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The Eaton Democrat. (Eaton, Ohio) 1875-1903, March 01, 1877, Image 4

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NEWS IN BRIEF.
Items from the Capital.
It is mentioned upon the highest official
authority that the President has determined
a Don the prosecution of Don Piatt, editor of
the Capital, for libel and also for seditions
writing, indictable unaer both tne common
and statutory law. District Attorney Wells
was directed to take the necessary steps. A
recent article in the Capital principally in
vited the official action jnst determined
upon, but it is understood that previous
articles in the same paper, regarded as
libelous upon the President, will be officially
noticed in a criminal prosecution for libel
on the President.
Congressmen Ellis, Colonel Burke and
Counselor Cavanac, of Louisiana, called on
the President a few days ago, and explained
to him the condition of affairs in that State.
The President replied that he was satisfied
that General Nicholls was acting in good
faith in preserving the statu quo, and he
therefore had no intention of changing his
instructions to General Augur. In the
course of the conversation the President
siid that General Nicbolls should not be
held responsible for the freak of the crazy
man who shot Packard.
The extradition treaty with Spain is rati
fied en both aides, and announced by Presi
dential proclamation.
The West.
On Wednesday evening, February 21, at
half-past six o'clock, a small band of In
diana made an attack on Spearfish City, a
mail mining town near Deadwood, D. T.
Abont one hundred shots were exchanged,
None of the miners were injured, owing to
the darkness. The damage done to the In
dians is unknown.
On the evening of February 24, near
Crook City, Indians attacked and eaptured
Dick Dunn's and Hornick's and Evans's
cattle trains, killing two men, McGonigle
and Riley, and wounding another severely,
named Jones. The three men were con
nected with the trains. Lieutenant Cum
mings, with soldiers and citizens, are in hot
pursuit of the Indiana who captured
Broughton's cattle on False Bottom,
The South.
Four parties, named Holt, were arrested
at Nashville, by .United States Marshal
Wheat, on dispatches from Chattanooga and
Atlanta, charging them with having partici
pated in the mnrder of Lieutenant Mo
Intyre, in Northern Georgia, recently, while
the latter, at the head of a force of revenue
officials, went to break np wildcat dis
tilleries.
General Brevities.
Harvey Vance, a young man well-known
in Indianapolis, blew out his brainB with a
shot-gun a few days ago. while sitting in an
arm-chair in his room, in a fit of sickness.
Harvey was discovered, sitting in his chair,
j - o j
the gun across his knees, and the whole ton
of his head blown off. He had Disced the
muzzle against the temple and pulled the
trigger. The bullet lodged in the ceiling
and penetrated out of sight.
Abe Rothschild, a man who attempted
suicide in Cincinnati on Saturday morning,
February 17, was placed under arrest during
the day, charged with the murder of a
woman found in the woods near JefferBon,
Texas, several weeks since. The murdered
woman la now supposed to have been
mistress of Rothschild, and was known in
Cincinnati " sporting circles " by the name
of Bessie Moore. It is alleged Rothschild
was at Jefferson, Texas, about the time of
the murder. Rothschild shot himself in the
head with a pistol, and at last accounts
was thought he would not live.
fvAbram Johnson, living thirteen miles
northwest of Kokomo, Indiana, went three
miles west of his home to transact some
ajiu.
I,,, m , . ,
""""""" " " r"iu
his business, and had returned about one
mile, at 7 p. m., when he met three men in
spring wagon, who stopped and asked him
his business, to which he replied that he was
running a planer, and one of them said,
"You are the man. we want to see ; have
something to sell you." While one man
attracted his attention, another struck him
on the back of the head, knocking him
lifeless. They then robbed him of twenty-
nve dollars, threw mm in the wagon,
"hauled him within two miles of Delphi, put
him in a hollow log, stopped the opening
up and left him for dead. After lying
there thirty hours he became conscious, and
seeing the light, worked himself out He
arrived home, a distance of fifteen miles,
and is now lying in a critical condition
Bear Admiral Louis M. Goldsborbugh
died, on the morning of February-20,
typhoid pneumonia. This is the sixth death
among the Rear Admirals within four or five
weeks.
Hon. A. C Branham, State Senator from
Jefferson County, Indiana, died on the 20th
of February. He has been prominently
connected with many of the railroad and
other public interests of the State.
The approaches to the St Louis bridge
were burned on February 19. The damages
were estimated at $30,000. While the bridge
was under repairs, railroad passengers
. transferred by ferry,
A boiler exploded at the Clifton (W. Vs.)
keg factory on the afternoon of February
at half-past three o'clock, making a fearful
- crash, and houses for a mile and a
around were sbaken.There were four persons
killed and nine wounded. The wounded
are all expected to recover. The factory
was owned by Holland & Maxwell, and is
great loss to them. A. A. Holland, one
the proprietors, was dangerously hurt inter
nally. Morgan Barker, a boy, was blown
into the air and down a bank a distance
seventy-five feet, and escaped unhurt
fearful flight waa witnessed by a crowd
the river bank.
The State Prohibition Convention met
Columbus Ohio, February 22, and adopted
platform favoring the prohibition of
liquor traffic and against the employment
in pnblio service of persons who sell liquor
or are addicted to the habit of drinking
liquor, and demanding female suffrage
compulsory education ; favoring the use
' the Bible as a text book in the public schools
and the observance of the Christian Sab
bath. .A State ticket was nominated.
Hester, Tnlly and McHugh, three Molly
Maguires, have been convicted of murder
Pottsville, Pa.
General Andrew Dennison, Postmaster
Baltimore for nearly eight years, was found
dead in bed Saturday morning, February
aged forty-six years.
Bulla A White, grain and stock dealers,
Richmond, Indiana, have suspended.
assignees hope to pay seventy-five cents
the dollar.
Mrs. Hiram Young, of Island Point,
recently deserted by her husband,
murdered her two children.
John Seed committeed suicide at Maxin
knekee, Ind., a few days since, by blowing
the entire top of his head off with a shot-gun.
Cause, temporary insanity.
Diax has been elected President of Mexico.
Francisco Vincente Ageuuga, late Vice
President of Cuba, died in N-w York
Saturday, February 24. His remains lay
state all day Sunday in the Governor's
in the City Hall. The flags on the building
were at half mast and the pillars leading
the room draped in mourning. Thousands
of people viewed the remains, among
the prominent Cubans of the city. Guards
of honor, composed of Cubans, relieved
other every hour.
Bpecial Agent Stuart, of the Post-office
Department, who has been in Chicago
. several days, looking into the accounts
the Chicago Post-office, has discovered
General MacArthur, the Postmaster, is
defaulter to the amount of $38,000. It
believed that his bondsmen are also bankrupts.
Foreign Items.
Twenty more Bulgarians, charged
complicity in the May insurrection,
been sentenced each to twenty years
servitude. Chenkel Pasha, of atrocious
notoriety, baa been appointed to the com-
mand of the army corps on the Danube.
Bossia has 600,000 men, or two-fi ftha of her
army, organized. Abont half are on the
frontier! ready to begin operation's. The
Russian army aonth of the Caucasus, on the
Asiatic frontier of Turkey, in readiness for
action, numbers 115,000 men, with thirty-
five field batteries and two hundred and
fifty heavy siege guns.
News has been received that the Russians
are actively working in Persia to induce the
Shah to join them in the event of war. The
inducement is the possession of the disputed
frontier territory. The Shah does not ap
pear altogether averse to the plan. The
Turkish frontier is almost denuded of troops,
and with the twenty thousand soldiers the
Shah can collect, something might be done.
FORTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
In the Senate. February 18. there was
debate of two hours over the Louisiana
decision of the Electoral Commission, and
ten minute speecbes were made by various
Senators. Finally, by a strict party vote of
28 to 41, the decision of the Commission
wu arlnntatri- and the Senate adionrned
In the House it was resolved, by a vote of
140 to 130, to take a recess until ten o'clock
to-morrow.
In the Senate, February 20, the objections
made in the joint sessions to counting the
votes of certain Electors in the States of
Michigan and Nevada were considered, and
in both cases it was resolved, unanimously,
that the votes be counted. The Donate then
adjourned In the House, by a party vote,
it was resolved that the Electoral vote of
Louisiana was cast for Tilden and Hendricks.
It was also re 8 Dived that the full Electoral
vote of Michigan should be cast for Hayes
and Wheeler. An attempt was made early
in the session to take a rececs until to
morrow, but it was defeated by a large
majority. Before the caseof alleged ineligi
ble'Elector from Nevada was considered, the
House adjourned.
In the Senate. February 21, the session
was resumed at ten, and the Senators waited
the notification of the House decision in the
Nevada case, which was received at 11:40,
when the Senate proceeded to the hall of the
House. .....The House met at ten o'clock, but
a full hour was consumed in ascertaining
whether there was a quorum present, and in
the reading- of testimony to sustain the ob
jection made yesterday against the electoral
vote ot . 1L uaggett, oi JNevaoa. Mr.
