OCR Interpretation


Newark leader. ([Newark, Ohio]) 1917-1946, December 01, 1917, Image 4

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078775/1917-12-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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FEWER “STRIKES” ON RECORD
Authorities Point With Pardonable
Prtd® to Good Work Done Since
Beginning o* War.
According tn statlstlca just complet
ed by the drpnrfnent of labor, there
had been reported to the government
shtce April 6, 1917, when a state of
whi
with Germany was declared, no
less flian 500 strikes and other “in
dustrial disturbances.”
These statistics cover a period of al
knost exactly six months and show that
n,029,671 working men were affected,
[in the same period in 1916 only 144
Strikes occurred.
I The government’s record shows that
fof the 500 strikes to which official at
tention was called, 100 are still in
[force, 50 were given up as Impossible
jof adjustment and -18 are in a quasi
ladjusted condition. The remainder
[were settled in one way or another.
Realizing that labor disturbances,
[especially such ns would affect work
iupon war contracts, w uld constitute
n material weakness in the effort put
forth by the United States, the war
industries board has under consldera
Ition a form of contract which will give
jthe government power to act as arbi
trator without waiting for an invlta
[tlon from either side and which binds
the contractor to abide by the decision
pttue in each case. For its part, the
Igovermne't will agree to revise the
Eontract prices to meet any revision
pward In labor costs resulting from
puch arbitration awards.
WOMEN TURN FROM
HOUSEHOLD LABORS
4
Woman engine wipers at Fpo
knne and at other division points
on the Great Northern and the
Northern Pacific railroads In
the state of Washington like
their work and prefer it to
housework, C. H. Younger, state
labor commissioner, declared re
cently after an inspection trip
to the railroad shops of the
state. The women in the em
ploy of the Northern Pacific at
Spokane work ten hours a day,
but receive time and a half for
the last hour, he said. In Pasco
and Ellensburg women engaged
at the same work for the North
ern Pacific work eight hours a
day, as do women coach cleaners
in the employ of the Pullman
company.
Demand Union Pay for Women.
Widespread introduction of women
|nto men’s work has aroused the
jAmerlr-an Federation of Labor. Plans
pre being developed to combat replac
ing men with women at less than
lUnlon wages.
The queetion of unionizing new
Women workers will be taken tip in
connection with the whole labor short
age problem at the American Federa
tion of Labor convention In Buffalo.
Generally the organization denies
Shortage of labor. “There is some
^shortage of labor in specialized
branches called into greater activity
in consequence of the war, but other
wise there is no ral shortage,” said
J. W. Sullivan, acting head of the de
[fense council’s labor committee.
If it is necessary to employ women
In some trades the association will in
sist they be allowed the right to or
ganize the women so that there will
be no reduction in the working wages
pr living standards of the men.
PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS
WE ARE ALWAYS PLEASED
TO SERVE YOU WITH-----
We have many
other styles you
may like.
2 FIBER SOLES A
SPECIALTY
A SPLENDID SHOWING OF
“UNION MADE”
SMART SUITS, OVERCOATS,
HATS, SHIRTS AND NECK
WEAR, WHICH ARE ALL
MODERATELY PRICED.
A T"« CLOTHIER
“The Store Where Quality Counts.*
“Tommy Walker” at $3.85
Has Made Such a
Hit That We Have
SOME THINGS LEARNED
In perusing the reports of the of
ficers of the International Typo
graphical Union to the Colorado
Springs convention of 1917 we find:
That the gross earnings of mem
bers were $66,652,431—an increase
of $3,940,625 over the year 1916.
That the old age pensioners were
paid $351,505.
That mortuary benefits were paid
to the amount of $298,476.88.
That the Union Printers Home re
ceived $156,726.69.
That the strike expenses were only
$4,684.50. for the year 1917.
That the strike expenses for the
year 1907 were $1,531,496.07.
That for strike benefits and special
assistance $12,281.35 were paid for
the year 1917.
That the amounts paid for strike
expenses, strike benefits and special
assistance “are the last word in the
argument in favor of the principles
of arbitration as a method of adjust
ing disputes between the union and
the publishers”
That the receipts for the year were
$1,090,362.87 and the expenditures
$1,022,982.34.
That the increase in earnings in
1917 over the gaia in 1916 was
384,106.
That the largest union is New York
(No. 6), with amembership of 7625
Chicago (No. 16), 4573, second
Boston (No. 13), 1877, third, and
Washington (No. 101), 1808, fourth.
That the smallest union is Red
Lodge No. 273, with a membership
of 3.
That the International Union must
be put in the bond-holding class, hav
ing funds invested in gilt-edge gov
ernment, state, county and municipal
bonds to the amount of $674,466.98.
That the International Union is a
business organization, doing business
at a cost of less than one-third of 1
per cent on a total sale of the labor
of its members, $66,652,431.
Ordered
posr.f4B.Acn
it ___JI
,L |T ■TORSS
17 STORKS
More!
