OCR Interpretation


The pioneer express. [volume] (Pembina, Dakota [N.D.]) 1883-1928, August 19, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076741/1904-08-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I Jfelf**
T*W
#5
".'\ kv
jf
"tf *Vi
1
'w:wmm
1
-HI'
^'"''W
f,",'V,
A
w'
A.
Sohlti.
The fiBank of Ottawa,
and Labor,
B. J. Turner.
Judge* Supreme Court, K. 0. Young, D.
E. MorgamJ. 1C. Cochrane.
bbnatojm.
Firit Diitrlot, Judeon LaMoure,
Pembina.
Second DUtriot, Albert Uarnett StThom
ae.
*»r»*»WfTATiv««.
First Diitrlctj W. J. Watt. Hvde Park,
I. Chevalier, Bathgate, G, A. MoCrae,
Drayton.
Beuond Dletrlot, John Trun.uer, Cara-
Uerj C. K. Wlug. Cryetal, P. J.' Skjold,
Juds»^o?the Dlitrlct Court, Seventh Ju
dicial Dletrlot,W. I. Kneeihaw, Pem
Clerkof District Court, A. L. Alrth.
ooONTTornoBBB.
States Attorney, K. Brynjolfeon.
Sheriff. Chae. Atklnion.
Auditor, Swain Thorwaldeon
Treasurer, W. A. Hurphy.
Register of Deede, .*• G»M-»
County Judge, J. O. Wallace.
BuperKtendent of Sohoole, J. W. Alex
ander.
Surveyor, F. B. Hebert
3oroner, Dr. F. Breklue.
ooO«*,
htt
oomossioMne.
First District, F. C. Hyriok, Pembina.
Second District, S. Swurdeon, Gardar:
Third District, Geo. Taylor, Bathgate.
Fourth District, J, Morin, Heche.
Fifth Disk, A.T.Cox, Bowe»mout.
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
•aoo jonro-M
A. Ward welt. G. G.'Thompson.
WMUWBU ft TKOKFSOH.
Entered at the poetolBce at Pembina as second
«laes mall matter.
The
Piohmb
Bxpasss is sent omy on the di­
rect order of eabscribers, and ts continued until
ordered stopped and all arrearages paid.
The rate of subscription is alike to all, 12.00
per year. Bubscrlberf pacing in advance have
the ohoioeof several premium papers in addi
tion.
"Sample"-or "marked copies" are sent as com
plimeBtary only, and while we desire them to be
congtdered as Invitations to subscribe, they will
not be continued except- request.
Bxpkxssupon
The
P10NIKB
is the best advertising
«Mdlttm In the county, having a morexeneral
circulation than any other paper. Cardef rates
sent on application.
THE JUDICIAL CONTEST.
The Grand Forks Evening Press has a
correspondent from Grafton who glori
fies in the fact that Attorneys Swiggum
and DePuy participated in the demo
cratic judicial convention held in that
city so far as to speak in favor of the
nomination of Mr. Jeft Myers, who was
nominated. Mr. Swiggum was the re
publican secretary of the district com
mittee and signed the call for the repub
lican convention and read the same when
the convention was called to order. There
was not .the slightest objection to the
legality of the convention or any dele
gate thereto. There was only one name
mentioned as a nominee before that con*
vention, though there was ample oppor
tbnity given for such nomination. There
is no doubt if any" other name had been
mentioned that the present nominee
would have received the total vote of
both Pembina and Cavalier counties,
which was more than two-thirds of the
whole number of delegates.
Now, what have Messrs'. Swiggum and
DePuy to complain of? Only one thing,
that Walsh coiinty could not have its
owu way against two other counties,
each of which "cast mor^ republican votes
at the lastele$on than itdicl.
The sulks of these disgruntled attbr
nes are easily accounted for. It is sole
ly and because Gralton lost the privilege
of forcing every attorney
:and,
itigant who
has business With the' district judgev in
chambers to go to Grafton to pay their
hotel bills. When th? district was made,
this WrfS incorporated in the jaw. Th'e
'people elected Pembioa «tt(Kney i.s
jifdge, gainst the votes of a lMrge' ma
jority ol the people of Wulsh: count«'^
wbiC^ included almost the uuanimoM'
vote of Grafton, The Pembina- county
delegation diangedthe law and now the
judge holds chambers Restated interval
wellas at ot^
.county seats and lawyon«nd liMff»nts 4o
ftot have tp tea*e their oiro (wuntiee- tb'
dobwMie»
A.1
-#VV^
M/.
Y:
ESTABLISHED 1674.
HEAD OFFICE, OTTAWA, CANADA.
CAPITAL, (anthoriied) $3,000,000. Beat, $2,389,197.
CAPITAL [PAID UP) $2,491,310.