Springer, who made objection, offered
resolution that the vote be counted, and ex-
Dlained that an error bad been made in
describing the office held by Daggett as that
of United States Commissioner, while the
testimony showed he held the ornce of Clerk
in the United States Court. After a number
of speeches of no special significance were
made, tne vote was taxen on Mr. epringen
resolution, that the vote of Daggett bi
counted, and it was agreed to without
division. The Senate was then notified that
the House was ready to continue the count,
and the two bodies met in joint session.
In the Senate, February 22, a bill appro
priating $250,000 to erect a fireproof build
ing adjoining the Smithsonian Institute, for
the national Museum, was passed, the
j : l.:n . .. i
ueucicuuj oj (- u uin w bo wacu up,
considered, amended, read a third time and
passed. Adjourned. in tne House, tne
it
sundry civil appropriation bill was consid
ered and several amendments were adopted,
the most important of which were increasing
the appropriation lor the continuance ot
thePostoffice buildings of Cincinnati and
Philadelphia from 235,000 to 400,000
Adjourned.
In tne senate, February 23, the naval
Appropriation Bill was considered and
several amendments made to it
and it was passed. The right of
way over the HotSprings(Ark.) Reservation
was grsnted to the not springs itailroad.
At the expiration ot the morning hour,
Conrad N. Jordan, cashier of the Third
National Bank, New York, was brought to
the bar of the Senate, when he sent to the
Clerk's desk and had read a statement,
disavowing any intention of treating the
order of the Senate or its committee with
disrespect, and said he declined to produce
the books and papers of the bank hecause
he was not custodian of them, and hsd no
control over them, but the President of the
u i. .v.: j u j
, I nau iv wn luwruuBiuuiBjj suucuuiuuniuuiio
them. Ha added that he declined to
a
He
answer further without counsel, acd
asked to be allowed the advice of counsel.
Mr. Mitchell, of Oregon, submitted a resolu
tion setting forth that Jordan bad refuced to
testify, etc., and directing the Piesident of
the Senate to certify the fact to the United
sia'ea Attorney tor the District oi uoinm-
bin, which led to a long debate. At the
close of the discussion, Mr. Jordan stated
tnat ne was willing to appear before the com
mittee to testify, and the Senate then adopted
resolution discharging Mr. Jordan from
contempt upon his appearance before the
Committee to testify .........In the House, the
I sundry civil Appropriation Bill was consul-
of
ered. and several amendments were offered
and adopted. Before any final action was
taken c n the bill the House, by a vote
130 to 109, took a recess until ten o'clock to
morrow.
In the Senate. February 24. the decision
of the Electoral Commission giving the three
votes of Oregon to Hayes and Wheeler was
read and debated, Senators Morton and
Conkling making the principal speeches.
The Senate voted to agreed with the decision.
In the House, an attempt waa made,
soon as it assembled, to take a recess until
Monday, bnt the motion was rejected by
vote ot lav totsy. The senate s amendments
to the naval and Postoffice appropriation
bills were non concurred in. The post route
bill was passed. The decision of the Elec
toral Commission in the case of Oregon was
discussed, and the House finally voted to dis
agree with the decision
The Tripartite Commission.
21,
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penal
The Electoral Commission held a meeting
at tour o'ciocE on the afternoon ot t eoru-
ary 20, pursuant to adjournment and after
a recess assembled again at half-past
u'ciock. ine commission was in session
altogether for three quarters of an hour.
Justice Field's motion on the Louisiana
case, which had been omitted from
ecurd by mistake, was ordered to be
serted. The question of publishing
opinions of the Commission on the various
points submitted was discussed, and an
formal undemanding was reached that
the opinions of all the members should
published together in one number of
Uoneressional uecord alter the work of th
commission is finished. This publication
will be made early in March. The members
of the commission accordingly decline
furnish any of their opinions for publica
tion in advanced this date.- The commis
sion adiourned to meet to-morrow afternoon,
when it is expected the Oregon case will
ready lor its action.
the Electoral commission met at
o'clock, February 21. all the members
present The President laid the papers
ceived irom tne two nouses Deiore the Com
mission, and on motion of Mr. Abbott they
were ordered printed, ine papers were
then read Dy tne secretary-
Judge Clinord asKed who aPDeared
oojectors on tne two Bides, senator Kelly
announced that himself and Mr. Jenks
would appear as objectors to Certificate
No. 1, and Senator Sargent announced
senator Mitchell and Mr. .Lawrence would
appear as objectors to Certificate No. 2.
Mr. nelly asEeo an order for the produc
tion of the commission and resignation
Watts from the fostomce Department
also tnat senator Mitcneu and Mr. watts
might be subpoenaed as witnesses. Judge
Clifford asked if the witnesses were within
reach.
Senators Mitchell said they were both
the room. The orders in both cases were
granted, and at the request of Senator Kelly,
who was to open lor the objectors, a recess
of half an hour was taken to allow him
procure the necessary books, etc.
The commission was called to order again
at 2:10 o'clock, and was addressed on behalf
of the Democrats by Senator Kelly, Repre
sentative Jenks, and Judge Hoadly,
argued the Commiss'on had excluded
evidence in the Florida and Louisiana
because it was wtthout judicial power,
said without the exercise of judicial power
you can not deprive Hideo andrlendricksof
one vote cast for them in Oregon. Without
exercise of judicial poweryou can not award
it to Hayes and wneeier.
Senator Mitchell and Mr. Lawrence
sented objections on oenaii oi the ttepubl
cans, arguing tnat mere was no law
Oregon authorizing the Governor to
a minority candidate elected, and that
maior nart of electors Dresent is a nnornm.
Stanley Matthews opened the argument
when the Commission met on February
and spoke for nearly two hours in opposi
tion to the Cronin certificate. He said
the law of Oregon required that the votes
Electors should be given, received, returned
and canvassed, the same as for members
Congress; and in the caseof members
Congress, it was made the duty of the Secre
tary of State to canvass the votes,
and there the statutory directions
end. The statute in relation to Elec
tors further provided that the Secretary
of State should certify two lists, showing
who had received the highest number
votes, and there the canvass ended. The
Constitution and law stamped that record
the legal and constitutional result of the
election. The certificate of the Governor
was sought to be intruded here aa a substi
tute for the canvass. It was signed by the
Secretary of State simply as an attesting
witness, and not as a canvasser of
votes. The eertincate oi tne uovernor
of Oregon did not conform to the statues
of the United States or of Oregon.
Mr. Matthews combatted the proposition
that the ineligibility of Watt made a non-
election, or that the votes cast tor an ineli
gible candidate were void. He also con
tended mat tne r.ngnsu aecisiona, wnica
declared the candidate who was eligible
bnt received a less number of votes
than his ineligible opponent elected, had
not been adopted as the American rule,
wnicn was that, when sucn a case occurred,
neither was entitled to the office.
When Mr. Matthews concluded, inquiry
waa made as to whether tne rostmaster
General was present in response to the sum
mons, with papers and records regarding
Watts. Mr. Tyner was not in the Court
room, so a recess was taken until a quarter
to one. The Democrats expect to prove
that Watts acted aa Postmaster on the day
he voted in the Electoral College. Com
mission took a recess. After recess, proofs
of Watts'a resignation as Postmaster were
placed before the Commission. Speech's
were made by Messrs. Evarts and Merrick,
and the Commission adjourned till neatt day.
On February 23, the Electoral Commission
reassembled In secret session at 10:30, and
remained in consultation on the Oregon case
four hours and a halt. At three o'ciocK, the
discussion being concluded, and Senator
Thurman not having been able to attend the
sitting on account ot Ulness, a recess wss
taken in order to ascertain whether he would
prefer coming to the Capitol or that the com
mission should proceed to his residence and
there transact the business incident to taking
his vote.
A committee consisting of Senators Bay
ard and Frelinghuysen was appointed for
this purpose, and reported in due time that
Senator Thurman preferred to receive the
commission at his house. At four o'clock,
therefore, the other members of the commis
sion proceeded to 8enator Thurman's resi
dence. Senator Thurman was found con
fined to his bed, where he remained during
the proceedings of the commission. The
commission was formally called to order by
Justice Clifford, President.
Mr Edmunds offered the following, and it
was finally adopted yeas, IS; nays, none:
Baolved, That the certificate signed by E.
A. Cronin, J,N. T. Miller, and John Parker,
purporting to cast the Electoral vote of the
State of Oregon, does not contain or certify
the constitutional votes to which the State
is entitled.
The following, offered by Mr. Morton, was
adopted yeas. 8 : nays. 7 :
Ruolvcd, That W. H. Odell, J. C. Cart-
wright, and J. W. Watts, the persons
eertincate xso. 1 are
named as Electors in
. 1. , f 1 I.-1 . .1 Ui.i c
and that their votes are the votes provided
for by the Constitution of the United States,
and should be counted for President and
Vice President of the United States.
The decision of the commission was then
drawn np and signed by the eight members
voting in the affirmative.
