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The labor advocate. [volume] (Cincinnati, Ohio) 1912-1937, October 14, 1916, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88077379/1916-10-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE LABOR ADVOCATE
MjzrtXr rr SESasiCl1
INDEPENDENT
NONPARTISAN
TWPN
4 MPEfi FOR ALL WHO TOIL
Official Organ of The Building Trades Council of Cincinnati and Vicinity
Issued Weekly
V. E. MYERS Editor
Business Office, 20-21 Thorns Building. Phone, Canal S511
State Building Trades Council
Holds Annual Convention at Toledo. Year 1916 Not
able for Labor Trouble, Official's Report Shows.
Outlook at Brightest, State Secretary Says.
Communications should be
on hand not later than Wed
nesday to it irre publication.
Entered at the postoffice at
Cincinnati, Ohio, as second
class mail matter.
ONE DOLLAR A YEAR IN ADVANCE
70
CINCINNATI, OHIO, OCTOBER 14, 1910.
BROTHER MEMBERS!
Hcrrick and the Cincinnati scabs had a reunion last week.
NATURALLY.
If President Wilson should indorse the ten commandments, Can
didate Hughes would promptly pronounce against them.
WITH ALL DEGREES.
Willis is an excellent liar when he talks about the workmen's
compensation and what he did for it.
HERRICK AND HIS SCAB MEETINGS!
Hcrrick addressed two meetings of brother scabs during his
stay in Cincinnati, but he fought shy of the Central Labor Council
that met the day he was here.
MONEY TALKS.
The German Alliance supported Willis who voted for. national
. prohibition, and passed resolutions against Pomerenc, who voted
against it.
What's the reason? $$$$$$$$
THE BOSS WILL VOTE THEM.
Half the scabs that Hcrrick spoke to, have only been in the city
since the machinists' strike started, but the bosses will get them reg
istered and will vote them against local labor and for Hcrrick, there
fore union men should support Pomerene.
OH, YE GODS!
Colon Schott, the Democratic member of the Rapid Transit Com
mission, after rubbing elbows with Win. Cooper Procter and E. W.
Edwards, has left the common people and gone over to the capital
ists' class. Me will support Hughes, but he cannot take anybody with
him. Another Democrat who gets pis'n from the Republicans.
IT IS UP TO UNION LABOR.
Does the United States favor raising the standard of labor by
adopting the eight-hour day wherever it is practicable? Woodrow
Wilson says "Yes." Candidate Hughes says "No."
File your verdict November 7th.
The year 1910 in the building trades
circles has been notable for the lack
of labor disputes.
This was the message which Thomas
H. Mugavin, of Cincinnati, secretary
treasurer and general organizer of the
Ohio State Building Trades Council,
brought to the 75 assembled delegates at
the state meeting which opened in C.
L. U. hall Thursday morning.
Mugavin said: "The spirit of give and
take and the principles of arbitration arc
gaining ground every day."
The report was made at the afternoon
session of the convention. Mugavin said
the outlook for the building trades never
was brighter, that better wages arc be
ing paid and the workers arc getting
shorter hours, and that there have been
fewer strikes than in other years.
Forerunner of Federation Meet.
The convention, which opened at 10:30
with addresses of welcome by Edward
P. Usher, president of the Central La
bo Union; Mayor Milroy, Chief of
Police Herbert and Business Agent John
Quinlivan, of the C, L. U., is the fore
runner of the State Federation of Labor
meeting next week. Practically all of
the delegates here for the building trades
meeting will remain in the city through
out next week, vhcn400 more delegates
and as many more visitors arc expected
in Toledo to attend the Ohio State Fed
eration of Labor convention.
The morning session was taken up
with preliminary business. F. R. Smith,
of Cleveland, president, is ill and was
unable to attend. Harry II. Cutler,
president of the Toledo council, who
opened the convention, turned the gavel
over to Thomas Joyce, of Cleveland,
second vice president of the state coun
cil. Appoints Five Committees.
Secretary Mugavin announced five
committees appointed by President
Smith. They arc :
Resolutions John Owens, John Bis
hop and Thomas West, Cleveland; Ed
ward O'Donnell, Cincinnati, and Oliver
Myers, Toledo.
Finance -Joseph Cullen and Fred
Hock, Cincinnati; Peter Hasscnpflita and
Charles Smith, Cleveland, and Harry H.
Cutler, Toledo.
Constitution and Laws J. M. Gay
lack, George E. Brewster and S. S. Stil
well, Cleveland; A. E. Smith, Spring
field, and Patrick Ilorgan, Cincinnati.
Appeals and Grievances Phil Gas
dorf , Cincinnati ; J. Biglc, Cleveland ; H.
