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The pioneer express. [volume] (Pembina, Dakota [N.D.]) 1883-1928, November 30, 1900, Image 1

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VOL. XXII.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY, pp
WAWor cccej.
0. B. Bepw»hj« '.f», B, F. bp^dinr.•
B«ri!or«,H.C.H*Tubi-ouih,P. MoCnmber
Sontn.',!. MnehlK.
H. U.Tbonif*.
FLCMATOM.
F!.e» Oil 'ot.Jad.-on UjMoure, Pembina,
second D'«wot,Janie:j Fuller, bLThomae
munmiwn.
K'rrt D'*r»ct, W. J. Watt, Hvde Park,
J. 0. Walla e, Dray on.
Seoont. Die Jot, E. H. Eesemayer, Cava-
I Soon Ttort»i«o», Henje!.
Jndze o? »?e D'.« tCooii, Seventh Ju
dle'al O's .'oi. O. B. santei. Grafton.
Clerk of Dliuloi Coa .. A. L. AIrJ».
OOODTTOtriOBBS.
states A., orney. W. J. Burke.
8hei:ff. .F. .T. fitiiow.
Audio Prnl Wl'aw*
Vea«irer, Robert «J
rej.ier o." Deeds, 3. M. Cbjrtolm.
COOOT Judse, V. OiccfeonoMh,
SoMrlnindntof bchooli,C. B. Jackson,,
Surveyor S. O. VoQnto.
/oroner. Or. u, P. ratine.
COUWTT ComUW-OHKK*.
First Dlsftici, F. O. Myriok, Pembina.
Second DU.rlct. S. 1. Slsfnsson, Mountain
TJilrd District, Geo. M'aylor, CirJisrate.
Fonvth Dls «'ci, P. loUj, Neolie.
P'.nb Dlsttlci. H. P.O em, 8t Tbomaa.
COUNTY JUSTICES
C. Mnt-phy Necho.
J. E. Jov. Olassion.
B. H. Uerxman. Gai dar.
B. i.. BtioU, 'yslai.
COJNTY CON^'-'A-BLM.
Tio». McFaddeo. Necbe.
92.00 £3B»
I
f-u
,-&'v
:..
Knt QomnoTj i. M. Dntafc
Secretoryo" 8 *_ed J*1'•*,*,' '%'*v1:
S ateT/eaio .D. W.OrlfCon.,
r%%
8'JM Atffi'ior, A. H? CulMop.
Atoroev Generrl, John Oo
wan.
Judges ttapnme couit, N. 0. Tonne, Al
ftSi Wefcln, J.M. ^iv boldaiew.
Eil Toad ComffilMfOM t. John Simons,
flriry Kickfloo, L. L. Walton.
.Hnperlnlendant of PaMlo Imiraotion, J.
a" Hilltiul.
CoiiHnbstoiMr ot ln»atance,Q. W Hatrl
Coreffl'cs'ouer ot Agriculture and Labor,
x-
C. "I. Plon. Wallialla.
11* shall .'isckeoo, Neche.
A. U. Folllns. Crystal.•
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
l®."S^63tfS.
A. Ward well. 6- Tbompnon,
WABOWELL ft THOMPSON.
Bntsred at the png.offlce at Pembina as second
ela«H mall matter.
Tbe PIONIEB Rxroaes is sent onty on tbe d'
ect order of snbsc: ibers, and con.lnued nu
ordered stopped and all arrearages pud.
Tbe rate of subscription Is alike to all,
12.00
pe: year. Subscribers paying in advance have
be choice of several premium papers In addi
tion.
"Sample" or "marked »p\ei" are sent as com
plementary only, and while we desire .hem to be
co laddered aa invi*a.ions to sabacribe, they wl!l
no: ee oonl nned except upon .eque«..
The PloNKKB BXPBKS* S iiie oeat advertising
mecinm "n. i.be county, iiav'a .aore general
oi.e.' a' o« oinany otber paper. Card of rates
sent on anpUcaUort. .•
I he Pioneer Express.
THANKSQTVINQ-.
Always to the mind of the New Eng
lander .comes the memory at this season
of that first historical Thanksgiving on
the shores of Massachusetts, where the
little company of religious enthusiasts
who amid all sorts of^hardships, dangers
,and privations still found something to
be thankful tor to the Giver of all.