EMERSON BRANCH' 1
A general banking business Transacted.
Interest allowed on deposits in Savings Department.
Drafts on all points bought and sold.
*¥V***v»vvyMy wyv*v¥*¥vvv¥¥y¥¥¥¥*yy¥vv¥¥
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY,
0. g, Representative, Thoe. F. Marshsll.
8«neto*s,H.C.Hanibrough,P. McCumber
Governor, Prank White.
Lieut. Governor, David Bsrtlett.
Secretary of Bute, B.JV Porter.
State Treseurer,D. H. McMillan.
Stat* Auditor, H. Helm*.
AttorneT General, C. N. Frlcta,
Beilroea CommlMloneri.F, Shea, 0. J.
Lord,
bupesintendent of PublicInitrnctioii, W
L. Stookwell.
mrai—ion
Lentb
Co:
iner of Inaaranoe, Ferdinand
Commieeieaer
at Agrloultuie
V{
S^PnH#
(WMC vl. \f
li iToV\Wf
4 ,hv^tr
*$ V'V
A AAAAA AAAAAA **AA A AAA AAAAAAAAAAA A* Hk
EMERSON BRANCH,
4*
5-
A. H. LOGAN, Manager.
there is a disposition among Walsh coun
ty (Grafton people to take the udiciary1
out of politics. That is to say, take it
out of politics in Walsh county, and vote
for favorite son, but make it politics in
each of the other two counties—and the
Walsh county man goes in.
The vote of1900. when the last judic
ial election took place, was as follows:
Forjudge For Governor
Kneeshaw Spencer White Wipperman
Cavalier County:
1243 1317
Pembina County:
1117 1651
Walsh Conhty:
2158 1730
1403
2036
1341
4780
1270
1361
1841
4518
The vote in 1802 in Walsh county for
governor gave a small majority for Cro
nan, the democratic candidate, while
Pembina and Cavalier increased their
republican majority, the latter especially
so, uoing from an almost equally divided
vote in 1900 to a majority of about 350
for the republican ticket in 1902. So,
figuring on this latter vote, if Walsh and
Pembina counties each vote largely for
their own local candidates and Cavalier
county stays nearly with the party ticket
as they did in 1900, then the chances are
more favorable to Judge Kneeshaw this
time than they were before.
Of course the fact that Judge Knee
shaw has been on the bench for one term
will make some diflerence ooth ways. In
his position in the course of business he
must displease some on the other hand,
his record as a clean, upright, courteous
and able judge will help now with many
who did not know anything of him per
sonally four years ago. We also take
into consideration the fact that Mr. My
ers is popular and able to a much great
er degree than Mr. Spencer was thought
to be, and that will make some differ
ence, but that difference will be mostly
in Walsh county, and Mr. Spencer had
that pretty solid before.
MR. LAM0URE REPRESENTS PEM
BINA COUNTY.
Some of "our state contemporaries,
some of whom should know better, as.
sume that Mr. LaMoure appears annualy
at the equalization board as an emissiary
of the railroad corporations and make
various sarcastic remarks about it.
The Wahpeton Globe writes to the
above effect and several other papers
copy the same or make similar com'
ments.
In the first place we see nothing wrong
in the railroads being represented before
the state equalization board. Iu 1903
they were assessed for one seventh of
the total valuation of the. state and from
the fact that the roads mostly run in the
thickly settled communities and through
the incorporated cities and towns their
pioportion of taxation as to the total of
the state must be a still larger proportion
than one seventh. In round numbers in
1903 the total assessed valuation of other
personal property was about 33 millions
while the railroads and aliied corpora
tions paid on an assessment of about 23
millions
In the face of the fact that they pay so
la ge a proportion of the taxes, and also
iu tlie face of the other well known fact
that there is a .well defined sentiment
anfong a large class of people to 'sinch
the corporations," we can see nothing
wrong in'the railways being represented
beiore the equalization boards.
1
There would be nothing wrong in. Mr.
LaMoure rep esenting.the»e great inter
estsof the railways. Proixably no ma'/.
iii the state has a better. ..knowledge ol
the subject of taxation than Mr. LaMoure
has. .The collection of taxes and the «xv
penditure of the proceeds are the rigi.t
»Qd left arms of1 (he s«ate and its innni'ci
p^leorjpoiratjons. As a legislator since
the. beginning" of the territory the busi
ness portion of the state's aftairs has
t^ea* familiar subject of thought and
aetfcty wijkh hira,^. 4*^4®
^Inal^is legislative hisVoryt'ht) ipa^'
ha»ieve|' baen able to place.hbu'^jnger
any act'of, Mr. Ln Moure thai h^s
r-Ott
L--1-
espwciaily fiyomble to the rniirofdi
against the peoplv- has,
Jl
£ng&*z,»"
-wb
ft#
^5 *r*
,V Jv-, i,
THE WAR.
