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Devils Lake world. (Devils Lake, N.D.) 1914-1915, April 10, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076524/1914-04-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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THOUGHT RIVER
HAS REACHED
HIGHEST STAGE
Bismarck, N. D., April 8—There
•was a heavy run of ice in the Missou
ri river during the first of the week
At all points is North Dakota be
tween Washburn and the South Dako
ta line. The highest stage reached on
the night of the 6th and 7th was 11.0
feet at 3 a. m. From that time on
there was a gradual decrease until at
7 a. m. of the 7th the sage was 9.3
and 10 p. m. was 8 8.
It -was feared for a "tiihe Tuesday
morning that the river might leave
Its banks, as the water was within
three feet of the high bank south of
town.
Fortunately the ice was not suffi
cieatly solid to form a gorge at Sib
ley Island. Beports from points farth
er south-show higher rises than at
Bismarck. .-
At the meeting of the board of
county commissioners Tuesday The
World waB awarded the contract for
furnishing of the stationery, blank
books and blanks for the county tor
the coming year, the bid of The World
being the lowest submitted. The bid
of T-he World was to the effect that it
would furnish letter heads, envelopes,
etc., at a price 10 per cent lower than
any other bid submitted and on blank
books S per cent lower than any othar
bid submitted.
BENDER'S SKIER
CETS DIVORCE
Mandan,. N. D., April 8—Mrs.
Maud J. Parker, a sister of Pitcher
Bender, the famous Indian tvrfrler of
the Philadelphia Athletics, is party to
a divorce action hero. Her parents
now live at Boosevelt, Minn. She for
merly lived at Devils Lake, where she
was divorced from her husband- She
is a full blood Chippewa. Two years
ago she went to the Pott Yates r*ui
ervation and was soon ifterwards mar
ried to William J.|. Parker a breed
clerk at the agency. Beuently he in
stituted divorce proceedings and Mrs.
Parker filed a contuer suit also ask
ing* for a divorce.
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5.3 Judge Griffin issued a marriage li
cense this week to Peter J. Boehmer
of Webster and Mlss SopWe Aaberg
alio of Wstwter. The groom i« a pop
ular young farmer of Cato township
and the bride is the daugfcterxof Mr
Lars Aaberg Mao a farmer in Cato
township. The marriage will take
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Winnipeg,, Man., April 9—John
Krafchenko is guilty of murder in the
.- first degree and must pay with his
life for killing H. M. Arnold of the
Plum Coulee bank. The jury returned
v. its verdict at 2:10 o'clock, after de
liberating for a little over two hours.
After the verdict had been given
-the prisoner's strong face did not
flinch. He stared straight ahead
bravely. His blue eyes looked fear
less, and the dark, closely shaven face
did not grow appreciably paler. His
iordship adjourned the court until 4
••'clock, when the death sentence will
be passed.
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B. Suffield, counsel for the pris
oner, went over to tlie dock and con'
ferred with him. It ,ii likely that
Krafchenko will make a.'statement be
fore the death sentence is passed.
Chief Elliott looked Ua£ and pale,
as did all those connected, with the
case. The jurymen were apparently
all deeply moved. The aUenee in the
court room was tense during the whole
grim period. Many Women shed
tears. There was not a braver face
in the room than that Of John Kraf
chenko.
JEAN BARTHOU.
French
Holder
8tate«itian and
of High Officii.
IISOUAW ill
TONIGHT AT
THF
Positively one of the greatest stor
ies ever produced in motion pictures
is "The Squaw Man" which will be
shown for the last time at the Charles
theatre tonight. This great film was
released in six big paits by Jewse L.
Lasky and is being handled by the
Famous Players Film Co. No expense
was spared in making this the first
production of Mr. Lasky, a film never
to be fogotton by those who are for
tunate enough to see it. It was shown
last night at the Charles to capacity
houses and will no doubt draw. even
fetter tonight, judging from the most
favorable advertising it is receiving
today from those wh^ attended the
show last night.
It is truly a great picture in every
iscense of the word, and the Charles
management is to be commended
for securing such a high-class film for
their theatre.
Owing to the great expense in secur
ing this film it was necessary for the
management to raise their price of
admission to 15c but such a picture
is, really worth many times,, the price.
FALL
BEFORE BALLOT
Chicago, April 8.—Saloons were
driven from six teen counties in yes
terday's elections, and hundreds of
the saloons have been forced out of
business, largely through the women's
ballot.
