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The pioneer express. [volume] (Pembina, Dakota [N.D.]) 1883-1928, December 15, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076741/1905-12-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXVII.
The rate of subscription is alike to all, $3.00
per year. Subscribers paying in advance have
the choice of several preminm papers in addi
tion.
"Sample" or "marked copies" are sent as copi
plimentarv only, and while we desire them to be
considered as invitations to subscribe, they will
not be conticued except upon request.
The Pionekr Expkkss is the best advertising
medium in the county, having a more general
-circulation than any other paper. Card of rates
*eht on application.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
0. 8. Representativts, Tiios. F. Marshall.
A. J. Qronna.
Senators, U.i/.Uansbrough,P. McCumber
Governor, E. Y. Sarles.
Lieut. Governor, David B&rtlett.
Secretary of State, B. K. Porter.
Slate Treasurer, A. Peterson.
State Auditor, B. L. Holmes.
Attorney Ueneral, C. N. Frich,
Kail road Commissioners, U. S. Deisem,
Chrietlanson, E. SUgue.
ouperintendent oi rubliolnstrnctlon, W.
A******AAAAAA**AAAAAAAAAAA**AA***A*A*AA
The Bank of Ottawa,
L. Stockwell.
Commissioner of Insurance, E. C. Coop-
Commiseicrer ot Agriculture and Labor,
W. C. Gilbreath,
Judges Supreme Court, N. C. Young, D.
E. Morgan. Edward Engrud.
HKNAluUb.
First District, udaon LaMoure,
Pembina.
Second District, AlbertUarnett St.Thom
as.
kbpbmkntativkb.
First District, J. T. firiden. Walhalla,
1. Chevalier, Bathgate. Q. A. MeCrae,
Drayton.
Second District, John Trumner, Cava
lier, C. Ganssle, St. Thomas, us. Wai
ters, Gardar.
Hallson.
Judge of the District Conrt, Seventh Ju
dicial District,W. J. Kneeshaw, Pem
Clerkof District Court, A. L. Airth.
county orriOBs.
States Attorney, M. Brynjolfson.
Sheritt. Chas. Atkiutou.
Auditor, Swain Thorwaidson
Treasurer, Frank H. Andezson.
Register of Deudt, J. *.Gin.
County Judge, H. G. Vich.
Superintendent of Schools, F. M, Sherats
Surveyor, F. fi. Hubert
Toroner, Dr.«, F. Ersklne.
Public Administrator, John Halcrow.
Bowesmont.
CODNTT COKKIBBIONIRS.
First District, F. C. Myriok, Pembina.
Second District,
HEAD OFFICE, OTTAWA, CANADA.
ESTABLISHED 1874
CAPITAL (paid up) $2,500,000. REST. $2,500,000.
Undivided Profits 73,332.26. Total Assets over $23,000,006*.
Drafts on all points bought and sold.
EMERSON BRANCH,
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
TSXiMS, 82.00 PER •AJ&T2Ttd*2£
A. Ward well. 9. G. Thompson.
WA&DWEU. ft THOMPSON.
Sntered at the ppstofflce at Pembina as .second
bI«m mall matter.
The Piombkb Expbbsb is sent omy on the di
rect order of subscribers, and ih continued aniiJ
•Tdered stopped and all arrearages paid.
A general banking business Transacted. ..
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT.
Interest at currant rates allowed on deposits of $1 and upwards, com
pounded half yearly.
S. Sigurdson, Gardar.
Third District, Fred Farrow, Cavalier
Fourth District, J. N. Horgan. Neche.
Fiflh Diet., A. T. Cox, Bowesmont.
RUSSIA, AUSTRIA, TURKEY.
These are the three plague spots of
Europe. For a century Turkey has been
"permitted." During all this time she
has been practically under the care of the
other powers. Because of the theory of
"balance of power," which means that
none of the other nations woujd permit
anfy other nation to take charge of the
Dardefielles or take of territory of Tur
key, she has been permitted to remain
as a shame and disgrace to all Christen
dom.
Austro-Hungary, which is kept in pas
sable peace only by the life 6f the aged
emperor Francis Joseph,^ ripe for all
sorts of eruption.