PEMBINA, ST. D., FRIDAY, ATJG. 19. 1904.
a
CUT
A, Boydston, Atchison, Kans.
opposed some arbitrary and foolish legis
lation aimed at the railroads, but always
with the argument that such legislation
invariably defeats itself by its unconsti
tutionality and unfairness.
But,—there is no evidence whatever
that Mr. LaMoure at this session or at
any other session ever appeared before
the board as agent for any railway com
pany. "There is no evidence that he ever
asked the. board or any member of it for
any concession to any railway company.
Inlhe matter of the difference between
ex-treaisurer Driscoll and Mr. LaMoure,
we have Mr. D's. published statement
that it was not about railways.
As a matter of fset, Mr. LaMoure does
appear and has appeared for several
years before the state board in an official
capacity, to-wit: as an authorized agent
of the county board of the county of
Pemiina—and his work before the board
in behalf of this couuty has always been
satisfactory to the county board and to
the tax-payers of this county. But so
far as we know he has never asked any
thing from the board that was not reas
onable and just. The county board of
Pembina county consists of one republi
can and four democrats and they will
doubtless repeat their action of unani
mously sending Mr. LaMoure to repre
sent them at the board of equalization
next year and as many years thereafter
as Mr. LaMoure will consent to go.
The events of the past week or ten
days have been very disastrous to the
Russians in the war. At Port Arthur the
Japs have been working in closer and
closer to the doomed city until their
seige guns would reach over the city to
the harbor and strike the Russian battle
ships anchored there. There was no
other way to save the Russian fleet than
to make a dash to the open sea through
the Japanese fleet. This was tried, with
most disastrous results to the Russians.
One ship was totally disabled .and just
managed to reach a Chinese port, from
which, even if possible to repair her, she
can not issue again as a fighting ship
during the present war, owing to inter
national law. The other vessels that es
caped are but little better off and their
whereabouts is not definitely known, but
it is supposed that four or five of them
went back to Port Arthur. In the mean
time, probably by pre-arrangament, the
Vladivostock fleet also came out and
started south, with the probable design
of Uniting with the Port Arthur flset,
the latter succeeded in getting away. A
second Japanese fleet got after them,
sunk one battleship and damaged the
others very seriously and now they are
scattered in various directions. The de
tails of the present positions of the two
Russian fleets are somewhat uncertain at
this writing, but enough is known that it
is certain that the Russian fleet, which at
the beginning of the war was nearly eq
ual in strength to that of the Japs, is now
but a weak remnant, incapable of doing
any serious harm to anybody.
Beyond the mere loss of the fleet of
war ships at Port Arthur, the desperate
sally to the sea, portends without a shad
ow of doubt, that the end of the sie*e of
that city is a matter ot the near future.
The taking of Port Arthur in its turn
will do much to bring about the finish of
Gen. Kuropatkin's army which is a hun
dred or more miles north. The Japan
ese have by flanking movements and
fighting during th~ last two months forc
ed the Rnssian army to gradually fall
back about a. hundred miles towards
Mukden on the line of railway leading
from Port Arthur to the north. Here
the Russians have strong fortifications
and are evidently making a last stand.
Meantime the |aps have been bringing
reinforcements until they now have the
Russians surrounded on three sides and
are endeavoring to push their lines still
farther iiorth so as to cut in behind the
Russians. II they sMC^e^ in thB. Kuro
tkin. must eitheri retreat pgain or* tight
a decisive battle. If Port. Arthu^ should
(all wititia a lew days it will release
an^then lar**'body of Japanese soldiers
who wonldtbe hurried to* the front of Ku
ropatkin's army and help the rest ol the'
ariny toi extend their lines to hi£ rear.
hus ir jooks as if the first volume of
the ipar has atyt^fiwsi^d 4*8 h^iry.
S
Sp
far, japfa has haqan uninterrupted spriet,
of*uccissefi jhe begiuning. their
success 5n tile past is a megus'tire/ of the
iufure, tfofe' Russians afet? licked, But
»..*
S&
?8
5^tfl«W!ff'" '"W 'S.S.*
*.t
out very fast, so I tried Ayer's
Hair Vigor. It stopped the fall­
ing and made my hair grow, until now it is 45 inches long."
--Airs.
J.C.,
!1. Alldrugfiste.
iyer Co.,Xowell, JIass.
fight with or fight for, but Russia is used
to being whipped in war—and still lives.
A SEA SERPENT.
A thrilling story comes from Devils
Lake of a monster sea serpent being seen
there. Dan Richter, poet and peripatet
ic journalist, is at Devils Lake getting
some Indian land and covering the open
ing of the reservation for some eas ft rn
papers.—Sheldon Progress.
