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The Celina Democrat. (Celina, O. [Ohio]) 1895-1921, March 29, 1918, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88077067/1918-03-29/ed-1/seq-8/

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TITO CF.LIN'A DEMOCRAT
n n rmtPm rm fl i fWi '
North-east Corner Main Hi Fayette StreeU
ElEflL BAB6AIQ
UfiiilE THEY LA
Ladies' Hose, worth 25, at 19c pair.
R. M. C. White Crochet Cotton, 8 balls 25c.
One lot of light Percale House Dresses, worth
$2.50, at $1.75.
One lot of lijfht Blue and Stripe House Dresses,
worth $1.75, at $1.25.
One lot of Changeable Silk Petticoats worth
$3.50, at $2.75.
One lot of Embroidered and Lace-trimmed Petti
coats and Gowns at 75c, $1, $1.50 and $2. The ma
terial alone would cost more to day.
Girl's Gingham Dresses at $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 and
$2.00. Worth a third more.
Khaki Wool Knitting Yatn at 90c for quarter
pound skein.
New Spring Coats, Silk Dresses and Skirts the
LaVogue Styles.
New Wash Goods and Silks.
Black Bat Hosiery in all colors. None better.
Summer Underwear and Royal Worcester Corsets
at reasonable prices.
T. J. Courtright, Celina, Ohio
Northeast cor. Main and Fayette Sts.
THE PROBATE COURT
Last will and testament of Wm. L
Wall, deceased, duly admitted to pro
bate and record. Election of Sarah
Wall, widow, filed. Sarah Wall ap-
pointed executor of said will. In
ventory and appraisement March 25.
Flora R. Hod, guardian of Francis
V. Grubb, filed 1st partial account.
Fo bearisg April 30.
Application filed to admit to pro
bate and record the last will and tes
tament of Gertrude Willenborg, de
ceased. For hearing March 22.
M. D. Uowell, appointed admlnista.
tor of the estate of Angeline C. Heav
llin, deceased. Invetory and appraise
ment March 23.
Stella Smith, guardian of Ermal L.
and Ansdall E. Fast, filed partial ac
count. For hearing April 30.
Last will and testament of George
Henry Young duly admitted to pro
bate and record. Go. K. Young ap
pointed executor of said will. In
ventory and appraisement dispensed
with.
Last will and testament of Fannie
R. Patton, deceased, duly admitted to
probate and record.
Laura E. Sutton, admlnistratrid of
of the estate of Martha Daring, re
turn order of sale of real estate. Sale
confirmed and deed ordered.
Mark McDonald, administrator of
the estate of David Hole, deceased
filed final account. For hearing April
30.
Application to admit to probate
and record the list will and testament
f James Norman, deceased. Waiver j
and consent fo probate filed. Will
duly admitted to probate and record.
Chas. H. Howick appointed erutor
of said will. Inviiiry ad appraise
ment March 28.
Last will and testament of Ger
trude Willenborg, deceased, duly ad
mitted to probate and record.
Jos. Willenbcg appointed adminis
trator with the will annexed of said
estate. Inventory and appraisement
March 29.
James McKirnan aad Gus Kna)ke
crecutors of the v;!!l of Jr.mes McKlr-
naa, deceased, fiU'd partial account.
For hearing April 30.
M. Margr.ret Tovn.end appointed
administrati'ir of the estate of Sarah
M. BowlanU, deceased. Inventory
and appraisement dispensed with.
red GROSS IS
READY TO AID
SOLDIERS
Provides Loans, Grants and
Allowanc9S, Where Neces
sary, to the Fighting Men's
Relatives and Charges No
Interest
tEDITOR'S NOTE Thl la the third of
aeries of Ave articles prepared by Mr.
Fieser, who Is In charge of civilian relief
work In Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. The
subjects of the other two articles in the
series still to appear are "tVhat Haa Been
Taught Home Service Workers" and "Or
ganizing and Training 30,000 Horn Serv
ice Committeemen."
By James L. Fleeer,
Director, Bureau Civilian Relief, Lake
Division, American Red Cross.
Mrs. Brown is In pressing need of
funds to meet her grocery bill and the
government check for her separation
allowance is slow to arrive.