MINERS TO ASK FOR WORK
DAY OF SEVEN HOURS
Kline, Toledo; C. C. Davis, Akron and
O. B. Chapman, Dayton.
Press and Publicity Fred Miller,
Cleveland ; James A. Armstrong, Colum
bus, and Guy Hccker, Cincinnati.
Go On Mauniec Melt Trip.
Thursday afternoon at 2 the delegates
started on a trip around the Maumce
belt. They arc scheduled to attend the
Empire Thursday night, and there will
be a banquet in Swiss hall Friday night.
Business sessions will be held Friday
morning and afternoon which will be
addressed by Thomas Williams of
Washington, D. C, president of the na
tional building trades department, and
William J. McSorlcy of Cleveland, in
ternational president of the lathers.
There are 00 councils of building
trades in the 85 larger cities and towns
of the state. Affiliated with the building
trades are :
International Association of Heat and
Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers;
International Association of Bridge and
Structural Iron Workers; International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; In
ternational Union of Elevator Construc
tors; Internationa Union of Steam En
gineers; International Association of
Granite Cutters; International Hod Car
riers, Builders and Common Laborers'
Union ; International Union of Wood
and Wire Lathers; International Asso
ciation of Marble Workers; Internation
al Alliance of Sheet Metal Workers;
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and
Paperhangers ; Plasterers, Operators and
Cement Finishers' International Asso
ciation; United Association of Plum
bers and Steam Fitters; International
Brotherhood of Roofers. Composition,
Damp and Waterproof Workers of U.
S. and Canada; International Union of
Slate and Tile Roofers; Stone Cutters'
Association of North America, and
the Ceramic Mosaic and Encaustic
Tile Layers and Helpers' Interna
tional Union.
The following officers were elected for
the ensuing year :
G. E. Brewster, Cleveland, 0 presi
dent; Edward S. Nagel, Mansfield, O.,
first vice president ; Thomas Joyce, sec
ond vice president, Cleveland, O.; Thom
as West. Cleveland, O., third vice presi
dent; John Bishop, Cleveland, O., fourth
vice president; Oliver Meyers, Toledo,
O., fifth vice president; Aden E. Smith,
Springfield, O., sixth vice president;
John Carley, Cleveland, O., .seventh vice
president; O. B. Chapman. Dayton, O.,
eighth vice president; Thomas 11. Muga
vin, Cincinnati, O., secretary-treasurer.
ROBERT J. O'BRIEN
Announcement Made lly President
While of United Workers.
REAL PROSPERITY IS HERE.
Even Henry C. Frick, the famous head of the Carnegie steel
properties and an old-style Pennsylvania protectionist, takes an up
percut at the Hughes "temporary" prosperity talk. Mr. Frick says
that our prosperity not only will continue after the war, but is no
longer dependent upon it and will be more substantial without it.
ALL WISE MEN.
Ford. Hurbauk. Luhin. Edisnn wiznnU nf AmnnVnu luicinncc
science, agriculture and invention detect the real article from the
spurious in the political as well as in flic fields of their own special
ties. They reject Hughes as unworthy of consideration with Wood
row Wilson in the field.
A FOOL'S "FOOL'S PARADISE"?
Three iron and steel kings to date Schwab, Farrcll and Frick
dispute the assumption of Candidate Hughes that American suprem
acy in the world's steel supply is "temporary," or a "fool's paradise,"
or in any degree dependent upon war.
They look to the close of the war as creating a greater world mar
ket for American steel than war munitions afford. That the invest
ing public backs their judgment is shown by the steady and continued
rise in the values of industrial securities.
A PAGE FROM HISTORY.
The greatest boom in American railway stocks in years has fol-lowed-the
passage of the Federal eight-hour law for railway train
men. Thus American railway history repeats itself.
Railway organs, it will be remembered, made the same fight
against safety couplers, electric headlights, and the prohibition of
passes and rebates. They invoked heaven and earth and their polit
ical henchmen to fight all these wholesome and necessary changes.
And increased prosperity followed every reform.
"Necessary for Welfare of Members
of Organization."
Use of Machines Making; Pick-Mining
u host Art, He Says.
Bcllaire, Ohio Demands for a seven
hour day will be made by coal miners
of the country at coming wage confer
ences according to John P. White, pres
ident of the United Mine Workers of
America, sneaking at the Miners' Day
celebration here last week, Such a move
is necessary, he said, in order to con
serve the economic and social welfare
of members of the miners' organization,
and results from the increase in the use
of mining machines. "Having estab
lished the eight-hour day universally
throughout the jurisdiction of our un
ion, and likewise the mine-run system,
wc can well afford to turn our attention
in the coming wae,c conference to a fur
thcir reduction in the hours of labor for,
in my opinion, such a move is necessary
if wc arc to conserve the economic and
social wclfarcof our vast membership,"
President White declared. "This is made
almost essential because of the increas
ed use and introduction of machines.