All of which taken together as it is
written reads like Dan was the "see-ser
pent."
THE STATE TICKET.
Presidential Electors—B. S. Russell,
Stutsman Roger Allin, Walsh Samuel
Richardson, Ward F. A. Schreiber,
Mercer.
Governor—E. Y. Sarles, Traill.
Lieutenant governor—David Bartlett,
Cooperstown.
Congress—Thos. F. Marshall, Oakes,
A. J. Gronna, Lakota.
J(i$tice Supreme Court—N. C. Young,
Cass Edward Engerud, Cass.
Secretary of state—E. F. Porter, Mel
ville.
Auditor—H. L. Holmes, Bathgate.
Treasurer—A. Peterson, Sargent.
School Superintendent—W. L. Stock
well, Walsh.
Attorney General—C. N. Fnch, La
kota.
Insurance Commisfioner—E. C. Coop
er, Grand Forks.
(^Onimissioner of Agriculture—W. C.
Gilbreath, Morton.
Railroad Commissioners—C. S. Die
sem, LaMoure, chairman John Chris
tiansen, McHenry Eric Stafne, Rich
land.
''yeribest''flour is the cheapest because
it wj{l| make the most as well as the best
bread. F. A. Feidman sells it. 50 tf.
Tlw Death Penalty.
A little thing sometimes results in
death. Thus a mere scratch, insignifi
cant cuts or puny boils have paid the
deatli penalty. It is wise to have Buck
len's Arnica Salve ever handy. It's the
best salve oh earth and will prevent fa
tality, when burns, sores, ulcers and
Piles threaten. Only 25c, at T. R. Shaw's
Drug Store.
THE ONLY LINE WITH A
WORLD'S FAIR STATION.
This refers to the Minneapolis & St.
Louis Railroad and means
1st—The Shortest Line.
2nd—iThe most comfortable route.
3rd—Two fine through trains direct tJ
the gates of the Fair.
4tH—A saving ol about three hours in
time. v..
5th—You avoid the croWds at the Un
ion Depot and on the street cars.
6th—Yousav- money by being lander'
just where you want to go.
There are many other reasons, but "q
word to the wise is sufficient."
For excursion tickets, berth reserva
tions, and a complete Guide to the Fair,
free, address
A. B. CUTTS, G. P. & T. A,
Minneapolis, Minn.
FACT& YOU OUGHT TO KNOW.
1 Se^on.tickets from St. Paul or Minne
apolis to St. Louis and return, $25.00—
sixty day ticket 121.35—ten day ticket
$19.20.
2 Fair opens about May 1st, andj closes
December 1st.
3 Five daily trains to Chicago, each mak
ing close connections witn St Louis
twins.
4 No extra charge to go via Chicago.
I
...
5 Tickets good on the Fast Mail and the
Pioneer Limited, electric lighted trains
6 Full information about rates, routes
and accommodations will be cheerfully
tymished^ on application to
W. B. DIXON, IT. W. P.
.Chicago, A^Iwfukee & St. Paul RyH
?.
i&'nkgto CbmmeWttri College, Mahka
I^.MIn^gfaefc you lw|,months |fee.
advantageqj^t.
Mowing ^mad^ine ^. cans, 5d. Five
gallons extpi h«»vy Casto^machinc oil,
WKQft ROOKER.
pf
t.
*.
One year ago my hair came
ifc.V.'ii
»••.( «*s }TT*P4FT~YU
'v
KTPIX
S
i' Hf?'
ff **1*7^!^
1
03 [Hl^lO
Aio-taAuxfi
^aioos nw«°WH
IMIIY DUUIVWL. HARNESS AND MACHINERY
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••SI###
Look Here!
See how this fits you:
A lotBof new shoes just in.
A pair of stockiugs or socks free with every
shoe, purchase, for the next two weeks.
Eresh Groceries just off the cars.
Canned goods not published in the adultrated
food list.
Samples of fall suits are in. We take the meas
ure, that means fit.
J. B. Branchaud.
ri/f
'f
The Cheapest S
qpwiNEs!
Jl on Earth are:
PLYMOUTH and
DEERING
WHY?
Because you lose no time in the field
when you use them. We have both. Come
in and get our prices.'
Kino & Banker
Dea,ERS
LN
v*$V?v.«~J"js
•t W
."5
7,«1S
NUMBER 7
HARDWARE
j^,,
eeseeeeeeeeeees
M. H. Miller,
Watches,
Clocks,
Jewelry,
Feir Prices and Good
Vaiuesl
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A I
PEMBINA TONSORIAL PARLORS.
AKQTA BUSINESS JfcOUEGE
ders,pereoB«l
keiiM school.
U* heiria. any
BerolM362last mif
4
i-
ft
'AS
4
W

xml | txt