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The pioneer express. [volume] (Pembina, Dakota [N.D.]) 1883-1928, May 25, 1900, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076741/1900-05-25/ed-1/seq-7/

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8
ERE CENTURY DAWN.
A Memorial Day. School Recitation for
1900.
In this the waning light of rounded
years,
We swing the portals q.f the century
near,
In ecstacy of hope—through blur of
tears—
We wait the Word prophetic, be of
cheer.
The Holy of the Holies enter we,
The dream of ages, and of seers
foretold,
A day of kinder motive, bondless, free,
The century-tide, where, meet the
Mew and Old.
In clash of hungry steel and din of
hate,
We hear the echo of a dying past
We pray it jangle not the new-born
state,
Nor that its clang this pregnant
year outlast.
For dispensation new the world hath
need
Of peace on earth and God's good
will to men,
Where Love shall make new war—on
lust of greed,
And old war steel shall thirst for
blood in vain.'
And what have ye to gain of arms ye
bear,
Ye nation's army—mad, in fevered
strife
What measure shall we mete for blood
ye spare,
For waste of treasure and for sunk
.. en life?
The fittest have ye drained, to mar and
slay,
Survive the weakling, to beget your
young
Decadence dogs your dead march all
the way,'
XL a
From hall to hut the haunting wall
li wrong.
4
Ye pile the burdens higher^ year by
y«r,
Ho! Armistice! ye leaders, be ye
wise
Ere yet the century sands have all
been spilled,
A truce to let of blood! ye nations
rise,
And call the measure of your hate
o'erfilled.
For halt shall, come nor may the
question cease:
"The turn, be it of choice, or led by
fate?"
T«..
!v-'-r
bid for rising joy of unarmed
SfS 'Peace
i' 1 ^'b-'vrV.V ,\•r'
Or War, to broadcast wild the seeds
of hate!
Come ribw and let us reason, saith the
Lord,
If there be not for men an holier
way
For ye shall lay ao lines of less re
ward iJU-
Than such have fallen ere this
Epoch day.
We wait a newer school in things of
State,
Of joy in brotherhood, and weal of
men,
To lift the human life—put Love for
hate,
Look ye—the writing on the wall
again!
If e'er an hour outrolled within our
ken,
When it were due to,pauee, one
cometh now—
And on apace—when o'er this world of
men1
There broodeth thought of Peace
o'er aching brow.
So be ye swift to take your fill of
blood,
Then haste to wipe your blades e'er
:'M set of sun
1
,./
For eveiT ship ye build, are bullded
til item, 7* cbunsel .take of—
A
1
JS&A
begun..
1
1
For men Implore that in more Iranian
mood, .a\
The wide world o'er, the cetftury be
Mark not with stain of bloed that ea*
cred hour—.
At tftrn pf century tide. Thle
threshold cross
With lowered lance. Show,, ^ye a
mightier power
That counteth wa*v aixdt spoils of.
/1,, war, all loss.
4
vi
it
0 ye, who are the hope o( this dur 4ay,
Whp dominate world-tlurngbt^-ye of
t\. ,3iPu«»
Defy not. but ally that ye may say,
On Century Morn no battle hymn be
sung.
—William Henry Lynch.
GRANT'S CHARGES.
From his earliest boyhood General
Grant was an expert rider, and like
Washington, he possessed a mysteri
ous power over horses. 'He ridiculed
the idea that be could be thrown, so
long as the horse kept on his feet. He
asked but one thing of a steed,, and
that was that he should go. No Mexi
can vaquero, Bedouin sheik or Ameri
can cowboy had a firmer seat, or more
resembled a centaur. Early in the
Mexican war Grant purchased a su
perb stallion that had just been cap
tured from a herd of wild Texas
horses. He was blindfolded and
then saddled for the first time.
The young lieutenant, springing
lightly into the saddle, ordered
the blindfold removed, when the
untamed steed boundett like a bull,
reared, leaped, threw his head almost
to the ground, sprang first to the right
and then to the left in his efforts to
unseat his rider but finding all his
efforts futile, he dashed away at a ter
rific rate of speed, soon disappearing
in the distant chaparral. General
Longstreet, who after more than half
a century recalls the incident, in a let
ter to the present writer, states that
no anxiety was felt concerning Grant's
safety, who Was then, as well as pre
viously while a cadet at the Military
Academy, universally recognized as
an accomplished and fearless horse
man. Of Cortez, as Lieutenant Grant
named his wild charger, he wrote In
his Personal Memoirs:
"I had, however, but little difficulty
in breaking him, although the first
day there were frequent disagreements
between us as to which way we should
go, and sometimes as to whether we
should go at' all. At no time during
the day could I choose exactly the part
of the column 1 would march with, but
BEBBSSO'S STATUE OF GRANT.
alter, that I. had as tractable a borse
as any in the army."