Congress in Joint Convention.
of
as
a
six
the
in
the
in
all
be
the
to
At one o'clock, February 20, the debate
on the Louisiana question was brougnt to a
close in the House, and the ayes and nays
were then ordered on the original resolu
tion, declaring that the vote of Louisiana,
as decided by the Commission, shall not be
counted, Mr. Hurlburt having withdrawn
his amendment to strike out the word "not"
yeas 172, nays 99. The House having dis
posed of the resolution, joint convention was
resumed at 1:45. The Houses had not con
curred in rejecting the decision. Mr Ferry
--J lTl i-J 1 .1; jl.
said it wouiu eutnu, suu uirecieu tnat tne
.ii,t vote, f TniBina be onnntd f,
Hayes and Wbeeter. The count then pro-
ceeded quietly, Maine being the next State,
Her 7 votes were entered lor Haves; Mary-
land, 8 for Tilden; Massachusetts, 13 for
Hayes. When Michigan was reached,
Tucxer, oi Virginia, objected to counting
the vote ot one ot tne Electors, on the
ground that he was a United States Com
missioner on the seventh of November.
Upon this the Houses separated. After con
siderable discussion in the Senate, a resolu
tion deolaring that the votes of Michigan
should be counted was carried unanimously,
The House also passed a resolution in favor
of counting the votes of Michigan, and the
two Houses again met in joint convention
and the eleven votes of Michigan were
counted for Hayes and Wheeler. When
Nevada was reached. Mr. 8pringer objected
to the count of one of the three votes ot that
State, on the ground that an Elector, R. M.
Daggett, was, at the time of his appointment,
and lor a long time previously, and there
after continued to be, a United States Com
missioner for the Circuit and District Courts
of the United States in the District of Ne
vada; and the two Houses again separated.
Un i ebruary Zl, Mr. springer, who made
the objections to counting the vote
Nevada before the Joint Convention, when
called upon was forced to tell the House
that he had no evidence whatever to sustain
his objection. After this statement a reso
lution to count the vote was agreed to with
out division, and notice sent to the Senate
that the House was ready to proceed with
the count At 11 :45 the Senate made
appearance, and the Joint Convention was
called to order.
The votes of the States of Nevada. New
Jersey New Hampshire, New York, North
Carolina and Ohio were counted. The
reading of the papers in full being omitted,
by consent ntteen minutes only were occu
pied in opening and counting the votes
these six states.
When Oregon was reached, the presiding
officer opened and handed to the tellers
certificates from that State. It was read
Mr.Stoneand proved to beasworn certificate
of the three Hayes Electors. Cartwrient.
Odell and Watts, executed before a Notary
Public
The papers contain a fall statement of
domes oi utetnree electors, tne resignation
of Watts as Postmaster, his subsequent
cnoice Dy tne otner two electors, tne original
ballots cast by three electors, etc. The pre-
siding officer then handed to the tellers
certificate of the three rival electors, Cronin,
Miller and Parker authenticated by
signatures of the Governor and Secretary
the State with the seal of 8tate attached.
This certificate gives two votes to Hayes
w neeler, ana one vote to Tilden
Hendricks.
Senator Mitchell presented objections
tne eertincate ol Uronin Miller and Parker.
Mr. Kelly presented objections to
Republican certificate; and Mr. Lawrence
presented further objections to the Cronin
certificate, signed by Senators and members.
Ihe fcenate, then, at 12:50 p. m., withdrew,
Commission Report on Oregon.
re
as
that
of
and
in
to
who
the
and
pre
The report in substance is as follows
The Electoral Commission havinz
certain certificates and papers purporting
be the certificates of the Electoral vote
the State of Oregon, and objections thereto,
report that it has dnly considered the same,
and has decided and does hereby decide
that the votes of W. H. Odell, J. C. Cart
wright, and J. W.' Watts, the persons named
in the certificate of the Secretary of
State of Oregon as the persons receiving
highest number of votes fer Presidential
Eiectois, are the votes provided for by
Constitution, and that the same are lawfully
be counted, as testified to in the certificate
of said Electors, namely: three votes
Bntherfoid B.Hayes, of Ohio, for President,
ana tnree vote, lor vyiuibuja. nneeierior
Vice President.
The! report further sets forth that
election of Watts by the other two members
Irtth ft.C
The grounds for this decision, so far as
concern tne engiointy ot watts, are
the certificate ef the Governor so far as
same is not founded npon the action of
canvassing or returning authority, provided
for by the laws of the State, which authority,
in tne case oi vregon, is neia to oe
Secretary of State. The report
takes the ground that it is. not
sential to snow tnat an Elector
eligible on the 7th of November,
providing it be shown that he
eligible when he cast his vote in the
College, and the fact appears that
alleged ineligible Elector, Watts, was chosen
to fill a vacancy caused by his own absence
from the Electoral College, and that he
not ineligible at the time he cast his vote.
Report of the Commission to
Congress.
22,
that
for
of
of
of
The Electoral Commission having received
certain certificates and papers purporting
be the certificates of the Electoral votes
the State of Louisiana, and certain papers
accompany the Barae, and objections thereto,
report that it has duly considered the
and baa decided and does hereby decide,
lhat the votes of William Pitt Kellogg,
U. Brewster, A. B. Levisse, Oscar Jefi'eries,
Peter Joseph, J. H. Birch, L. A. Sheldon,
and Morris Marks named in the certificate
of William P. Kellogg, Governor of
State, (which votes are certified to by
persons as it appeara by the certificates
submitted to the Commission
aforesaid and marked No,
by said ' Commission, and here
with returned,) are votes provided for by
the Constitution of the United States, and
that the same are lawfully to be counted as
therein certified, namely, eight votes for
Rutherford B. Hayes, of the State of Ohio,
for President, and eight votes for Wm. A.
Wheeler, of the State of New York, for Vice
President. The Commission also decides and reports
that the eight persons first before named are
duly appoited electors in and by the said
State of Louisiana.
The ground of this decision, stated briefly,
is substantially as follows :
That it is not proper to go into evidence
aliunde as to papers opened by the Presi
dent ox tne senate, in tne presence oi toe
two bouses, to prove that other persons
than those regularly certified by the Gov
ernor of the estate of. .Louisiana in ana ac
cording to the determination and declara
tion oi their appointment, in outer woros,
to go oenino tne eertincate oi tne uovernor,
so far as it is founded upon the action oi
the Returning Board.
The report also states that the Commission
could not receive any evidence to show that
anv Elector was ineligible on the 7th of
November, the day of the election, on the
ground thatit was not essential to show
tnat an JMector waseiigioie on tnu uay, ao
long as he was eligible when he cast his vote
the Electoral Colleee. and the fact
appears that the alleged ineligible Electors,
Brewster and Levisee, were cho: en to fill
the vacancies caused by their own absence
from the college, and there was no allegation
of ineligibility at the time they cast
their votes.
Fashion's Vagaries.
Chenille fringes and tassels are still
used
Gray is to be the fashionable spring
color.
Nets are worn only with morning
coiffures.
Fashionable coiffures are broader and
wider.
Diagonals will no longer be worn in
spring fabrics.
Scarfs are draped with flowers in many
fanciful ways.
Many rich toilets are ornamented with
beads and golden and silk cordeheres.
The latest style of evening gloves are
laced, instead of being buttoned, and are
finished with small silk tassels.
In embroideries, the very rich chenille
and the broiderie mousse worked upon
very light tulle are the favorites.
The most fashionable garnitures for
ball dresses for married ladies are
feathers, stones (jewels or eems,) and
, - -
laces.
Ball dresses are made low-necked,
TJ-necked or V-necked, or heart-shaped,
or Bquare in the neck, according to
fancy.
Sulphur color now replaces all the
different shades of yellow lately in vogue.
Ivorv-white and caroubier form a beauti
ful combination.
Lace mittens, reaching to the elbow
and sown with seed-pearls or ornamented
with ribbons and flowers, are struggling
to replace gloves at balls.
All sorts of fans are in favor, black
feather fins with paistings, colored
feather fans, lace fans, and many other
kinds. Very large fans are again used
f i.i. i
for the theater and opera.
A. small Douquei oi natural nowers,
principally English violets, is much
.. ...
worn on some portion of the corsage,
it is no longer unusual to see a DUtton
;
hole bouquet in the button-hole of
pelisse or long paletot.
Silk stockings, striped with lace inser
tion, are among late novelties of the
Parisian toilets, and gold-dust, hereto
fore for the powdering of coiffures, ap
pears to have descended to further elabo
rate this costly hoisery.
The Telephone.
of
its
of
The five himdred-or more people eath
ered in Lyceum Hall, Salem, )Iasa,,
other night, to hear Professor A.' Gra
ham Bell's lecture on the telephone-
were not more surprised and delighted
than were the few persons in the work
shop of Professor Bell, on Exeter Place,
Boston, who were, to a certain extent,
participators, in the proceedings.
illustrate his lecture, Mr. Bell had
communication between the
places by means of a wire of the Atlantic
and Pacific Company, and had left
Thomas A. Watson, bis associate inven
tor, in charge at the Boston end. At
time Mr. Watson brought an organ
nse, and "Should Auld Acquaintance"
and Yankee Doodle were heard
heartily applauded in Lyceum Hall.
