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Newark leader. ([Newark, Ohio]) 1917-1946, January 05, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88078775/1918-01-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
W^v^KvV
WEWaRK LEADER
Official Organ of Organized Labor
in the city.
Issued under the management of the
Newark Trades and Labor Assembly.
Devoted to the promotion of the best
interests of both employer and em
ployee* free from religious or pol
itical affiliation.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
JULIUS JUCH, Publisher
JOHN BUSH, Associate Editor
Auto Phone 5006
Censor Board:
Paul H. Ziegfeld J. H. Sharritt
John Bush
Business and Publication Office:
No. 17*/j W. Main St., Newark, Ohio
Auto Phone 15*8
Subscription Price, $1.00 per year.
Entered as second-class matter
November 28, 1917, at the post office
at Newark, Ohio, under the Act of
March 3, 1879.
THE AMERICAN WAY
By Dr. Frank Crane.
In North Dakota there is a farmer
by the name of A. C. Townley. His
main crop was flax. This was what
happened. I quota from Eleanoi
Taylor in the Survey:
“In order to buy new equipment,
seed, etc., he borrowed a large sum
of money from a groip of interests
which controls not only the credit
offered to the farmer, but also the
transportation and marketing facil
ities of the state. When his crop
was ripe it necessarily passed through
the hands of this group to be put on
the market. They paid Mr. Townley,
as they did many of the farmers, a
low price for his flax, and sold it for
a high one. Their price to him was
so low that he found it impossible
to make the required payment on
his mortgage. The mortgage was
foreclosed, therefore, and his farm
taken to liquidate the debt.
“Townley saw other farmers in al
most similar predicaments. In spite
of hard work and intelligent effort
they were so at the mercy of food
and grain speculators that they barely
made both ends meet. He gathered
a few together, therefore, talked the
situation over, and out of their con
ference grew the North Dakota Non
Partisan League, with today a mem
bership of 130,000 farmers and an
annual income of about $1,000,000.”
Very soon the combined farmers
saw that they could not do much
toward relieving their economic
troubles without going into politics.
The old parties, both Republican and
Democratic, had been side-stepping
in their usual way. The farmers put
their own men in the primaries. The
1916-1917 elections seated their can
didate in the governor’s chair, and
got them three supreme court judge
ships and 105 out of the 138 members
of the legislature.
The labor unions have co-operated
with them.
The point I want to bring out in
all this is that this is a fine sample
of the real way to run a democracy.
Instead of standing about berating
your country and mourning the in
justice of the laws, why not get busy
and create a majority to remedy the
bad conditions?
Why complain of politics? Why
not go into politics, clean things up,
and get what you want in a straight
forward, American way?
If you don’t like the parties on
hand, start a new one.
Anything that will break up the
old, traditional political alignments,
that have come to mean nothing but
phrasemaking, is welcome. Perhaps
Townley and his co-workers have
shown us the way. At the recent
convention he said: “The farmers
control 35 per cent of the' vote of
this country labor controls about 2'1
per cent a combination of these two
elements would make itself felt
through the nation.”
Illinois is to be one of the battle
grounds of the National Non-Partisan
League in the near future. Word has
gone out from the leaders of this
agrarian labor fight against the old
political parties and special interests
that if the league can elect 100 con
gressmen next yean- or aid in the
election of that many representatives
favorable to its purposes, the “steel
barons,” “coal barons” and others
suspected by the farmer of making
billions of dollars from the war will
lose their influence at Washington.
With North Dakota already won
and the Non-Partisan League sweep
ing through Minnesota, its leaders
are now planning a congressional
campaign to take in Illinois, Iowa,
Jansas and several other western
states, and congressmen who have
failed to heed the appeals of the
league are to be bitterly fought for
re-election. —Popular Finance.
The Union Men’s
View of Wor
By John Bush.
When it cqjnes to getting down the
gun for a man-hunt or springing to
arms for a war, some of us may
hesitate. That is natural, because
we are peaceloving and not in the
least belligerent or militaristic, and
war is not one of our hobbies.
