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The state-line herald. (North Lemmon, Adams County, N.D.) 1907-1912, April 03, 1908, Image 7

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076576/1908-04-03/ed-1/seq-7/

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W SICK
J.YDIA E. PINKHAM
Ko other irtorticine has been so
guecesst'ul in relieving the suffering
of women or received so many gen
uine testimonials as lias I^yilia E.
Piukham's Vegetable Compound.
In every community you will lincl
women who liave been restored to
health by Lydia E. Pinkham's Veg
etable Compound. Almost every
one you meet has either been bene
fited by it, or lias friesds who have.
In the Pink ham Lilxiratory at
Lran JI ass., any woman any day may
see the liles containing over one mil
lion one hundred thousand letters
from women seeking health, and
here are the letters in which they
openly state over their own signa
tures "that they -were eured by i.yciia
E.Pinkh un\s Vegetable Compound.
Lydia K. I'inkham's Vegetable
Compound has saved many women
from sursrical ope rat ions.
Lydia E. I'inkham's Vegetable
Compound is made from roots and
herbs, without drugs, and is whole
some and harmless.
The reason why Lydia E. Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound is so
suroessful is ln'eause it contains in
greiiients which act directly upon
the f' ininine organism, restoring it
to a healthy normal condition.
Women who aro suffering from
those distressing ills peculiar to their
sex should not lose 'sight, of these
facts or doubt the ability of Lydia
E. I'inkham's Vegetable Compound
to restore their health.
The Winter Wheat.
'How beautiful is the wheat," she
erifd "rising and falling tn the wind!"
Ah but," said he, "you should see
!'r ng and falling in the stock ex-
Guar**
What a Settler Can 8ecure In
WESTERN CANADA
351' Vi i
to
the Acre.
Ti*be-f "r the Acre.
OooTi .J'."1
E™W»n«»FREE.
S^™
.L"ru*d Low IUIM.

J.:,"! u1^h",c
Climl, j'i* ?r
Prod"ctioi»«.
S
and
p®rf«t
Health.
or
P'ofu«bl« Investment*.
..v.,, .""1''1'1 •fk' fr.i!n-pr«1uclofr lands la
A.ht-Ma may now b% ®o
rii^ -Vi' initl prosperous
Hcn.esiead Regulations
io.!m!ry
v
i
n':thvn
by proxy (on o«*r-
I n i a e o e s o n
i .r
ullitr
or sist«'r of intruding home-
Isf 10.00. For pamphlet.
l'|Hri]'ii1 irsaslorat.Krouteij)
l:where
io locate, applj lu
to go
CHAS. PILIINO,
Ortad Porki, North
JLET
ANTISEPTIC
w
i e n i a i i o u a n o y
«nd free from un-
term-hie
an
chtt'aifr
a n n
Sanders and the
Dream Lady
odors,
'''-ipand ioth preparations
do. A
Ju.n.
and deodar.
.Metre
luiMte
,.tIcePtionai
4
n
v
n
i
tc"n-
ir, ,l!U3luahle
'"tamed eves
eatarrh.
At
cnne
Crj«
and
r".
ri
toilet
cents,
Postpaid.
Jy Trial Simple
BOOK «(NT mi
PRXTON TQ! LET MttS.
By ROY NORTCN
iCopy right.)
McCarthy, superintendent of the
Oolconda, big, bluff, and burly, was
unhappy. He stood at the station wait
ing for the belated train that was to
bring with it ihe special car contain
ing the wife and daughter of the pres
ident. McCarthy disliked the waste
of time and the role of entertainer for
women.
"Most of the women I have known
have been a nuisance," he said audibly,
in his growing annoyance.
"Me, too, Mack," piped up a small
voice beside him.
The superintendent looked at his
companion, Sanders, the stage-driver.
The latter, nearly four feet in height
and 13 years old, returned the gaze
unblinking!y from a pair of wise-look
ing Irish-American eyes which belied
his a^e, meanwhile wrinkling his
freckles into a mass that served as a
harmonious fresco below his red hair.
The train groaned and creaked
along the rails, and came to a whining,
perspiring halt.
