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The Democratic banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, November 03, 1922, Image 1

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THIS DAILY BANNIR 18 THI ONLY MT. VERNOM HEW8PAPKK THAT PRINTS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS-THE BEIT BY TMT
WEATHER REPORT,
MT. VERNON AND VICINITY
Cloudy tonight nnd Frldpy.
twmmlit
CALL ill
Telephone Your newi
mtiiper.
;
to. The Dally Banner, Me.
Vernon's Best Newspaper.
K
, '
-Ml
t
ESTABLISHED 1838
MT. VERNON, 0., FRIDAY, NOV. 3,' 1922 No. 88
$2.00 PER YlAJltj
$
mm.
1
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fc
SUDDEN-DEATH
OFCUMfilT
PHILADELPHIA
C
Chairman Oi Railway Execu
tives Found Dead In A
Private Car
Took A Prominent Part In
The Recent Strike Of
Railway Shopmen
(Br The Associated press)
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 2 Thomas
Dewltt Cuyler, a director of the Penn
sylvania Railroad Co. and chairman
of the Railway Executives' Associa
tion, was found dead today In the pri
vate car of. President Rea of the Penn
sylvania railroad, in the Broad street
station.
Mr. Cuylcr was "in Rochester,
N..Y., yesterday and was apparently
in good health.
Mr. Cuyler was a lawyer, but most
of his tlmo was taken up with rail
road and financial affairs. He came
prominently bofore tho country in the
recent shopmon's strike by virtue of
his position as chairman of tho rail1
way executives. He took a firm stand
against some of the demands of the
strikers, cspoclnllyi that relating to
seniority.
Mr. Cuyler was born in Philadel
phia and was 68 years of. age.
TO CHOOSE SUCCESSOR
(BY The Associated press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 2 A. successor
to T. Dewltt Cuyler, chairman of tho
Association of Railway Executives,
who was found dead in Philadelphia
today, will bo chosen at, the next reg
ulaWon'gfitfe?3S0clatilpll"''on Nov. 9.' !., 4 t f- ,
Information Is Given Voters
Of Martinsburg At Meeting
Wednesday Evening
A mooting was held Wednesday ev
ening at the High school auditorium
in Martinsburg for tho purpose of in
forming tho voters of tho Martinsburg
school district of the situation mak
ing important their support at the
oloctlon next Tuesday of a proposal
to lovy on tho district a special tax
lovy of three mills.
A large crowd of men nnd women
is ropbrted to have attonded tho meeting.-
An interesting program was giv
en by pupils of the Martinsburg
school. This was followed by several
short' talks explanatory of tho special
lovy and Its necessity. The speakers
were Supt. Earl R. Welkor, County
Supt. J. C. Marriott and Fred J.
Freese.
Theso talks were well received and
following the meeting mnny were
hoard to speak approvingly of tho pro
posal and to announco their purpose
'.to vote for it at the election.
'CASES OF PEAS'
Hi
Prohibition Officers Make
Unusual Find At Co
lumbus Today
-(BT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)
COLjUMMJS, Nov. 2 Acting on n
tip, feueral prohibition agents' today
boarded a Dig Four train at the Union
station and removed 10 "cases of
peas" from an express car.
The casps, the agent3 said, contain
ed booze and had been shipped from
the Dixie Products Co., Savannah, Ga.,
to the P; P. O'Drion Grocery Co.,
Cleveland.
An investigation will bo made both
nt Savannah and at Clovoland, It. war
HEAR WHY-TAX LEVY
SOUL
D BE APPROVED
MED
OOZE
announced today.
BOY AND DOG FOUND
IN NEWLY DUG GRAVE
(Br The Associated press)
CLIKFS1DE, N. J., Nov. 2 His
amis wound about a whining mongrel
;)pup with a broken leg, 7-yonr-old
John Hansen was found today, weak
from oxposuro, In a nowly-dug gravo
in Cllffsldo Cdmotoj-y. A caretaker,
on a vlsi) of Inspection,, discovered
tho child and his dog, helped them
out and home.
