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Newark leader. ([Newark, Ohio]) 1917-1946, December 15, 1917, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078775/1917-12-15/ed-1/seq-5/

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DECEMBER 15, 191?
Umbrellas
Rubbers
Soles
The When Store
36
West Main Street
Announce Their Preparedness To Supply Your
Christmas Wants.
Women’s Men’s & Boys’
Suits, Coats Suits
Dresses, Skirls
Waists, Slats
Petticoats
Trousers
Raincoats
Only merchandise from the best known Union
manufacturers shown in this store and priced most
reasonably.
Liberal term concessions offered to those de
siring it.
The When Store
36 West Main Street
E. H. REYNOLDS, Manager
17 West Main Street
Headquarters for Toys
GOODS LAID AWAY FOR A SMALL DEPOSIT
Newark Wai! PapcrCo.
29 W. Main St. Satisfaction
Union Men! Get Our Prices on Job Printing
Felt Shoes
Rubber Boots
Work Shoes
Dress Shoes
Vallses
Freshman at Cornell University
Falls in Love With Girl
of Tender Age.
SUIT LASTS 12 YEARS
Naturally the Lassie Grew Up and
When Persistent Lover Returns
From Foreign Visit He
Marries Her.
Boston.—After waiting 12 years,
Harry Gorham Farnum, a young busi
ness man of New York city, has
claimed as his bride Miss Viola Evelyn
Trueman of Boston and thereby hangs
a story of a most unusual courtship,
for the bride was but seventeen years
old when she married, being a chubby
child of five years when Farnum first
proposed. At that time he was twenty
two years old and a freshman at Cor
nell university.
The romance that persisted to a cul
mination rarely attained outside of
story books had its inception at Provi
dence, R. I., where the Trueman and
Farnum families had homes in close
proximity. The young man’s father had
imade a fortune in the leather business
and during college vacation periods the
junior Farnum spent the time at home.
There he first noted the little girl
happy with her dolls.
Wrote to Girl Through Mother.
He played with the little girl and
when he returned to college he wrote
her letters, through her mother, re
counting his adventures and pranks in
college. According to Farnum’s con
fession, he was unable to get the baby
countenance out of his mind for a min
ute. He attended dances, met the
eligible girls of the college set, but his
mind constantly reverted to the little
tot at home.
Three years after their initial meet
ing, when Viola was nine, her faithful
suitor received his degree at Cornell.
In most college romances that would
have been an opportune time for the
lover to have claimed his bride, hut
Viola continued to play with her dolls
and Farnum hastened to New York to
pursue a post-graduate course at Co
lumbia university.
Took Journey Through South America.'
The college man continued his love
making and the strange persistency of
The Marriage Was Solerrinized.
L^zz.*t™”wo^
ria red the idea preposterous. Every
other member believed that when the
proper time arrived Viola and Farnum
would be married.
After completing his post-graduate
course, Farnum went to South America
where he spent several years in the
hide and leather business. But he did
not omit the formality of frequent pro
posals or cease in his ardent love-mak
ing. The girl confessed that she was
lonesome for him and longed for his
return. When he did get back the Viola
of other days was no longer little. She
was a woman of seventeen, and big
und old enough to marry, so she
thought.
A poll of the family was taken and
all gave their consent but Papa True
man. For a time he held out hut, worn
llown finally by the determined as
saults of his daughter and her stal
wart lover, he gave his consent. The
parents of the girl accompanied her to
|he city hall and obtained the license.
1’hen the party repaired to the Congre
gational church where the marriage
was solemnized.
Found Wealth in Trunk of Recluse.
Ord, Neb.—An auctioneer was sell
ing the effects of Mrs. Elizabeth Cur
tie, an aged recluse, who died recently.
When bids on a trunk came slow the
auctioneer lifted the top and found an
expensive toilet set and some silver
ware wrapped in silk quilts. As he
lifted one of the quilts three packages
containing $3,000 in bills, dropped to
ihe floor.
Boy Caught Fox by Grabbing Tall.
Brattleboro, Vt.—Charles Norman,
sixteen years old, captured a fox by
grabbing its tall. The boy saw the
fox’s tall protruding from a hole. He
lelzed the tail, pulled the fox back and
lit It over the head with a cu***
'IMS NEWA iK LEADER
LITHOGRAPHERS AID
IN WAR OPERATIONS
According to information sent
out by the American Alliance for
Labor and Democracy, the
Amalgamated Lithographers of
America are furnishing skilled
craftsmen to the government,
whose duty it will be to revise
and print daily field maps, show*
Ing troop movements in France.
Soon after the selective draft
act went into effect Charles J.
Hohlweek, president of Local
No. 1 of the Lithographers?
union, New York, was ap
proached by army officers, who
sought his assistance in devising
some sort of traveling printing
and lithographing shop. So far
the union has furnished 300
skilled men for the task, and ex
pects to offer more.
'MORE WORK IN FEWER HOURS
(Ample Proof That Shorter Day of
I Labor Is Beneficial to Em.
ployer and Employees.
