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The labor advocate. [volume] (Cincinnati, Ohio) 1912-1937, April 29, 1916, Image 4

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THE LABOR ADVOCATE
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I P1P? FOR. ALL WHO TOIL
Ofllclnl Organ of The Huildliig Trades Council of Cincinnati and Vicinity
Issued Weekly
W. E. MYERS
Business Office, 20-21 Thorns
Communications should he
on hand not later than Wed
nesday to insure publication.
ONE DOLLAR A YEAR IN ADVANCE
CINCINNATI, O.,
-MM--M--f-M"M- - -M-f-f-f 4-f
ui:mi:mi!i;h t
Tim friendly business flrtns wlio are patronizing the Tiabor Advo-
cntu and endeavoring to show (heir good will and sincerity through X
the columns of this paper, the olllcial journal, deserve the patron- T
ago of loyal members of organized labor, and will bo remembered r
by them on every shopping trip.
NO DANGER OF THIS.
The corporation interests that control the local Republican party
hint that they may keep their hands off of the coming primary
election. '
We will bet they will not do anything of the kind; they have
worked too hard to get control to ever give those with courage and
independence a chance to get a crumb.
WHO'D EVER THINK IT.
Mr. Draper, of the Traction Company, informed the committee
of the City Council that his company was as eager as any individual
or organization to work out a transfer system that would meet
with general approbation.
This is a decided change of front, there must be a nigger in the
wood pile somewhere or Walter is only jesting.
A HYPOTHETICAL QUESTION.
Mr. John V. Campbell, you will please answer this question
Yes or No J -. .-, ,.
Supposing that Willie Melish, President of the Chamber of Com
merce, was with John Doe at the time that John Doe killed a man,
would you accept a plea of second degree murder from John Doe
and have Willie Melish indicted for first degree murder, and then
use all your cunning to have him railroaded to the electric chair?
And supposing that the jury, who heard the case, disagreed, stand
ing ten for acquittal and two for conviction, would you use every
effort within your power to keep Willie Melish from getting bond
so he could support bis family?
Then what is the difference between Melish and an ordinary
painter in the eyes of the law?
GREAT STUFF.
The highest class of politics was pulled off when Judge A. K.
Nippert took his life in his own hands to carry money over to
Germany. The way it was worked up in the press as to the great
risks the Judge took, won the hearts of every hyphenated citizen of
Cincinnati.
But the Judge had an ace in the hole, he knew that Germany
was the only nation murdering innocent people on the high seas,
and he knew that they would not touch his ship as long as he was
bringing coin to them.
Upon his return he can run for any job he wants and secure
the support of our German citizens. When you consider the future
returns on the investment it was a clever idea.
THE SAME GAME, BUT DIFFERENT.
Before election Mayor I'uchta gave the Labor Advocate a mes
sage to organized labor in which lie said: "If I am elected, union
labor will have no complaint."
Last week the police raided the Garment Workers' headquarters,
on Walnut street, and arrested five or six German tailors who were
playing poker for a five-cent limit. That's gambling, and the police
did right.
But at the same time the members of the Business Men's Club
were playing the same game for a ten-dollar limit. That's a gentle
men's game and the police are not allowed to molest them.
Is this fair?
Should the union tailors complain?
WHAT TUESDAY'S ELECTION MEANS.
The election last Tuesday in Hamilton County was going over
whelmingly against Willis and Procter up to 10 a. in., when "some
one" handed out a big bank roll. From that minute the machine got
busy, and all the clerks left the City Hall and Court House to hustle
up the vote to save Procter and the Governor.
locate
NONPARTISAN
Editor
Building. Phone, Canal 5511
Entered at the postoffice at
Cincinnati, Ohio, as second
class mail matter.
s;70
APRIL a", lain.
M-M-M-f-f
Glascr polled more votes in Hamilton County than Willis did
in 1914, when the machine supported Tod.
Glascr secured seven thousand votes in Hamilton County, all
of whom are strongly anti-Willis, and avIio will vote against him
next November.
As Willis only carried Hamilton County by 1,800 votes over
Cox in 1914, it looks to a man up a tree that all James M. Cox has
to do this year is to come down and get Hamilton County.
THE CENTRAL LABOR COUNCIL SHOULD GO SLOW
IN THE CURVE.