Russia is in such a state that even the
czar is the most pitied man in the world.
So poor is he, with all his ostensible'
power, and millions of income,that hard
ly another man in the world would ex
change conditions with him.
When one thinks of the awful possibil
ities in prospect in these three nations,
with the present conditions in Russia and
Turkey, the soul recoils in horror, and
wonders if the world is to be bldtted out
of existance. For, if eVents continue
along the lines of present history, not
only these three gre&t nations, with their
millions ot people, will run with the
greatest streams of.
blood, the world hns
ever seen, and it will be hardly possible
for other European nations to keep out
of it. They will be drawn in, perhaps to
keep the peace if possible, for self pre
servation perhaps, for additional terri
tory at the expense of the misfortunes o)
others, or a hundred other reasons, but
these three great nations cannot fall
alone, they will .bear others to the ground!
l. witfrthem.
.-SV'fr' rJ»
America in former yearfc was far on,
today we ar^nearer than France was to
i, Russia when Napoleon niarched.oa Mos-
kow%fev
&
I L*
ie troubles in Russia- are.' shadr
That
:isk
i*£,
VJ»V^.$SS^'HWI4"
.^4, /:w
h. LOGAN, Manager.
owing the whole world is as apparent as
the approach of the summer shower
clowd, and we as little know the out
pour thereof. It may be that this dan
ger of a great world conflct miglit in it
self be a cure. Oilier nations may inter
fere to make peace there for fear of the
results to themselves. But it will have
to be done through a combination of
countries it would not do to let,say Ger
many settle th trouble there alone. All
nations are selfish, and Germany especi
ally so. It will be a big task to bring
about such a combination. Turkey has
been managed in this way after
The/Herald still argues, however, that
tlje primary law is not yet "broad"
enough. That is, the more we have of
the "individual choice" business the bet
ter it will be. Individual choice is pro
ncunced a probable failure when limited,
because of probable confusion, but if ex
tended it then becomes all right. Which
is very logical—perhaps.
The trouble with the primary law is in
the idea that the individual voter wants
to make a separate choice. He don't.
The average voter don't pay enough at
tention to politics to know or to care
who all the officials shall be. He may
be interested in one, two or a few,
but not all. The best informed "boss"
or politician in any county would hesi
tate in naming a party county ticket
without consultation with others.
As a matter of fact a direct v«jte at the
primaries lor party candidates for the of
fices of congress and governor would
bring out actual personal opinions as to
candidates, better than lor the voter to
try and select the lower state officers or
even a whole ticket for his county, be
cause the voter knows of the former
tnrough newspaper reading.
However, the Herald and others need
not worry a^out the new or any other
primary law.. The general results will
be just the same under any form of elec
tion law. There will be no contusion or
mix-up next summer at the primaries.
The names of the delegates will be se
lected lor each party in each county,
the same as usual^ except that after they
are selected, the form of ratification
at the polls of the primary will
be proceeded with. It will just reverse
the old form. Before we had a caucus
and a convention, now we will have the
conventions first and the caucus after
ward.
We like the old way best because 'the
voters selected the convention^now the
convention will be composed of a few
self-elected persons who will select the
candidates. Of course, the people need
not ratify their action, but the
mostly Willi as they, always have..|«/v
When Bie'r Lampman goes to Grand
Forks, the Pembina, county coterie of
journalists will miss something, Bre'r
Lampman hes be£n £he Vesuvius7 of the
crowd, and in pretty! constant 'eruption.
We| particular tho. Pioneer &xpr&ss,
were certain to find something of special
interest every week. iir^^^lirqijotypie.
Bre'r Lampman is a^bi^ and spicy
wiiter imd.wjjll hav^" ari^pp^rto
spread Jus wings in the fifeld th^t covers
ihe.stats#-,,
atfr
n$mf*?i
m'W
I V~N
-Z-7
a"
poor
fashion, but to add Russia, and possibly
Austria soon, it would be a stupendous
job.
We are looking on the struggle in Eu
rope wiih more interest than that of
mere lookers on. There's possible danger
in it for us in far-oft America. The jar
of the machinery of'tlie mills of the gods"
may shake our own shores before the
grist is ground to its exceeding fineness.