Men—you’d do well to get in early
Saturd’y to capture a pair
of these snappy walking boots
They’re gunmetal, tan, cocoa
tan---English last—long vamp
that give elasticity and bouy
ancy to the step,
UNION MADE
^3.85
first try to get
‘Tommy Walker’s’
equal elsewhere
for $5 to $6.
Furniture,
RESIDENCE,
HOTEL,
$-/
pex
That the increase in earnings
member for 1917 was $1,086.34.
That the balances of the various
funds total $1,064,349.85.
That the subscriptions to the Lib
erty Loan of the International and
the various local unions, so far re
ported, were $108,150, which does
not include the subscriptions of indi
vidual members amounting to many
thousand dollars.
That the average paying member
ship shows a gain of 1119 over 1916,
the present membership being 61,
350.
That 214 unions negotioated scales
with increases.
That of the enormous receipts
taling $1,090,362.87, the sum
$812,099.72 were returned to
members
form of
benefits,
pensions
Home.
to
of
the
the
and beneficiaries in
mortuary benefits, strike
special assistance, old age
and the Union Printers
per
That the death rate was 13
1000 members.
That the average age at death
50.42.
was
the
Illi-
That the state of Ohio has
largest number of unions, 53
nois second, 51 New York and Penn
sylvania tied for third place, each
having 45.
MATTRESSES, BEDDING.
Sewing
machines,
SILVERWARE.
Carpets,
linoleums,
domestic rugs.
I
COMMUNICATED.
ORGANIZED LABOR OF
NEW YORK CITY.
There is an awakening- aU along
the line on the part of the working
class in regard to education. Organ
ized Labor of New York City has
taken an active interest in the Public
Schools of that great city. A recent
conference of Organized Labor .. pre
sented a petition to the Board of Ai
dermen asking for an investigation of
the educational situation. In accord
with this demand the Board of Aider
men is beginning a searching inves
tigation of the schools of the city.
Public School matters will be thor
ous psuts of the city at which these
Public School maters will be thor
oughly discussed. Parents’ Organiza
tions, Mothers’ Clubs, Educators,
School Boards, Organized Labor,
Employers of Labor, will be called
before these hearings. Various
charges concerning the sinister in
fluence of wealthy foundations, the
inadequacies of the housing and
teaching system and other material
defects in the educational system will
be made the basis of a thorough in
quiry. It has been charged that the
executive manager of the Board of
Education is paid by private interest.
This, and similar charges will be
thoroughly invesitgated.
We wish to call the public' attention
tion that Labor Councils, Labor Un
ions, Labor organizations are taking
more interest constantly in this great
question. We realize how fundamen
tal this question is. The subject of
education came in for a considerable
discusion at the last American Feder
ation of Labor Convention. The con
vention declared that the people
should directly control educational fa
cilities through the popular elections
of boards of education for a system
of free text books for adequate pen
sion provision for public school teach
ers to have a voice in the adminstra
tion of the school system that schools
must be removed from politics by the
merit principle of civil service to the
employment, advancement, and dis
misal of teachers that teachers
should receive financial recognition
more nearly commensurate with the
importance of their service in the
comunity that vocational eudcation
should be encouraged, and that the
right of teachers to organize and offi
ciate with the organized labor move
ment shall not be questioned. The
convention directed that efforts be
continued to organize school teachers
throughout the country. It was rec
ommended that every local, national
and international union, central and
state federation of labor be requested
to do everything posible to secure the
membership of every school teacher
in a union affiliated to the American
Federation of Teachers.
J. J. NEIMANN.
Arbitrate Strike.
The strike of shipyard workers of
the Harlan & Hollingsworth corpora
tion, Wilmington, Del., involving about
1,000 men, was settled by arbitration.
Roster of Local U nions
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Meets 2nd and 4th Sundays, 9 a. m.
at Trades Assembly Hall. Wm. M.
Morgan, Pres., John J. Callan, Sec’y.
BARTENDERS INT. LEAGUE, 412
Meets 1st and 3rd Sundays, 2 p. m.,
Fromholtz hall, Cor. E. Main & Webb.
W. R. Jones, Sec’y and Business Agt.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 172
Meets 1st and 8rd Thursdays,
Trades Assembly Hall, Wm. Hall,
Pres., Sam Alsdorf, Sec’y-Treas.
Engineers Local 530, I. U. of S. & O. E.
Meets 2nd Wednesday and 4th Sun
day at their tall, llMi E. Church St.
Henry Kelley, Pres. C. R. Kinney,
Sec’y. W. H. Cocanour, Fin. Sec’y
and Treas., Masonic Bldg.
IRON MOULDERS UNION No. 152
Meets 1st and 3rd Monday nights,
Redmens Hall, Issac Pyles, Pres.,
E. A. Ringer, Sec’y^
LICKING LODGE No. 80, I. A. of M.
I Meets 1st, 3rd and 5th Tuesdays,
Trades Assembly Hall. Chas. Bucking
ham, Pres., A. B. Uffner, Sec’y. J.
P. Wolfe, Business Agent.
:-v
News from our Locals
Secretaries and business represen
tatives of the various labor organ
izations are requested to furnish
weekly The Leader with the news
from their respective organizations.