At a meeting of the Central Labor Council last week, the Public
Utilities Committee reported that next week they would report
on what organized labor expects in the revision of street car fares
and a cheaper gas rate. Several delegates said the Council should
demand certain things and fight for them.
This sounds very well, but what is the use of the Council de
manding and fighting for things that they have no chance of getting.
The first thing to be considered in the street car situation is to
see that the men get more money, at least as good as Toledo gave
them a few weeks ago, which was 31 cents in 1916, 32 cents in
1917, and 33 cents in 1918. The next thing is to see that they put
on more cars and give universal transfers, and if you get that it
is all you can expect. You may ask for six tickets for a quarter,
but you will not get it.
Mr. King, the expert engaged by the city to investigate the gas
situation in Cincinnati, reported that the gas rate was too low, and
that a minimum charge of 44 cents should be made. If you can re
tain the present gas rate you arc doing well, as it has been in
creased lately in Dayton from 34 to 34j cents, and in Cleveland
from 30 to 35 cents in 1919.
A Columbus paper giving the different gas rates throughout Ohio
prints the following: "Lima, Wapakoneta, St. Marys, Celina and
Coldwater, first thousand, 50 cents ; all over, 30 cents. Sidney, Ohio,
40 cents for first thousand ; minimum charge of 70 cents per month.
Piqua, Covington and Troy, first thousand, 35 cents ; minimum charge
of 70 cents per month. Ashtabula, Geneva, Conncaut and Jefferson
36 cents a thousand ; Toledo, 35 cents."
If the Council wants to fight for anything it should demand the
retention of the present rate, which is as low as any city using
natural gas.
Nothing does labor more harm than to endorse or demand a
thing and not have influence enough to put it through. And if they
look into this matter thoroughly, they will see that the wages and
conditions of the street car men should come first.
AISANDON INSUKANCK lUUlu
Albany, N. Y. Senator Mills has
abandoned his bill providing for health
insurance for employes and lias accepted
the suggestion of trade unionists that the
(uestion be submitted to a special inves
tigating committee, which will inquire
into all matters concerning sickness and
accident not covered by the compensa
tion law.
The Mills bill was championed by the
so-called American Association for La
bor Legislation and was opposed by
President Goiupcrs and the New York
trade-union movement. The organized
workers protested, among other things,
igainst the compulsory visitations to the
liomes of workers by State officials.
TIIIKTIOHN MOIth! DAYS!
Chicago. Representatives of four
brotherhoods of railroad men delivered
to the Association of Western Railways
April 1,1, a request for ihe appointment
of a National Committee to deal with
the union representatives in the matter
of their demands recently submitted to
ine railroads ol the country lor an
eight-hour day and time and a half for
overtime. The railroads have been given
until April 2ti to make answer to the de
mands of the men.
NNWK h'HOM DKTICOIT.
Detroit. An Arbitration Board has
raised wages of laundry workers from
.11) cents to $1.50 a week.
Brickniakers raised wages 25 -cents a
day after they had suspended work.
Local unionists have assisted them in
perfecting an organization.
Pattern makers, who have been on
strike for several weeks to enforce new
wage rales, are standing firm, despite
four injunctions issued against them.
The local Federation of Labor is con
ducting a vigorous agitation in favor of
initiating an aiiti-iujuuction amendment
to the State Constitution.
Brewery workers have secured a two
ear agreement with wage increases.
The Federation of Labor will start a
labor forward movement.
PAINTIOItS INCUIOASK WAKS.
Erie, Pa. The Painters and Decorat
ors' Union has won its strike and rais
ed wages from WT, to W cents an
hour. Of the 225 employes who sus
pended work the first of the month less
than a score are now unemployed.
.MKTAI, WOltKKKS MA KM fiAIXS.
Joplin, Mo. Machinists ami iron
molders have won strikes for improved
conditions. In both cases wages are in
creased to $1.25 for a nine-hour day.
OPPOSIC STATU MKItfiKK.
Springfield, Mass. At an open meet
ing of the Central Labor Union a unani
mous protest was made against the pro
posed consolidation of the State Depart
ment ol Labor and Industries, the Mini
mum Wage Commission, the State Hoard
of Conciliation and Arbitration, and the
Industrial Accident Board. President
Wrcnn of the local central body said:
"Labor knows that the proposed meas
ure which will consolidate the foremost
important boards in the Slate is nothing
less than a veiled attempt to nullify the
principal labor laws of Massachusetts.
