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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, October 28, 1910, Image 15

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EL EA.SO HERALD Frida7 0ctober 28 19m Herald's Sporting News 15
The Herald s Sporting News
hS
10 IS WINNER OF PENNANT IN
tuc PflpTim Rfflllll IFUKIIF?
fill hyh ! I J iEfsLlE 1 1 fc I E I I K IT i i i
O
HARVARD AND YALE TEAMS IN ACTION
El Paso Leads if Games Act
ually Played Are to Be
Counted; Otherwise Cana
nea Is at the Top.
Again, which club is the champion
of the Cactus league?
Cananea has been: claiming the pen-
nant because of the standing this club J
had at the end of the season. El Paso .
ind Douglas had a tie game t play ,
of from the regular schedule, the win- i
ning of which would give El Paso the
rag on games actually played and -won.
This game was played Thursday after
noon and El Paso won with ease
Enter Victor "Walling, manager of
the Cananea club, by way of the
"Western Union nite letter service. V. R,
says in brief:
hae four forfeited Bisbee games to
our credit, which gives us the cham
pionship unquestionably."
This puts it up to a baseball arbi
tration board to 'decide just which of
for Douglas, but was relieved, not for
I cause, in the last half of the seventh,
when Powell went in to bat for him.
In the first of the eighth Powell was
J sent to left field and Harper took the
mound. Mills came in to catch.
Olmstead and Wolfe composed the i
opening 'battery for El Paso, but Gray
filled in the first half of the ninth.
Following is the score by innings: t
Score By Innings.
R. H. E. I
Douglas. ..3 00001011 6 10 9
El Paso 0 0 12 3 3 10 x 10 12 7
Batteries: Douglas, Kane and Har- .
. . - .. i
per; El Paso, Olmstead and Wolfe.
HEREMAN READY
. TO FIGHT FOG-EL
Cincinnati, O., Oct. 2S- President
August Herrmann, of the Cincinnati
baseball club, when informed that
"Please remember we j president Horace Fcgel, of the Phila-
i delphia team, had asked president
Lynch, of the National league, to warn
Mn Herrmann "not to tanipler with the
Philadelphia players, said:
"If Fogel is- trying to scare any-
the prickly pear circuit teams finished -one, he is likely to be surprised short-
at She top of the ladder. 1' inasmuch as I have ordered my ste-
ReEenibled Fat Men's Ganie. -nographers to ascertain the addresses
Like a game (by courtesy) iietween or urant, -McQuillen, -Moren and Bates,
the fat men and the lean men with a
keg of beer at every base, was the exhi
bition of baseball at Washington park
Thursday afternoon. The El Paso and
Douglas teams were supposed to fur
nish the opposition, but little developed.
The game was finally brought to a
close, glory be, with El Paso leading
in the score of 10 to 6.
Hits and errors were as numerous
as June bugs in June, El Paso being
credited, with an even dozen of safe
ones and seven errors. The Douglas
Dons secured nine hits, at seemingly
inopportune times, and topped El Paso's
error column, nine blngles being placed
to their discredit. Blame it on the cold
weather and occasional sand storm, if
you want lo, but lack of interest and
ambition to play ball is a more plaus
ible reason.
Seventy-two Count 'Eni.
By actual count, 72 chilled" fans and
fanesses were in the grandstand when!
the game passed the eight inning stage,
and about as many more fair attaches
and fans were assembled in various
places over the field, moving from time
to time to "keep in the sun.
As a whole, the game was little more
than a poor exhibition, and not more
than half a dozen yeils came from the
grandstand. Three-base hits were at a
discount, El Paso having already cinch
ed the game when Stovall and Jones
made long drives. ,
Don't Forget 'Ducky.'
Oh yes, don't forget his umps,
"Ducky" Gowan, whose decisions were
about on a par with the error column.
But it didn't make any difference, the
players not having enough enthusiasm
to kick. .Probably Ducky also was
cold.
Douglas Starts tse scoring.
Douglas opened the scoring in the
first Inning, leading off with three.
Knapp, Mills and Harper, starHng the
fireworks. That ended the Dons run
getting until the sixth, when Mathew
son was allowed to steal home.- 'In tho
eighth Harper- got-to second, on an er
ror, stole third and came home on
Ward's hit. In the ninth Snapp scored.
El Pao 3take It Even.
El Paso tied the score, making it
three to three, in the .fourth, inning,
Graham scoring in the third and Brew
ster and Wolfe beating it home in the
.fourth on Graham's hit.
