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The pioneer express. [volume] (Pembina, Dakota [N.D.]) 1883-1928, April 07, 1911, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88076741/1911-04-07/ed-1/seq-5/

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PBorettioNAL
.'R.VtC'C
& B. SPILLER.
•ATTORNEY AT LAW* ,^1
PBKBDFA, NI L). $||
loui. Collections and Insurance.
1
OBO. PETERSON.
A TORNEY AT LAW§AP^
PBHBINA, N. D.
W/-'
'//n'
Loans, Collections nc nsurance.
CHAS. B. HARRIS. M. O.
Physician and Surgeon. Found at
all hours, when not professionally1
engaged, at his office, on Stutsman
street at day time and at his rest-,
fence on Cavtleer street at night.
PBHBINA.
N.
D.»
M.WALDREN, M.D. C.M.
Physician and Surgeon.
DKAYTON. NORTH DAKOTA.!
DRAYTON HOSPITAL.
DKAYTON. N. D.
Thoroughly equipped for the care of
medical and surgical cases.
DK. J. P. MCQUEEN,
DBNTIST.
Successor to Dr. Falloon
Office over the Merchants
Ifflce hours—9:00 to 5:00.
Telephone No. 64.
Bank,
PEMBINA, N. D.
WORDEN POST No. 12 G. A. R.
Regular meetings every second
find fourth Monday of each month.
J. G. SONDBRWAN.
Adjutant.
PEMBINA LODGE, 2. A. F. tc A.
Regular meetings of first and third
"riday of every month. Visitintr1
Hrethren in good standing are invit-'
pd. I
I A HARVKY. E BOOKKR
Secretary. Mi.
PEMBINA LODGE 110. A. O. U. W.
Meets every first and third Tues
day of the month.
1 McDousrall N patterson
1
Recorder. M. \V
PEMBINA CAMP 3277, M. W. A.
Meets every second and fourt'i
Monday. Visiting neighbors cordial
'y invited
GBO. PBTBRSON. AUO. SHORT.
Clerk. V-
BROTHERBOOD OF AMERICAN
YEOMEN
Meets every second and fourth
Friday of each month.
F. A. FBI.PMAN W. C. SHUMAKBF
Correspondent Foreman
DEGREE OF HONOR.
Meets every second and fourth
Wednesday.
MRS. PATTERSON
MBS. AYTEN
Recorder.
C. Of H.
PEMBTNA CHAPTER No. 41. OR
DER EASTERN STAR.
Meets in Masonic Hall first and
third Wednesdays of each month
Visiting members cordially invited.
MRS. H. G. VIOK. Sec'y.
MRS LULU THOMPSON, W
PEMBINA FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Meets every first and third Tues
day of the month.
J. B. EWING J. H. MCCARGAR
Secretary. Chief.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Sunday Services—Epworth League
!:45 p. m. Sunday School 11 m.
The Maflpi*
1
Preaching 7:30 p. m., every Sunday.
Prayet Meeting each Thursdav
evening at 8:00 o'clock. Junior league
Saturday, 10 a. m.
R&v. HOMER H. MOORE Pastor.,
WINNIPEG SCHOOL OE MUSIC.
Sandison Block. Faculty:
PIANO—J S. Ambler, Diiector
C. A. Macklin, S. K. Hall.
1
Sylvester Gerardin,
Mrs Freeman, Mrs. J. Aister Nichols.i
Miss H. C. Fumerton.
VOCAL—Rys Thomas, F. Warrington.)
(Director of Winnipeg Oratorio Society)
VIOLIN—Mr. Macdonald, F.C.V.
Mr. Sylvester Gerardin, local repre
I presentative, Pembina, N.D.
[Piano pupils received at his residence)
TIL 1 1
PEMBINA
Loan and Savings Association.
PEMBINA, N. D.
Loans money on good Pembina COunty
real estate. Every, borrower is a share
holder and participate" In the profits the
same as the investor. Every dollar paid
In pays part of the debt and is also pale
at interest for the benefit of the share
holders. From experience it 1b found that
from 108 to 11 monthly payments pays the
i. rincipal and interest on any sum borrow
ed. Monthly payments are SO cents per
share and $lper hundred of sum borrowed.