Sanders dove frantically through the
crowd and planted himself before the
platform. Down the steps surged pros
pectors, miners, commercial travelers,
and women, bumping each others' legs
with bales, bundles, and bags, and all
in a hurry. But it was not Sanders'
day. There was none who knew him
—and those who were attracted by his
shrill voice crying: "Stage-line to
Home," paid small heed to his appeal,
and trafficked with his rival.
"Here, you, Sanders," hailed Mc
Carthy's voice from the diminishing
crowd, "here are some passengers for
you."
The wise-looking little, old face
brightened up hopefully, and he came
forward unabashed, but colored with
self-consciousness before the outburst
of merriment of the most beautiful
lady he had ever seen. He recalled in
stantly a story his father used to, tell
him before he went to rest back up
there in the hills, and from then on
she became to him the "Dream Lady."
McCarthy led the way to the stage,
assisted the president's wife and
daughter to a seat, and then deposited
his own buge bulk beside the driver's
cushion.
Sanders crawled up to his place, us
ing the spokes of the wheel as a lad
der, clutched the reins in his small
hands, tripped the brake with much
effort, and started his horses with a
yelp.
McCarthy had always thrown all
the patronage to Sanders' line that he
could. McCarthy never laughed at
him, and McCarthy was a big man.
A real superintendent who worked
many men and who was a king up
there where all those men worked.
McCarthy was a trump.
The stage-driver's mind went ram
bling away to the stories he had read
in the ten-cent books he had secured
I'rom the miners, where the heroine
was always a beautiful young lady
who always fell in love with the hero,
who, if not a stage-driver, was a brave
young detective. They always mar
ried, and, as far as he could recollect,
ived happily ever after.
It really seemed like a very short
drive that day, and when the stage
rolled up to the front of the superin
tendent's office, which had been pre
pared as a temporary home for the
visitors, Sanders was quite surprised
•t» »it* speed they had made.
The t'.ays changed for Sanders.
There was no longer a weariness in
he drag uphill from the American
to the Golconda. This was because of
the Dream I^ady.
There was something odd about it
all, he pondered. McCarthy took more
pains than he used to, because he
slaved every day, and had a new hat
that he wore when not going through
the mine. The Dream Lady, too,
showed signs of the summer's progres
sion. She looked at iiie superin
tendent differently, and there was
something in the look that led San
ders to know that she saw in this
white-hatted, silent man a master of
men and things. Ah! be could love
her for that.
The Dream Lady didn't seem to be
as happy as she had been, and there
was trouble between her and her
mother. The boy wondered at that,
and spent his idle time in vain specu
lations. True, he had heard but little,
but it was a certainty
that the Dream
as if avoiding something. The boy
felt aggrieved. The Dream Lady was
very fine, but there was no one too
good to be friends with McCarthy, and
she must have said something to have
changed him so.
The tamaracks changed color and
the gtass on the open spaces grew
gray with age. Another summer was
dead.
So. with the flight of warmth, the
stage-driver came to the m:ne one
pgocning and found the Dream Lady
and her mother waiting for the down
stage.
McCarthy was trying to look uncon-
•MMfci
cerned, but his eyet. were very deep
and konely. The Dream Lady had a
veil over her face, and no longer
laughed as gaily as when she came to
the hills for the summer. Only her
mother talked—talked volubly and
sharply and unceasingly as Sanders
took them abroad.
The superintendent stood awkward
ly by the wheel. "Some day we shall
meet again," Sanders heard him say.
The Dream Lady turned away without
a word and looked toward the moun
tain tops as though bidding them fare
well.
The horses felt the coolness of the
morning, and were mettlesome. Their
hoofs rang spitefully on the frost
hardened roads, and they tugged at
the bits until Sanders' tough little
arms ached with the persistent pull.
They surged against the lines or
jumped, as if frightened, away from
familiar objects.
"What the devil ails you?" yelled
Sanders, as the off-horse suddenly
broke into a run. Sanders' foot struck
out madly for a greater purchase on
the brake, a defective bolL snapped
somewhere, and he nearly fell from his
seal. The team wildly plunged for
ward.
Down the deadly hill, lurching.
Sander's Heart Ached for Him with a
Dull, Sympathetic Hurt.
swaying from side to side, or violently
jumping over boulders, they went, bnt
Sanders sat firm, with his browned
hands twisted desperately into the
lines.