During the occupation Of the capital
by General Scott's forces, la Mexican
gentleman with whom Gjciuit was on
tet?iB of Intimacy, requested the loan
of Cortex for an afternoon. His own-
HAt-SW
'^tfte Jtorse, apd yet-i
knttr Jj'I. aai4 word to that effect tke
suspicious Spanish nature would think
result was tfae iMexican mounted the .* «vi tut
•pWted reportk and: the society news
lad one three blocks and Instantly
Killed!
A few days before the American
army evacuated the city of Mexico,
Grant mounted Cortez and rode out to
make a morning call on the colonel in
command of the Castle of Chapultepec.
The officers' quarters were inside of
the fortress, which was surrounded
Urith a high, broad earthwork. Riding
up the outside slope and around the
castle without observing any hitching
post, Grant spurred his steed down the
broad but long, steep, stone stairs that
led into the fort. When the colonel
appeared and saw Cortes tied at the
floor, where no horse had ever been
seen before, he exclaimed in astonish
ment:
"Lieutenant, how in heaven's name
did you get your horse down here?"
"Rode him down, sir," calmly an
swered Grant.
"And how do you expect to get him
out?"
"Ride him up, instead of down," re
plied the lieutenant, which he accord
ingly did on his departure, the intelli
gent Cortez climbing like a cat to the
top, when Grant, waving his chapeau
in adieu to the colonel far below, dis
appeared over the breastworks. With
the single exception of Captain
Charles May's Black Tom, a magnifi
cent and powerful coal black gelding,
such a steed as Theodore .Winthrop
introduces in his best story under the
name of Don Fulano, or the Forest
King in Ouida's novel of "Under Two
Flags," Cortez was the grandest war
horse in General Scott's army with
which he conquered Mexico.
Five years later, when Captain
Grant was stationed with the Fourth
Infantry at Columbia Barracks, now
Fort Vancouver, on the Columbia
River in what was then Washington
Territory, he purchased the most valu
able horse in that part of the country,
calling him Garland, in honor of his
brigade commander during the Mexi
can war. In April, 1853, Lieutenant
George B. McClellan, of the Engineer
Corps, reached Columbia Barracks,
and for three months, while on duty
there, was Grant's guest. The day of
his arrival, while seated with several
comrades in front of the officers'
quarters, they saw the captain return
ing from a ride on his superb charger
and approaching a six-gun battery
which was parked some 300 yards dis
tant. As he drew near the guns and
they were observing, the graceful
movements of Garland and his perfect
rider, the group of officers saw Grant
pull down his hat more firmly and
seat hiihself squarely and securely in
the saddle. "He is going to leap the
battery!" they exclaimed, when Mc
Clellan and the others—including Gen
eral Rufus Ingalls, Grant'3 West Point
classmate, who told the story—all
stood up to see the interesting per
formance. Running his horse at good
speed toward the pieces, Grant put
Garland over the six guns, one after
another, as easily and gracefully as
C'harles Lever's world-famous Charlie
O'Malley could have executed the clev
er act of horsemanship.
Early in June, 1861, Governor Rich
ard Yates appointed Grant colonel of
an Illinois regiment, and borrowing
$400 from his father's Galena partner,
with which to equip himself for the
position, he paid about one-half of the
amount for his famous Claybank, or
Old Jack. This showy war horse Grant
used for several years, and he wa3
well known to the Army of the Ten
nessee as "Old Yellow." At the bat
tle of Belmont, a horse haying been
killed under him. Grant mounted his
cream-colored steed. When at the
close of the fighting our forces retreat
ed to the boats on the Mississippi, the
general on reaching the landing place
found that he was the only represen
tative of his army between the the
Confederates and the Union transports
and war vessels. From one of the for
mer a plank was run out and from a
high bank the intelligent horse took
in the situation, sliding down the
difficult slope on his haunches to the
gang-plank, and with his rider was
soon safely aboard the steamer. Grant's
groom was captured. Belmont, and a
colored cook belonging to a Confeder
ate colonel escaped with the Northern
troops. An exchange was proposed by
Bishop Polk, the Confederate com
mander at Columbus, Grant replying
that he had. no authority to exchange
a black man, but the cook could return
to the colonel if he so desired. The
slave did not, but Grant's groom was
nevertheless courteously sent back by
the Confederate prelate-general.
A Polite Stranger.
A big, fine-looking man sat in the
corner of a Brooklyn car reading his
newspaper. Next to him sat a little
woman in an up-to-date frock. /3he
had a box of candy in one hand and
an opera libretto in the other, says the
New York Telegraph. She tried to
get a newspaper from a newsboy who
came through the car, but the con
ductor broke up the transaction, and,
seizing the small newsdealer, put him
down 01^ the pavement Then the
pretty woman in the up-to-date frock
paid\ her fare in pennies and smiled.