Or there may be sickness, followed
by death and funeral expenses, In the
Charnoskl family circle, for which the
government allowance, made because
of Private Charnoski's enlistment, la
Insufficient.
Or aged Mr. O'Reilly, overcome by
rheumatism, can no longer support
himself and Mrs. O'Reilly. Their only
son, Barney, is a gunner's mate on
man o' war. Yet there Is no govern
ment allowance check for the O'Reil
lys because Barney, for a year or
more previous to his enlistment in the
navy, did not have to help the "folks"
because Father O'Reilly then was
able to boss his gang of street mend
ers and keep up the little home on a
side street.
It Is for the Browns and Onaraoekla
and O'KaUlys that the Amerloan Red
Cross, through its chapter Home Serv
ice Sections, provides monetary re
lief In the form of loans (without In
terest), grants and allowances.
And practically every chapter la
Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky Is prepar
ing to assist, or has prepared and Is
assisting the Browns, the Charnoskls
and the O'ReiUya. They are also pre
paring to assist relatives of men serv
ing in the armies aad navies of our
allies.
Fully Ixptalns Loans.
When It becomes nooesaary (or a
Red Cross chapter to loan money to
an enlisted man's family, the condi
tions of repayment are thoroughly ex
plained, the obligations put In writ
ing and signed and the coll act! on of
the loan carefully followed up when
It becomes due. As has already been
stated, the Red Cross does not charge
Interest for a loan.
Grants may be made necessary by
demands which the family lnoome and
government allowance cannot be ex
pected to provide (or, such as sick
ness, funerals and need of special
training to create or Increase earning
power. Orants In small amounts may
be required to tide over a period of
acute distress until proper Inquiry
can be made and a plan of service de
cided upon.
Allowances are payments at regu
lar Intervals of a stated sum by the
Red Cross Home Service Sections to
the relatives of a soldier or sailor.
They are usually limited, though not
always, to those not entitled to gov
ernment allowance, suoh as, for ex
ample, the families of men serving for
one of our allies.
One may wonder how a Red Cross
chapter, buying several thousand dol
lars worth of supplies monthly to be
made Into surgical dressings, woolen
socks and convalescent gowns, can
spend money for civilian relief work.
Have Civilian Relief Funde.
Last summer American Red Cross
chapters raised more than a million
dollars for the Red Cross War Fund
Each chapter was permitted to claim
a refund of up to 25 per cent of the
amount collected for the expenses of
the campaign, for the purchase of raw
supplies and for Its civilian relief
work. In making claim for refunds,
each chapter was required to state
how much of the refund was to be ex
pended for civilian relief. And now
the chapters are obligated to keep the
civilian relief portion for civilian re
lief work. To date It baa not been
necessary to draw heavily from this
reserve.
IRRESPECTIVE OF THE DIFFER
ENCE IN STANDARDS AND COSTS
OF LIVING IN THE MANY. COM
MUNITIES LOOKED AFTER BY
RED CROSS CHAPTERS, THE
AMERICAN RED CROSS WILL NOT
BE SATISFIED WITH CIVILIAN RE
LIEF WORK THAT WILL PERMIT
THE LOWERING OF THE STAND
ARDS OF LIVING OF THE RELA
TIVES OF AN ENLISTED MAN.
RATHER, ITS AIMS TEND TOWARD
A BETTERMENT OT THESE
STANDARDS.
DOUGLAS MACARTHUR
Son of General MacArthur
Wounded at French Front.
i .svji
j. -
I
MM
The following bills were allowed
last Friday and are now payable:
Geo. Hill, ditch fees $15 00
Robt. Steinbrunner, same... 15 00
John Now, same 12 00
The Gallon Iron Works, cor
rugated pine 193 71
J. D. Adams & Co., road king
bla:le and bolts 9 00
C. A. Stubbs, stamps 3 00
R. B. MorriLon, ex. account. . 27 63
The Columbus Blank Book Co.
supplies for Probate Judge.