Enthusiasm was lacking, so El Paso
proceeded to score three more in the
fifth. Ketchum came In on a wild
throw by Carlson and Stovall and
Brewster finished rounding the bases,
following Wolfe's safe hit through
second. In the sixth the Mavericks an
nexed three "more, Stovall and Jones
each making three-base hits, lollowel
by Brewster who singled, stole .second,
or rather was permitted to steal, went
to third on a iwld throw intended to
stop him at second, and concluded by
Bteallng home. In the seventh, Flick
hit for two bases, was advanced to
third on a sacrifice by Jackson, and
then beat the ball home after Graham's
high fly to center1 was caught.
Kane opened the game on the mound I strong.
and as soon as I have them, I "will
open up negotiations with them with a
view to signing them for the season of
1911. They belong to the Cincinnati
club and I have no doubt but what they
will play with us next season.
"I see that some mention of the na
tional commission has been made. The
national commission has nothing to do
with this question. I cannot see how
it could have. But I do not anticipate
any fight when facts are known and
unless someone tries to claim my play
ers, I cannot say what I would do."
WINGO ANDERSON
COMING FOR FAIR
Wingo Anderson, the phenom. pitch
er, who holds the palm for popularity
with El Paso fans, is to be here to par
ticipate in the fair tournament. Pip
Carson has received a letter from An
derson at his home in Alvarado, Texas,
where he has been resting since he left
El Paso, in which he says he is strong
er and in better trim than he was last
year when he pitched such great ball
for El Paso in the fair series against
Christy Mathewson and Rube Waddeli.
Wingo has not yet been signed by
the El Paso club, but will probably ap
pear in the blue and white uniform of
the locals during the tournament. He
is expected to arrive Saturday.
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TELLS PUPILS TO
MASTER PROBLEMS
Founder of the. Agricultural
College .Gives Helpful
Talk to Students.
Agricultural College, X. M., Oct. 28.
One of the most forceful talks delivered
here this year was given during the
last assembly by New Mexico's vener
able educator, professor Hiram Had
ley, first president of the college and
its founder.
He showed the value of a theoretical
training as against the practical train
ing how each are dependent upon the
other. He cited the complicated age in
which we live- and the competition of
the human minds in the mastery of the
great problems 6f today. He suggest
ed to the students to conquer the hard
things in the school life and shun the
easiest. . - - ....
The Athletic association has more
students in it this year than any pre
ceding year known. There are now
19Q registered The tennis courts dur
ing a great part of the time are occu
pied by players, especially among the
girls. Many of the girls are turning
out for basketball also. In a short
while the boys' basketball team will be
organized and actual practice begun.
Friday afternoon the E. P. M. I.
team will be here to j)lay football
against the first eleven. School will be
dismissed for the game. The field has
been irrigated and will be in very good
condition for playing.
The seniors and juniors will be en
tertained by the Alumni association at
the home of Oscar Snow at La Mesilla
Friday night.
The battalion of cadets formed on Ue
parade ground for instruction under
Maj. Charles P. George. The dress uni
forms have not come yet, so the ser
vice uniform is in use all the time.
The college orchestra is now organ
ized and has been practicing under the
leadership of Mrs. Sexton of Las Cru
ces; however, Miss Morrison, the mu
sic directoress, will take charge now.
Mrs. Nagel and her daughter. Miss
Florence Nagel, of South Havens, Michi
gan, are visiting with Mrs. C. P. Hag
gerty, who is another daughter of Mrs.
Nagel.
Miss Gladys Merriman entered college
as a pupil recently.
Harry Jones, until the last few years
an El Paso boy, had to go to doctor
Gerber to have the stub of his arm
attended to. One of the boys acciden
tally struck the stub and caused it -to
break. The new break was somewhat
painful and had to be attended to at
once.
MISS ADELA LUCERO
IS CARNIVAL QUEEN
The Contest a Spirited One
Throughout and Heavy
Vote Is Cast.
Las Cruces, N. M., Oct. 28. Miss
Adela Lucero won the contest for
queen of the Las Cruces Amusement
club carnival in the final count.
The contest was a spirited one and
the outcome was a matter of conjec
ture up to the last few minutes. Miss
Lucero received a total of 220,270 votes
and' was crowned as queen on the car
nival ground. A handome diamond
ring has been ordered for her and this
will be presented in an appropriate
manner as soon as it comes.