No,t..all of the women, however
voted for prohibition, as is evidenced
by the condition in Springfield and
other sections.
....
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FIRE DESTROYED
FIVE BUILDINGS
Lakota, N. D., April 7—Lakota had
another disastrous fire which des
troyed five buildings. The fire start
ed in the Amundson bowling alleys
and a good start. Despite the efforts
of the firemen to keep the bla«» in
check, five buildings burned to the
ground. They are the Amundson
pool hall and bowling allege, West
hotel, Schroeder carpenter shop, Salis
bury employment office and Lynch &
Kennedy's blacksmith shop.
MONDAY EVENING
The Sixth Annual ball of Company
M, N. D. N. G., of this city, will bo
given in the Armory next Monday eve
ning, and a good time is looked for
ward to. The militia bays never
spare any pains to make the annual
ball a grand affair, and all can rest
assui'ed tht it will be up to the usual
high standard this year.
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DEVILS LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA. FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1914
:\WA:
Realizing the exceptional opportunity offered, and the great educational
value afforded in the coming engagement of the great Minneapolis Symphony
Orchestra next Thursday April 16th, the Board of Education has authorized
the announcement thru Supt. Barnell that any grade or high school pupil who
desires to attend the Special Matinee will be excused by simply advising the
teacher to that effect. An extremely low price has been placed on these
tickets for children:- 25c for grade and 50c for high school.
GUSTAF OPERATED
ON. THURSDAY
Stockholm, April 8,—King Gustaf
will be operated upon tomorrow.
Professor Fleiner of -Heidelberg and
other attending specialists today decid
ed that as his majesty's condition con
tinues to grow worse an immediate
operation is advisable.
It is believed tha,t they may find
the king suffering from an ulcer of
the stomach.
King Gustaf has been ill since last
October. Professor Fleiner who is one
of the-most noted specialists on stom
ach- and intestinal troubles, in the
world, was mfihmoneciMMr StOckhofm a
week ago for consultations
MCK15 GETS
INTUIT
•lack Puis, one of tlie popular Dem
ocrats Of this city, has received the
appointment of chief deputy under
Joseph Doyle, the newly appointed U.
S. marshal, and lias gone to Fargo to
take up his new work. Mr. Duis has
many friends who will be pleased to
leara of his success.
"WATCHFUL WAITING."
GOES GRAZY
ON TRAIN
New Rnckford, X. D, April 8—Be
cause his strange actions frightened
fellow passengers James Yohe was
taken from a Great Northern train
at this point and afterwards adjudg
ed insane. He was enroute from
Seattle to Terre Haute, Ind. He says
he doesn't know whero his wife is,
that a son is dead and a daughter is
living with relatives but ho doesn't
know where.
There was a meeting of the as
sessors of the county held in the au
ditor's office here Wednesday. The
attendance was good and matters per
taininr to the assessment of the coun
ty was gone over. Each year the as
sessors have a meeting to go over mat
ters along the line of assessment, and
this was the regular annual meeting.
*rK«M|*r iiv Ntw York bvemnu dun*
JAMES LYNN OF
DRY LAKE WAS
CALLED BEYOND
The death of James Lynn of Dry
Lake township occurred last Wednes
day evening at 10 o'clock at the farm
home.... Heart trouble from which he
had su&ered for some time, was the
cause of death. Deceased was 68
years of age and was one of the best
known pioneers in Bamsey county
coming here in 1884 and settling on
the land which he farmed ever since.
A wife and five children survive the
deceased: Arthur E., Mrs. Whitmore
of Bowman, N. D., James B. of Al
berta, Walter J. of Alberta and Mrs.
Oharlson of Bay.
The funeral will be held Sunday af
ternoon from the Methodist church
at 2:30 o'clock. The cortege will
leave the farm home at 12 o'clock.
WILLARD SAULSBURY.
U. S. Senator New Member of
Foreign Relations Committee.
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The board of county commissioners
adjourned yesterday after completing
(he business before them.