No bonus. This form of borro win money
isespeciall convenient and profitable to
wage earners and salaried men who nut
to own their own homes. The montuiy
payments are less than rent, and this
lor mof 'rent" buys the home
I. t. THOUPSOH. E. I. BOOKER,
PrtsMiit Sicrri.
Ceiling.
One of the apartments in the an
dent
royal palace
at
to known
Gintra, Portugal,
as the Hall of Magpies.
Painted In the arabesque celling is to
be found a swarm of magpies Each
has In the mouth a- scroll, on which,
painted In red on a white ground, are
the words, "Por bem." The story
runs that King John of Portugal was
making love to one of the maids of
honor In this chamber and was sur
prised by the queen. His majesty made
the best of the circumstances and ex
plained to the queen, "E por bem minka
sacre" ("Oh, It Is nothing at all. It Is
quite right There Is no barm In It"). As
to whether the queen was satisfied the
legend Is silent, but the ladles of the
court were deeply Interested and were
constantly saying to one another with
smile, "Por bem! Por bem!" The
king thought it time to act, so he com
missioned an artist to paint on the
celling as many magpies as there were
talkative ladles about the court, each
holding In the beak the ribbon with
the words, "Por bem."—London Globe.
Fate of Portugal's Homer.
"The Luslad" Is one of the noblest
records ever written of national glory
and success. Camoens, Its gifted au
thor, determined to do for Portugal
what Homer bad done for Qreece. The
great poem' was written In the six
teenth century, which has been called
the heroic age of Portugal, and Its
main feature Is the rounding of the
Cape of Good Hope by Vasco da Gama,
while a most Interesting episode Is
the crowning after death of Inez de
Castro as queen of Portugal. "The
Luslad" took Its name from Luslus,
who was said to have founded Lisbon.
Its author was born about 1520, and
his career, which began brilliantly,
was blighted by the death of a broken
heart of the lady of his love, for whose
sake he was banished from the land.
He tvrote "The Luslad" In his banish
ment and was recalled in 1571, losing
on the way all his property except his
poem. Pensioned at first by the king,
this great epio poet of Portugal died
in great poverty in 1570, when bis
patron was also dead.
Down In a Coal Mine.
To the ear accustomed to the con
stant sound of a living world the still
ness of a coal mine, where the miles
of crosscuts and entries and the un
yielding walls swallow up all sounds
and echo is a silence that is complete,
but as one becomes accustomed to the
silence through long hours of solitary
work sounds become audible that
would escape an ear less trained. The
trickling murmur of the gas, the spat
tering fall of a lump of coal loosened
by some mysterious force from a
cranny in the wall, the sudden knock
ing and breaking of a stratum far up
in the rock above or the scurry of a
rat off somewhere in the darkness
strike on the ear loud and startling.
The eye. too. becomes trained to pene
trate the darkness, but the darkness Is
fo complete
that there is a limit—the
limit
of
the rays oast by the pit lamp.
—Joseph Husband In Atlantic.
Portuguese and Codfish.
It is an interesting fact that the fish
ermen of northern Portugal started
and developed the fishing industry on
the "banks" off the northern coast of
Amerira. and. though they now send
fewer ships, their taste for salt cod
from Newfoundland is unabated—in
fact, it is a national Portugese dain
ty. It is found in every little grocery
shop, hard and brown as a board. A
number of Portuguese have made their
home on the islands to the south of
the mainland of Massachusetts, and
there the dark eyes of the Iberian
maiden, raven locks and a certain pic
turesque element in dress are not In
frequent. This connection with Por
tugal dates back many years, the
ships of Marthas Vineyard brldsring
the distance over sea and returning
with Portuguese crews.—Exchange.
Adam and Eve.
"I hope this expulsion of ours.is not
going to injure our social position."
said Eve ruefully.
"I guess not," replied Adam. "They
can't stop us from being one of the
very first families, whatever they do."
"I don't find our names here In the
'Social Register,'" said Eve, looking
the volume over.
"Look under 'Dilatory Domiciles,' my
love," said Adam as be went out and
named the Jackass after himself.—
Harper's Weekly.
A Pithy 8ermon.
Here Is the plthiest sermon ever
preached: "Our Ingress Into life Is
naked and bare, our progress through
life Is trouble and care, our egress out
of it we know not where: but doing
wel| here, we shall do well there. I
could not tell more by preaching
a
year."