Up from below, with bells tinkling
on the leaders, and driven by one who
carelessly whistled, came an ore
wagon. The whistle stopped abruptly,
and the driver was startled into action,
but too late. Sanders had seen the
danger, and made instant choice. It
was that his own viciously running
horses must be swung up into the
bluff to avoid being hurled into the
river below. He reached far out and
caught a tenacious twist in the line
nearest the bank, gritted his teeth
and with a sudden jerk threw his en
tire weight back in one mad fling.
There was a sharp crash, which re
verberated back into the hills, the
splintering of wood and a confusion ol
struggling horses. Sanders felt him
self hurled high into the air, heard
the whistle of the wind shrilling in his
ears, accompanied by the groans and
screams of the maimed animals. He
had a vision of wildly striking, kick
ing hoofs, into which he plunged as
though shot from a catapult, and then
it grew dark, very dark.
Sanders thought something smelled
bad—just as the hospital did that
time when father was taken there. He
tried to raise his arm, but there was
some big wooden thing on it and it
hurt. He rested a while, trying to re
member what had happened.
Then he decided to open his eyes,
but one was blind, because there was a
cloth wrapped around his head. Final
ly he looked out with the other one
with much effort, and discovered, to
his amazement, that he was in the su
perintendent's office only it didn't
look natural—there were so many hot
ties around on tables.
Sanders tried to sit up, but a cool
hand restrained him. "Not yet, dear
boy," said (lie Dream Lady, and then
his mind became active and he wanted
to know where the stage was.
"You are through with the stage,
my little driver, said the Dream Lady.
"As soon as I can take you, you are
going home with us, away back into
the east, where there are no stages,
but only schools and other little boys
10
I,la-V
with
Lady and her mother were not on good
terms. So he hated the mother.
Worst of all. McCarthy somehow
seemed to feel the change, and San
ders' heart ached fur him with a dull,
sympathetic hurt which required con-,
stant repression. Of course he couldn't before Sanders voice could become
Wl»ere you will aot have
You
to work, but just become a man.
are going with me."
"Not on your life," said Sander3,
re'apsing into his old-time emphasis.
I've got to stick with Mack. 1 ain't
goin' to leave. I'm goin and then
mere wail he heard another and a
deeper voice as it came to the bed
side. It was on the side where the
talk to the man—that would never be
understood besides, there wasn't the
same camaraderie that there had
been, because the man was quieter, if I obnoxious bandage was, and somehow
possible than he used to be, and he h* couldn turn his head to see but
spent more time working underground,
n
the other eye he saw a man's
hand reach out across him and grasp
the hand of the Dream Lady, saw a
smile of tenderness break over her
face and saw her blush as the big
voice went on: "Sander?, you are go
ing east, but it won't be long until 1
a:r. there to see you, and maybe some
time we will ail come back out here
logeihf r."
Sanders smiled, but desiring the full
approbation of the big man, mur
mured: "I Kne my best, Macfc, but
they ruaned away. You know did,
den't voui"
And the big voice had a note of
laughter in it as it rumbled: Yes,
you did, little partner."
WHAT WINTER WHEAT IS DOING
FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA.
Splendid Crop* on the Former Ranch
ing Plains of Canadian West.
That portion of the country in Wes
tern Canada formerly recognized as
ranching country has developed into
one of the best winter wheat districts
In the continent. Yields are quoted
running from 30 to GO bushels to the
acre, and giving a return to the farmer
of from $25 to fjO per acre. These
lands are now selling at from $12 to
|20 per acre, and pay well at that
figure. H. Howes of Magratli, Alberta,
Western Canada, had 50 acres of land
In wheat, which averaged 45 bushels
to the acre his yield of oats was 35
bushels. The value to him per aero
of wheat was $35.00. J. F. Haycock
of the same place, says: "I had 65
acres of wheat, 35 acres of oats and
four acres of barley. My average yield
of oats to the acre was 80 bushels
wheat—winter—60 bushels and red
fyfe, 33 bushels, and barley, 50 bush
els. The value to me per acre was,
wheat, $2S.OO oats, $32.00, and bar
ley, $24.00." J. F. Rradshaw of Ma
grath, had 1,030 acres of wheat in crop
that averaged bushels to the
acre, his oats, 32 bushels barley, 53
bushels. He threshed 31,000 bushels
of wheat from 540 acres. He also had
250 tons of sugar beets from 25 acres
worth $5.0214 per toil. W. S. Sherod,
of I^ethbridge, says: "I came to Leth
bridge from Souris, North Dakota, in
April, 1907, having purchased 900
acres of land in this district last fall.