Then a speech was called for, and
Salem people heard Mr. Watson say
wm clad nf the. nriviWn nf KdHrnasinff
the t1(lm iriini, t,a oa ir.t.n -!!.
by I a--"-
I away. A song was sung, and the
the
plause that could be heard coming
the wire to Boston showed that it
been recognized and appreciated
Salem. Indeed, the signs of approval
were so clearly heard that Mr. Watson
asked if any demonstration other
the
the
of
and
and
to
the
the clapping of hands had been made.
The answer was that nothing else
been done. Then " Hold the Fort"
sang by Mr. Fletcher, and a series
questions propounded in Salem.
mation was sought as to the condition
aSairs on the Boston and Maine
road, and the weather, a number
well-knottn Salem gentlemen taking
part in this desultory discussion. Taken
altogether, the first public experiments
with the telephone must be regarded
unqualifiedly successful.
A Hawk Among Hens.
of
the
the
Gilbert White tells a most dramatic
story of a neighbor who had lost most
his chickens by a sparrow-hawk
came gliding down between a fagot
and the end of his house, to the
where his coops stood. The owner,
vexed to see his flocks diminished,
the a net between the pile and the house,
:,. w.,,. the bird dashpd and was
lnt0 , , 1 , T 6 aasnea ana waB
for tangled. The gentleman's resentment
suggested a fit retaliation ; he therefore
i; t,ov .,t
"""" " "'"6 l"A"
the talons, and, nxing a cork on nis
threw him down amone the brood-hens.
"Imagination," says Mr. White,
they not paint the scene that ensued; the
sub- pression that fear, rage, and revenge
the 8Plred were new or at least BUch as
the been unnoticed before ; the exasperated
matrons upbraided, thev execrated,
tne
also
es
was
insulted, they triumphed. In a
they never desisted from buffeting
adversary till they had torn him
hundred pieces."
waa
Elec
toral the
was
to
of
same,
O.
said
said
as
1
The present King of Greece is a
man of exceeding modesty and frankness.
He talks good English, and with
freedom and joyousness of a bo."
Queen is famous for beauty and
sweetness of her manners; the
nation seems to be in love with her,
is so gentle and good. The pair
four ruddy-cheeked children, who are
jumping about like squirrels
the royal carriage, so that the King
he has them fastened in with
straps lest they should throw
overboard. Tbe King
America, and he seriously says that
chief revenue of Greece is derived
from the plum-puddingB of England
America, the currants of Corinth
its principal article of export.
A Hawk Among Hens. History of a Picture.
Two of the most celebrated artists the
world has ever known dwelt in the same
city. One delighted in delineating beauty
in all its graces of tint, form, and motion.
His portraits were instinct with the charm
of physical vigor. The graceful, half-volup-tnous
outline of form and feature harmo
nized with delicately blended tints. On his
canvas, the homeliest faces had an almost
irresistible charm. - The other found pleas
ure only in depicting weird and gloomy sub
jects. Above all, did he excel in painting
tne portraits ot the dying, xne agonizing
death-throe, the ghastly face and form, were
all deDicted with marvelous fidelity. There
existed between these artists the most in
tense diBlike. At length this dislike cul
minated. The beautv-loving artist had been
engaged in painting the portrait of beau
tiful woman. Connoisseurs pronounced it
the most wonderful piece of art that had
ever been produced. His brother artist was
iealnua of his fame, and eoneht revenge.
Rv bribine the keeper of the studio he
gained access to the picture each night At
first he was content to only deaden the bril
liancy of the complexion and eyes, efface
the bloom from cheek and lip, and paint a
shadow on either cheek. Later, his strokes
rrrw bolder and freer, and one morning tne
rtiat awoke to find the entire outline of
the portrait changed. He coma scarcely
recoenize in the emaciated form and hag
gard countenance tne glowing mju;epuuu
Ka had embodied. The pallid face and ex
pressionless eyes he had attributed to a lac a:
nf rannineness in his materials : but when
the outlines were changed he suspected the
cause and indignantly dismissed the keeper.
What the revengelul artist marren oy a iew
rapid strokes of his skillful brush was only
restored Dy years oi patient muusuj,
R tutor need we name the artists: Health,
who naints the flowers and 14 grassy carpet"
no less than the human form divine; Dis
ease, the dreaded artist who revels among
the ruins both of nature and humanity;
and Carelessness, the keeper to whom
Health often intrusts his portraits. And is
it not the beauty of woman, the most ad
mired of all the works which adorn the
studio of Health, that Disease oftenest seek
to mar? The slightest stroke oi his Drusn
upon the delicate organization leaves an
imprint tnat requires much emu and pa
tience to ettace. lies to ration must
prompt. Carelessness must be dismissed
Let suflering women heed the warning ere
Disease has marred their chiel beauty,
Health, beyond reparation, vr. fierce
Favorite Prescription has been used by
thousands of these sunerers, and they are
unanimous in their praise ot its excellence.
If you would be transformed from the
pallid, nervous invalid into a happy, vigor
ous woman, try it.
Popularity.
The popularity of Messrs. James B. Kirk fc
Co.'b soaps,manufactured inChicago.is shown
by the unprecedented sale wnichtneir goods
have reached during the year 1876. This by far
is the largest soap manufacturing concern in
the United States, producing and selling in
all parts of this country, from the Red River
of the North to New Orleans, and from Port
land, Me.,to 8an Francisco, 25,000,000 pounds
annually. JNo so-called greases enter into
these soaoa. Onlv Dure refined tallow and
vegetable oils are used, containing no adul
teration. Fair and square weights always re
liable. This is why their soaps are so popular
witn all good and economical nouseaeepers.
Because a total eclipse of the sun
above my own head, I will not therefore
insist that there must be an eclipse in
America also; and because snowflakes
fall before my own nose, I will not be
lieve that the Gold Coast is snowed up
also.
"THE ARLINGTON."
Cincinnati, O.
This popular Hotel has reduced its rates
to two dollars and two dollars and a half
J. W. GARRISON & CO.
a
the
To
ef
fected two
Mr.
one
into
and
the
he
ap-
over
had
in
than
had
was
Minneapolis, Minnesota, put about
$1,000,000 into buildings last year. The
flour mills there turned 50,500,000 bush
els of wheat into 1,100,000 barrels
flour.
Fakmbes and stock raisers have fre
quently told us that they have Been very
good results from giving Shtridm't Cavalry
Condition Powders to cows and swine before
and after they drop tbeir-young. The pow
ders put them in good condition, and give
them strength to care and provide for
sucklings.
The police of Constantinople have dis
covered a secret correspondence, show
ing that Midbat Pasha was plotting
the overthrow of the Sultan and his own
nomination as Director.
Is these one reader of this paper suffer
ing from rheumatism ? If so, write to Hel-
Sbensttne as bentley, Druggists, Washington,
'. C, for a circular of Durang'a Bheumatic
Bemedy. This medioine is taken internally,
and will positively care any case of rheu
matism on tne lace oi tne green earth.
Price, one dollar a bottle.
Philadelphia's debt has increased.
in four years, from $52,700,000 to $84,-
000,000, and the yearly expense from
$6,000,000 to $12,000,000.
We have often wondered whether there
is a person in tne country who does
know and appreciate the value of Johnson'i
Anodyne Liniment as a family medicine ?
is adapted to most all purposes, and is
DeBt pain destroyer tnat eaa Be used.
Millions of bottles of Burnett's Coco
have been sold during the last twenty years.
and the public have rendered the verdict
tnat it is tne Den nairaressing in tne worm,
Vegetable PuJjionary Balsam, the
New England cure for coughs, colds and
Cutler, Bros. & Co.'s, Boston,
genuine.
A stove that will save one half the fuel
worth having. We understand that
"Favorite" is warranted to do this.
The Markets.
of
Bail-
of
a
as
of
that
pile
place
hung
on
to en"
v.:.
bill,
ex-
in-
had
thev
word,
their
in a
young
the
CINCINNATI Flour Q notations range as
lows : Patent, 18,38 60 ; fancy, 17 40JS ; family,
S6 8.va7 10: SDrini. 16 50137 15: extra. SS 25(36
superfine, S soyas 75. Bye flour, $4 504 SO.
Wheat, prime to choice white is quotable
(l ovi 62 : prime to cnoice rod is neia at si
155: hill. SI 50(81 60. Corn. 4lfa44c Eve. No.
7880c. Oats, prime to choice white, 8740c.
ley, Canada spring, Sll 05; Bute fall, 80990c
Hay, Ne. 1 timothy, 110(811. Mesa pork. SIS
15 75. Lard. 10llXc Cotton, loai3e.
INDIAN APOUH r'lour City fancy, 7
7 75 ; city family, S6 507 ; country family, 6
7: extra. 163.626: low Krades. 14(35. Grain Wheat.
red wheat ia offered at f 1 35(81 50, and (1 40(31
lor wnue ana amoer. iwrn, a-j(ajsuc. uats,
89c Bye, 72373o. Hay, S1010 25. Lard,
18c Wool Tub-washed and picked, 88c;
and common, unwashed, 23(32Sc: fleece-
washed. 80 (385c Hoot, 15 80(35 60.