R. F. Houts, asst. eng. Hattery
ditch
Chronicle Ptg. Co., witness fee
order
G. W. Winters, electrical sup
plies
The Celina Democrat, sub
scription
In the matter of the' Hartings
Road Improvement the following
awards for compensation and dam
ages were made:
Acres Comoen. Damaires
P. B. Romer. . 1.418 J127.62 $94 00
Marv Franks . .703
J. H. Harting. .303
H. Steinbruner .606
Jos. Osterfeld.. .303
Wm. Kramer.. .303
75
1 00
2 00
5 35
1 00
63.27
27.27
66.66
33.33
33.33
46.00
20.00
40.00
20.00
20.00
Sanol Eczema Prescription Is a fa
mous old remedy tor all forms of Ec
zema and Bkln diseases. Sanol Is a
guaranteed remedy. Get a S 5c. large
trial bottle at the drug sWe. adv.
For Your Advantage
mm
I
ran
Md
We are still continuing our astonishing CUT-PRICE SALE
and have just received 5672 Rolls, which, together with our stock
on hand, makes a complete selection of Wall Papers.
All patterns are priced below last year's selling prices. Use our
patent paste for hanging. It is much cheaper than flour or starch.
' DBO
OHIO GETS SEED CORN
Governor Announces Plan For Dis
tribution Among Farmers.
Columbus, March 23. Ohio has
succeeded In obtaining a big supply
of sead corn from Pennsylvania,
which gives assurance that the state"?
1918 corn crop, which it was feared
woull be a failure because of the
great dnmage canned to seed com
last winter, will be a success weath
er conditions permitting.
A total of 65 cars of seed corn on
the ear, all tested, has been imported
from the Keystone state, and com
plete plans for its distribution have
teen announced by Governor Cox.
The seed crmes from a group of
counties which have a climate sim
ilar to that of tho corn belt of Ohio.
The diotribution of this seed is un
der the general supervibion of Deau
Alfred Vivian, heal of the college or
agriculture. Ohio State university.
Farmers who want this seed must
first a;i!y to 'their county agricul
tural agent or the president of their
county fitrm bureau. These two oili
cers wili arrange with some bank,
grain dealer or other responsible flrni
or Individual to honor a sight draft
for a .rarload of corn. In the few
corn counties where there is no farm
bureau or county agent, application
may be made tc the county food and
irop commissioner.
Dry Petition Denied.
Chicago, March 27. The wats won
another victory when Judge Grldley,
in supreme court, ordered stricken
from the docket the petition for a
mandamus filed by the Chicago dry
federation to compel the election
board to print the proposition wheth
ed Chicago shall be dry territory on
the baJlots tor use at the election
next Tuesday.
Leads AH Counties.
Cincinnati, March 25. Hamilton
county was the first in Ohio to cross
the $1,000,000 mark !n war saving?
stamps sales, according to a letter
received from State Director H. P.
Wolfe. The letter says: "Please ac
cept warmest congratulations upon
the splendid showing of your county,
which is tho first to cross the $1,000,
000 amount in sales. If the other
large cities of the state, excepting
Columbus, were even approximating
your record ihero we would eas'.iy
lead the entire nation."
Perkins Transferred.
Chilllcothe, O., March 25. Briga
dier General Frederick Perkins, who
has been acting commander of the
Eighty-third division, during Major
General E. F. Glenn's absence from
camp, left for Governor's Island, fol
lowing au order from the adjutant
general of the army assigning him to
duty with the eastern department.
Brigadier General W. A. Holbrook,
commanding the One Hundred and
Sixty-fifth infantry brigade and the
officers' school of the line, took com
mand of the cantor.ment here
IKlouso losiiiflinig
UIBTI
Just received a car load of Mattresses
of all kinds at prices that are right. Kind'
ly give us a call and look them over.
We would like for you to visit with us
whether you want to buy or not.
. Everybody welcome a.
FURNITURE RUGS
Banqueters Made III,
Marion, O., March 23. Between
200 aud 300 Elks were made sick as a
result of attending a banquet given
by Marion Ivodge of Elks, in honor
of District Deputy Grand Exaitod
Ruler Charles W. Fairbanks. All
suffered from ptomaine poisoning,
due to eating canned corn.
Shaw on Wheat Prospects.
Columbus, March 27. Wheat crop
prospects for next summer "simply
are wonderful," it was said by Secre
tary of Agriculture Shaw, back from
trips into various parts of the state.