It was a peculiar trait of those old
Puritans, that even in tribulation and
trial they still could find in corything,
traces of Cod's goodness. So far as
history goes at that time, there was no!
much to be especially thankful for. In
deed circumstances 'and chances were
seemingly against them. They had land
ed on rude inhospitable shores, they
were, sunrounded by hostile tribes of
savages, they had left little of friendship
or chance of succor across the ocean.
Except for the present meal, and rude
shelter they had but little of what the
world calls pleasure or comfort to be
thankful for. And yet it thia° little band
I could have realized and understood how
much their presence on the shores of
Massachusetts Bay, meant on that first
I Thanksgiving Day they could not have
|sung their psalms of praise or made their
prayers of thankfulness sufficient to ex
press their gratitude for this great na
ion looks back to that little band more
Ian to any other Immigrants as the
hinders of this grand republic.
iieir love of liberty, of morality and of
ation have been the foundation prin
Iples of this republic. It Is quite possi
le
that If
tliie
Puritans had not immi­
grated to New England that this nation
light still be colonial possessions of
Suropean nations. They bnllded better
Ihan they knew. They had far more
•reason for that first Thanksgiving than
[even the .most sanguine could possibly
ream of.
We also give thanks for what we hav^
Received. This is a time of great prob
abilities and impending possibilities in
aiV, nation's history. It may be that we
klso have great reason for, Thanksgiving
for "what we are about to receive.1,'-
POLITICAL BALOOVX8T8.
There is no more phantasmagoric
leetingand evanescent bubblethan popu
ity and political popularity
the H^tert« and most illusive ignis'
^^'^^iMiosphoreiMent.speckw.i
that l^e sit*'
io tlw hefcrtf of the dear pe*
rw$
'v
1
tfi?11*
\\J?\
V* $
an unpleasant back action. It may set
the swimmer safe on the beach—or may
take him out to sea where there's noth
ing to do but drown. There area whole
lot ofpeople, some successful and some
disappointed with the results of the late
election, who may chew these cuds of
reflection, both for present and future
digestioa
The moral is, don't get married to- a
political office. The old woman is
mighty precarious and liable to quit bed
and board without provocation and insti
tute divorce proceedings while you wait.
Always provide a solt pace to fall on—
when you are sailing high in the political
baloon.
WEALTH IS DEATH.
Sunday night, 2 a. m. the billiard and
bar room of the West Hotel, Minneapolis
was the scene, a party of young bloods—
liquor, drunkenness, a quarrel—a young
millionaire, Leonard Day, lay on the
floor, a stab in his neck, his life blood
flowing from the wound.—A young news
paper man arrested, but his p.ea, too
drunk to know what he was doing and
the rest of the party about the same. It
is a sad story. Money, dissipation,
crime, death. And yet some people
think that money means happiness, sue-,
cess, power. The average boy and
young man has abetter chance for happi
ness and success in life without money.
A million of dollars is too heavy a load
for most young men to carry. It is only
a mill-stone about their
ck.
TWO ERRORS.
THE PIONEER EXPRESS of Pembina
was in error last week when in mention
ing the happenings of Cavalier county on
Nov. 6th it «ave States Attorney Dick
son's opponent the bis end of the vote.—
Langdon Democrat.
We tender apologies.
Pembina ounty's ijority for the head
of the republican ticket has dwindled
down to 198, only about one-third what
was claimed awhile back.—Langdon
Democrat.
Republican presidential majority 411,
congress 333, governor 282, secretary of
state 351. All other state officers ap
proximate, except Comstock 107. Please
apologize Bro. Democrat
Bro. Lampman of Neche and Bro.
Wardwell of Pembina are accusing one
another of not being republicans. In our
humble opinion we could not call either
of them democrats. —Grafton News and
Times.
Marriage Licenses.
Mary
Nov. 24th—Walter Gardner to
Yeado, both of Leroy.
Nov. 28th—Frederick B. Puschinsky,
Cavalier, to Christina Bartellett, Backoo.
William James Little to Annie E.
.Yeado, both of Leroy.
Fred Beairsto to Ida Tuson, both oi
Backoo.
James H. Gordon and Eliza Spence,
both of Walhalla.
Nov. 27th— William Shuttleworth to
Mary E. Wilson, both of Bathgate.
Married by county judge.