Wanted It Well Hidden.
Little Bobby was too polite to say
he -wanted a big piece of the turkey,,
bnt he said be would like
a
be
piece of
the chest, where the wishbone was,
only he didn't want to find the wish
bone too quick.—Browning's Magazine.
It Was This Way.
**I suppose the father gave the bride
away."
"Not exactly. He gave a million
away and threw her. In."—Philadel
phia Ledger.
-r-r 1
Excluded.
Aacum—Well, well! I congratulate
yon, old man. .And how to the baby
to
named? Popley—By Ay
people, It seems.—Exchange.
Martian
Attractive TMfifc
The difficulty of using a foreign Ian.
guage was iunuslhgly Illustrated when
ft certain mission started work in Chi*
na. They were In some perplexity,
says Rev. Lord Gascoyne-Cecll In
"Changing China," as to the title they
should choose for their society. They
wanted to convey to the Chinese that
their denomination claimed especially
to feed the souls of men. They ex
plained all this to an educated China*
man and quoted well known texts.
He immediately wrote down two char
acters and assured them that they rep
resented what they had said about the
spiritual food that they provided and
would also be very popular with the
Chinese, as Indeed It proved. The
moment they opened the door of the
chapel they were besieged by hun
dreds of Chinese of the poorer class,
who, after listening for a short time,
went away discontentedly. The mis
sionaries found out afterward that the
title given to them, literally translated,
was "health giving free restaurant"—
a most attractive title, to the hungry
Chinese!
Proof of His Generosity.
The teacher had a class in English
literature before her. The subject for
the day was Gray's "Elegy." She had
asked the class to bring In questions
on the life of Gray. These questions
were to be deposited in a box which
was to be opened before the class and
each question read aloud. If no one
could answer It the one who contrib
uted It was to be called on for the an
swer.-
The first slip drawn out contained
this:
"Give a proof of Gray's generosity."
The teacher thought of what a re
cluse Gray had been and of how little
interest he had ever shown in his fel
lows, and she wondered bow any one
could have received the Impression
that he was generous.
Every one looked blank, and no one
attemped to answer. The girl who
wrote the question was called on for
her "proof," and this is what she said,
"He gave to misery all he bad—a tear."
—National Monthly.
Letters and Postage Stamps.
"Strange ideas some people have
about postage," said the clerk who
opens the mall. "Yes. See this letter
here with three one-cent stamps on it
and stamped 1 cent due? That's a
case In point. The writer of that let
ter thought that perhaps it weighed a
little over an ounce, a little more than
would go for 2 cents, and so he put on
a little more postage—1 cent more—
which he thought would cover itwhen
the fact Is that it required an addi
tional two cent stamp. Of course you
know that letter postage is not frac
tional, but that It goes in multiples of
two. If a letter weighs ever so little
over an ounce It requires an additional
two cent stamp. But not everybody
seems to know this, and so we some
times get letters like this one with a
little more postage for a little more
weight."—New York Sun.
A Strange Situation.
"Humor is a very funny thing," said
Binks.
"It ought to be," said the philoso
pher.
"Oh, I don't mean that way," said
Binks. "I mean that it is a strange
thing. Now, I can't speak French, but
I can always understand a French
joke, and I can speak English, but
I'm blest if I can see an English joke."
"Most people are," said the philoso
pher.
"Are what?" said Binks.
"Blest if they can see an English
Joke," said the philosopher. "It is a
sign of an unusually keen vision."—
Harper's Weekly.
Force of the Imagination.
There is a story of a man who was
tied up In a dark rqom and Informed
that he was to be put to death by
bleeding. His tormentors made a
small incision in his neck and arrang
ed for a stream of lukewarm water to
trickle down his back for fifteen min
utes. At the end of fifteen minutes
the man died of exhaustion. He had
not lodt a drop of blood, but he thought
he had. Such is the power of sugges
tion.—London Saturday Review.
Suggested a Remedy.
Even medical gentlemen are not de
void of professional Jealousy. Two
doctors were bragging about the num
ber of their patients.
"Why, last night I was wakened up
half a dozen times," said the younger
doctor.