We declare our abhorence of war
and our devotion to the cause of
peace. But we realize that there are
evils greater and more intolerable
than those of war.
We are aware that war waged for
evil ends must be met by war waged
for altruistic ends A peace bought
by the surrender of every principle
vital to democracy is no peace, but
shameful servility.
We are positive that neither our
president or our nation’s officials
sought this war, we know that they
desired peace as did the people, and
and that they tried to keep aloof from
the political affairs of Europe. Our
President, W’ith forbearance and pa
tience which people in all parts of
the world thought extreme, exhausted
all honorable means in behalf of
peace, and the declaration of war
came only after many months of
futile efforts to avoid a conflict.
Beware the fury of a patient man.
We are aware of the fact that in
this crisis the one fundamental need
is unity of action, and the union
men of our nation are the best pre
pared at all times, and always ready
to render the government every ser
vice in their power.
We strongly denounce the words
and actions of those enemies of the
government who are striving to ob
struct the operations of war. The
union men, in their long years of
struggle to obtain their present stand
ards have encountered many such
persons who deserve the detestation
of mankind.
We have every reason to believe
that the government desires to make
the people happy, and knows how to
make them happy.
We know that God grants liberty
only to those who love it and are al
ways ready to guard and defend it.
Who would not rather founder in the
fight
Than not know the glory of the fray?
When all the blandishment of life
are gone,
The coward sneaks to death, the brave
live on.
CLEARANCE
EXTRA SPECIALS
30c Men’s work and
dress suspenders 17c
50c Men’s stylish fine
neckwear for 27c
39c Men’s fine neck
wear for only 17c
10c Men’s fine white
handkerchiefs for 7c
38c Men’s stylish muff
lers for only 47c
25c Men’s dress socks
for pair only 17c
$3.00 Men’s heavv
warm sweaters $1.97
50c Men’s wool sox
for pair only 37c
$4.00 Men’s corduroy
pants for only $2.97
50c Leather palm
gauntlet gloves....34c
$2.50 Boy’s wool
sweaters for. $1.77
$1.50 & $2.00 Men’s
stylish mufflers..-97c
$3.00
for
$1.00
for
75c Men’s work shirts
for only 59c
$2.00 Men’s silk muff
lers for only....97c
$1.50 Men’s dress
shirts for ........97c
$1.00 Children’s Velvet
bonnets for 50c
$3.50 Extra large cot
ton fleece blankets,
for pair $2.49
Men’s fur caps
$1.97
Men’s mufflers
only 47c
THE NEWARK LEADER
THANKS, BRO. ARMSTRONG
The Columbus Labor Journal, ft
live organ of organized labor, printed
in the capital city, has this to say:
“Newark, Ohio, gets a Labor Paper,
which is called the “Newark Leader.”
It is quite a newsy sheet, containing
a nice line of advertisements, which
is a very essential point in making
a labor paper pay its way. The paper
is issued under the management of
the Labor Assembly and has a cen
sor boadr to look after it. We wel
come the newcomer and wish it a
long and successful life.”
20% OFF
Boy’s Suits, Overcoats &
Mackinaws—THE HUB
$3.50 VALUES $2.80
$4.00 VALUES $3.20
$5.00 VALUES $4.00
$6.00 VALUES $4.80
$7.50 VALUES $600
CHIROPRACTIC
If a machine fails to work properly,
you look for a mechanical defect, or
a place where some part is out of its
proper relation to some" other part.
When you find the place you “adjust”
the machinery, so to speak. Did it
ever occur to you that your body is
a human machine, that certain parts
may get out of proper relation to
certain other parts, and as a result
nerves may be pressed upon causing
certain organs to fail to carry on
their work properly, and that disease
is the result? Throw off an electric
switch and you shut off the electric
current—subluxate a spinal bone and
you pinch the nerve and shut off the
life current, which passes from the
brain down thru the spinal column
and out to the parts effected.