He anticipates a substantial Improve
ment in the April report over the con
dition of a month ago.
THE MARKETS
Woman a Suicide.
Columbus, March 26. From the ef.
feots of bichloride of mercury polsoD.
taken with suicidal intent, Mrs. Elsie
Moreland, 20, Pataskala, died at a
local hospital. She had quarreled
with Clifford Stone here after he had
purchased the poison for her at her
request.
Charges Against Engineer.
Painesville, O., March 27. ndrew
Peisler, a New York Central engineer.
Is under arrest here, charged with
making unpatriotic remarks. Peisler
is alleged to have made remarks dis
crediting liberty loan and Red Cross
campaigns.
Fourteen Families Homeless.
Toledo, March 27. Fire at Rows
ford, a suburu, destroyed two large
apartment noises and damaged eight
cottages, rendering 14 families home
less. Seven men and one woman
were injured i lightly. The -loss was
$11,000.
Head of Private Bankers Dead.
Greenfield, O., March 23. Fay Bald
win, president of the Ohio Privntv
Backers' association, ' and whose
home was in this city, died at Cleveland.
Death Calls Former Mayor.
Youngstown, O., March 26. Isaac
Barclay Miller, prominent attorney
and former mayor of Youngstown,
died at his home here, following a
month's Illness of grippe and attend
ant complications. He was 68 years
jld.
Teacher Let Out
Urbana, O., March 27. Roy Kauff
man. Mennonite teacher in the
Illinois, whs dismissed because he re
fiisod to sr:ve pledge of allegiance.
LAST CALL FOR INSTITUTES
The farmers' Institutes of Ohio are
covering a wider field, rendering a
more efficient service, and becoming
more popular each year. The man
agement i now at work on the sche
dule for 1918-1919 institutes.
All places wishing to make appli
cation for a state-aid institute next
year should do so without creiay.
Address F. L. Allen, Supervisor of
Farmers' Institutes, The Ohio State
University, Columbus, Ohio.
Mercer county, is entitled to five
stato-aid institutes.
Chicago, March 27.
Cattle Native beef steers, 9 4014 60;
etorkers and feeders, $7 J011 80; cows
end heifers, $6 7D11 0; calves, 110 SO
e is.
Hog Ua-ht. $17 ORft'17 78: mixed,
$1C 76817 70; heavy, $16(frl7 35; roughs,
$16(516 40; pi", $12 7516 5.
Sheep and lamb Sheep, $11 10&15 10;
Iambs, $14 50W18 90.
Receipts Cattle, 13,000; hog. 35,000;
sheep and lambs, 14,010.
Esit Buffalo, N. Y., March 27.
Cattle Prime steers. $13 80)14; butch
er steers, $1012 75; heifers, $9i:, cows,
tZl2 25; bulls, $711 25; calves, $79
10 50.
Hor-3 Heavy, $18 40T1S 50; mixed and
heavy Yorkera, $18 7518 90; llaht York
ers, !8ifil8 25; pip. $17 75018; roughs.
$1C 50016 60; stairs, $!3(f14.
Sheep and Ijimt-s Yearlings, $121T 25;
wethers, $14 50014 75; i-wes, $7614; mix
ed sheep, $U(ffl4 25: ISnDS. $1319 35.
Receipts Cattle, 600; hogr. 3,400; sheep
and lambs, 4,600; calves, 500.
Cleveland, O,. March 27.
Cattle Choice fat steers. $11 50013;
butcher steers. $Rffll 50: heifers, $8 50(fJ
10; bulls $S 50piC6n; cows, $79 50;falr
to choice calves, $8frl8.
Hor;s Yorkers, mixed and IlKhts,
$18 50; heavies and pigs, $18; roughs,
816: stags. $14 50.
Lambs Choice. $1l18 25.
Receipts Cattle, 100; hog, 1,600; sheep
and lambs, 500; calves, 150.
Pittsburgh, Pa., March 27.
Cattle Steers, $13 2513 50; heifers,
$10 6ftll 50; cows, $9 10(910; top calves,
$18 50.
Ho?s Heavies, $18018 25; heavy York
ers, $18 3018 60; light Yorkers, $1 25
018 60; pigs, $18018 25.