The rccords show there are more ma
chines ucd in coal mining now than at
any previous time in our history. So
widespread has become their use that
pick mining in many districts has be
come almost a lost art."
A Popular Candidate for the State
Senate.
l'erullar Vocabulary.
"Your daughter," said Mrs. Oldcastle
after being conducted through the newly
furnished win'; of the magnificent palace
occupied by the Bullingtons, "has such
a splendid vocabulary."
"Do you think so?" her hostess re
plied, "Josiah wanted to get her one of
them escritoires, but 1 made up my mind
right at the start that a vocabulary
would look better in a room furnished
like hers is, even if it didn't cost quite
so much." Exchange.
aaaaEii-, aLLiH
aBBBBaak'tVm ssLiaiBaiH
WE FIT .
Stout Women
Up to 59 Bust.
ALL WEARING APPAREL
Write for Catalog
WINDHORST'S
12th and Main.
Wo have at
MODEST PRICES
Pianos and Player-Pianos
which are thoroughly
well made and guar
anteed to be entirely
satisfactory in the
HOME
GJhe3Mito)m;piano Company
Manufacturer
142 Weit Fourth Street
HEILEMANN'S SHOES
Are Always Best gJggSf,
, c, 112-114 Elder St., Findlay Muket
ZJ!I2 2137 We.t Eigith Street
H. J. DUDLEY
SHOES for Everybody
Agent for the Celebrated Molder'i Asbestos
Shoe, Union Made, and Fireman's Boots
603 ua 60S Centra) Avenue, Oppoiite Market Home
Saturdays to 10:30. Phone Canal 470
THE EIGHT -HOUR
TOBACCO CO.
Is owned and operated by Cincinnati peo
ple. All its brands are made by members
oi Tobacco Workers Local No. 25.
It Is the only Tobacco Company
in the United States which has
adopted the eight-hour d ay.
8 -HOUR UNION SCRAP
"ALL DAY SCRAP
HOME RUN SCRAP
.-------,.-------------.
The Slitiwl.
Shawl is from the Sanskrit sala,
which means floor shawls having been
first used as carpet tapestry.
Hon. Itolit. ,). O'ltricn.
Our old friend, Col. Robt. J. O'Hricn
who has just returned from the East,
will actively take up his campaign for
State Senator.
Col. O'ltricn was formerly council
man of the sixth ward and has a world
of friends in cverv walk of life.
He retired a few vears ago, but be
came restless and wanted to get into
the thick of the political light again.
Col. O'ltricn is one candidate on the
Republican ticket who will poll thous
ands of Democratic votes, as he has as
many friends in one party as the othfcr.
His election is almost conceded, his
popularity among the laboring classes
will bring him a big support from that
class of voters. O'ltricn has not only
been fair to union labor, but exceedingly
generous.
Polo.
Polo is an oriental game of antiquity
which, it is claimed, can be traced back
to i0() It. C.
BECKER. BROS. CO.
INCOKPORATFD
Main Store and Office: 942 Monmouth
Street, Newport, Ky.
Phones: South 2967,. 1100
Manu
facturers of
all Kinds
of
Dealers jjjfijKfl
in ftlBS&M
Choice onHRw Sau
Meats GJr sages
COVINGTON STORE:
1048 Million Ate. Hione, South 3644
NEWPORT BRANCH:
S. E. Cor. 7li and Pttterson Sli. Phone, South 2649-Y
203 W. 6th Street CINCINNATI. O.
Phones, Canal 6011, 6012
- ----.
FAYWAY BUTTER STORE I
H. F. HOLTHXUS, Prop.
Butter, Buttermilk, Cottage Cheese,
Eggs, Etc
Branch: SUth and Miln Third and Vine Sts.
Phone Main 1617
Union-Made HATS
1120 Main Street
USE JOHNSTON'S DULL KOTE
PAINT. It dries perfectly flat without
lustre, washed and cleaned like tile.
Color folder free. Buy it from your
dealer, or
THE It. F. JOHNSTON PAINT CO.,
Pcnrl and Main Sts., Cincinnati, O.
The I5(IU)li(l.
The voice of the naked throated bell
bird can be heard at a distance of three
miles.
r
Be Thankful
FOR
HEEKIN'S TEA
LAWRENCE E. WEBER
TAILOR
The Union Label on Every Garment
1524 Vine Street CINCINNATI, 0.

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