Sever the nerves running to any
vital organ and death is the result.
Pinch the nerves running to any vital
organ and desease to the extent of
the pressure is the result. Constipa
tion, stomach trouble, asthma, deaf
ness, piles, appendicitis, etc., are
caused by pressure on nerves. Chiro
practic adjustments will remove the
pressure and you will get well. No
drugs, no surgery. Don’t say it can’t
be done, that’s what people said about
the telephone, airship, etc. Investigate
E. R. BEBOUT, Chiropractor,
16 Arcade, (next door Western Union)
Newark, Ohio.
Starts Friday Morning
With Winter Merchandise Priced Far Rclow Actual Value
We can’t afford to carry over our vast stock of Winter Merchandise—yet we know
that in most instances the Clearance Sale Prices are absolutely less than we can buy the
^ame merchandise for next year—but when we and every merchant has to pay more you
will have to pay more. It’s up to you to save at these Clearance Sale Prices. Our
Clearance Sale will continue from dav to day until all winter merchandise is disposed of
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED—COME FIRST
Our January Clearance Sale
Prices on Men’s, Women’s and
Children’s Shoes are absolutely
unmatchable.
These for instance:
$5.00 Men’s Dress Shoes, variety
of style—-Clearance fl? *7
Sale Price, pair only
$6 Men’s and Y’ng Men’s Mahog
any Colored Shoes-- 1 A
Clearance price only \j
$2.50 Men’s Work Shoes—Clear
ance Sale Price per iff5 A 7
pair only.................. Up I V
$2.50 Boy’s Shoes in sizes to 6
—-Clearance Sale fl
$3.00 Women’s Dress Shoes, lowland medium heel Q7
Clearance Sale Price only Jj
$4 00 Women’s Patent and Dull Leather Dress Shoes (T"
Clearance Sale Price only.................................................W JW 1
$1.50 Men’s Rubber Artics—Clearance Sale Price
Only
Lot of Men’s Rubber Boots, good
quality—Clearance
Sale Prite only........Lt
I
tf' H) (Y 7 I
V
RAnENBERG’S
2 Doors West of Square^
TEACHERS MUST ASSIST
Their Aid Needed to Teach Nation
Economy and Thrift
___ di­
School teachers of America must
assist in teaching the nation the
lesson of economy, self-denial and of
saving to the point of self-sacrifice.
They must help in pointing the way
to this all-important task for the
maintenance of “national strength,
which will safeguard posterity and
advance civilization”
First step in reaching Ohio’s mil
lion school children in promoting the
sale of United States War Savings
Stamps and Thrift Stamps has been
undertaken by the Ohio War Savings
Committee. In a letter addressed
this week to every school superintend
ent in the state, information is carried
that “our government is expecting
big results in the thrift campaign
from school chidren of the United
States”.
Help of the school superintendent
is enlisted to bring the important
War Savings Stamp lesson to every
school teacher and pupil in the state.
Accompanying that appeal to the
superintendents are copies of pam
phlets directed “To Young America,”
and “To the School Principals and
Teachers of America.” The former
is signed by Secretary of the Treasury
McAdoo, and the latter by Frank A.
Vanderlip, chairman of the National
War Savings Committee.
“The teachers form a mighty agency
which can start aright”, Chairman
Vanderlip says, “the movement among
our children on which the success of
our government depends.”
20 OFF
Men’s Suits & Overcoats
$10.00 VALUES $ 8.00
$12.50 VALUES $10.00
$15.00 VALUES $12.00
$18.00 VALUES $14.40
$20.00 VALUES $16.00
The Flub The Hub
The Order of R. R. Telegraphers,
aided by Federal mediators, has ob
tained an eight-hour day and pay for
overtime. Hundreds of B. & O.
operators were benefitted.
The city fathers of Augusta, Ga.,
have granted an increase of 10 per
cent to employes of the police, fire,
street and scavenger departments.