"Yon were, eh?' replied the other.
"Well, why don't yon buy some Insect
powder?"
Did Not Look Like It.
"What Is It?" asked the visitor In
the studio.
"An Italian sunset," replied the
proud artist:
"Oh!"
"Didn't yon ever see an Italian sun
set?"
"Oh, yes. That to the reason I asked
what It was."—Yonkers Statesman.
Considerate.
"The most considerate wife I ever
heard of," said the philosopher, "was
a
woman who used to date all her let
ters a week or so ahead to allow hei
husband time to post them."
Accomplished.
Blobbs—I never knew such
a
of It—Philadelphia Record.
wife's
***•,+ 1^—S——»
if
rvi
A toofc ilow friendship is thebest
}m* mm
By Contraries.
Things go by contpartM to
world. People who hav* nothing to
my
wd-Hecald.
ipi:
Ufe en a Battleship.
To
the landlubber one
enUar and ofttlmes discomforting ele
ments of life on a warship during tar*
get practice Is the necessity for nu
merous baths. After each volley all
the men on deck must take a bath.
Sometimes there are four or five baths
a day. This becomes quite monoto
nous. The Japanese Inaugurated this
practice. A bath is taken before and
after shooting to guard against pos
sible infection of open scratches and
cuts from the flying powder. When
the big guns go off the landsman on
deck Is thrown Into consternation. A
horrible, sickening wrench makes one
feel as If each limb were separately
grasped and pulled In various direc
tions, and It Is a long time until be
gets his "sea legs" again. Life aboard
ship is not the ordeal that rumor has
characterized It The hardtack legend
Is erroneous. The sailors are well fed
with the best viands procurable, and
their bread, far from being hardtack,
is as good as that which Is served In
any high class hotel or restaurant
There is a spirit of good fellowship
among the men below decks. Each
man has his separate duties definitely
designated, and there are no petty jeal
ousies.—J. W. Aide In Leslie's.
No Place For His Talents.
At St. John's a man stowed away
upon Harry Whitney's yacht bound
for an arctic hunting trip. He was
discovered too late tc return him to
the little Newfound nd port but
Whitney de'. rmined to make him
work his passage. He wasn't success
ful at this, however. The stowaway
simply couldn't see any sort of work.
Short of personal violence he couldn't
be made to button his collar.
"By thunder," Whitney said one day,
"I've a notion to leave you here at
Etah." The stowaway seemed mourn
ful.
"Bee-lieve muh, Mr. Whitney," he
said emphatically, "you haven't made
me so welcome on board your jiggered
old yacht that I want to stay. But
what could I do Up here?" He swept
his hand around at the Eskimo huts,
half roof and the rest hole in the
ground.
"What is your business, anyhow?"
Whitney asked curiously.
"I," said the stowaway, "am a sec
ond story worker."—Cincinnati Times
Star.
A Pathetic Banquet.
Jacob A. Riis was discussing In New
York his experience as a police re
porter.
"l'hey were intense experiences. The
pathetic ones had, indeed, such an In
tensity that they couldn't be used in
literature. They'd seem overdrawn.
For example, one cold and dreary
Thanksgiving evening as I passed a
famous restaurant I saw a little urchin
standing before the area. Through the
area gratings the kitchen, brilliantly
illuminated, could be seen. The cook,
in his white dress, basted a half dozen
great brown birds.
"'HI, Tlmmy!' the urchin cried,and
a
second youngster turned toward him.
'HI, Tlmmy, come an' eat yer crust
in the smell from this here kitch
cn. It makes it taste just like roast
turkey.'"—Detroit Free Press.
The Arab Steed.
An Arab steed of pure breed would
probably be outpaced in a race by an
English thoroughbred, but in other re
spects it outshines its western rival.
It is so docile that it is treated by its
owner as one of the family, and it has
an iron constitution, for it sleeps out
aj night without covering or shelter.
Nature protects the Arab horse with a
thick, furry coat, which is never
touched by brush or comb and which
falls off at the approach of spring,
when the body and legs, which had
been shaggy as those of a bear, again
resume their graceful beauty and glis
ten in the sun like polished marble.—
London Chronicle.
A Woman's Letter.