Nov. 28th—Napoleon Taiflon, Neche,
to Annie Carrivan, Olga.
V.
THE SOLDIER'S PAROLE.
What la Kcaat hy it and H*w It to
Amagsd,
Parole, It must be understood. Is a
purely voluntary compact The captor
Is not obliged to offer to parole his
prisoner, and the prisoner Is hot oblig
ed and cannot be compelled to give his
parole.
If he does so, he will probably beret
leased on pledging bis word not to
serve during the existing war. If he
refuses, he will remain captive until
the war Is over or until he can make
his escape.
The nsuiil parole pledge extends only
to active service agalnilt the enemy.
A prisoner released on parole Is not
breaking his contract If he drills, re
cruits. quells civil commotions or fights
other enemies.
A soldier taken prisoner has no au
thority to pledge himself never to serve
against a particular enemy. can
not throw off thus (Igbtly the doty he
owes his sovereign or country, and If
he makes any pledge It must be con
flin»a to a limited time.
^Moreover, if a prisoner should make
a pledge qpt.approved by his own gov
ernment he bound to return and snr
render hhgself the enemy.
In the British army a soldier can
'only give bhl parole through a com
missioned officer. ,^ren,a noncommis
sioned olllcer or an officer of inferior
rank cannot glve|n)2eelther for hlm
felf or for bis men. wiChont Nrmisalon
from his commuidlnx ilfflfsf
The United Btatas au^clp^i^ tbe
glr« greater UtM^ty ^r
Is. the case with the :«nb^
«np%n^| prtiMpm,-tMi'
h..-y .^riVtf
ZEB KNEW THE HOWL
IT INTERRUPTED A DISCUS3ION
V.
ON
THINGS BIBLICAL.
W
The Old Poaanm Hunter Telia Abont
Wildcat Scrimmage and How,
After He Thought He Had the Old
Woman Licked, She Stlemced ««—,
[Copyright, 1900, by C.
B.
'He
Lewis.]
"One evenln," said the possum hunt
er ot Tennessee, "as me an the old wo
Joan sot smoktn our pipes on the doah
Itep an feern at peace with the world,
6lie suddenly says to me:
'Zeb, do yo' know why, the preacher
pldn't stop with us-when he was 'long
rere two weeks ago?'
'Bekase he stopped with Jube Tay
lor,' says I.
stopped thar, but he wasn't
ewlne to till he beard what yo' had
Bald. Then he got mad an wouldn't
fctep foot over the doah/
'An what did I say?
"'Yo' was, blowln round that yo'
jlldn't believe the whale swallered Jon
fer. 'Peared that yo' wanted to start a
jfuss with somebody. What's thgt
.whale an Joner got to do with yo'?
MBBBB THE WHALE SWALLBEED JONEB."
'What's tbe matter that what's good
'nuff fur Elder Hopkins an everybody
else round yere ain't good 'nuff fur
yo'?'
"'But I ain't a-bellevln the story.
How's a man gwine to live right on
pxter he's bin swallered by a whale?*
"'That's none of our blsness,' she
Bays.
'But I'm makin it my blzness,' says
I. 'What don't seem likely to me I
ain't gwine to believe in.'
"'But yo' might keep shet about it
not raise a fuss. Who air yo', Zeb
bite, that yo' disputes the Bible?1
"That started the row," said tbe old
man, "an we had some purty hot words.
1 said I didn't believe the story, an she
told she didn't keer whether I did or
not, an we was sassin away when we
beard a cry up on the hillside. It was
unthin like the cry of a child, an the
ild woman gits up an listens an says:
'Zeb, thar*s a leetle child wanderln
about In the bresh. Jest hoot two or
three hoots to draw It this way.'
"The cry come ag*ln, an then I know
bd what it was. It wasn't no lost
Ichild, but a prowlln wildcat I hadn't
heard one fur two y'ars, but I was dog
Puah
of the game. I'd hev told the old
oman, but she got mad bekase I
ouldn't boot an called me names,
hen the third cry comes, she says to
me
'Zeb White, that must be Joe Ba
ler's leetle boy Jim, an he's wandered
miles away from home. If yo've
got a heart In yo'r busum, yo'll go up
the mounting an find him an bring him
down in yo'r arms.'
'I ain't huntln fur lost boys,' says I
as I fills my pipe,
1
"Then I am. I'll go up thar myself.'