Miss Lucero is the daughter of J. R.
Lucero, clerk of the district court 'cr
the third judicial district of New Me r-Ico.
TEXAS BALL GOSSIP.
By Horace Shelton.
ABE ATTELL WHIPS
MACKEY WITH EASE
Newv York, Oct. 28. "Biz" Mackey,
of Cleveland, proved an easy mark for
Abe Attell, featherweight champion,
In their bout last night. After Attell
had floored the Cleveland man three
times in the sixth round, -the latter's
seconds crawled Into the ring and
hauled Mackesr into his corner.
The bout was to be 10 rounds, but j
Attell demonstrated his superiority be
fore two rounds had progressed.
A clean hard, one 'to the body knocked"! reserve list. He iras secured from
Mackey down rthe first time In the sixth
and as he rose, a right han.d swing
to the jaw toppled liim over again. A
right to the jaw ended the battle.
: : ! . o
BOWLING.
V V
f
Play in the city league will con
tinue tonight. The Cactus club will
visit the T. M. C. A. The club team Is
In the lead.
On Cactus club alleys tonight .Har
ris, the pitcher for the Cheyenne in
dians, will bowl Houck. The pitcher
is after Houck's title as city champion.
TO PLAT FOOTBALL.
Probably the greatest disappointment
in the American league lo Texas fans
was the hard fall 'down of Northen of
Houston, who went to the St. Louis
Browns the latter part of the season.
He started in the game in fine shape,
batting over .400 for the first four or
five games, but in the remaining 26
games in which he participated he bat
ted onlj- .19S.
Of the other Texas plaj-ers who went
to St. Louis at the fag end of the sea
son, only Mitchell, pitcher, is on the
Houston also. Malloj", who went from
Houston as a pitcher, has been re
leased. Mitchell won four of the six
games pitched, which is considered
remarkably good whea it is considered
he was pitching for a tail end team.
1
Newnam, first baseman who was pur
chased by the St. Louis Browns for
$3000, appears on the suspended list, j
He is now wintering in San Antonio.
He will p'robably be traded to some
Texas league team, as St. Louis does
not seem to want him any longer.
Of the other Texans with that team,
Griggs, formerly of San Antonio; Cris's,
formerlj- of aDllas; Truesdale, formerly
of Houston; Bailey, formerly of San
Antonio, will be retained, all four being
seasoned men.
Tris Speaker, of the Boston Ameri-
4
4. RACING DOPE.
At Lafbnia, Ky., yesterday, MeJi- j
sande met her-f match in the Handicap,
the featu retrace, w-Jlen she wentfvdown j
to defeat 'before7 Mevrrick in a six fur-
long-"'dash." -The Tesult was never in,i
doubt. M.erricK was off In good po- j
sition and shooting to the front In
the 'first few jumps, put-three lengths j
between himself and the field before
the stretch was reached.
A drizzling rain interfered, somewhat
with the attendance and racing at Bal
timore Thursday. The owners' handi
cap steeplechase, the carded feature,
went to Duffield, a well backed first
choice in a pretty race. The day's
feature was the winning of the fifth
race, a distance affair, by El Oro, a
40 to 1 shot, with apparent ease. The
winner had gained some reputation by
a race at the recent Marlborough meet,
but it was the greatest sort of a sur
prise when ie took Hilltop's measure.
At Latonla yesterday jockeys Her
bert and McTaggard were "suspended
after the last race for disobedience at
the post and jockey Rice was sus
pended for five days and fined $50 for
rough riding in. the fourth race.
EL PASO MAN FIGURES IN
LAS CRUCES KANGAROO COURT
Las Cruces, N. M., Oct. 28. The Las
Cruces Amusement club's kangaroo
court netted the club ?100. A jail was
constructed. On Main street and the
prisoners-- Tvere - locked up until tc
judge could ear the cases. Light fines
were assessed. Several jail deliveries
toojk plac,- and the . numerous police
men were kept busy running after
those .who had escaped.
Norwood Hall, of El Paso, was ar
rested and fined and then sworn in as
a special officer to assist in appre
hending the others.
Ardoln's pig sausage, a great winner.
WILLIAM DUNBAR IS
BADLY HURT BY A- HORSfi
Las Cruces, N. M., Oct- 28. Williara
Dunbar is suffering from severer
bbrulses received while riding over te
Schneider and "Willis ranch, north of
Las Cruces.