While his pot, with bandaged leg,
licked his hand, tho boy told his moth
or that whllo frolicking lato yesterday
afternoon tho dog fell into tho grave,
hurting his leg, and that ho Jumped
In to get it. Unable to climb out, he
cried nnd called for help and finally
fell nslcop.
FRIDAY IS LAST DAY
Tl
No Absent Voters' Ballots
Will Be Issued Thereafter
By Election Board
Friday will bo the last day, Clerk
Pierco A. Thayer, of tho Knox county
election board announcjd, Thursday,
on which absent voters' ballots will
bo issued or applications may bo
made. On tho Saturday following the'
ballots and other oloctlon supplies will
be issued to the presiding judge of
each of tho voting precincts in the
county.
Up to noon of Thursday a total of
200 absent voter ballots had been is
sued by Clerk Thayer. This number
would seem to indicate a degree of
Interest in tho coming election but
slightly less in degree than that in a
presidential election. Two years ago
the total of absent voters' ballots
'issuedrwas-239.-. .- r-. -
Until tho last week or 10 days the
apathy and Indiffcrenco thai had
marked the campaign from 'the; begin-:
rilng- was to -bo "noted. Thlsl disin
clination to bo concerned over; things
political extended throughout both
parties to such an extent that the par
ty workers and managers manifested
a very real concern. There was no
noticeable change until after the end
of tho registration period in tho cities.
Thousands of voters because of indif
ference voluntarily disfranchised
themselves. None of tho larger cities
of tho stato will poll the vote they
should.
Tho election supplies, Including bal
lots and report blanks, will bo secured
by tho presiding judges at tho offico
of tho election board in the Stauffer
block on North Main street. Since
tho election held in -November, 1921,
'tho offico of tho board has been
changed from Its former location in
tho Poterman building to its present
location in tho Stauffer block. Tho
olection officers nro advised to bear
this change in mind.
Tho hours of the election, when tho
polls open and closo are from G:30 a.
m., Central Standard time, or 6:30 a.
ra., Eastern time, to 5:30 p. in., Cen
tral Standard tlmo, or 6:30 p. m.J East
ern time. Theso hours also should bo
kept clearly in mind by election offici
ials and voters.
COAL PRODUCTION
IN OHIO IS SHOWN
(ar The Associated press) '
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 Ohio's
coal mines produced 31,942,776 not
tons of coal during 1921, accoul'ng to
statistics just completed by the Unit
ed States Geological Survey. Tho
state's coal output, which is exclusive
of the product ofywagon mines, was
valued at ?84,686,500 or an average of
$2.65 a tou. In its mining and pro.
paration for market, 51,785 employes
were utilized, each working an aver
ago of 134 days of the year. 'Miners
and loaders numbered' 33,143, all oth
er underground workers, 11,555, and
surface employes, -70S7.
Belmont county was tho leading
coal mining county with an output of
11,601,150 tons, valued at 29,845,000
,and a total of 13,891 workers, averaging-
17jf days worked.
Jefferson county stood second with
43G3.870 tons, valued at $11,924,400,
and a total of 5974 workers, averaging
137 days workod,
Athens county was third with 3,S3(i,-
590 tons, valued at f 10,038,000, and a
total of 7959 workorn. nvornglng 10!
days worked.
SEGUHEBUUnS
I -ngni v V jsa5 L .... r ,-,,,. ,v,, $.
Are women's clothes an aid to de
fense in a criminal trial? That is a
question that stirred psyhchologlsts
in tho trial of Mrs. Mabel Champion,
in Cleveland, O., for tho alleged mur-
der-of Thomas Connell, a Yale grad-j
uate. Mrs. Champion and her hus
S
E
Resume Deliberations Today
After Spending. Night
In A Hotel
; (By the Associated Press)
dlEV.KLAN.OrNor2-r,Tho'Jury in,
whose, hands 'rests tho fato'of Mrs.