PRIMARY LAW
The Grand Forks Herald is making
some pretty solid arguments against
the primary law system lately. It
has called attention to the fact that be
cause the "independent" voter may vote
for anybody he chooses at the primary,
therefore in the selection of a large num
ber of delegates to state convention, that
the lists of names voted might become
interminable, as each voter might make
up a separate list of his own, and as such
lists may comprise iti some counties as
many as thirty or forty names, the result
would be a mix up.
Hf* it *k*•£'%%
Js %/c 'V.
A^Cr vi Ll* "t
11
J*L& JS ^¥l f&f & -Li\^-
Say, roll another piece of paper around
that present that you are sending by
mail. The half-tied parcels that are go
ing through the mails these busy days
for the postal clerks, are what bring the
grey hair on their heads. Some people
will wrap a parcel that has to go through
half a hundred hands, and be thrown
about and. carried in a big bag full of
merchandise land newspapers for hun
dreds of miles, in rotten paper and a
short siring, that wouldn't carry it safely
from the store to the house. Wrap them
up strong and then th lolks will get
them, and th« clerks won't swear. And
don't forget to put the address on 1/ig,
:ar and biack.
When you send a present to the friend
at a distance, don't forget to mentally
thank the many men who have to handle
it and take it «afely and promptly to the
destination. You need not thank lhe
express companies—ihey take care of
that part of it themselves—but the extra
labor of the postoffi 'e departments is
something enormous. Their work is
doubled and with no extra pay, but they
do it as a matter of professional pride
and don't sp ue labor to keep the goods
going without delay. Merry Christmas
is changed'to-"my busy day" with these
our faithful servants of the public.
Real Estate
Transfers
Alex Dodds to Louis Keena ne qr
3161 53 Hamilton 85,700
Emiel Dalkey to A McFadden
lots 10, 19, 20, 21 22, blk Ne
che
Johnson to Ole Olson lot
2 ms Drayton
I Francis to O Olson, lot 2
ms Drayton
Johan Johannesson to Arni |. Jo
hannson hf sw qr 24-161-56
Beau lieu 2,000
W I logan to ChasE Widell sw
qr 20-162-51 Pemoina 3,750
Oie Fmgason to Stephen Eyolfson
se qr sw qr 27-159-56 1,437
S Fairchild toO Olson part
of lot 16 ms Drayton 118
Lamb to E Crowston hf
39-162-52 Carlisle 12,000
S Dickson ro Geo Hunter....
lot 7 blk 2 Crystal 1,000
Isabella A Burley to fos May lot
3 blk 11 Walhalla
ur%£*,h,:
'.: *•.'
•&•/• vf/ *sw
W8rtw^
ry
.,:: j.-. :.-/1 .v •'••''•^c-'
idnm
600
W Marshall to Wm Ell«s lots
39 to 48 blk 9 Ciystal
Appleton to Geo E Church sw
qr 23-160-55 Park....
Bank ot Hamilton to W Frost
sw qr 21-161-53 Hamilton
A Miller to Jos Greenwood sw
qr 14-160-5b Park. 4,000
Alice Murphy to John Brown lots
14, 15, 16,17 blk 3 Neche 650
825
3,600
4,800
Jury Drawn.
A petit jury was drawn by Clerk of the
Court Airth, on the 9th inst, for the tetm
oi court that opens the 2nd day of Janua
ry next. The jury is called for the 3rd,
as the first day will te taken up by the
court in setting cases for trial, and gen
eral arranging for the term, The follow
ing are the jurors.drawn:
John Johnson.
Robert Green.
S. S. Messecar.
David Ellenbaum.
John Krisher.
James Neil.
M. Quigley.
W. B.Clement.
Janies Slater.
Louis Capitan.
James Curtis.
John G. 0:son.
Jas. Halfpenny.
Geo. Swenson.
T. R. Chambers.
Paul Williams.
John McGjllis.
Ciias. Snell.
Patrick O'Toole.
Jno.H. Gudmundson
Menne Surerus.
H. R. Best.
Thomas Welford."
D. G. Mcintosh.
A. L. Mcintosh.
Ed. Armstroug.
Henry Webb.
Edward Cull.
