
Other Real Estate Business Picking
Up in Nice Shape.
Realty transfers at the Register of
Deeds office were numerous this week,
including a number- of Soo railway
deeds. Following is a list of trans
fers:
Edward Anderson to Ida Anderson,
war. deed S. E. 1-4 22 and N. W. 1-4
23, 158-60. Consideration $1.00.
Ellen A. Ruger to Rosa S. Thomas
and Sarah M. Ruger, war. deed, S. W.
1-4 of N. W. 1-4, 15-154-65. Consider
ation $200.
K. O. Skjeimo and wife to Ole A.
Sampson, war. deed, N. W. 1-4, 12-156
61. Consideration $3000.00.
United States to Joseph Latraille,
Patent to Lots 10 and 11 and S. E. 1-4
of S. W. 1-4, sec. 30 and Lot 3 sec.
31, 153-85.
Wm. A. Crary and wife to A. K.
Runions, war. deed, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
and 6, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, blk. 11,
Crary's west addition to Crary, con
sideration $2,000.00.
Farmers' Loan and Trust Co., Crary,
N.' D., to Eden Thurston, war. deed,
part N. W. 1-4 of S. W. 1-4, see. 16,
153-62. (1 1-5 acres), consideration
$100.00.
Julia Iverson to Soo Railway Co.,
right of way deed
Hannah Jacobson to Soo Railway,
Co., right of way deed.
Dora Peters, to Soo
right of way deed.
Alexander Jacobson, to
Co., right of way deed.
Soo Railway
Soo Railway
Josephine Jacobson, to Soo Railway
Co., right of way deed.
Louis H. Miller, Adm., to Soo Rail
way, right of way deed.
Ole S. Nestegard and wife to Soo
Railway Co., right of way deed, con
sideration $7S8.00.
Knut S. Nestegard and wife to Soo
Railway Co., right of way deed, con
sideration $558.00.
Joseph Kneisel and wife, to Soo Rail
way Co., right of way deed, consider
ation $600.00.
Alois Wolf and wife to Soo Railway
Co., right of way deed, consideration
$750.00.
Adam Scharf and wife, to Soo Rail
way Co., Tight of way deed, consider
ation $1,600.00.
Oletha McCarthy and husband, to
Soo Railway Co., right of way deed.
consideration $145.00.
C. A. Stotlar to Stotlar Investment
Co., war. deed, lots 7 and 8, blk. 8,
RugeT's addition to Devils Lake, con
sideration $1.00.
C. A. Stotlar to Stotlar Investment
Co., war. deed, all unplatted part of
lots 1 and
Greenwood, addition, consideration $1.
STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS DI
VIDES STATE—KNUDSON
IS CHIEF.
Bismarck, N. D., Aug. 5.—The state
board of examiners has confirmed the
appointment of deputy bank and other
examiners and apportioned the state
into six districts. Following are- the
appointees and the districts they rep
resent:
Chief examiner Oliver Knudson,
Bismarck.
Chief office deputy—Roy A. Nelson,
Bismarck.
Office Deputy—L. J. Blecker, Bis
marck.
Bismarck district—Ed. Schulenberg.
Jamestown district—J. F. Hoffman.
Fargo district—B. I. Keating.
Grand Forks district—John Vallely.
East Minot district—Jno. M. Fahev.
West Minot district'—B. J. Cchor
egge.
County and institutional examiners—
S. H. Wilson and Frank Shanlev.
Chief clerk—Roy M. Halliday.
Stenographer—Gertrude Leonard.
TO IMPROVE ROADS AT MILTON
Farmers and Automobile Men
Unite Their Efforts.
club seeks especially to interest. The
plan outlined calls for a series of auto
mobile trips into the surrounding eoun
try, each auto carrying its capacity of
local men, all armed with picks and
shovels, and the onslaught on the roads
will then be begun. Every approach to
the city as well as all cross roads, will
be handled in this same manner.
GETS $60.00 POSITION.
Nellie Lien, a graduate of Dakota
Business College of Fargo, has ac
cepted a $60 00 position as steno a
pher for the Soo R. R. at Ender..o.
The good firms,—those that pay Mg
salaries and demand first-class help—
employ D. B. C. graduate!. io
FOUND—A white setter bird do£.
Owner may have same by identifying
property and paying Charges. Frank
Holland, 825 School Ave.
FOE SALE—1 year old colt, $100 if
taken at once. H. N. Halgren.
FOR SALE—A full-blood, registered,
Holstein bull, coming two years old.
Very gentle and a fine animal. Will
sell cheap and on time if desired.
Can be seen at my farm near town.
C. M. Fisher.
FEED FOR SALE.
Feed for sale on time. Corn, barley,
speltz and oats, at my place. Call and
inquire. H. M. Creel, Devils Lake.