LOUISVILLE. r'lour Extra, 15(35 60;
ramlly, so 70(jat su. wain wneai, si 3(gi
Corn, white. 43c: mixed. 41c Bye. 80c
41(343c Mesa pork. (16 2S16 50. Lard
tlv..AW.c: sea-. I2(313c. Cotton. 12c
TOLEDO. Grain W heat. No. 1' extra
Michigan, 1 59; amber Michigan, SI 60; No.
amher Michiean offered at Si 86 : No. 2 red
ter, $1 49)i ; No. s red, tl 35. Corn, high
4t1,-bC: No. 2, 43:4c; damaged, 42c; rejected,
Oats, No. 2, 35c; Michigan, 39c rejected,
Dressed hogs, S6 50.
nkw YORK.. Flour Nos. 2 and S. 14 30(35
super line Western and State, $5 65(36; common
good extra, 5 956; good to choice, 16 05(36
white wheat extra, 16 1537 50 ; dc fancy, 17
8 60 ; extra Ohio, S5 95(37 76; St. Louis, 16(33
Minnesota patent, $7 609 75. Bye flour is dull
94 5UQo. urain wneai, 91 11191 00; rye, 074
84c; barley. 85c; corn, 6861c; oats, 414356c
Mess Pork, new, (16 76(316. lard, prime
BIO 20(310 80. Cotton. 12 3-1 6(3 12 5-1 6c.
domestic fleece, 3353c ; pulled, 20315c; unwashed,
1230c ; Texas, lagajc.
PHILADKLPHiA. Flour Iowa. Wisconsin,
Minnesota extra family, 87 127 76 ; Pennsylvania
and Ohio extra family, 17(37 75; city mills
family, (6 256 60 ; high grades and Minnesota
patent process, 18(310 25. Grain Wheat, Western
red, 81 40(31 65 ; Pennsylvania amber. 81 61 ;
Western, 81 60(31 65. Corn, yellow Western,
56c; white Western, 66c.; Western mixed
sail, 66450Jic oata,. white Western, 4042Kc;
mixed W estern, 85a37c Petroleum, refined,
crude, in barrels, 14c
MEMPHIS-Flour Family, $8 2598 60.
firmer. 47049c Oats scarce asd firm, 50(355c
Pork quiet, 818(318 50. Lard qalet; tierce,
llc; keg, 12(512c. Bulk meats firm;
6a7c; clear rib, 9Kc; clear 94c Bagging
Arm. 12faiZ4c
STOCK MARKETS.
the
whole
she
have
al
ways in
says
them
selves likeB
the
and
form
ing cmCTNN Art Cattle Common to medium.
82 604 00; good butchers' qualities, (4
Sheep, 83 25(36 00 for common to extra. Hags
Common to good light, 84 9095 60; fair to
packing, 85 GOitIS t.
BUFFALO. Beef Cattle Demand and offerings
1, l . c VftQfi 1Kb Knno tA
Sheep Good Western, 85 25. Hogs Fair to
Yorkers. C4 45a5 15: cood to heavy, 86.
NEW YORK. Beet Cattle Ordinary to
steers, 88 50(3(311 50. eneep uecenl so
s(36c; extra lots, 6K7kc per lb. Hogs
Market dull, and nrlcf s nominal, at 6(36ic
EAST LIBERTY, PA. Beef Cattle Hales
made of best grades at 85 75(35 80 per 100 lbs.;
dium to good grades, 85 265 60 ; common to
grades, 84 70(96. noga oaics were maue 01 a
at 85 25(11.5 70 Der 100 lbs.: Philadelphia
86 25(36 50. Sheep were selling at from 84
5 60 per lira ins.
WOOL. In Boston the demand is steady.
niiPennavlvania. 43i350c: Michiean and Wisconsin,
8840c; combing delaine, 4554c; superfine
extra pulled in lair uemanu at (c
SWORII STATEMENT
OP A
BOSTON DRUGGIST.
Omttmen, ! hereby certify that I bars had Ca
mh for ten vearm. anil forthelaststx Tears have been
a terrible sufferer. 1 was rendered partially deal, nan
buzzing in the head, pains across the temple, dlzzr
spells, weak and palnfal eyes, swollen and ulcerated
tonsils, hard and constant coug-h.aeTere pain across
the chest, and ererr maioauou o. consumption. r
head ached all the time. The matter accumulated
so rapidly In my head and throat that I could not Keep
mem ireo. r reuueimj n. m.u. ii iu, wu .
bed. It seemed to me. at the point of suffocation. I
would then have recourse to every means In my power
to dlilodse the mucus from ray tbjont and head before
being aDie to sleep again, foil pvnuu oi iuteiti
mnld with dlfflcnltTswallow. InnaUvconsnlted au
eminent surgeon In regard to an operation on them,
but at his request postponed it The constant lnflam-
Mi.mmni tnattr riin.nlnff ifavn frnm mv head, had
so Irritated and lnflamedmy lungs that 1 coughed ln-
rnutniTa nwn. mm eddeii. mrinnune unit stem
began to show the effects or this disease, so that I lost
i grew ubib, - J -J ''.-
v rinth li pAnmtnnUaii. Vmcn matters bad
l Maatar nr thont six months airo. I began
the use of SaHFOBD's Radical Ccaa fob Catasbh.
Alter using tne nrst oome a ncaaa w inipruo "t"u?
lv. The first dose seemed to clear my bead as I bad
not known It to be lor years. It seemed gradually to
a-rj.BC th rllaj-hnrtrML. ft .tTYT, nVl mtf COUOh ifl CATeS
iayt. By using It as a gargle I soon reduced the In
flammation and swelling of my tonsils, so that they
soon ceased to trouble me. The soreness across mr
chest disappeared. 1.10 onzztng noises in 1 j m
..... mv annappinf hnaTlnir and of seeing Were com
pletely restored, and every symptom of disease that
bad reduced me to the verge of the graveaisappearea
t y the use of saitf-obd b nAwoAn.uMFuAjBBj
have been thus explicit because, as at druggist, j
have seen a great-deal of suffering from Catarrh, and
hope to convince many tnattnisiaa great remeuy.
lam famlllarwlth the treatment of Catarrh asjiri
most eminent aoou. my wo. 1 -of
remedy and apparatus that have appeared during a
period or six years past, and have, while following
K.inu t.trn irrMti-aM ttt dt general health. 1
.ki.i.ut'.nHitafnr.nc.nnnffiinentfromlllTOttlli
1 have recommended It In over one hundred cases
without a single case of failure, and have In numerous
u.r.nM. ial whnlaaAla orders from parties to
whom I have sold one bottle. This Is the onlypatent
medicine I have ever recommended, never having be
n.i.rt in them before, although constantly engaged In
their sale. VerygrateraUy yours. T.rYBit
Bonos,
Bcttoxx, bs.
reb.2S.18T5.
Then pereontvllr PTred the talfl Georye T. Vina
tore, and made oath that the foregoinff lUtement oj
CUall l. inunao.
lusuce 01 uereace.
frim aabacrlbed is true..
COLLINS
9 VOLTAIC
PLASTER
Cures Pains and Aohes.
It equalises the Circulation.
It removes Fain and Boreness.
it subdues Inflammatory Action.
It cures Ruptures and Strains.
is
t xnrMglrinavComnlalnt.
It strengthens the Muscles.
It cures Rheumatism and Neuralgia
It Relaxes Stiffened Cords.
Tt Minl K-rTQIU ShOCkS.
t is lnvaiuaaie in raraij bib.
t cures Inflammation of the Liver.
X removes Nervous Pains.
;t cures Spinal Weakness.
t IS uraieiui ana Duovuuig.
t cures Epilepsy or Flu.
t Is Safe, Sellable, and Economical.
t Is prescribed by Physician.
v. 4. &,ri,rojri hV F.lp.Ptrlr.lAna.
cm v- .11 ..ra0.iH.tA fur25centA. Senton receipt
S cents for one, U5 for sir, or 2ai for twelve, care-
rally WTaPPCa.RUU wanniucu uCi,u., uj i
POTTEH, rroprlctors, Boston, Mass.
TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL KEPOM
OF THB
Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co.
OF PHILADELPHIA.
Office. Ha. aI Cbealaat .
. 15,230,68
Asssts January 1, 1S76 - ..
aKaiFiu.
Premium receiots..1.194,80 44
Interest received, 215,158 16
Deferred payments.
Increase in vaiue ox sracaa, em
Accrued Interest
$1,509,628
JAWtOaCU
160,730
99,887 I
Total
DIHBI'RSKMSNTS.
LcsesAendowmentspaid...t377,039 53
Dividends to poucv-noiaers. o
Surrendered policies....- 196,878 74
Re-insurance, etc 20,989 53
Commissions, salaries, etc 210,316 31
Taxes, advertising, etc 23,582 61
..17,097,260
Assets
asSETS.
United States five and six per cent.