1 had 12S acres of Alberta Red winter
wheat which was put in on breaking in
the fall of 190G, which yielded 41'^
bushels to the acre, for wMch I re
ceived 87cents per bushel, which
paid me $3G.30 per acre. 1 had 190
acres "stubbled in" that is disced
in on the stubble, which yielded 22
bushels to the acre at i7V£ cents per
bushel, which paid me $1P.25 to the
acre. I also had 350 acres of strictly
volunteer crop, which it tvas intended
to prepare in the summer but when it
was see* lhat it was a good, looking
crop, it was allowed to go. From this
we threshed 15 bushels to the acre,
which paid us at the rate of 87^
cents per bushel or $13 12 per aero.
Our total crop yielded us 14,742 bush
els of first-class wheat. Taking it as
a whole, I consider that I had a first
class crop all through and. taking in
to consideration the fact of part of the
crop having been "stubbled in," and
part strictly volunteer (which was
never touched at all until the binder
was put into it), I consider I had a
heavy crop. I might, say that I waB
in North Dakota five years, and I i
never grew as heavy a crop during
that time. This is the 25th day of
November, and my teams are still
ploughing, and, from the appearance
of the weather, will be for some time
yet." R. W. Uradshaw of Magrath.
says: "I had this year 400 acres in
crop, viz.: 200 acres of wheat and 200
acres In oats. My average yield of
oats to the acre was 50 bushels, and
wheat, 22'/^ bushels. The value to me
per acre for wheat was $19.00, and
oats, $17.00. The highest price ob
tained by me this year or offered me
for my grain was for wheat 82 cents The only s'ure thing about
per bushel, and $1.05 per hundred for cure for a cold is that it isn't.
oats. I also had 100 tons of hay r— _...
worth $12.00 per ton, and will say my
wheat was all volunteer this year.!
Lots of wheat is averaging from 50 to i
60 bushels per acre on summer fallow,
and on new breaking, when the break
ing was done early in the spring."
Writing from Spring Coulee. Alberta,
W. L. Thompson ways: "I had this year
3,000 acres in crop, viz.: 2,000 acres of
wheat and 1,000 acres of oatn. My
average yield of oats to the acre was I
30 bushels and of wheat 35 bushels. I
The value to me per acre for wheat i
was $27.00 and for oats $15.00."
(Information regarding the districts
mentioned, best way to reach them, i
low rates, certificates, etc., can be
secured from any agent of the C'anadi
an government, whose advertisement
appears elsewhere.—Ed.)
Speaks From Experience.
"How
-HI
know, young man, that
your attentions will be acceptable to
my daughter?"
"I've tried it, sir." Illustrated Hit?.
Important to Mothers.
Examine carefully every bottle of
ASTORIA a safe and Bure remedy for
infants and children, and see that it
Bears the
Signature of
In Use For Over HO Years.
The Kind You Have Always Bougbt
Some men seem to have that dire
disease known as spring fever all the
year around.
SICK HEADACHE
CARTERS
ITTLE
PILLS.
They regulate the bowel
SMALL PILL. SMALL DOSE. SMALL PRICE.
A Sore Throat or Cough.
if suffered to progress, may affect the
lungs. "Brown's Bronchial Troc&«»"
give immediate relief.
Remember, young man, that a little
encouragement during leap year Is a
dangerous thing.
Mr*. Wlimlow'a Soothing Sjritp,
Jor t'hllui nil t« »*t'wlllf. S'» #*U tiu* 11 »)!!, t'tl 1
ftamiufttion altaja «*.ne* w tnUi-v.u-. ttx-ftbottfe
Many a follow who has told a gir'
was good enough to rat has
obliged to swallow his own words.
Irf-t's have .'mother run of that
CANADA SAP MAPLE SYRUP
tn'lore the I •.