8-2-3-w
Taken Up.
Three brindle calves, reddish color.
Owner call for same and pay charges.
NORMAN MORRISON,
Webster, N. D.
A Bargain.
Hot air furnace for sale at a bar
gain if taken at once. H. Huesgen.
FOB SALE-
Andrea Jacobson to Soo Railway Co., set of harness,
right of way deed.
Minnie Jacobson, to Soo Railway
Co., right of way deed.
-Horse, buggy and full
Cheap. H. N. Halgren.
Boarders
Railway Co., find great conveneince at the
Loekwood Hotel. Comfortable quarters.
Thoroughly remodelled, with baths,
electric lights and new furniture. Rates
the best. 123 Third street.
Soo Railway
William Jacobson, to
Co., right of way deed.
Amanda Jacobson, to
Co., right of way deed.
Farmers!
I have a number of inquiries from
Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois for im
proved farms to rent. If you want
to rent or sell write me or come and
see me. My office is upstairs, First
National Bank building, Devils Lake,
N. D. CHAS. C. CONNOLLY.
For Sale.
Twelve H. P. Runabout, perfect con
dition. Address Box 3S, Doyon, N. D.
5-5 tf.
For Sale.
Two mules, weight about 2500. Cheap
if taken at one. —H. N. Halgren.
See Huesgen for engagement rings.
Peerless Flour is popular. Try it.
Two fine office rooms on the second
E 1-2 N. E. 1-4, S. W. 1-4 N. E. "l-4 and fioor, hot and cold water, bath and toi
2. sec. 18, 153-64 and lots in iet in connection. Strictly modern.
G. H. LOCKE.
Subscribe for The World and get all
the news.
Hot Weather Hurts Skm.
Poisonous perspiration causes rashes,
hives, blotches, pimples and prickly
heat, often the beginning of serious
skin troubles.
To wash away the poison entirely,
apply a simple solution known as D.
D. D. Prescription for Eczema. D. D.
D. is generally sold in $1.00 bottles,
but for 25c we can now give you
enough to prove that the very first
drops soothe and heal the inflamed
skin as nothing else can.
We vouch for the wonderful prop
erties of D. D. D., for we know that
it brings instant relief for all kinds
of skin trouble.
Devils Lake Drug Co.
COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY
City Council Will Probably Adjourn
Will Regular Session Early.
The city council, scheduled to meet
next Monday evening, may adjourn its
Milton, N .D., Aug. 5.—Extensive session without much business being
campaign for the purpose of bringing transacted, until Monday evening, Aug
about improved road conditions in this ust 21, when matters of importance
section of the state has been inaugur- I are scheduled to come up before the
ated under the direction of the Milton city board.
Commercial club, and has met with
hearty response from the farmers and
automobile men, the parties whom the
BASEBALL GAME TOMORROW
1
Travelers and City Team Will Get To
gether Tomorrow.
A baseball game was arranged to
day to take place at the local lot to
morrow afternoon, when the United
Commercial Travelers and the Devils
Lake City team will cross bats for
amusement's sake.
Colonial Hotel
and Cafe
C. E. Gray, Proprietor
That is why we do the
business
Good Service
Moderate Prices
ROOMS: 50c 75c $1.00
THEPEOPLE'S
Meat Market
Wholesale buyers and ship
pers of live stock and poultry.
Bring in your hides for the
highest price.
Respectfully yours,
Kirchof 8 Cooper
A GOOD SHAVE
Good workmen make our
shop the best place in town
for a good shave or haircut.
Edw. Richardson,
Under First National Bank.
PIANO TUNING
F. W. CAMPBELL has tuned pianos
in this city for over ten years. THAI
TALKS.
ORDERS AT
CHICAGO PIANO CO.
A WATCH
BARGAIN
$11.50
Hampden
Nickel, 17 jewels in composition
settings, patent center pinion, bre
guet hair spring, microm. regulator,
expansion balance, engraved plates,
bright flat screws. Elegantly dam
askeened, sunk second Arabic or
Roman dial
Fitted in a 20-Year Crown
Gold Filled Case.
FRANK LUECK
309 Kelly Ave.
DEVILS LAKE, NO. DAKOTA
SHE IS PROTECTED BY $15,000
INSURANCE IN THE
MUTUAL LIFE
Insurance Company of New York
KYnilDC?
And what will their
I UUnO future be if you were
to leave on that journey in which
there is no "homecoming." I can
save you not cents but dollars on
your insurance by taking it in
THE OLDEST COMPANY IN AMERICA
The Strongest In the World
A
Tonnou
District Manager
.H.
I GMIGJ, Devils Lake, N.D.
PHONE 161-2

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