Concrete illustration of the fact
jthat as much or more is sometimes ac
complished when the daily working
period is reduced were given at the
last meeting of the American Associa
tion for Labor Legislation by Ethel
bert Stewart, statistician of the fed
eral bureau of labor statistics.
Mr. Stewart cited flour mills to
[Louisville, Ky., to which it had been
found that when the 24 hours was di
vided in two shifts 44 men were re
quired to pack the plant’s output.
IWhen a change was made to three
shifts of eight hours each 45 men
were employed with no change to the
(Output.
Mr. Stewart said further: “In con
nection with my work on paper for
the tariff board, I found that one pa
per company had made two wage in
creases amounting in all to 21^ per
cent, although during the same time
they changed from a two to a three
shift system, a reduction in hours of 33
per cent. The labor cost per ton of news
print paper was less in the year the
investigation was made than it had
been 14 years before on a 12-hour
basis and at lower wages. The paper
mills out West have not been com
pelled to establish the eight-hour day,
but they have done it because there
|s more money in it.
“The argument that reduction of
hours will drive the manufacturer out
of business makes me think of a con
versation I heard up in Pennsylvania.
iA.n automobile man was roasting an
agent of the Ford company for paying
$5 a day and reducing the hours to
eight, on the ground that it was a
purely selfish, moneymaking scheme.
The man’s answer was: ‘Mr. Ford has
hot patented the $5 a day nor the
plght-hour day. If you think you can
friake more money that way, go to it.’
So I am not prepared to concede that
phanging a continuous industry from
twelve-hour to an eight-hour basis is
going to be a hardship.”
For Night Work in Shipbuilding.
Construction of ships by electric
light, employment of two or three
eight-hour shifts and the addition of
committee comprising three produc
tion engineers are a few of the things
planned by the shipping board to ex
pedite production.
Chairman Hurley wired coast ship
ping builders to arrange if possible
tor the employment of two or three
extra shifts. He said that the excel
lent climatic conditions prevailing in
those localities at present should be
made the most of. The plans would
(involve ship construction at night. A
New Jersey plant has started ship con
struction at night. The government is
to pay for the electricity and increased
(equipment.
Praises Compulsory Work Yjw.
That the compulsory work law of
Maryland has proved
a
Wk
big success
was the assertion today of George A.
jMahone of Baltimore, director of
the bureau which is attending to
Jits enforcement. Said Mr. Mahone:
“The compulsory work law has now
been in effect for about two months.
The eastern shore counties have been
visited once by a representative from
this bureau and the counties on th
(western shore have been visited at
least twice by representatives from
the Compulsory Work bureau. Wliile
In some of the counties there have no!
been any registrations, from report
received it has been demonstrated
without doubt that the law has fully
justified its eiKietmeut and that idle
ness unquestionably has been re
duced.”
LABOR NOTES.
A general strike of employees at the
factories of the Minneapolis and On
tario Power company. International
’Falls, Minn., was called. The reason
given by the men are that the hands at
the new Kraft mill have not been ac
corded the increase in pay granted tn
employees at the paper mill, causing
ithe strike, and that the paper mill men
[went out in sympathy with the Krai i
(mill men.
A strike of chemists in Petrograd is
on. The strikers themselves desig
mated 32 of th« 2'0 druggists in the
^capital whose stores may remain open
In order to meet the urgent needs of
Ithe population.
Conditions in this country could be
made a great deal better and accidents
lessened to a remarkable extent by a
wider standardization of safety meas
ures and accident prevention equip
ment
This year heed the National appeal
to eliminate foolish giving. Electrical
gifts are in keeping with the times.
JUST A FEW SUGGESTIONS:
Toasters
Percolators
Irons
Grills
Lamps
Sewing Machines
Washers
Cleaners
Motors
Flash Lights
COME IN AND SEE THESE AND
MANY OTHERS
20 Arcade J. E. CURRIE, Mgr.
Office Hours:
7 to 11 A. M.
1 to 5, 7 to 9 P. M.
With Gift Shopping Time here we
invite your inspection of Men’s Things
chosen by a Men’s Store—everything
useful and practical with generous
provisions for the Boys in Khaki.
Cloth ier and Furnisher
LICKING COUNTY PIONEER
OFFICE, 69 WEST MAIN ST.
I
State Licensed and National School Graduate
get
Greatest Christmas Store
Y»E ARE READY TO HELP YOU
Bibles Games Stationery
Fountain Pena Pictures Building Blocks
Pocket Books Toilet Sets Popular Copyright Books
Smoking Sets Gift Books Boys and Girls Books
a
We have
Fare Five
Newark, O.
Automatic Phone 1357
Results
large and varied line of Christmas cards, Book­
lets, Post cards, Seals, etc., etc. We extend a cordial invitation to
every reader of the “NEWARK LEADER” to see our Holiday Line.
LETST N KINGERY
34 WEST MAIN STREET
DR. EARL J. RUSSELL
DENTIST
Auto Phono 1028 24^ West Main Street
&

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