I '"Better not'
'But I wllL Befo' the Lawd, but I
don't know what's come over yo', Zeb.
Fust yo' go an deny that the whale
swallered Joner, an then yo' won't
move band or foot to save an lnnercent
child from perlshln. Mebbe yo' air git
tln ready to turn Mormon an run away
from mef
'I ain't takln wild varmints fur lost
boys,' says I as the scream come ag'in.
"'It's no wild varmint Ifs the
voice of leetle Joe Baker, an he must
be skeert almost to death of the dark-i
ness. Yo' sot right yere like ah old
mewl, an 111 go np an find him. Fm
thankln the Lawd yo' hain't got no
children of yo'r own.'
"With that she grabs up a stick an
starts up the hill. While I knowed that
wildcat was rodmln round, I didn't
hlnk the eld woman would come to
any hurt I hoped the cat would yell
out an skeer her, an so it was ton min
,lts befo' I foilered on. She' went push
in through the bresh an callln to Joey,
an now an then the cat cried out In an
er. I was doin a heap of langhjh to
yself when the old woman calla.back
to me:
'Come on,'Zetti I've dun found the
lehUdr
'"Then bring him along.' aaya
'I can't He's up a tree. Zeb, did
ytf ever hear of a kst boy dlmbtn a
IreeT
'Not skaraly, but mebbe tiley do It'
•-"'An bis egres are shinln l&o two
coals of fire, Inever knowed towt lost
*1#- that way at-
i: down atthe oid.-wainah.^
SVr/^SC-^-f^K. .'
^j| j$ ,i
PEMBINA, 3ST. I)., FRIDAYI NOVEMBER SO, 1900. NUMI5KK, -21.
ptn had jest opened my moutn to icry
|out a warnin when tbe cat hissed an
prowled an rattled the bark with her
Claws. That was
nuff. The old wom­
an gin a yell an started to run, but at
Mho fust move she fell over a log. I
reckon that cat
bad 'bout sunthin,
out an jumped to the ground an in two
jumps was on the old woman's back an
usjn her teeth an claws like sin. I
grabbed up a club an mixed In, but at
the fust blow tbe club broke, an the
rat turned on me. Lemme tell yo' sun
thin *bout wildcats. If yo* was to be
pitched into a hole on top of fo'teen
jbuzzsaws. It wouldn't be as bad as
'lievin a row with one full grown wild-
fat She would gin me a bite an then
gin the old woman a clawln, cn thar
was no gettin away from her. We bad to
fight fur our lives, an I never did slch
fightln in all my days. We'd hev both
bin done up except that I. dashed the cat
ag'in & tree an stunned her, an while
she lay thar we fled to the house an
locked' the doah. We hadn't skassly
got in befo* the critter whs screechin
round, an, not bein able to git at us,
she went round to the shed an bit an
clawed my old mewl till he was no
good all winter.
"We was a drefful sight to see -when
nve got Into the house—me an the old
woman. We was in tatters an klvered
with blood, an we jest fell down an
laid thar. I was the worst hurt, but I
hadn't got over bein mad ylt Bimeby
I sot up an says:
'Mebbe the whale swallered Joner,
an mebbe he didn't?'
"The old woman groaned with her
bites an didn't say a word.
•''Mebbe Zeb White has a right to
his oplnyun, an mebbe he hasn't?'
"She groaned ag'in, but she hated to
give up.
'An mebbe Zeb White has sense
'nuff in his head to know the yeowl of
a wildcat from the cry of a leetle child?
If yo' think he hain't, then yo'd better
tree some mo' lost boys.'
"'What's the argyment Zeb?" she
asks as she sits up with tears In her
eyes.
'"The argyment is, Kin I hev my
cpinyun 'bout Joner an the whale?*
'I'm considerin that yo' kin.'
'An am I a man to leave an inner
cent child to perish In tbe bresh?*
'Not skaesly.'
'An air yo' still thankln the Lawd
bekase we hain't got no children?*
'I don't believe I am.'
'An, lastly, air yo' gwine to fly up
mad bekase I say them lions orter hev
eaten Dab'l when he was cast befo'
'em?'
'I'll argy the p'lnt, Zeb.'
'"Then that's all. I'll light another
candle, git out the coon's fat an some
rags, an We'll see If we can't patch
each other up an git along fur a month
without no mo' fussin.'"