11 .tk' -mi! i ~, n\
A wedding
without a hit
fails lo appeal
SHIP IS Y1H K I HK tM TO-DAV,
:r wrltp for t:*K» and pri.'p*
I'll* CrMPfnt mmrrj St.
After all, the tti.n
troubles may he pre!'
who tells his Jokes.
RIL.KN CCKKIT IN
6
TO 14
mmB
Positively cared by
these Little Pills.
They afoo rfllev# Did
trearifroin riyspepHia. ia«
and Too II«*art7
KAtinff. A r»«rfpr*t rem'
edy for I)*zzlD.»^t Nau
sea, Drowsiness, Bad
Taste In the Mouth, Coa6*
Tongue, Paiu In the
e TOIM'ID LIVEKl
Pure.y Vegetable.
Genuine Must Bear
Fac-Simile Signature
CARTAS]
IITTIE
PIU? i
REFUSE SUBSTITUTE!.
CSTAM.iuhici) if».
WOODWARD CO.
NiaiMapofi* CRAM COMMUWfl
-v
MVS.
FAflO OIN'TMKNT 1* fc.Miurnntofl tu onro am
I i.f lu'hliitc- llilml. or erntruitiii* 1'
I 8 to d»r»or uuinvy refunded. AOr.
Did you ever hear of a
jury returning a verdict of
kindness?"
Killed I'
OR. J. H. RINDLAUB, (Specialist),
Eye, Ear, Nose and fhroat,
Fargo, N. D.
Profane language has no hanns
Tor a man who won't even -ut ar at
an alarm clock.
tnvenlors should knt.w it at i i ,u\ ot.
tain j• ntr11» for tlilrr lmentinns absolute
ly FRi:K. For particulars enclosr stamp
lo 'Kdwln 1- YewcII, Solicitor of Patents,
SU6 MctJr.l Hiillding. Washington, I). C.
No Half Measures.
i Molly—When you spoke to
did you tell him urn had
bank?
George—Yts.
Molly—And what did he say
George He borrowed it!
I Ttipre 1» more Catarrh In t)i!« «fett"n of the country
i than a!: -thir (llnea**** put hrr, nn) unit
11 ho. luC
few yearn w as mtpposp'J to t»e Incnf 1't-r ft Rrra',
i inaiiy y^nr# d'oi.nrs« ['r-nouri« It a lot a] dUeaHe hwI
pr'*»rrtbe(1 local r*Mnedle». anii ly falling
1 riire w ftli Sural i ream.ent. prni».unrr»l It tnetiral'Ie.
Sr e tuia prv en ntarrh to lm a final I tut tonal Jh
ea«* auei there for* «i 1»«•# ceriMttin tonal treat l'ifMit.
Hail Catarrh nro. inanufartnr«M by F. •. hwiejr
A i •..Toledo, lilo, la tin* only I onMliutlona! rnre on
the market Jt Is taken Interuiiiiy In doM»»froiu 10
c!r pH to a tetfrpoonfut. I'
nr,#
and
IIIUO-HIR
directly on Mood
ttiirfn'-en of the fvatem. Thf-Ytb«
W tl.I, I1 U'KR 2 I t*. A IIOI.I. AVI) VP
Send for fr"t "ample instruction book.
A II lianney. «16 lien, ave., »liuneapoli».
Failure is due not so much to miss
ing opportunities as to failure to make
them.
WE IMV TOP PHICKS FOR CRKAM.
Cash everv lav. Write for prices and tags.
MIl.I.EK & HOLMF'-S. 8t Paul. Minn.
$399 35?
"^MEMBER OF THE FAMILY,
MEN, BOV«, WOMEN, MISSES AND CHILDREN
W. L. OtriiglmM ntmkmm and me II a mtiro
mm'* 92.BO, $3.UO and S3.SO mho*a
a n a n y o a a n a o u n I n o
J6£T~ world, bocaumm thay hold Ihalt
aha pa, fit oat,'
m, ,,, u*nter, mraar langar. and
ara at praatof valua than any othar
ahoaa In tha world to-day.