7
Prices, pair only
1 jr
Misses' School Shoes, sizes to 2
---Clearance Sale (p 1 1
Price, pair only J)
1 TT
$2 Little Gents’ School Shoes
sizes to 2---Clear- (M
ance Price only .p tt/
97c
Lot of Men’s House Slippers
Choice for Clearance
4 Af
Sale only............................ Try
V
2
2
2
I
I
CLEARANCE
EXTRA SPECIALS
$4.00 Ladies sweaters
for only $2.98
50c Stocking caps for
only ....... 39c
35c Stocking caps
for
only .................... 19c
95c Angora -caps for
only 49c
75c Scarf and cap
sets
for 39c
50c Men’s dress caps
for 37c
$1.00 Men’s dress
caps
.....for 79c
98c- Women’s corsets
for ..........69c
$1.25 Men’s overalls
only ....................97c
$3.00 Men’s
dress and
work pants for $1.97
$2.00 Men’s flannel
shirts for .........$1.77
$5.(10 Women’s silk
waists for $2.98
$1.50 Women’s waists
for ......... 97c
45c Women’s silk boot
hose assorted colors
for 29c
50c Children’s dresses
for 39c
25c Boys & girls school
stockings for...19c
85c Women’s percale
coverall aprons....59c
10c Women’s handker
chiefs for.... 3’/2C
85c Children’s union
suits, size 2 to 14
for ......................65c
Lot of children's vests
and pants union
suits lor 39c
77
O.' G.
For Farms and all kinds of Real Estate.
Best Horse Insurance in the World—pays a
death from any cause.
All kinds of live stock sold on commission.
O. G. WARRINGTON
Room 11, Hibbert & Schaus Bldg. Newark, O.
THE FUTURE
Have you ever thought seriously of how you were
going to fare when your ability to earn a livelihood has
been impaired to the point where you were no longer
capable .of earning enough to keep yourself and family?
It’s very important to you, especially if you are a young
man. Many an old couple have been saved the disgrace
of having to depend upon their friends by preparing for
their older days by making investments in municipal
bonds that yield a good income 5% and 6 per cent
There is nothing that is so sound as good municipal
bonds such as the ones that are being sold by D. H. Pigg
who represents the Security Municipal Bond Co., 18^
North Park Place. Municipal bonds from up.
ExigHteen Vears
That is the length of time that the New York Finance Company
has been in business in Newark, Ohio
For the past four years the state has regulated this business.
Investigate our methods of loaning before borrowing elsewhere.
Loans made any place in Licking county on household goods,
pianos and live stock of all kinds.
Diamonds taken as collateral security.
New York Finance Co.
ROOMS 12 AND 13 HIBBERT & SCHAUS BLDG.
AUTO PHONE 1319
GO TO THE
I WILLIAM E. MILLER,
1 HARDWARE CO.
I No. 25 SOUTH PARK PLACE
FOR YOUR
HARDWARE, PAINTS AND GLASS
ROBES AND BLANKETS
STOVES, RANGES AND FINE CUTLERY I
GUNS AND AMMUNITION
ALUMINUM AND SILVER TABLE WARE i
Motor Ambulance Private Funeral Parlors I
The Citizens Undertaking Co. I
(Incorporated)
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
JANUARY 5, 191 a
103 EAST MAIN STREET, NEWARK. OHIO I
CLIFF J. STEWART, Manager
WITH LADY AND GENTLEMAN ASSISTANTS I
Prompt and Efficient Service Day and Night
Bell 900-W PHONES Citizens 2072
i diaiaj di
c-j dj on dj i or di'didj
JAMES W. PASSMAN, Jr. I
Practical Electrician I
ELECTRICAL WORK OF ALL KINDS
i MOTOR REPAIRING A SPECIALTY
Auto Phone 1696 58 HUDSON AVE. I
CHAS. A. DUERR
The Arcade Florist
Flowers For All Occasions
Both Phones
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3
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