The big man's newspaper was spread
out before hen eyes, and she glanced at
the headlines. Then she read half a
column about a thrilling rescue of a
typewriter girl by a gallant fireman.
She glanced sideways at the big man.
Apparently hef was taking no notice.
She began on a story of burglars in
a south side flat, how they bound and
gagged a woman, stole her sealskin
sacque and-—"Oh, the horrid
things!" she exclaimed excitedly.
big iftan looked around inqiiirlhgly,
and then, quite as a matter Of couree,
he said: "Have you. finished this page,
madam? If so, let u* turn to the stock
tArt
rmtmutm
btm« Uit W*#k
RtftliiTMton IkTcatsri.
Edward J. Brennan, St. Paul. Minn.,
track-laying machine Albert E. Hud
ley, Mount Vernon, and F. Tielebein,
Planklnton. S. D., adjustable belt
guide Lauritz H. Jensen, Minneapo
lis. Minn., folding bed Olaf H. Lund.
Kenyon, Minn wagon jack Ole A.
Mlckelson, Wlngefr, Minn., combined
straw blower and spout Henry R. Nel
son. Gales, Minn., stoker for straw
burning furnace Emil Olund and P.
J. Caesar. Duluth, Minn., wheel Will
iam G. Scott. Rode Dell, Minn., culti
vator: Jerry Stair, Pipestone, Minn.,
lawn mower.
Harwln, Lothrop a Johnson. Patent Attor
un HI a MS Pioneer Prtaa Bids., St Paul
Oar Effusive Candidate.
"Grand idea, that, of our new can
didate!" said the election agent just
before the contest in a certain Lanca
shire town. "He isn't satisfied with
shaking hands with his constituents In
the ordinary way. When he meets one
of them he grabs both hands."
"Isn't that rather overdoing it?" said
one of his friends.
''It might look that way to you, but
Warrigan knows his business. As long
as he holds the fellow's hauds his
watch Is safe."—Answers.
A Poor Falkland.
During a performance of "The Ri
vals." in which Joe Jefferson played
Bob Acres, the actor rendering Falk
land was inadequate ^to the role. In
the scene in which Falkland. Captain
Absolute and Bob Acres have a wordy
altercation, Falkland ranted violently,
raised his voice to an unnecessary
pitch, and, finally, in a burst of anger,
slamir.cd a door as if to make his exit.
It is a part of the business for Captain
Absolute to say at this juncture, "Poor
Falkland!" He did so, and Mr. Jeffer
son promptly replied, "The poorest I
ever saw!"
Are Too Using Allen's Foot-EsitT
It is the only cure for Swollen,
Smarting, Burning, Sweating Feet.
Corns and Bunions. Ask for Allen's
Foot-Ease, a powder to be shaken into
tbe shoes. At all Druggists and Shoe
Stores, 25c. Sample sent FREE. Ad
dress Allen S. Olmsted, LeRoy, N. Y.
She Conldn't Call Again in the Paat.
"You advertised, I believe, that you
would tell women how to be beauti
ful."
"I did."
"Well, I'd like to know how."
"Certainly, certainly. Two dollars.
Thank you. The surest was is to be
born beautiful. Call again some future
time."—New York Journal.
Send for "Choice Recipes,"
Ay Walter Baker A Co. Ltd., Dorcbeicer, UIH^
maUcd tre*. Mention tbls paper-
Winning Her.
Briggs—Nothing remains but to ask
the girl.
Griggs—Do you think she will con
sent?
Briggs—Oh, yes. I am going to tell
her that her parents are dead against
it.—Detroit Free Prtss.
Carter's Ink I* the Best Ink
made, but no dearer tban the poorest.Has the
largest sals o( any ink in the world.
A a S in
Tired Tompkins—There's one job I
wouldn't mind haviu'. Horace.
Hungry Horace (in amazement)—
What's that 1
Tired Tompkins—Lineman fer a wire
less telegraph company.—Life.
Remove the causes tbat make your txa!r lifeless
sad GRAY wltb HAIB BALSAM.
BIHDKBCOKCABZBS'S
S. ilia best cure tor corns. lBcti.
A Prime Thought.
A teacher of music in one'of the pub
lic schools of the South desired to im
press the pupils with the meaning of
the signs "f" and
"iff"
in a song thai
they were about to sing. After ex
plaining that "f" means forte, he said:
"Now. children, if 'f' means forte,
what does *ff* mean?"
Silence relgned~for a moment, and
then he was astonished to hear a
bright little fellow shout:
"Eighty!"—San Francisco Wave.
ALABASTINE
Is a durable and
natural eament
baae wall coating.