Mabel Champion, ,22, on! trial for tho
murdor of Thomas A. O'Cdnnoll, New
Haven, Conn., resumed its delibera
tions today after spending a night
locked up' ina' hotel.
The caso went to tho Jury at 4
o'clock yesterday afternoon.
A roport was current around the
courthouso today that the jury on
retiring last night stood 11 to 1 for
conviction.
BELIEVES II. S JILL
(Br The associated press)
LONDON, Nov. 2 Prime Minister
Law, in an address' to a meeting of
women in tho Drury Lane theatre to
day, reiterated that his policy wa3 ono
of tranquility and stab'ility.
"As regards foreign policy," ho add
ed, "I vonturo to say that America
may, gradually tako an interest in tho
League of Nations in 'some form and
may feel that it ia hor duty to help
In tho chaos in which the war has loft
the world."
(Br The Associated press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 Tho Greol;
Metropolitan and ten priests captured
by the Turks at Aivaly wero burjed
alive because they refused to embraco
Iolamism, according to a cablegram
received today from Athens by the
Greek legation.
Robert W. Wilson Dies
(Br THE ASSOCIITED PRESS)
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 2 Rob
ert Wheeler Willson, professor emeri
tus of astronomy at Harvard Universi
ty, died at his home today. 'Ho was
a member of the staff of tho Argen
tine National Observatory before join
ing tho Harvard staff in 1875 and sub
sequently served as an assistant as
tronomer at Yalo. Returning to Har
vard ho wns an notive member ofMhe
fncjilty until ho retired in 1019,
ufYILHfl
HIPI1 CAS
COWIE INTO LEAGUE
K
PISS
DURE LI
CLOTHES AND THE WOMAN
band were seated in a restaurant, I spread attention, because Mrs. Cham
when Connell entered and began talk-. plun appeared each day In a beauti
ing to thorn. A quarrel followed, and Iful new black gown, said to have been
three shots-killed Connell. Both the I selected with a ncye to Influencing
Champions were arrested, but the hus-
band was freed and the wife tried for
murder. Tho trial attracted wide-
Cotton Manufacturers
Confess Tax Evasion
GREENVILtjE, S. C, Nov. 2
Four South Carolina cotton manufac
turers plcadedfgullty today in U. S.
district court shcro to a charge of
evading tho federal income tax, law
and wore sentenced to pay fines or
serve pall sentences. H. H. Watklns,
Campbell, Cpurtenay and St. John
Courtnay, of Columbia, wero ordered
to pay fines of. $ 10,000 each or servo
eight months in tho county jail, while
Ashmeado Cour.tenay and Henry Rut
ledgQ,,ISuist, oiiCharloston,..,w.erp' sen
tenced to pay fines of $30dQ each, or
serve three months In jail.
LUTHERAN SYNOD
MEETS IN BUCYRUS
BUCYRUS, O., Nov. 2 Moro than
500 prominont Lutheran clergy and
lay men from all points of the stato
aro expected hero today for tho third
nnnual convention of tho Synod of
Ohio of tho United Lutheran church,
-which will close its sessions tonight.
Rev. Dr. Paul W. Roller of Mans
field is president of the Synod, and
Rov.-J. S. Herold of Columbus, secrc-.
tary.
National Lutheran leaders as well
as many other nationally prominent
religious workers wfilk occupy promi
nent places on tho Synod's program.
The speakers will includo Dr. Roes
Edgar Tulloss, president of Witten
berg College, Springfield.
Ono ovouing session was devoted to
a celebration of tho festival of tho
Reformation, with an address by Prof.
A. R. Montz of Gettysburg, Pa. A
number of young men will bo ordain
ed into the ministry tonight.
Tho Synod of Ohio is ono tho larg
est constituent bodies of tho United
Lutheran Church. It was formed by
a merger of four older synods at
Springfield in 1920. Since Its organ
ization, tho work of the church in
Ohio has been greatly amplified.