The horse which he was riding be
came frightened and got from his con
trol. After running for quite a dis
tance the horse ran into a barbed wir
fence, throwing Dunbar over into the
next field. He vras, picked up by h.JS
companions and hurried to Las Cruras,
where medical aid was secured. It
was found that he was badly bruisad
but had no bones broken, and no seri
ous results are anticipated.
AEROPLANES FAIL TO MAKE
HEADWAY AGAINST A GALE
New York, N. Y., Oct. 28. At the
aviation meet here Johnston and Hox
sey tried to imitate the gull, to set
their wings and soar into the gale
without effort, but although they kept
their poise beautifully, and although
the speed Vf the biplanes they were
flying is normally 35 miles an hour,
and their engines were running wide
open, they were pushed steadily back
out of view and down over the edge
of the horizon. The upper gale they
were jamming must have been more
than 40 miles an hour, bu as neither
was willing to come down before the
other, they stuck it out until forced
to land by sheer compulsion of the
elements.
Both were driven miles off the
course. Hoxsey landed safely at Brent
wood, Long Island, about 25 miles dis
tant. Johnston was carried 55 miles
to Middle Island village, Long Island.
These were the two longest flights
of the day. Each telephoned in that
they hoped to fly back to the course
today.
Wilbur Wright gave the details of
their adventures.
"Incidents?" Mr. Wright said. "There
was none. It was just one straight
forward progress backwards. When
they got up a thousand feet or more
they struck a wind blowing about 25
miles an hour faster than they could
travel. I estimate that it must have
been between 65 and 75 miles an hour.
So they just drifted. That's all thera
was to it; but I guess it's the first
time in the history of aviation tha.r
anybody ever made a flight tail end
foremost."
Fair Colors El Paso Candy Wheel.
Turkish baths for gentlemen at Gem
Barber Shop. 20S S. El Paso.
Look out for Snookums!
Snookums is certainly a wonder!
HAMLET
had melancholy, probably caused by
an inactive liver. A bad liver makes
one cross and irritable, causes mental
and physical depression and may re
sult disastrously.
Ballard's Herblne is acknowledged to
be the perfect liver regulator. If you're
blue and out of sorts, get a bottle, to
day. A positive cure for bilious head
ache, Constipation, Chills and Fever and
all liver complaints.
Sold by all druggists.
Thellig Feature
OF THE GREAT EL PASO FAIR AND EXPOSITION on tke
Fair Grounds, TOMORROW ONLY, SATURDAY, OCT. 29fk
"Buffalo Bill" Positively bids you Farewell Forever.
The Military Institute football team j cans has returned to his home in Hub-
nas gone to -iiesuia jrarK, wnere the
A. and M. college will be played this
afternoon. The local team departed 15
Old
MlJlr
MaTKs
Wm
sROliL
'Jm'
The greatest care is exercised in their
manufacturing, and their blending is exquis
ite a combination of bright Virginia and
Carolina leaf wrapped in Wheat Straw
paper the paper that you select for rolling
your own cigarettes.
Ftdl FlaooTed and MeUovt
lOforSc
Texas League Baseball pictures and
a valuable coupon in each package
Old Mill Cigarettes are packed in TINFOIL
bard, Texas. He brought his automo
bile, the only one in those parts, and
he is burning up the country and con
siderable gasoline. Of all the men
from the Texas league he made the
best record.
The Dallas club announces that con
tracts have been signed with pitcher
Fulton and third baseman Fulmer of
the Cresson (Pa.) independent team.
Both of these players made star records
during the past season.
Big Ed Hulburt, former Texas league
player and umpire, who made a record
in the Southern league by cleaning up
three players who attacked him, has
come into the limelight at Memphis,
Tenn. He objected to the way a cop
was handling a youthful prisoner, lit
into him and whipped tho policeman.
After the dust had cleared away the
cop admitted he needed a whipping and
refused to prosecute Hulburt.
Louis Drucke, the Texas pitcher with
the New York Giants, closed the season
with an excellent recprd. He was put
in to pitch one of the post season
games between the Giants and the
Americans and went to the" seventh
inning in fine shape, allowing the
Americans but one run. In this inning
V A TTTrt C? - 1y sin s-tY.4- T.A.n. t L
. ., iw n-cu uui ucutiuse xxe Degan to
I sret nervous and "fnthwcrTi -nroo ..
in.
Vu fc .
TTILLIE HOPPE IS LEADING
IX THE BILLIARD MATCH.