11,157,244
$5,940,006
of
the
" '
for
not
It
the
aine
great
con
sumption. only
is
the
bonds, Philadelphia, and city loans,
a. an nep MnL morteaffe. railroad
honds.haak and other stocks.! 1.969,744
Mortgages, all first liens on property
valued at t6.000.000..
Premium notes, secured by policies
Loans on collaterals, etc
Agents' balances secured by bonds...
Premiums on policies not reported, net
Deferred payments due in 1877, net
Interest due and accrued on loans-
Caen on hand and in trust companies.
Real estate owned by the Company
Furniture at home offices and agencies
Total
XJABIUTIBS.
Death losses, etc. not yet due f 101,798 00
lieinsurance resex ve, ys per
cent. Actuary's taoie, etc is
2,811 662
722,884
167,048
29,561
62,318
48,207
90,887
122,977
401,880
18,85$
Surplus for poHcy-holdere
4ft per cent, oasis..
fol
50:
drain
at
toi
Bar
509
25$
50(3
50
bzqs
11(3
me
dium extra
sz.
Oats.
Tierce,
white
2
win
mixed,
43c
82&.
00:
to
10;
55(3
60;
at
la
steam,
Wool.
and
extra
white
55(3
on
26c;
Corn
11$(3
shoul
ders, 25(35.
good
SO
good
prime
prime,
were
me
fair
ora
r hoes.
85 to
Ohio
and
85,940,006
1
4.787,028
.81,202 978
Kumher of noliclea in force 10 648
Amount of risk 831,055,730
The, Perm has the lamest ratio of surplus to
bilities el any Mutual Lite lompany in ine country.
Samuel C Euey, Frea't.; Samuel E. Stokes, Vice-
JTes't.; U. H. Biepnens, ao. vice?rTeB-i.:ias.
XUson, Actuary'; Henrie Austie, bee y ; Henry
j. Brown, Asa t secretary.
L W. IREDELL, Jr., Genl Agent, 33 W. 3d St,
IF von fel dull. dwwBT. debilitated, bare fregneot
headache, month taatefl badly, poor appetite
tongue coated, jrou re nnenng irom torpid
nr T hilfnnsnmis " and no thin will cure TOU
ipoeauy ana permanently as
1 y afca
A GIT sVa waunwAHil s4tA.ktM T)I11ah. MflT.u
rfctimsof Fever and Ague, the mercurial di
imtient. how thev rncev fired health. ctiMrfnl
and good appetite they will tell you by taking
muus lAirer ivegaiaojr.
BAD BREATH!
Nothing iio nnpleaaant, nothing to common
bad breath, and In nearly every case it comes
the stomach, and can be so easily corrected If
will take Simmons' IilTer Kegnlator. Do not
so sure a remedy for this repnlalTe disorder. It
also improve your Appetite, Complexion, and
eral Health.
SICK HEADACHE!
This distressing affl iction occurs most freqnentlr.
Tbe disturbance of the stomach, arising from
Imperfectly digested contents, causes a severe
in the head, accompanied with disagreeable
and this constitutes what is popularly known
Sick Headache.
From Bom. Alerandtr H. SUpimu. MarckB. 1872:
" I occasionally use, when my coaiditton
It. Dr. Simmons Liver Regulator, with good
It is mild, and suits mo better than more
remediete"
AN EFFICACIOUS REMEDY,
I can recommend as an efficacious remedy for
disease of the Liver, Heartburn, and Dyspepsia,
Simmons' Liver Regulator. Lewis G. Wander,
Blaster Street, Assistant Past Master, Philadelphia.
J. H. ZEILIN & CO.
Sole proprietonfiimmons Lirar SeguUUr.
unpiiiss
A
Perfeot
'Hair Dressing.
A Promoter
of the
Growth of the Hair.
A Preparation
Free from irritating matter.
mil
BTJBNETT'S
C0C0AINE.
Tot prerrlng and beantiflng the
Hair, and nndering it dark and
The Cocotrine holds In a liquid form.
large proportion of deodorized
Cocoa-nut Oil,
rrepared eapraslr for a,,, PUTpo.
Mo otoer compound pos-eara tha
pacullar properties which ao czaedr
toil the vartoua conditlona of th. hu
man uair
It aofteni the hair when hard and dr..
It wihs the irrlutcd acalp akin.
It aSbrda the rich-it luatreT
It remain longeat In effect,
It il tilt Bat and Ckeapat
HAIR DRESSING
a TBS WOULD.
DIRECTIONS.
Applr with 1 the hand, or a loft bro.h,
every other day, or aa often as the roe
may require, ruhbioff tt thoroughly
into the roota of the hair.
To remove liandruff. Scurf. e.
waah the head with Bl-BNBTT'a KaU
Liaros, rubdry with a towel, and ap
ply the Cocoojiu aa directed.
riirttiD oatr bt
JOSEPH BURNETT k CO.
BOSTON.
lAUtaJ, aanrdiaa t. Art rf Ceaarna, la t,
M0 WKAKiBOMB condition ox nuoiauiti.'
continually troublM with a hack ine couch,
awake at night when at 1 the wopld'i in
nerely to cough and ipit. JDenigi Cough
will proT-nt it all, r-ve- yon a good night1! rett,
cure the worit cold, V ceote a bottle.
PIANOS and ORGANS.
lg77 SPRING jVIVNOUIN CEMENT. 1ST"?'
' " at ,1 . , . V T ? J -llaat. Iaa A Aa, was wit aa, inilniMsnlnta
1 r E desire to call the attention oi tne raouu swu -
W offered bT nj. pot only in price and terms, hut in Quality, Style and Variety of in-
struments offered for selection. Having built up our larg. and still increasing business
by a careful study of the wants of our customers, and supplying them with none but good
and reliable instruments AT thb lowbst pbicks that good work could bs amobdbd,
n now prepared to offer greater inducements than ever before. Ail our purchase.
are made for Cash, while our facilities enable na to offer to our customers m. most tavor-
able terms as well as Lowest Prices. We solicit a call or correspondence from those wno
desire to purchase, or think of buying or renting Pianos and Organs; will take pleasure
in giving all information desired, and in sending full descriptive circular, ireeoi cuarge.
33. Ha, Bialdriii. cfo Oo.,
1 58 West Fourth Street ana to fcim otreet, Cincinnati,
watola-aatloaMl Mall dealer la rianoaaad Oraaaa !-) rottMM Plaaaa Uw Wanrjr
i-i.nos. Aai-veaea A seas' nana. Use Ester roiuuje visaas, aas aer innnaw
awaesofnaaMaaaOrsaas.
I The I
the sha
hree Beautiful Premiums Free to Every Subscriber of this Paper.
! T.nnrlnn Pnhlihlntr imnanT haTe init tuned three bean ti fill color Chrammtio Work of Art. t
lahaasnf M ( lTTi I F.H hirh for rvaantv sni. worth, ai-a withntit mml.
The First, GOO BLK33 OUtt HOME, ii In old EoffltBh type, beautifully embellished with Tinn nd rotes
nonius; through the entire work. In the center of the first letter ' O "
children to repent a prayer, while to her riffht svre two larger children with beautiful flowing robes-slnging
praise to God. The bacKRrouod of the rut ire motto Is a beautiful Landscape teena, representing Home.
The Second, THR LOUD 18 MY tiHEPHCRD, is also in old .English type, beaatifallr embellished with
Tines, ferns, and flowers. Tbe central figure is here represented bjr the Lord as a Shepherd, la bis anus
he carries the Shepherd s crook and tho lost lamb. The effect is most beautiful.
The Third. PRAISE THE LORD, is similarly embellished. The central figure la this motto li three
beautiful hair grown cjilldnm, representing angeis, singing raise to ioro.
Size of mottoes, 10x25 inches. Remember we make no charge for the abore mottoes, as our arrange-
ment makes them a free premium, the subscriber omv Detnc required to pay tne actual expense o
postag.. wrapping, ana turn neon me premium wieciea, nicn muaDu to centa oacn.
Address LONDON PUBLISHING CO 168 and 186 W. Second St. Cciiuiatt, O.
range-
AM Of I
A
TO ADVERTISERS!
SEALS & FOSTER,
No. 41 Park Row, NEW YORK,
OINEBAL AGENTS FOR
THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER UNION LISTS
OF CO-OPEEATiYE NEWSPAPERS.
Advertisers desiring to use either of thi Lists (not
Sublisheri in their own city) may communicate with
lessrs. BE ALS a FOSTKB direct, as all orders a IU
hereafter pass through their hands.
A. J. AIKE.SS, Pmident,
American Ne-rapaaer Unloa.
23
Clarke's New Method LaIT
(2.50) Is nniTrsally known as one of rare merit,
both in the instruct Ue course, and the well chosen
airs for practice
Cnhnnl FOB PARLOR ORGAN.
UCUC o wuiiwui (f2.50). Tbe sale oi more
than 3O,0U0 copies it the beet proof of its great
popularity.
Emerson's New Method W
(S2.S0) 1 1 the work of two distlnffnished musicians,
and is equal to the best.