"And so It ended all right?" I asked
of the old man as he finished his story.
"I thought it had," he replied, with a
sigh. "I thought I had the old woman
licked an was gwine to boss the cabin
from that time on, but we was both
still llmpin from our hurts when I hap
pened to mention that them people
never crossed the Red sea dry shod,
an she turned on me an got me by the
ha'r, an I had to take it'all back an
shet up like a clam." M.
Saeeeaa Those Who Take This For
a Motto.
A homely rhyme found In an old
fashioned jingle book Imparts a sound
philosophy:
Thodrirtfail little Maiy Wood
Alwaja did the best (he could.
Let us follow Uary'a plan.
Always do the best we cat.
At the first glance this looks very
easy, still, inost ot us know that there
are days when we do not by any means
attain to so high a standard. To do
one's very best implies that one has a
conscience that will not be satisfied
with half mieasures, that one has more
than tbe average amount of good
health and that one's Ideal is a lofty
one. Most of us start off splendidly
when we bjegln anything new. /The
real testing time comes when the
novelty is irorn off and we^ue tired
and begin ti carry the load wearily.
The old proverb, "A new broom
Sweeps clean," would .never have been
spoken if tlw lnvariable custom of the
world bad ilivays been to do tbe best
on all occasions. Tbe great cathedrals
of Europe trere built Slowly through
the ages by men who did their best
The great explorers and Investigators
In science have done their best What
ever the work. If it is worth doing at
all. It Is worth doing well.
The persoh who has a reputation for
accuracy anil toe punctuality, whose
work Is always thorough and whose
name standv for the best he can do,
never need fear that be will not find
room at the top.—Harper's Basar.
Larry—Be hlvins, Dinnls, that ould
hen'S tmfom
Dinnls—Iteybe she's goln to lay
o»pM -Mtt|p^w's Oasette.
The native drsss of the better class
of Japansaa ot both sexes la a
iraapper, opp^tft\the chsat aadatthe
waist conf
55
must hev bin mighty
tin, fur she screamed
M. 1
QUAD.
"DOING ONE'S BEST."
B»t TB^., A ff* 1
'J f,
$£ -X
& 9 **fc Mi 1* 4
4
S^
'sL.-,
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
1
II $25
P. S. EUSTIS,
ften'l Pass. Agent,
Chicago, 111.
(SFor further particulars
tfohrttn^ Patlct,
Our Bob Sleighs
Have earned a well merited reputation for strength
durability and easy draft.
We are offering rare bargains, for a few days, in
the following lines of new and up-to-date goods:
Diamonds, Watches, Clocks,
Sterling Silverware, Spectacles,
Silver Novelties, Eye Glasses.
FINE REPAIRING A SPECIALTY,
H. MILLER, Jeweler, Pembina, N. D.
Burlington
Route
AAAAA**AAA*A*
».
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W W
By purchasing in car Jot we are enabled to Rive much piles
and terms than we could if we shipped in by local freight
will buy a second-hand, two-seated cutter
practically as good as new that cost $125.
Let us Figure With You About Feed Cutters.
KING & CO.
Dealers in Farm Machinery, and hardw ire.
Lighted Limited.
"A twist of the wrist"—it's on. Another twist of the
iv v'»t. it's off—the berth light on the BurJinton's Chicago
li iiited. Conveniences—a buffet*library smoker compart
in
nit and standard sleepers a dining car a reclining chair
cm electric light steam heat. Leaves Minneapolis 7:20
p. m,, St. Paul, 8:05 p. m„ daily. Arrives Chicago 9:25
next morning. Ask your home agent for tickets via thin
line..
Money to Loana Moderate Rates.
PARTIAL PAYflENTS PBRTHTTBO.
CALL ON OR
«rA
1

3-
5-
1
I
Satisfaction
There is satisfaction in
dealing at a jewelry store
where every article is sold
on merit and at a true value
You do not have to be an expert Jeweler to get all you.
pay for here. Our years of successful experience pro
tects customers in making selections, as much as it
helps us in buying.
I!
I
GEO, P. LYMAN,
iAss't Gen'l Pass. Agent,
,^r: St. Panl, Minnesota.
LOANS.
wim to
6E0. B. CLIFFORD rCft
INVESTMENT BANKERS,
:4
-f
•^3

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