New York, Oct. 28. Willie Hoppe
beat Albert G. Cutler in last night's
play on their 1800 point handicap; bil
liard match, 300 to 102, running out in
13 innings. On this, the fourth night,
the match was transferred to Brook
lyn, where play will be resumed 'to
night Cutler displayed the worst form of
the match and is now 254 points be
hind Hoppe..
FOOTBALL POOREST SPORT
IX EXISTEXCE BUTLER.
New York, Oct 28. "Football is the
poorest .sport in existence," according
to president Nicholas Murray Butler,
who gives his views in the Columbia
Spectator.
T heartily approved of the action
of the university council in abolishing
football," said Dr. Butler referring to
the action taken five years ago.
"To revive the game- wpuld be a
sxep oacK into the middle ages."
IXJtmiES KILL FOOTBALL PLAYER.
Ithdca, N. Y., Oct 23. L. B. Paine,
Duluth, Minn., acting captain of
of
the ' Gornell freshman football team,
died at the Cornell infirmary last night
j.ruiii suupusea internal miuries ra-
icelved while playing football: HtI:Jr-
SAX FRAXCISCO TVIXS.
Sacramento,, Cal., Oct 28. San Fran
cisco scored 4-6-0 and Sacramento 3-9-2
in the ball game yesterday. The bat
teries were: Eastley and Barry;
Nourse, Baum and LaLonge.
LIGHTWEIGHT FIGHTER HERE.
Johnny Frayne, a Pacific lightweight,
passed through the city Thursday on
his way from New Orleans. He Is
going to San Francisco, where a series
of bouts will be booked.
4- f- -g'
4. -
4. WRESTLER CRUSHES TWO
4. MEX IX A FIGHT.
Edwardsvllle, 111., Oct 28.
4- Two indictments were returned f
4 against John Burton, profes-
4 sional wrestler, by the grand
4 jury charging him with killing "f"
$ Leo "Wentz and Louis TV"ei- 4
4 bracht, August 14. Burton with
I a strangle hold, is alleged to 4"
j have crushed the two men to
4s death in a fight in a vacant 4
Jt house at Marine, 111. 4"
4..4.4,4.4.4.4,4.4. 4. 4.4.4,4.4.4.
LAS CRUCES -DAILY RECORD.
Las Cruces, N. M., Oct 28. Deeds
and other papers of record filed in the
office of the probate clerk are:
Deed Filed.
C. H. Tidd and wife, of Maricopa
county, Ariz., to V. N. Hopper, war
ranty deed to land in precinct 20, meas
uring 210 by 859 by 210 by 877 feet, in
Las Cruces, $450.
Emma B. Boyer and husband to R.
N. Reagan, warranty deed to the north
east quarter of the northeast quarter
of section 31, township 25, south of
range 3 east, together with full .water
right in' the Chamberino main corn
unity ditch, $2400.
William Moeller, A. Krakauer, "W. F.
Latta and John A- Happer, of El Pao,
to Neal Jackson, warranty deed to all
of lots 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31
and 32, in block 6, Altura Park addi
tion to the town of Mesilla Park, $tGs..-
"William Moeller, A. Krakauer, "W. B.
Latta and John A. Happer, of El; Paso,
to Ben Alldridge, warranty deed to all
of lots 1, 2 and 3, in block 21 Altura
Park addition to the town of Me.IHu
Park, $35. N
L. H. Vanderwerf, of El Paso, -to
John R. Blrdzell, of Roswell, war
ranty deed to lots ,11 and 12, in block
60 of Miller's Washington Park addi
tion to Las Cruces, $1 and other valu
able considerations.
Frank E. Cox to James Bankhe-.d
and wife, warranty deed to lots 14, :5
and 16, in Cox's subdivision of Las
Cruces, $150.
TO GIVE HALLOWE'EN PARTY.
On Saturday evening, October 29! the,
I Aid society of the Houston Square Bap
tist cnurcn win give a Hallowe'en parT
ty at the home o,f Mrs. F. R. Kennedy,
1115 Octavia street
maivig
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mlra Hit ykKByr
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mtkmfMw
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SCROLL OF FAME
Bears no-names-more illustrious than those of men who have de
voted their lives to the advancement of mankind. What noblar
mission could there be than to give pleasure, education and amuse
ment to one's fellow-man? To have given to the world original.
command lasting fame for the originators, founders and perpetuators of
ISTTnmiA DTIT5C 1T7TT Tk WrJFTi
nirrai.il n j,.i whji nr.M i
APtt'-
PAWNEE BILL'S FAR EAST
WHO NOW ANNOUNCE
BUFFALO BILL'S LAST VISIT
- To this City -
AS NO RETURN DATES WILL BE STABLE, and
pioneer, plainsman, hunter, guide and Indian fighter, has for more than
a uarier oi a century gainea lame acros3 two hemispheres through
exhibiting his historic exposition of early days in the Western wilds.