E PEOPLE
TO RAISE SPUDS
The business men Of Edmore are en.
thusiastie over the outlook in that sec
tion to go into mixed farming, and ac
cordingly some of the business men
have gotten together and purchased
two carloads of seed potatoes, which
they will ship in and sell to farmers
at actual cost and an effort will be
made to build a potato warehouse to
handle the crop. Mr. H. R. Aslak
sonj' who owns and operates a large
farm in the vicinity of Edmore has
hired a man from Wisconsin and as
he is versed in the lines of potato
raising he will devote a certain por
tion of his time instructing farmers
along the line of potato raising. The
Edmore people are working along the
right line, and if each and every com
munity in the county would do some
thing along this line they would do
much good. In this way the farmers
would not only be educated in the line
of mixed farming, but would see the
benefit' resulting from such a work,
and we predict that the time would
see the benefit resulting from mrfdm
not be far distant when the farmers
themselves would consent to the coun
ty commissioners spending a sum of
money for an expert farmer, and as
•soon as that time arrives, we predict
that the county board will stand ready
and willing to take action. At the
present time it is the farmers who
are opposing the expert farm proposi
tion, and for this reason the board
feels that as the farmers have a great
er right to be heard along the line of
farltting than anyone else, they aro
opposed to spending any money along
this line until the farmers themselves
want' it.
Chas. Garske and bride arrive diu
Devils Lake from Wausaw, Wis., last
week and ahre now at their farm n«ar
Garqke.: Mr. and Mrs. Garske were
married, in WauBaw during the holi
days aid have been visiting with rel
atives and friends there «ince that
tine. Mr. Garske ia well known in
this vicinity having lived near the
toip& ot Gaoke for a number of ,years.
'.
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A case against Henry E. Brown for
violation of the live-stock quarantine
law was terminated on March 23 in
the Eastern district of Pennsylvania.
The defendant was fined $100.
LARGE CROP OF
WINTER WHEAT
IN THE MAKING
Washington, April 8—The average
condition of winter wheat on April 1
was 96.5 per cent of normal, com
pared with 91.6 last year, 80.6 in 1912
85.7 ten year's' average, the depart
ment of agriculture reported.
There was a decline in conditions
from Dec. 1, 1913, to April 1 of 1.0
points as compared with an average
decline in the past ten years of 3.5
points between these dateB.
KENMARE CIRLS
HAVE CLOSE CALL
ii
£fe»Sli
»•-•'$
*0,
TO BE ENFORCtD
FINES FOB VIOLATION OF TWEN
TY-EIGHT-HOUR AND QUAR
ANTINE LAWS.
Three cases tlie Department of
Agriculture against the Chicago, Bock
jfsland & Pacific Railway Co., for vio
lation of the twenty-eight-hour law
have recently been terminated in
Kansas. The penalty in each case
was $100 and costs which were respec
tively $10.60, $16.50 and $15.25. The
Union Pacific Railway Co. was fined
$100 and coBts of $53.31 for violating
the same law. The law in question
prohibits the confinement of live stock
in cars foil more than twenty-eight
hours without unloading for feed, wa
ter and rest (when a special request
is signed by the shipper the time may
be exteneded to thirty-six hours.)
Kenmare, N. D., April 9—The mem-
Ihms
of the James Brown family had a
narrow escape from asphyxiation. A
small quantity of soft coal had been
fed to the furnace awaiting the arriv
al of hard coal and that evening the
hard coal was put on the fire and it
is thought the chimney had been stop
ped up by the soft coal soot. Misses
Susip and Mabel Brown, whose room
is directly over the furnace were af
fected the most from the gas. When
the girls arose in the morning they
were so overcome by gas th^ey were
miable to get out of the room. After
several attempts Miss Susie managed
to reach her father's room where she
fell in a faint. Mr. Brown went to
Miss Mabel's .rescue and found her on
the floor just outside her door. After
the windows were opened both young
ladies soon returned to consciousness.
ARCHIE MILLER
GIVEN FAREWELL
As Archie Miller is about to join
the ranks of the benedicts, it was with
much pleasure that a number of his
friends joined in giving him a fare
well. The party was at the banquet
rooms of the Colonial hotel Wednes
day Arening, when a Dutch lunch was
served. About twenty-five of Mr.' Mil"
ler's friends were present and the oc
casion was the source of much merri
ment. Allie V. Haig acted as toast
master, and different ones were called
upon and made some 'appropriate re
marks. Mr. Miller will be married
in the near future^ but the date has
not yet been given out.
....
James Stewart, one of the old timei?
of Ontario township was here to at
tend the assBMom' Meeting Wednes
day he being the assessor of that
township.
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