Sheep and Lambs Top sheep, $14 76;
top lambs. $19.
Receipts Hogs, 1,500; aheei- and lambs,
300; calves, 100.
Cincinnati, O., March 27.
Cnttle Steers, $7 6013 50: heifers,
57 snrij'12 25; cows, $6 75010 50; calves,
$7ffl7.
Hogs Packers and butchers, $18 55;
common to choice, $10016 50: pigs and
lights, $13T'18 35; stags, $10013 25.
Sheep and Lambs Sheep. $0012 50;
lambf. $13018.
Receipts Cattle, 600; hogs, 2,700.
Baltimore, Md.. March 27.
Butler Fancy creamery, 44 045c; Ohio
rolls, 30031c; store packed, 28029c.
Eggs Nerby and western firsts, S5e.
Poultry Chickens: Young, smooth and
fat 43 045c; rough, 35&40C- old roosters,
35c.
Boston, March 27.
Wool Ohio and Pennsylvania fleeces:
Delaine washed, S3085c; ine-haif blood
combing 77078c-; three-eighths blood
toirblng, 77078c; delaine unwashed, 75c.
Toledo, O.. March 27.
Wheat, $2 20; corn, $1 It; oata, 7o;
clover seed. $20 66.
Cincinnati Dally Post and The Demo
crat, both one year, $3.60.
BIO K. of C. INITIATION STAGED
FOR APRIL 28
Wapakoneta Dally News
A class of sixty or more candidates
for membership in the Knigths of
Columbus will be initiated in Wapak
oseta, Sunday, April 28, when a Joint
initiatory event will be staged In the
rooms of tre Wjapakoneta council, 3rd
floor of the Brown theatre block, by
the councils of St. Marys, Celina, Sid
ney and aWpakoneta. The joint com
mittee arranging the event is compos
ed of J. H. Myer, Grand Knight, of
Wapakoneta Council as chairman;
Charles Hurm, Grand Knight, of St.
Marys council; P. F. Dugan, Grand
Knight, of Celina council; and Ed
Salm of Sidney council. At a meet
ing of Grand Knights held In Wapa
koneta with District Deputy 3. O.
Krabach, this .plan was decided upon.
THE CEQpKET
The following were the quotations
for grain, livestock, poultry and pro
duce in the Celina markets yesterday
evening:
GRAIN
(Furnished by Palmer & Miller)
Wheat, per bushel $2 00
Corn, no quotation.
Oata, per bushel 88
Rye, per bushel 2 00
HAY
(Furnished by L. G. McMillen)
Timothy $26 00
Mixed $22 00 to 23 60
Clover 20 00
LIVE STOCK
(Furnished by "Frank Fisher)
Hogs $12 00017 25
Cattle 6 00011 00
Veal calves 8 00012 00
PRODUCE
(Furnished by Laudahn & Mesarvey)
Hatter. 30c to 40c
Eggs, per dozen 32
Lard, per pound 25c
Potatoes, per bushel 76c
FIFTH
Annual Sale
At Durbin, Thursday, April 4
Thf iinrfarftic'tiH will at ..V1:
naaa a ualif
auction, at their place of buiineia at
Durbin, 7 miles weat of Celina. com
mencing at 12-30 p.m., prompt
One good sized Jersey cow,6 yeara old,
with calf by her side
Nine head of Ewes
Eleven head of Lambs
One good Buck
One good brood sow, will farrow soon
Two bushels seed potatoes.
Second-hand Machinerv One second.
hand drill. 1 second-hand corn nlnntr
and I breaking plow.
New Farm Machinery
Moline binders, mowers. Flyine
Dutchman hay loader, double disc drill,
hay tedder, Best Ever aulky, Good
Enough sulky, Little Dutch aulky, cul
tivator, spring-tooth barrow, wood beam
lever harrow, Maudt steel axle wagon,
with bed, and other articles. Also a car
load of Jackson field and poultry fence.
A. L Kanorr & Son
REMAKING A NATION AT CAMP SJIRMAH
mmW captain s a Wfffcs a presbii?5!Sm for IV
feTr o, V ICOrtMUNlTV HOUSE f
1 1111 11 111 1111 V 111 " i ...i

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