Maj. Gordon W. Lillie, ''Pawnee Bill," has contributed to the allied
entertainment autnenuo pictures of the Orient, shown in animated tab
leaux. deDlCtintT.thft trihp nnr? nmnlp PTistriTri n vwfniniw nf ia rnmanK .
j.. ibi, ouu mua uujjujiag u cuuLrusung .pictures, authentically correct,
BOTH SIDES OF" THE EARTH
From the historic scenes and incidents, depicting pioneer days and frontier
Strife On OUT own rollintr tjrairica. Trith vista nf VirSnriP! irar nnd frwiv K
i -fA . .. , v ., . :. . -.-. ". ?r .tx . ? .
scene auuts to tnesanos oi tne oanara, its camel lcavaJcades and Ships of
the Desert," with the Pyramids and Sphinx, the tribes of the Soudan and
the gorgeous splendors of
AN ORIENTAL SPECTACLE
In theentire exhibition there is no sham or subterfuge; it is absolutely original,
authentic and true tO fact. Its rrprfnTTi?nnfinrF. K-iT-o.oT-;.t?r. ; mnmnanixig.
evervthine oresented i?rr.n1ism ?;plr v.vbtv hnramnn io v. Vir. . nnMunt,
Tl, . U ! :r 17 .,... TT '.J -w ;o ni, ? itl..ww..
j.i . uc cuniwa la mo icssoa oi a nieume. xas garD ne wears is tne umiorm
of the nation or tribe that gave him birth. In every particular it is emphatically
HISTORIC AND O-SNUZNS
Directing every detail of the exhibition and Positcvelt Appearing at Evert
.v.u.a.. tua jmk ui mo Kreai, aroma, tne lasc oi tne piainsmen-warnoi
who redeemed the Western wilds for the onward, march of civilization and
eat scouts, the last of the plainsmen-warriors
.. v iiwwm uiu iut mo auwaru. marcn oi civinzaiion ani
commerce ndes the hero-horseman, the last of the great scouts and pathfinders
WILD BUCKING BRONCHOS
TO
RHODA ROYAL'S 20 TRAINED HORSES
Indian Battle Scenes. Thrilling Western Episodes. Brilliant Far
Eastern Displays, fiance of Sports and Pastimes. Selected From
AU Jkroana tne Ufooe. numerous JNeto and Standard Gems
FOOTBALL PLAYING HORSES
Mexican Rurales and the Famous Cowboy Band
ROSSI'S R4USIGAL, ELEPHANTS
WonderouslvTrained Mammoths Which Plav Ormn? "Rlnw "Horn "Rinc
Bells and Produce Harmonious Music in Perfect Time and Tune. And
RAY THOMPSON'S TRAINED RANGE HORSES
REALISM RUNS RAMPANT
During tnree nours ot UDject-taugnc lessons in American History:
esinanism, ana an lixni-
has ever known. The only School of Instruction the Amusement
a School of Manliness, an academy of Equestrianism, and an E:
bition of Oriental Splendors, the Only Object Teacher History
World has ever maintained. Combining the story of a Nation's
Glory with the Benefits of Open-Air Entertainment: an incentive
to manliness and an Inspiration to xoung America. In short, a
PEERLESS PAGEANT OF PLEASURE
Dr. J. Morgan Clements, consulting1
engineer of the Mines Development
company of New York, is here, en-route
"t'o. Mexico- J'.. .A: .
. Two Exhibition Daily, 2 and S p. m.,
Italn or Shine.
Admission (Including e:rt) SO Cents.
All seats protected from run and rain b
immense waterproof canvas canopv. Grand
stand ccair3 (inelu!.nd dmlsslon) $1 no
Children under 9 years half price, on sale
day of exhibition at down town ticket of
fice. A. E. Ryan's Drug Store, 212 San
Antonio St. ' ' -
eu m
3
J I
M
Wm - F
Col Wm,F.G0DYtb&B0FFAL0 BILL
WITH HIS ROUGHRIDERS OF THE WORLD
Showing all kinds of horsemanship from the

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