W. L. Douglas $4 and $5 Gilt Edge Shoes Cannot Be Equalled At Any Price
«:*r low w i.. n name an-1
Bol1 r* fc!
bllld Um W
For
^Elixv
ixtrJfSonna
nnsos the Sv.slcm I'.f fi'ct-
o
IMIt'l S oIllN I
itollv una i ICOlV
tn lies duo to
Acts naturally, acts truly os
a I j*\ati\ c.
4
-i i.l
hi
joi MM»\vompn
DISTEMPER
80r® r»^ *rA
"•IpOtCld
^oitonouY'^1" xi
SPOHN MEDICAL CO..
tTABLiSMtn
TO
DIRECT
TOP MARKET
WRITE FOR PRIC'£
otul I mitt'
vn» Vouuand Old.
Hi «ct its IWnrju iol Rjject*
Alwus s liuv the ("Tonuiuc
lius tin* Jim name oj tlu Com-
'"CALIFORNIA
po S n v v Co.
tinm it rtuinnj» hir.ul i n the
by
j,-..»l -f
SOLD BY ALL
one only, i iliit
DRUGGISTS
price 50: bollla.
The Only Difficulty.
Ted -You're wasting your time !d
man. You're courting the wrong giri.
(leorge—No she's the riuht girl, all
riaht. I'm afraid the trouble is that
1'ni the wrong man.
r"h«»Editor of the Rural Voi der,
Ui.'in whom'there i* no better Potato i.n
pert in the country wp: "Salzer's Karh
e*t I'otuto is the eariu'Kt of 3^ railiMt
Mills, tried by me, yielding 464 bu per
acre." Sal/er's Knrly
IX IIMII JMIM
for the 15 urn I New Yorker i.'ki lm. pet
act'?. See Sal/er•'» catalog about
I
hem.
,11 ST KI..NI) 10c IN HI'AMI'S
and (liw notice to the .John A. Sailer
Seed Co., La I row, Wis., and they uiU
mail vou the only on^innl heed cataJo*
tiublisWd in America with wimple#
Ktiiprriir illiiim flats. Silver King Bar
ley. Million Dollar (ir,«K» which produee«
fatln-r l'i ion.- per acre. Sainfoin, tlie dry soil
., luxnnator, «(•., etc., etc.
I And if you send Me we will add paei»
age of new tariu seeds never before we*M
by you. Iv. & \Y.
offer one
hunrl.ni dollar* for any It falls lu cure. Bead
i for circulars atul te*i Ituonlai*.
A iWr««»: r. 11K N K
V ft CO., Toledo, OMOk 0
id by Drutfgiit*.
'l Ake Haii n FauiUjr rills for constipation*
Your message will go just as deep
into the hearts of men as it has roots
in your own.
ST PATRICK
Dr-.VG all the
'.NUKES
man who wants th«* earth muni
i to have a littie mud thrown at
You ought to be natimfied with nothing
Ws than Nature's latHtive, Garfield Tea!
Made of
HCI IIS,
it overcomes constipation,
leguUtes luer and kidneys, and bringt
Good Health.
Nearly every girl at some time ha*
made some fellow happy by refusing ts
marry him.
SPOT CASH FOR VOJ It CHKAM.
Top market price* always
MILTON DAIIiy CO.. 81. Paul
When a girl Is proverbially fond el
lobsters, she generally goes out to sup
per with one.
S?JAC0BS OIL
Drives /.'! !. •he
cures knt-uiiu.i.Mi,. .'n-uraij}
CONQUERS PAIN
25c.—AM. DRKJGISTS- 50c.
W.L.DOVGLAS
HIDES A FI'Rfl TA«*lCn FOB ftOHBS
Coats or rugs Send for price list
TAt'HKHT TANNERY Minneapolis. Ulna
A man who pleases only hlaifl«lA
must furnish all the applause
WK PAV 1IM.U PRICKS FOB FI R*
and hules. or 1an them for robes, runs of
coats. S, VV Hide & Kur Co Minneapolt*
flood people are suppoapd to tn
i happy, but they seldom look It.
from
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Shipping Fever
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US A*ltfSAVE OCJittSWm©FITSa
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Dulitli
SHIPPING TAG'S-
PATENTS:
When Aniwering Ad v^rti»ment» KlntfH
Mention This Paper.
N N U *-No 11.
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