ENGINEERS LOCAL No. 530
Engineers Local No. 530 met Sun
day afternon, with a good number of
the brethren present. The brethren
were all pleased with the “Leader”
and wish the paper the best of suc
cess. All the brethren are requested
to be present at our next meeting on
Wednesday evening, Dec. 12th. 7:30.
ELECTRIAL WORKERS No. 172
At the next regular meeting of
Electrical Workers Union No. 172,
Thursday, Dec. 6th, many matters of
importance and general interest to
the
the
ing
the
members will be presented, not
least of which will be the draw
for the set of books to be given
holder of the lucky number.
Officers for the ensuing term will
also be nominated. Be on hand
promptly.
GLASS BOTTLE BLOWERS UNION
John Zahner, Webb Merrick,-John
Sullivan, Elmer Horton, Chas. Dover,
Geo, Glaunsinger and “Skin” Wheeler
left for Hawthorn, Pa., last week,
where they will be employed in the
large glass works at that place. The
men are all expert bottle blowers and
have been employed at the American
Bottle Co.’s plant in this city.
Hold Sunstroke Industrial Accident.
The industrial accident board of
Texas held that sunstroke Is an In
dustrial accident. This decision van
reached In the case of Roy L. Stewart,
who lost his life while lu the em
ploy of the F. A. Jones Construction
company at Camp McArthur, near
Waco, last summer. As such employe
he was covered by Insurance, the con
struction company being a subscriber
to the employers’ liability act, and on
the date of the accident carried a pol
icy with the Ocean Accident and Guar
anty corporation.
The construction company contend
ed that it was not Hable for death or
injury of any of its employees from
sunstroke. The order entered by the
Industrial accident board provides that
Stewart’s beneficiaries are to receive
the sum of $12.17 per -week for 3G0
weeks, dating from July 27. 1! 17? Of
this amount $30 is to be paid for attor
ney’s fees.
Shipbuilding Workers to Be Listed.
To aid the shipping hoard In carry.
Ing out its great merchant shipbuild
ing program the chamber of commerce
of the United States has launched a
movement to enroll all men formerly
engaged In the shipbuilding trade so
that they may be called to the yards
as needed. The chamber’s national
war shipping committee announced
that local committees are being form
ed In various cities to make n survey
of labor resources and to secure the
consent of employers to release form
er shipbuilding workers when neces
sary.
Bell Phone 94
Funeral Director
LADY ASSISTANT
AMBULANCE SERVICE
15 WEST CHURCH STREET
NEWARK, OHIO
Newark Liquor Co
18 NORIH PARK PLACE
TRY OUR
Creme of Rye
AND
Darling
$1.50 per Qt.
DRAWN RIGHT FROM THE WOOD
L. H. HAMBURGER, Prop.
_____
Visit Oar Big Toy Department
THS ABCASE Wil OH BM»«M, KSWARK,O
21-23-25-27 WEST CHURCH STREET, 22-24 ARCADE
The Complete Home Outfitters
buiVAW’li
rmwilinilll
Auto Phone 1081
T. A. BAZLER
We have
re.
Auto Phone 1028
Draperies,
SHADES, CURTAINS,
LAMPS.
Stoves,
MONOGRAPHS,
Saturday, Dec. 1st, 7 p.
Souvenir Toys Given
MOTOR OR HORSE DRAWN VEHICLES
AMBULANCE SERVICE
I 27-29 NORTH FOURTH STREET NEWARK, OHIO
llill Illi IIMIIillllilllillMlllllllillMlSHMHIilil
I—I IIIIMI—*iMI ■—IIIIIIIIIMWiHi—
For the Finest and Best
Fresh Home Dressed Meats
of all kinds, Sausage, Pudding* and everything in the
Good Eating line, don’t fail to call on the old reliable
Gene Wollinsky
At the Farmer’s Market, West Main Street.
The Finest Grade of BUTTERINE a Specialty.
“JCT
WE ARE READY 10 HELP YOU
GET READY FOR CHRISTMAS
Bibles Games Stationery
Fountain Pens Pictures Building Blocks
Pocket Books Toilet Sets Popular Copyright Books
Smoking Sets Gift Books Boys and Girls Books
large and varied line of Christmas cards, Book­
lets, Post cards, Seals, etc., etc. We extend a cordial invitation to
every reader of the “NEWARK LEADER” to see our Holiday Line.
LEIST & KING FRY
34 WEST MAIN STREET
CHAS. A. DUERR
The Arcade Florist
Flowers For AH Occasions
Both Phones
DR. EARL J. RUSSELL
I,"
ranges,
CUT GLASS, CLOCKS,
HOUSEHOLD UTENSILS.
EDISON, DIAMOND DISC,
COLUMBIA.
ma OPENING OF
RACKET
STORE
22 S. Second St
to
Children
See Santa Claus il Work in Window
AUTO PHONE 1919 and 1082 BELL PHONE 459
LESTER N. BRADLEY
Funeral Director
24^ West Main Street
7%
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