Hailed as "the master of feminism,"
Marcel Prevost endeavors to make
good his right to the title by the fol
lowing bit of ^philosophy: "Is a wom
an's hat meant to cover her head? Is
a woman's sunshade meant to shade
her from the sun? Are. a woman's
shoes made for walking or her be
jeweled watch meant to tell her tbe
time? Why, then, should a Woman's
letter be meant to convey her real
thoughts?"—Exchange.
The Heirloom.
"An heirloom," explained the farm
er's wife to her thirteen-year-old boy,
"Is something that has been banded
down from father to son and In some
instances highly prized."
"I'd prize these heirlooms I'm wear
ing," remarked the youngster, "a good
deal more If they wasn't so long la
the legs."—Everybody's.
Thought For Others,
"Yon should endeavor to do some
thing for the comfort of your fellow
men." said the philanthropist "without
thought of reward." "1 do. I buy um
brellas Instead of borrowing them."—
Exchange.
Her Preference.
Miss Smith—Xo^*. M:'dge, tell m*,
which would vou r»thcr !•—pretty or
pood? )rror:i«flyi—I would
rather be
nvtv
easily be good
Punch.
liar as
Longbow. Blobbs Yes that fellow
could actually eat an onion
anfl
jle oat
Sunday
illl
of the pe-
tbe
Smith. I
Christian.
not todav v,
Rrownlng'H
%K
A state I*
all it*
'h th" *i»rv1
ran
like to try.—
'•5 vonr pn a
ifhsn
mpioved
Hume
MaMMi Major.
Bsten Cooke, who went tots*
war
aa an enlisted man in a Rich­
mond battery, was soon afterward ap
pointed
an
officer on the staff of Gen­
eral J. B. B. Stuart On Stuart's staff,.
Mr.
George Cary Eggleston says iu
"Recollections of a Varied Life." be
distinguished himself by a certain
laughing uonchalance under fire and
by his eager readiness to undertake
Stuart's most perilous missions.
It was in recognition of some spe
cially daring service of that kind that
Stuart gave him his promotion. The
delightful way in which tbe great boy
ish southerner did it Is best told In
Mr. Eggleston's own words.
"You're about my size, Cooke," Stu
art said, "but you're not so broad In
the chest"
"Yes, I am," answered Cooke.
"Let's see if you are," said Stuart
taking off his coat as if for a boxing
match. "Try that on."
Cooke donned the coat with its three
stars on the collar and found It a fit.
"Cut off two of the Btars," Stuart
commanded, "and wear the coat to
Richmond. Tell the people In the war
department to make you a major and
send you back to me in a hurry. I'll
•eed you tomorrow."
How It Feels to Be Run Over.
"When 1 was run over," writes a
correspondent "I had not seen tbe car
approaching. The first thing I knew
was that 1 was on the ground, kicking
upward with my legs in an effort to
get from under the car. Then 1 felt a
wheel going over my chest, which
bent as it passed over. In the inter
vening second or two I went through
several minutes' worth of feelings. 1
had tbe sensations of astonishment at
being on tbe ground, of wanting to roll
aside and away, of bracing myself
and my chest especially—stiff to resist
something, whatever it might be, while
a lightning ilasb of fear was dimly
there and a subconscious query, 'What
on earth next?' Yet it was hardly
fear, because there was no time for
such a durable sensation. It was rath
er a sense of being suddenly confront
ed with a grave reality, of doubtful,
obscurely terrible Import" London
Chronicle.
Origin of Coal
Coal Is of vegetable
origin.
When
vegetable matter accumulates under
water it undergoes a slow process of
decomposition, giving off Its nitrogen,
hydrogen, oxygen and some carbon,
the result of which if carried far
enough Is the formation of a mass of
carbon. Peat, found often In swampy
tracts. Is the first stage In the coal
forming process, and the further
stages are formed by the burial of
these vegetable deposits under great
loads of sediment where they become
subject to pressure and sometimes to
heat This effects a series of changes,
consolidation and loss of oxygen and
gives a series of products whose na
ture depends on the degree to which
the original vegetable matter has been
changed. The products are known as
lignite, bituminous coal and anthracite
coal.
Mixing His Dates.