In 5 lb. paper packages, made ready for use in
white and fourteen beautiful tints by
with cold water. It is cement that goes
through a process of setting, hardens with age,
and can be coated and recoated without washing
off its old coats before renewing.
1B entirely
different
from all the
various kalsomines on the market, being durable
and not stock on the wall with glue. Alabastine
easterners should insist on having the goods ic
packages properly labeled. They should reject
all imitations. There is nothing "just as good."
ALABASTINE
ALABASTINE
Prevents much sickness, particularly throat and
lung difficulties, attributable to unsanitary
coatings on walls. It has been recommended
In a paper published by the Michigan State
Board of Health on account of its sanitaiy
fea trues which paper strongly condemned
kalsomines. Alabastine can be used on either
plastered walls, wood ceilings, brick or canvas,
and any on® can brush it on. It admits of radi
cal changes from wall paper decorations, thus
aeeoring at reasonable expense the latest and
besteffecta Alabastine is manufactured by the
Instractfrre and iatorMttog booklet mailed £t*t
toaUftp&Ucantat
#$
LEWIS MS ENGINES
LEV
Adapted far All Purposes
SIMPLE
%q,ECONOMICAL
DURABLE..
Send for Catalogue sad
state your power used*.
•£I£!0,"PS0H "PC* CO.
•O*«0l. BCLOIT.WIB.
Wmb lisKCfiig MverHsemeats Kiadljr
Mratiba Tikis Taper.
Serious
Uterine and ovarian
troubles, kidney troubles,
ulcerations, tumors, un
usual discharges, back
ashes and painful periods
—thess are the Ills thai
hang on and wreck health
and happiness and dis
position.
has a wonderful record
of absolute oures of these
troubles a constant
series of successes for
thirty yearsm Thousands
of women vouch for this*
Their letters constantly
appear In this papsrm
ABSOLUTE
SECURITY.
Cenuino
Carter's
Little Liver Pills.
Must Bear 8lgrmturo of
gee Pac-Staile
1
CARTERS
First Glass Music.
BO PIECE8. 92.
Per sixty days we vrttl send FIFTY PIECBS
OF FIRST CLASS, FU1X SIZED, high
grade, standard Teeal aad Instrumental
MUSIC, carefnlly selected, Including Seles.
Daets, Qssrltlti, Waltzes, Polkas, Operas*
Negro Melodies, Hjtssst, etc., etc., charge*
prepaid by poet or express to any jinrt of the
United States or Canada, npou receipt of two
dollars la cash, ataasps or nauev order. The
regular price of this am
sic la $2U. Addres*
PRANC1S WAYLAND ULEN & CO.,
149 Broadway, New York City.
IN 3 OR 4 YEARS
IN INDEPENDENCE ASSURED
information as to reduced railway rates can be
had on application to the Superintendent of
Immigration, Department of Interior, Ottawa,
Canada or to Ben Davias. la4K East Third St,
St. Paul, Minn.
w. L. DOUGLAS
S3 ft 3.BO SHOES
!fo fin,
rBY
Mmm
Indorsed by over
1,000,000 wearers.,
The genuine have W. L.I
Douglas' name and price
•tamped on bottom. Take 4
no substitute claimed to be
as rood. Your dealer
•nould keep them—ifd
not, we will send a pair'
on receipt of price and 2jc.
"tra for carnage. State kind of ImAttk
8*ok%
BmL
AteftletaQr Sftfetad* itaunp«Yor
•»T^+Q9TT*Wrsse.A-
DROPftV"?* OftCOVCRr gtrm
nSS£ -"L^lmoajlts•ad^rplwtnfs"0'1^
W. V*
J1ENJ0UARH
eAR BER TflADE
mailorat college
^SN^J GRADUATES AT t60«S I40N1HIYIN CITY
ICR COUNTRY SHOPS, «0SWTAL^PUa«AHj3ikM
mi
Sf'lV
off
v. j"
f.
Tho dormiHfomonts of
the female organism thai
breed all kinds of trouble
end which ordinary prao
the does not ours, are tho
very things that g0ve way
promptly to Lydla Cm Pink
ham's Vegetable Com*
pound*
14
\t
SVt*
FQIREAOACRb
FOR DIZZINESS,
nni tiuovtictti—
FOR TORPID LIVER.
FOR CONSTIPATION,
FOR SALLOW SKIN.
FOR THE COMPLEXION
a a mmt.
CURE SICK HEADACHE.
SACRIFICE SALE
A
-M
V' 1
tT:
If you take up your
homes in Western Can
ada. the land of plenty.
Illustrated pampaleta.
giving eicper eikes of
farmers who huve be*
come wealthy fn grow
ing wheat, reports of
delegates, etc.. and full
r.m
WlM

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