Rnn'c Qrhnnl F0R rHE CABINET OR
ItOOl S OCnOOl GAN, ($2.50), is one of the
oldest and best metuoas. w laeiy Known ana usea.
Clarke's $1 Instructor F0D
is an abbreviated but Teiy good method for begin
ners.
Winner's New School Sagffigg
is the cheapest, and an excellent easy instruction
DOOK.
00
Iu I a a
64 urnan at Home.
($2.50 bda; S3 do.; St
gilt) his il'O well known
66
-Either book mailed, post-free, (or Retail Price,
OLIVER D1TS0N & CO., Boston.
C. B. Dttaon A Co J. E. Dltaon A Co.,
TUlrssdwaT, KicemmtotatHsIbr,
New York.
Philadelphia.
29
87
48
MAGIC EGGS
III
58 f
88 A
84 H
26 Q
40 I
85 I
89
01
26
01
OR
The mat Paiiaian Miracle and Scientific Wonder. The
rat K-mtiAn Mraterr renewed. There has never bean
87 axr trit- or lUuakm ao eiuterlj eouf-ht tor and St" anon
I 1 1 .... .. .. L' . J . V. Vm .- Siarrwrit
They create a world of fan and amazement, never f aUinsT
Bocial Circle, it excels all othen as a purely aoienUfic
BHtriar K.arvaro la nmntal to Drodnce a tMTteCt
14 snake. Thejareno lanter than a pea. ret by tonchlns;
- fir tothem Ahisaina- serpent ow 400 times the else l
23
00
lia
weir
CtnU
. tae Mtf, or h leui a jura in itragui, luura umu a
! Oaaaaan.1 a-nnVa and lalaiiTV.lw onila itjuxlf ill mob ft DAt-
nru acutnae uiu it u nmoat impowuiB w nwiiw u-.
it is not v real make. The reptiles produced by those
ecKft can be preserved w great curiositie. Satisfaction
roaranteed or money refunded. Buy one box and you
will send for a dozen. Single boxes 30 cents, or 4 boxes
for$lu ARMORY PUBLISHING UO-
oo iLanauipa niicci, wui4mw
od
lew, I
aa
sensed
anirtta
Sim-
as
from
yon
neglect
will
Gen
the
pain
nausea,
as
requires
effect.
active
REPUBLICANS!
DEMOCRATS !
CREENBACKERS!
All who with an able, newsy and fair-minded
per, representing tne oest pusses oi oouinern
pUDUCSDlim, IOOUIU IBftU iua
LOUISVILLE COMMERCIAL,
the leading and representative Republican journal
nf tho Rmitri
afaliy commercial, 91 v per year, so ceucs
month. Try it one month.
Weekly Commercial, neatly ftrranced, clearly
nrinterl. carfifullv edited a cavital familv new 8
per; per year, SI fer six months. In Clubs
five, 81.60 e-ch, per year; Clubs of ten or more
1.00 each.
Une copy of either edit" on sent free, post-paid,
I any address.
AD AKP'll WIOKN ill ewery urinni-uiuwuj av wuvui
we pay SO per cent cash commission, erahands
and valuable premium. Seud for Special Circular
to Agents.
Beat AdTerUalM Medium in tne SonUt
rates, and quantity and Quality or circulation
sidered. Bate eara ana copies 01 paper ire.
Address, A IE. WIKOFKIED,
Manager Comhebcial, IaOqUt1I1s My.
WM. GLENN k SONS,
I Centennial SOAP Powder.
Attention In Invited to this celebrated TOIIsKT
SOAP row 1K K, and below ar a few reason
Why It BDOUl Deimrouucea in'oeery iimux
It is put np in OKKOUE BOXlvH, tunki-g
neat ana conTeuieoi ior hbv uu ui luiiMDianu.
Being ALL SO A I, and not containing 2-to4"
per cent, meioiure as muat vm dbh uv, uu.
smaltquftntitf- is required to remove all foreign
stance from the skin. 1.t.A
Being manufacturfd from PTTBE IK ORE
Knas ana vivwivianiia'iviis'-, iubwiibumi
civw.1 iVis- a.fi-n insT mt.il nrfSiTViiiaT tllA skill.
Chapped Hands or Chafing of ti.e Skin it is
beneficial ana meets a speeay rum.
a iiKMTRlKHiPs it is excellent, thorou-hly
removing all canting from the teeth, and tin parting
n u t-i a 111., a-trior tn thaw lllfth.
For MHAVlNfi NO AP i t is uncqualed, prodnciog
a firm lather, softttuing the beard, md 1 av
smarung impression on tne sum, sucu is
duced by ins AlKanein mseooap.
Vnr I'anvtsnipuo-. KrilllOniT nDM PnrltT.
rPcommMMdiitselfaai.be aViueat Toilet iSuup
tbe Jlarfce..
MaDnfactrers Agents,
Cl-NCi.NNAli.
all
1623
.'iiiU-
Established 1846.
J.BSTE7 & CO.
Brattleboro, A7"t.
tsrSend for Illustrated Catalogue.
NKW WILLCOX A GIBllS
MTOIATIG
Latest
Invention, and
producing
most
Marvelous
Besolta.
Tnde lUrk In bm
mm
Only machine
tn the xuorld
with
Automatic
Tension
1 Stitch
'-r Iodicator.
of svery nuchlna.
SILENT SEWING 1IACHINE.
Send Postal Card for Illnstrated Price List, &C.
Willcox & Gibbs S. M. Co.,
(Cor. Bond St.) CSS Broadway, New York.
NATURES REMEDYr
The Cbmt B1000 Pumncfl jr
PanrtnrNra. R. I
H. R. STEVKbS. KfUl
, 164 Transit street.
I feel hound to exnrraa with rnv air-Datura thehteh
Talus I place upon yonr VEGfe.1 1--K. My fnml
have need it for the laat two years. In n-rrou
it is invaluable, and 1 recommend it to
who may need an inrigorating ton;c.
O. T. WALKER,
Formerly Pastor of Bowduin Square Church, Boston.
VegBtine is Soli ty All Irisls.
to be
to lie
dumber
Baliam
and
ANN ,
ELIZA
YOUNG.
AGENTS WANTED fttivtt-w
Book y BrJgham Young's
Wife No. 19. 25.000ir:y
lilititratol circoHn, lent fre Du8XI"H
Oilman & Co., thn(,vt.,ch.c.
uo, llli.. ClnrhiDaU. Ohio. Kitnwttl.
Praf. Hall'e Made Csmvonni
is the only preparation, oae package of
will force the beard to crow thick and
on the smooUicat face (without injury)
days in every eate, or money eheenullv
kfundwd. ii certta per package, pott pi id;
SO cent, iu. W. .'ONK8, Airland, Maaa.
C f n 9fl per dav at borne. Samples worth M
93 III 4U , BTiaaoa A uo.. Portland. Maine.
ion "7
VAaVS.
DriTOI UrDs,thotiofl,TO ,f r1- ra.ax.yrM.
KLf ULff L II WKfiTKR G ca Woaaa, Chlaaao, HI.
HO W TO if A KK TT AaW
and nltahU. VCK. YOSOEi CO.. N.Louu.ilo.
Oh f OUTFIT PKEE.
50 at once tt T. HASON
Best chance yet. Write
ui Hassan St., n. I.
ACTUM A The only an re remedy. Trial package
A3 I niTlfl. ft,, j,. SMITHS IQHT, Cleveland, O,
7C a week, Steacll Eey-Chok Outfits. The best.
VI 3 Smnsfefres. Stencil Die Worn, Brattleoro', Vt.
Anati wanted. Outfit aau
TKtJE a CO., Augusta, Maine.
VIA C WKF4T. rtatalocneand Samele FBK1.
0U r ELTON A CO.. JI9 Nassau 8t., New fork.
K tn tTT a Week to Agents. S10 OMfu Ttm.
0 O W i i P.O. VICKkBV, Angusta-Maine.
CCS a week in your awn town. Terms and S3 outfit
vODfree. H. HALLETT CO.. Portland. Maine.
rDII FDCV FITS eared by. Dr. Bear Eplleptil
kl Abl Wl xtemeaies. xklai, i.
Bemedies. TaiAl, PAcxAOB s but Faas.
Address. BOSS BBOS, Bicuoss. las.
S3
vkAlCBES. A Great Sensation. Saasvls
hatch and Outft Jrt to Agent. Bitter than
Gold. Address A. CODLTEB ft Co., Ghioago.
K tn IM"!!! Per week. Agents wanted ia
VawO W IUU overt county. NoKUa-Qussa
City Coptus House, t8 W. 4th St., Cincinnati, O.
PFNQinW1? No matter how slightly disabled. In
rLilOlUtlO creaaea now paid. Advice ft circular res.
T. McMlGHABL. Atty.. 77 Sanaom St.. Phila., Pa.
A CEBITS We want yon. Hew article,
-AA. pennon, sena lor na ttcuiare.
Manufacturing Co.
No com-
H. A. Whitnev
SUM Vine St., Cincinnati. O.
MnVBV EaaUysssMle with our StencU and
iUVllXi JL Key Check Outfit. Circulars free.