There is a story of a man who was
so transported with joy as be stood
up at the altar rail to be married that
his thoughts reverted to a day when
he stood up at the prisoner's bar in a
court of justice to plead "guilty" or
"not guilty" to a criminal charge. So
powerfully did that, the most painful
event of his life, obtrude itself upon
his mind that when the clergyman put
the question, "Wilt thou have this wo
man to be thy wedded wife?" and so
on, the poor distracted bridegroom an
swered with startling distinctness,
"Not guilty, so help me!"—From Tuck
erman's "Personal Recollections."
A Stubborn Opening.
The head of the household was go
ing through her husband's pockets the
next morning.
"What kept you out so late last
night?" she suddenly demanded.
"It was the opening of the cam
paign, my dear," the lesser half re
plied.
"Well, It. didn't take three cork
screws to open It did It?"
And she drew the offending articles
from his side pocket and waved them
before him.—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
A Riot of Ink.
Canon Nlcholl used to tell how on
(me occasion he had visited the famous
house of tbe Thrales In that suburb
of London where Dr. Johnson was at
home. "Johnson," said the canon in
recalling his visit, "bad occupied two
rooms, and these were left as he last
used them. The sight was an extraor
dinary one, for ink was splashed all
bver the floor and even on the walls.
It was one of the doctor's habits to
dip Us pen In ink and then shake it"
Teaehlng the Teaeher.
Teacher-Johnny, what part of speech
Is
'nose?' Johnny—Tisn't any. Teach
er—Ah, bnt it must be. Johnny—May
be yours is. because yon talk through
It bnt tbe only part of speech I've
got is my mouth.
Same Old 8tory.
"Does he pay bis alimony promptly?"
"No. He has to be urged and threat
ened every pay day but then, of
course. 1 «ri»t used to that when we
ere living ro^otht."—Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
Ma-S '1 i^ ^-pverMtyi-'-'
Men arc to cater
for. A vi ••'•111 lnv tbe things she
ws»nts. -i
--V} «n'v
buy the
thlnrs .•
r*'--b^nfe.
MMIT«AOB FORECLOSURE SALB^
liatlce is
hereby given that that
certahs
moitsaae. executed and delivered
bjr H. C7 Strand and Christine Strand hli
wife, mortgagors, to Peder Storholm,
mortoacee, dated the Mh day of November
AO.UH, and filed for record in this
office of the Register of Deeds of the
county of Pembina, and state of North
Dakota on the 9th day of November A. D.
1908). at 3:10 o'clock p. m. and recorded In
Book of mortgages at page "308",
will be foreclosed by a sale of the
premises in such mortgage and here
inafter described, at the front door of the
court house in the city of Pembina
county of Pembina and state of North
Dakota, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M. am
the 1st duy of April A. D. 1911, to satisfy
the amount due upon such mortgage on
the' day at sale.
The premises described in such mort
gage and which will be sold to satisfy the
same are described as follows:—vis.
The northeast quarter of the northwest
quarter and the south half of the north
west quarter and the north half of the
southeast qnarter and the southwest
quarter of the southeast quarter, and the
southwest quarter of section twenty-seven
all in township one hundred sixty-three,
north of range fifty-two, west of the 5th
P- M.. Pembina county. North Dakota
(NE%ofNWtt S*of NWJ4: N% of SEK
SW% of SE% and SW% of 27. twp. 163,
range 52:)
There will be due on such mortgage at
the-date of sale the sum of eight hundred
seventy-seven and 75-100 ($877.75) dollars,
besides the costs tee disbursements of
said sate.
PEDER STORHOLM,
H. B. SPILLER. Mortgagee.
Attorney for Mortgagee
Pembina, Pembina countv, N. D.
MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE.
Notice iB hereby given that that certain
mortgage executed and delivered by
Charles Petere (a single man) mortgagor,
to The American Mortgage tc Investment
Co... a corporation, mortgagee, dated the
30th day of September, 1902 filed for record
in the office of the register of deeds of
Pembina county. North Dakota on October
23rd MB and recorded in book 88 of mort
gages at pnge 113, will be foreclosed by a
sale of the premises in such mortgage and
hereinafter described at the front door of
the court house in the city of Pembina,
Pembina county. North Dakota at the
honr of twelve clock noon on the I5th
day of April 1911 to satisfy the amount due
upon such mortgage on the day of sale.