(Br The Assocu'pr Press)
MUSKHGON, Mich., Nov. 2 Ray
mond Wileom of Grand Rapids, arrest
od last night on a chirgo of kidnap
ing Rosnllo Shanty, aged 11, pleaded
guilty to a charge of abduction when
arraigned In court hero today. He was
returned lo the county jail to await
sentence.
Helmsman Is Eliminated
(Br TH ASfOCIATED PRESS)
NEW YOniC, Nov. 2 A mechanical
steoring device supplanted ths hand
of tho (juaiterinaster of tho Munson
liner Munargo on her last voyage from
eastern Cuban points to Now York.
Captain Andrew Asburn of the Mun
argo declared today, The vessel,
which docked here yesterday, was tho
first American, passenger ship to
make- nn ocean voyage without a
helmsman, company officials paid.
WILSON ENTERS
GUTYPLE
the Jurors. Mrs. Champion was repre
sented by Walter D. Meals and John
Orgill.
INDEPEii
E
IS ASKED FDR
Philippine Senate Today
Adopts Unanimously
A Resolution
. (Br The Associated, Press)
MANILA, Nov. 2 The Philippine
senate today adopted unanimously a
resolution asking the congress of the
United States to authorize the Philip
pine legislature to call a constitution
al convention to create an independ
ent republic in the Philippines and to
determine what relation 'it should
bear to tho American government
The resolution' was sent to the
house of representatives.
E
Every House In Soviet Russia
Must Display Large
Red Flag
(Br The Associated. Press)
PETROGRAD, Nov. 2 The fifth an
niversary of tho revolution which
brought soviet power will be cele
brated in Russia next weok on the
largest scalo ever attempted in this
country.
Next Tuesday is to bo anniversary,
day and orders have gone forth that
every house and building must dis
play a red flag at least a yard long
in order to avoid arrest and th pay-
rem oici nne.
s.--:. .
Hi
(Br The Associated Press)
"WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 A state
ment issued by tho Mexican embassy
here today announced that advices
confirmed tho press account of tho
death of. General Francisco Murgula,
and added: "Tho death of Murgula
puts an end to tho last revolutionary
attempts to disturb tho peaceful con
ditions now prevailing In Mexico." J&
- - -, S
ruum it t litis y
VERDICT FOR $401.59
li) tho case of C. G. Snow vs. W. W,
Young, the Jury returned a verdict for
tbe plaintiff In tho sum of$401.59vfn
common pleas court at 3 oclock this
afternoon. Tho Jury was out from
ll;30 a. in. . ,
E ILL
CL Tl
IP'S T
0 IT
ACTRESS DROPS SUIT
TO GET HEART BALM
"NEW YORK, Nov. 2 Rather than
submit to further examination into
her past, Mrs. Maud L. Coballos,
known on tho stago as Mona Des
mond, tho "Dresden china girl," gavo
up hor chances of obtaining $100,000
when she dropped her breach of prom
Iso suit against Clifford R, Hendrix,
Wall street tToker.
Announcement of tho withdrawal of
her complaint was inado by her attor
ney to Justice McAvoy of tho supreme
court, bofore whom the Jury trial was
proceeding. Ho stated that his client
had hecome so nervous during tho
cross-examination that sho did not
feel physically able to go on with tho
complaint.
A
Brands As False Articles Ap
pearing In The Repub
lican Newspapers
The following telegram was re
ceived by The Dally Banner at 1:00
o'clock this afternoon from A. Vic
Donahey, Democratic candidate for
governor of Ohio:
Editor Daily Banner:
"Please give this publicity In your
columns In reply to the statements be
ing published In Republican newspa
pers that I will deprive schools of
state funds. The report is absolutely
false. I stand on my platform issued
during the primary campaign which
says I will reduce thestate.prcperty
tax levy and still give tho educational,
welfare and highway departments of
the state as much money as they can
consistently expend. I have always
been a friend of education and the
schools of Ohio."
A. V. DONAHEY.
Anniversary Today Is Cele
brated In A Very Quiet
Manner
(Br The Associated press)
(WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 President
Harding today celebrated his 57th
birthday anniversary as quietly as the
average American citizens observes a
birthday.