Organized labor has worked too hard
and loo long to see the fruits of its hu
manitarian legislation swept aside on the
pretense of economy. Any person fa
miliar with the work which these boards
arc doing in this State knows that they
should have their powers enlarged rather
than curtailed by consolidation."
Trade unionists in other sections of
the State are conducting a similar agi
tation. "IMilXJAIi" KTItlKKIEK WIX.
Leadville, Col. Emplojes of the
American Smelting and Refilling Com
pany have had their wages raised.
About a month ago workers in the
Leadville and Pueblo plants of this com
pany struck to enforce a wage increase
of 5(1 cents a day. They ignored the
State law. which provides for thirty
days' notice, and were threatened with
all sorts of dire things including the
State militia by Governor Carlson and
members of the State Industrial Com
mission, because they had "violated a
law" by quitting their employment.
Other officials offered saner counsel,
However, and the strikers returenl to
work on a promise that their claims
would be investigated.
WAKNK At.'AINST lllfill KKKS.
I larrislmrK. I'a- The workmen's com
pensation board lias notified every in
surance carrier insuring against work
men's compensation liability that some
attorneys are charging exorbitant fees
or unduly large percentages of the in
stallments paid without having their
fees approved by the hoard, as required
by the compensation act.
To cheek this evil the hoard orders all
awards paid to the claimant, regardless
of their attorney, unless the attorney
shall furnish the hoard's approval of his
claim for legal expenses and services.
OltGAMKK; JtAISK WAOKS.
Jackson, Cal. llrewery workers have
organized and secured contracts with
employers which carries wage increases
ranging from $ to $8 per week. Hours
and working conditions are regulated.
We have at
MODEST PRICES
Pianos and Player-Pianos
which are thoroughly
well made and guar
anteed to be entirely
satisfactory in the
HOME
alhcalJrtoinIiano Ofompanij
Manufacturers
142 West Fourth Street
HEILEMANN'S SHOES
Are Always Best S,NP
, p, 112-114 Elder St., Findlay Market
ZMoret 2137 West Eighth Street
I Build Homes for the Working Man
We Build and Sell on
Easy Terms
EDWARD McCLURE
4904 Whalsel Aienue,
MADISONVIUE, CINCINNATI,
Phone, Mad, 349
Phone, Mad. 337-1
Ferdinand Doepke
FURNACE REPAIRS
HARDWARE and ROOFING
2904 Vine St., Phone, Avon 1622
THE EIGHT -HOUR
TOBACCO CO.
Is owned and operated by Cincinnati peo
ple. All its brands are made by members
of Tobacco Workers Local No. 25.
It Is the only Tobacco Company
in the United States which has
adopted the eight-hour d ay.
8-HOUR UNION SCRAP
ALL DAY SCRAP
HOME RUN SCRAP
7
If it is made of Leather or Canvas we
make It
Awnings Tents Harness
John SCHERZ sons
Manufacturers
Phone W. 1154 1006-8 FREEMAN AVE.
BECKER BROS. CO.
INCORr-ORATFD
Main Store and Office: 'J42 Monmouth
Street, Newport, Ky.
Phones: South !957, 1109
Manu
facturers of
all Kinds
of
COVINGTON STORE:
1018 Madison Ate. Phone. South 3644
NEWPORT BRANCH:
S. E. Cor. 7th nd Patterson Sts. Phone, South 2649-Y
203 W. 6th Street CINCINNATI, O.
Phonc, Canal 5011, 501 a
Telephones, Cunul 43J5 and 43'J6
RICHTER & CO.
MANUFACTURERS OF
SUPERIOR BRASS GOODS
210 E. Ninth St. Cincinnati, 0.
Union-Made HATS
Rielag
1120 Main Street
USH JOHNSTON'S JWIAj KOTK
PAINT. It dries perfectly flat without
lustre, washed and cleaned like tile.
Color folder free. Buy it from your
dealer, or
TIIH It. V. JOHNSTON PAINT CO.,
Pearl mid Main Sts., Cincinnati, O.
I
--
Be Thankful
FOR
HEEKINS TEA
I
Dealers ftiSIBlimlp'
Choice (flME San
Meats atRwjP sages
'I

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