H. N. ft Arthur Stafford. 108 Fulton St., New York.
ftOCA MoattA. Agents wanted. M beet
9 S W T selling art icles Tn the world. One sampsf
free. AddrejsJATBEONSON.Betroit.Mich.
U f f f A Tear mad Em-peaae to good Ag1 1,
0 vlv7 whoare wanted every where, tnastrictlr
1 ultimate and rlnaaant business. Particulars Ires.
Adirna J. WOBIU . CO., SJA. liAa, Mo. '
KIDDER'S PASTILLES.!
8tireraliefsinnri
Price 35cu.&0 1 iuULi
ibymaa. BtoweilftCo.
ICharleatown, Mass.
HOKT ") cured, fuel saved, and beat increased
raIMtPY fD aspiring the Spiral Draft. Send
UUilJjlO ) stame for circular twtth testimonials)
to Henry Colford. 7M Sanaom St., Philadelphia, Pa.
I VTpn 91m toffolfcit orden for trar goods:
saUnr. Traveling exrwn? paid hj Company.
uiuihi inauHiiu Horn, cidciudaii, u.
(bMH 3 (tOC iy Or rmW by- Acrnta Ml .hrf: oct Cbramot,
ifl K U 3 Crm-ona, Picture ftnd Chrotno C-nli. urn.
w "T W W kIsm. wortr, fV tMi. t aleV. Ill.,.t.
CaUtoarr,. fre. J. U. BUFFORD' SSONS, BOSTON, MAltt.
WANTED
Vaxisiiih to travel and sell Claada
II traveling x penses paid by firm. Address If.
1 1 . BODHF.K Cincinnati, Ohio.
of
pa
per
na
of
to
me
con
It
sub'
III
moat
n
piu-
I
iu
TV J Wanting llp1omna
I lA.TA'TC Medical College, leaal
JUl; LUL O where, ad's W. fticely.
from a
every-
Ml).
1 Bay miller St. .Cincinnati.
Wa bave a lamrmln for FTntrli'si fTnl an-wial Hnntrh
Syrup then for aiy oihrmed cineof ihe kind, we
nsveiorRAie an tne 01a standard remed.es. none
ore in such demand. Flint A Dayton, Friend. hip,
Kew York. Sold bp JOtW X. PARK A SOUS, Cur
cinnati, Okie. ,
new nnbreakahln eUu rhimnavn and
lame goods. He Peddllnsr. Salary liberaJv.
bminesi nermanent. Hotel A trawlinr iMinM
paid. MonitortilassCo., a&4MainSt.,Ctnciuaati,i.
A 1 tiamp Specialt
il Wm xjXM. j.3e wondetiu' curaJ
J ties. Particnlan
alties. Bine
nnera. llost
curative nroDsr-
tlea. Particular frr..
CHILD ft: PI ATT, Cincinnati, O.
"Combination of Cavital
Seto mo it oj tiperaiing in slock.
' Loss Impomble. ProJU sure.
I KritlmmnLnru circular attit ret.
1 dr C, Brokert.iA Brood U. , P. 0. UoxSXA, .Y T
fiOSE GROWER'S COMPANION AND FLOr.AL GUIDE
leiii von now to rrvw Kuscs, uerjunnu, eio.
r?dS " MaiUnft I'Lint-. n Spedattr. Send for
li'JBF ju a. K. WILT,tAI3.SneceJort0
. Y. TEAS & CO., Richmond, Ind
TOU can secure a fl f f T iMtyimr buaines,
exclusive lor yonr I 1 1 1 1 II county, at a hoialt
coat. No experience It 1 1 1 1 II an-1 a mall capital
required. Pleasant U U VJ JJ RUd honorable, by
addressing Jaua, T. Wllilnm-vop, Cincinnati, Ohio.
rPl A G Tha choicest fn the wo
Xal.lJxA.rOe ers priced Largest '
America staple article pleaes every
it seIaI.s at fciemv-w
and
y
de
bility all
Y
which
heavy
in a
re-
3 for
O'ld Import
. f!jmM.n la
nla artlri nleat?n warh,:dT TraH
litinuallv increaai-iB AK'tai wantc.l roivhtr-
lOBt inducempnta don't waste tinifr and f rcirrn
Ur to Kobt.WelI.,43 vy at., N.V. P.O. Box 127.
EMPIOT JIEST.-ANT PEBSON of ordinary
intellisence can earn a living by canvassing for
The IlluttraUd Weekly. Sxperirnce ii not Leoea
ary the only requiiltee being, ae in all mc Bag
ful bunneae. induatrj aDdDerrj. Send for partie'ra.
Ad'ea CHAS. CLUCA8 t CO., 14 Wmrrem N.Y
$100. REWARD. $100. .
Taw MOUSTACBK pndaeadaa ai-aoath nue
bj the dm of DrTB a BB4jt Rtan wltboat
Isjary, or win tbrfeit S100. Prlea by Mail ia
aeaied paekajra SS eeota, far three le eeata.
A. L. &M1TH CGu, jLgta, Palatiat, IU. .
POMONA NURSERY ffiSStfSS-
Jack nn4 (.rcetAmertean. the beat Rrawbrrrict.
I n smu of Ur-iudvirme (susiu-co) Bttsplierrioa,
y cldcdluatauniincrtfl.33Hs beud orCatalosnc.
WM. PARK f, Cinnaminaon, M. J.
FBAM LESLIE'S HISTORICAL BEGISTER
OF THB-
CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION !
la the only complete Pictorial Hiitory of the Cen
tennial published. A mammoth panorama.
large engravings, many of tham being l.?.x2nH looh.
Arena Wanted. Addreei. Age-net Department,
FHAhB LH6LLE S PUBIlsHINQ HOUSE.
m Pearl fltrett, Mew York.
wVO!fDEBPI7L SUCCESS! mT tUm
CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION
DE8C1UBED AND IXlUSTILATKU
Sold in 60 days. It being the only complete tote
pricework (T70popei, mnly S3.M), treating of the
anitre history, grand buildings, wonderful exhibit,
curiosities, great days, etc.; ill oat rated, and 01
cheaper than any other; ewernboifv canU it. Onewew
agent cleared ftSSO in 4 week. 4,000 ajentM wanted.
Send quickly for proof fabftve.t)pinion$vfoeiaU.elerfn
andprea, Mnnfepaqn. full dems -iptim. and extra termu.
Hi bbabd Bros. Pcbs;, 144 W. 4th St., Cincinnati, o.
PlTTTTn)! Itewrmre of false y claimed official
UtVUliUit and worthless hooka. Send f Jr prvt
A LUCRATIVE BUSINESS.
aa- WE WANT 50O MORE FIRST-CLASS
SEWINO MACHINE ACENTS, AND 500
MENOFENERCY AND ABILITY TO LEARN
THE BUSINESSOFSELLINCSEWINCMA
CHINESa COMPENSATION LIBERAL. BUT
VARYING ACCORDING TO ABILITY, CHAR
ACTER AND QUALIFICATIONS OF THE
ACENT. FOR PARTICULARS, ADDRESS
WM Sewing Machine Co CMcap.
ST! km BBOASWAT. Hew Tcrt. or w Orlaaa La.
LANDS FOR SALE.
SSB.O 1KB in SniH MEOlti.
First-cnss Stoclt Farms, excellent AgrJcnltjira!
Laid , and llie b?t Tl-acco lifpion iu ibf VVyal.
-h rt wint Ti. nocruavhopieta. orderly society, sjood
marker ti( a healthy country. Ami w frlcX
m.'-K -4flt !
i .- i .rxrr'atl;. to tho land fhrniihed
urr . ! ,"i information, :-dXreaa
v n '- liiiui-Ki'.m-r, M. Louis.
DR. WARNER'S UEALT1I CORSET.
With fYilrt Snppartrr aaal
tttlfaAaJtutia Pads.
Secures Health and CowTORTOf
Body, wrin OaAcaand tlaiUTTof "
Form. Three Garment to oaaa--Approved
by all physicians.
At. KNTS WANTED.
Sam pies by mall, tn CtmtiL, t
Satteen, II 76. To Agrats at '
!S cents less. Order sue ism
Inches smaller than waist ma
are over toe (Ire a.
Warner Bros. 763 Broadway.rf .T
Onlllll HABIT CUBED AT BOMa.
V 111 IV1 vn anbllcltr. Time short.
Terms m-xierate. l.orsl testi-
moaials. D-aeriliecasa. Dr.F.E.Uarah.Clalncr,aica.
A. BOOK for the MILLION.
altTIIClI iTITIPP fM. Paaiphlet on Special
EtiUlWVb AD UMi and 'ironic Diaea.-s, Cancer.
Jatarrh, Buptnra. Uptnm II .bit, etc.. SUNT FREE
on receipt of stamp. ArMre'e. Dr. Burrs' Diapeu
sarjt, ho. 12 N.sthsL, St. Louis, Mo.
-T7-iis:r w ki nwe xs AnwxitTisEiM.
,V pleaae say inal woas
aaaS La aa

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