Lyman Frasier.
Octave Pepin.
Malcom McMurchie
Tho-s. F. Kelly.
Rife Paddock.
Charles Edwards.
J. M. Morin.
P. F. Jennings.
Railaoad Rates and Service.
The Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Railway, via which line there are 5 daily
trains between St. Paul and Chicago, in
cluding the Government Fast Mail and
the Pioneer Limited, has a long list of
low excursion rates to points in the east
anu south. It you are contemplating a
trip in either direction write W. B. Dix
oiij Northwestern Passenger Agent, St.
Paul
For Tri-State .Grain and Stock Grow
ers Convention
rat
Fargo. Jan. 16 to 19,
J.906, the. Northerh Pacific-.railway will
selttickets to Fargj and.: return atone
fore for the roui)d trip. ^Tickets on' sate
ahd 16', good to return Jati. Tuesdai
PEMBINA, 3ST. 13., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1905. NUMBER 24
Bran New Goods
Note, that this
is not a sale of
remnants or shop
worn stuff, but
of a large and
complete stock
of bran new, up
to at
just from
wholesalers.
rl
,525
2,700
300
I E S
1st. One of our Beautiful Rugs.
2nd. One Ni Lamp.
iird. One-Pretty Water Set.
4th. One Ewer and Basin.
To be given as free gifts to the four
persons who are the largest purchasers
at this sale.
Groceries
Granulated Sugar, 18 lb* for .§1 00
Granulated Sugar, 100 lbs for 5.35
Light Brown Sugar, 20 lbs for 1.00
Coffee, good 17c, 7 lbs 1 00
Coffee.same as 25c other places, 5 lbs 1.00
Coffee, higher grades, 5c a lb off regular.
Tea, well wortli 35c 4 lbs 1 00
Tea, good 50c I eylon, "ii y........ ,35
Tea, English Breakfast, 60c, for .. .45
Rice 20 lbs, Prunes 15 lbs, Dry
Apples 10 lbs, each 100
Good Peaches 10
Apricots, 12 lbs 1.00
Raisins, package 09
15c Mothers Oats for 10
3 pk Yeast .. .10
Tip Top 3 lb Peaches, 7 cans for... 1.00
These are sample prices of all groce
ries, It will pay you to buy your Christ
mas dinner fixings right heri.—and now.
Fur Coats
NORTH STAR GOODS
Black Dogs, wambat collar, price
$25 for ......$18 00
Russian Lamb, regular $28 cut to. 24.00
Russian Buffalo, finely trimmed,
others mark at $35 28.00
A very nice Wambat, only 27.00
"Dry Goods
Come early and stay long, lake ad
vantage ot the opportunity. We w-int to.'
meet'you and all your family. Wishing
you 3 Mefry Christmas and Happy New
Year* I am sincerely yours,
Qlie&p Railway Excursions.'^
On account of the International Live
Stock Exposition ihe Northern Pacific
rail way jtt seH tickets from Pembina to
Chicago an
retUTn
at a rate of $24.80
for the round trip. Tickets oh sale Dec.
15 to 22/goud for return leaving Chicago
not. iater''than Dec. 24.
Av ll.^nderson, photographer, will be
at his Pgmbina studio
every
Mpnday and
m^o.jy
Until
January
v
«&
Grand Introductory Sale
For the purpose of introducing the
One-Price Store
to the general public, we will make a
Grand Introductory Sale on
Saturday, Decembei 16
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 18,19 and 20
This sale was planned for a month ago, but was delayed awaiting the
arrival of the new stock.
lie time, however, is opportune, as colli weather is upon us and everybody needs
winter wear of every description—and we have the goods.
It is also opportune because this the Christmas gift giving season, and we have every
thing in the useful, and a large assortment of fancy articles, toys and china from which to
make selections. You can be happy in buying because you can afford to bnv and give
away at our prices, and the recipients will be happy because the gift is so nice.
We shall be pleased to have you come and get acquainted with us—and with our
goods and prices.
BELOW ARE SOME FIGURES
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
Almost anything on our Dry
Goods side would make an ac
ceptable present for the friend or
relative, while anything in. the
grocery stock would be suitable
for charity, and besides this wr
have a very large stock of regular
Christmas j?cds, hut of course
cannot show them in print. Come
in and see lhe pretty tables.