Thpre was no, indication of any
thing moretban just an ordinary) day
in the life of the chief executive of
the land.
Because Mrs. Harding is still con
fined to her bed, although she is re
covering from her recent illness, thero
will not be even a birthday dinner
party, but the president will spend
the evening with her.
The fact that today was his birth
day, however, was not forgotten by
the closest friends of the executive
or by the nation and the world at
large.
All day long telegraph wires at tho
White House ticked and messenger
boys arrived carrying messages of
birthday greetings, many from rulers
of other countries.
E
if
(Br The associated press)
COLUMBUS, Nov. 2 Warden P.
E.
Thomas "of the state penitentiary to
day started an investigation to deter
mine whether guards at the state
brick plant at Junction' City, where
prisoners are emp'loyed, were aiding
the prisoners to escape. The escape
of James Flannigan and John McFad
den prompted tho inquiry.
DOIHEY MAKES
PUBLIC STATEMENT
P
HARDING
T
WR
N STARTS
INVESTIGATION
MILLSOBJECTS
TO STATEMENTS
OF THE WIDOW
Takes Issue With Statement1
Made By Mrs. Hall Given
Out Yesterday
Quotes From His Interview
With Mrs. Hall The Mont- '
ing After Murder V
(Br the associated press)
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J., Nov. 2-j
James Mills, whoso wife was murder
ed with the Rev. Edward "W. Hall on
Sept. 14, took Issuo today with soma
of the statements made yesterday bji
we clergyman's widow in an inter-,
view.
Mills said ho met Mrs. Hall at the'
church at 8:30 on the morning 0t Ser
tember 15. Mrs. Hall said yesterday
that sho was at tho church at 7
o'clock.
"The first thing Mrs. Hall asked; me, '
was 'Was anybody sick at your house,,.
last night?'," said Mills, "and we' "
then nnminpntfifl nri Ihn font u- uiu -HP.
my wiie ana nor nusoand were miss
ing, and I said 'I guess they hare
eloped'."
"'No,' was Mrs. Hall's reply when'
I 'said 'I think something has happen
ed to them.'
"I saw Mrs. Hall in her home. I
went there to aslc if sho had any
news. I had an idea that Dr. Hall and.
my wife had been together, but I dii
not know anything was wrong. Ldon't
know why I said there might have
been an elopement"
... i .. ... .j
Municipal Election In Londetj
Yesterday Adverse u.
To Laborites V
(Br The Associated press)
I . "
LABOR LEADERS !
LONDON, Nov. 2 Stunned by the if
..j uunuuui ui uieir ca-iiuiuaies IB r
the municipal elections throughout ,
England yesterday, tho Laboritea In
tensified their political campaign to
day with the hope of making a better -showing
in the general olection for,
parliament on Nov.-15.
In yesterday's balloting the Labor
ites lost 149 seats, which they had pre-, f
viously held inLondon, and about 160
seats which they had occupied la 80
boroughs outside the capital.
While it would bo ra3h to assume
that labor is doomed to the same fate
at the parliamentary polls as it suf
fered yesterday, nevertheless tha out-l $
come of the local election has
Labor's prospects for parliamen
discouraging.
(Br the Associated Preiii '
NEW YORK, Nov. 2 German
marks dropped to another low record
today here when they reached' 1.13
cents or 5,517 to the dollar.
U.SJU
!
i
(Br the associated Press)
LONDON, Nov. 2 The caso of the
American consulato at New Castle
made
terr. M
GERMAN MARK TO
IW W RECORD!
fiir Pi) ncv
has been virtually settled, it ia report, j, -ed
in dinlomatic circles tnrinv. hut' .
the opinion is expressed that the
United States will desire an apology,-)
in connection with the charge of dla- V
crminatlon against British 'shiDblkc
wheh led to the closing of tho c6mix,j
tun? inni. PUIIlUtV'lf e " ., ,, . f ,5
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