The premises described in such mortgage
and which will be sold to satisfy the same
are described as follows:—the northwest
quarter of section twenty-eight iu town
ship one hundred sixty-one north of range
fifty-one -west (NW14 of sec. 28. twp. 161,
range 51) Pembina county. North Dakota.
There will be due on such mortgage at the
date of sale the sum of $151.80.
The American Mortgage & Investment
Co. Mortgagee.
BCOTT REX.
Attorney for Mortgagee,
Grand Forks. N. D.
SUMMONS.
State of North Dakota, (. __
County of Pembina.
Jensine Wold, plaintiff,
vs.
C. L. Parker, defendant.
In District court. Seventh Judicial dis
trict.
The state of North Dakota to the above
named defendant:
You are hereby summoned to answer the
complaint in this action, which is now on
tile in the office of the clerk of the District
court in and for Pembina county, at Pem
bina. North Dakota, and to serve a copy of
your answer upon the subscriber within
thirty days after the service of this sum.
mons upon you, exclusive of the day of
service: and in case of your failure to
appear or answer, judgment will be taken
against you by default for the relief de
manded in the complaint.
Dated this 22nd day of March. 1911.
BANGS, COOLEY &. HAMILTON.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
Grand Forks, North Dakota.
SUMMONS.
State of North Dakota, J.
County of Pembina,
In District court. Seventh Judicial dis
trict.
The First National Bank of Perry,"
Iowa, a corporation, plaintiff,
vs.
P. M. Joice, defendant.
The state of North Dakota to the above
named defendant:
You are hereby summoned to answer
to the complaint in this action, which com
plaint is now on file in the office of the
clerk of the above entitled court in the
city of Pembina. Pembina county. North
Dakota, and to serve a copy of your
answer on the subscriber within thirty
days after the service of this summons
upon you, exclusive of the day of service
and in case of your failure to appear or
answer, judgment will be taken against
you by 'iefault for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
Dated this 18th day of March A. D. 1911.
H. G. VICK.
Attorney for Plaintiff,
Residence and Post Office address,
Pembina. North Dakota.
Summons
State of North Dakota, I
County of Pembina,
In District Court. Seventh Judicial Dis
trict.
Arthur D. Warner and Earle F. Andrus
co-partners, doing business under tha firm
name and style of
Warner & Andrus, plaintiffs
vs. Vss
Ida O. Pound, defendant.
The State of North Dakota to the above
named defendant: You are hereby sum
moned to answer the complaint in this
action which will be filed in the office of
clerk of the Dislrict court in and for the
county of Pembina, state of North Dakota.
and to serve a cops' of your answer
upon the subscriber within thirty days
after the service of this summons upon
you, exclusive of the day of service and
in case of your failure to appear or answer
judgement will be taken against you by
default, for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
Dated March 22nd, 1911.
H. B. SPILLER.
Plaintiff's Attorney.
Residence and post office address
Pembina, North Dakota.
CHATTEL MORTGAGE SALE.
Whereas, one John W. Hogan did, on
the 7th day of June A. D. 1910, make his
certain Chattel Mortgage of the following
described chattels, to
wit: One Russell
grader of class "C". one four horse R. R.
grading plow, nine slush scrapers, to
Samuel Maxwell to secure the payment
of the sum of seven hundred and fifty
dollars.
And whereas, default has been made in :.
the terms of said mortgage, in this, to,wit:
That the debt secured by said mortgage la
due and unpaid.
Now therefore, notice is hereby given.
that by virtue of said mortgage, and by
order of said Samuel Maxwell, the present
owner thereof, I will sell the above dc»
cribed chattels at the front door of the
court house in the city of Pembina, county A
of Pembina state of North Dakota, at tbe
hour of 2 o'cloek p. m. of the 15th day at
April 1911.
Dated at Pembina. Pembin county, state
of North Dakota, this 4th day of March
1911. SAMUEL MAXWELL,
E. W, CONMY Mortgagee.
Attorney for Mortgagee.
Residence and post office address
Pembina. N. D.
Flour and Feed
•:•.• •-wi^Storei
prices.
Mmseif
t" JL1
WMagjaj
t*«
'4$
Vv*
Wheat, Oats and Barley
taken id exchange or for
FELOM
A N

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