Underwear
Men's wool, fleece lined, a
bargain, suit at $ .75
Men's wool, fleece lined, hea
vy, suit at 1 00
Men's wool, fleece lined, l'bs
down, worth $1 80 1.40
Men's natural wool, w'th 2.50 2.00
Men's .extra fine $4 lor 3.50
Men's extra tine $3 for 2.50.
Ladies' underw'r, good value
each, only .25
Ladies' underw'r, 75c goods, .50
Good union suits, only .60
Fine union suits, good value, 1.00
Wool vests and pants, excel
lent grade, each. 90
Misses and Children's underwear
same discount.
APPLES
2.00
A big box of East
ern Apples, only
The goods talk plainer than we can and we
shall be only too glad to let them speak to
you personally, but we submit a few prices:
All the best Calicos, 7c and 8c, we sell at this sale for
Amoskeag Giiigham, you know the regular pries.
Outiog Flannel,-12c grade for 10c, 10c grade for*.
Outing Flannel, a good grade for
Cotton goods, such as Sheeting, Shirting, Denims and Tickings, prices are
away down. It will pav you to put in a supply at this sale.
Clothing
Suits, you pay $12 to §15, this sale $9.75
Suits, you pay. $10 to $12, this sale 8.50
Suits, you pay $7 to $8, this sale... 6.40
Overcoals, $15 coats sell
"i S-t#,»S
Still Lower Now
for
v) t^
regular
O 1
customers tell us
that our ordi
nary prices save
them on
every day. This
I ntrod ne tory
Sale means large
reductions in the
prices.
regular
I I
s'
*tc ?r
rv/.iar
11
'41
jJ,n
12.00
Overcoats, $12 coats sell for 9.75
Overcoats, $10 coats sell for 7.50
Overcoats, Boys' sizes, $8 for 6.75
Overcoats, Boys' sizes, $4.50 for .. 3.50
Boys' Suits, sizes 14 to 20—
Fancy worsted, worth $10 lor ...
Suit worth $8 for
Best Ever (club knee) cheap at.
Nice Blue Serge, worth $6 at...
Heavy 2-piecesnit
Heavy 2-piece suit...
Workers' Wear—
6.90
5.75
5 00
4 75
3.50
2.50
Corduroy coats, flannel lined,
very cheap at
Duck coats, corduroy liar and
cufl- cheap nt
Mackinaws go at
Duck coats. Sheep lined, every
day price S5 4.00
Corduroy coats, sheep lined
some stores ask $8, we sell for 6.50
3.50
2.00
2.75
Shoes
Men-'s box calf, valour calf or
$4.50 goods at...
Men's valour calf, $3.50 goods at
Men's satin calf, $2.50 goods at
kid,.
.... $3.50
2.75
1.75
reduce
I3F* On all Ladies' shoes we
the price 50 to 25 cents. We are al
ready selling overshoes very cheap, but
this sale we will discount 10 per cent.
Anything wrong with our .shoes we. A'
make right.
You can't afford to miss these bargains.
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS
We have them as low as 15c that are good
for the money, and some for IS7c that trill
save you lOe a yard. Some dress goods at
this gale for BOe compare favorably with 7Sc
goods as sold everywhere t&se. Some fancy
showerproof Saltings, regular .$1.40 and
$1.25, we will make an evendoUar this sale.
Don't forget to .ash to see the 7-yard Dr«»s
Patterns when you call, they are very cheap.
W A N E O N E N
J0 EMJN FROM $80 TO S17S P» MQHTH
WE- WANT YOUNG MEN -WIS®
For Firemen and Brakemen. Experience unneceseary« f|i
atructlonaby mailto your Home. High wegea promotiOn%uaran.
teed. Positions secured aa
aoon as competent. Send tb us to
day. Full oartlculara wlllbe sent you at once. Vr
NATIONAL RAILWAY TRAINING SfflOOt,
BEWARE 'WE' HAVE NO BRANCHES.
N. 124 Boston Block. MlNtHEAPOMS.
4*
$5*
"ft
•'WJ5

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