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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, May 31, 1915, HOME EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1915-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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ALD
HOME EDITION
vnuTron rtjKCCisr.
EI raso. fair; New Mexico, xeneralrj'
fair; Arlxaaa, fair; West Teaxs, zener
any fair.
EL PASC. TEXAS. MONDAY EVENING. MAY 31. I9i5. delivered axttrs m cbnts a month. 12 PAGES. TWO SECTIONS. TODAY.
LATEST NEWS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
SUfULB COPT FIVE CENTS.
SINKING U. S, SHIP MISTAKE-GERMANY
aim
I TODAY'S PRICES
Mei.!in bask. notes. 13 Mexican
pp. 39 Chiho&bua currency. S-y Car-
Irnzd currency. fc Bar sliver Handy
A. Harmon quotation) 49 Copper
Is 87 4 e 19 AC Grains (holiday) Llre
'cm.Il higher.
PASO
a Wins Race After Speed Duel OFFICERS
DeP
Drivers Achieoe Terrific
Speed In 300 Mile Dash
On Speedway Course. ,
MANY CARS ARE
SOON FORCED OUT
De Palma's Manager Claims
Resta Used Unfair
Tactics To Lead.
IDIA:NAPOLIS, Ind, May 31.
Ralph De '.Palma, driving a
Mercedes ear, won lb fifth in
lernationnl See mile speedway race
this afternoon.
"" The race Max featured by high
speed Tthieh at time ai erased
about 96 miles an hour, and by the
absence of serious accidents.
TNDIANAPOLI& Jtnd.. aa JL Ralph
De Pa! ma and D. Resta wand a
" onAA ...... ., . .. i
Speedway tracks in the fifth interna- '""' dm't. l.s- Z"n i .-
tional 50 mile automobile race. In ' ??.',t rJi t!. M" N,ew - '-"
whn.h there were r starters. First TOH evading rt-e main issue, the paci
Resta led and then De Palma. As one 1 fic nature of Germany s reply -akes
took first place the other dropped into I n ""son01 to believe that -he is
krrona The speed was terrific. Resta 1 Pvlng the way to admitting the Amer
ind at lMkm Sta-Stat 200. 0-2 I " S""0?" in ? Bltnl "
-testa got the lead again. I
. 1... . . -.-,
T-cnm. tk. i. 1- .a.- ,. -... . 1
- I- ....... ..... iau .u IMC X.V.U M.ff, BIKr I
nesxa nad strueK the wall at the north
turn and burst two urea The favorite
-. still 1rHnc .. 3i,i mIi- wot. u,. ,
B Still leadlnE; at 350 miles, with the
other leaders following in tnis order! j IX"8" l?. r.TT, tSe S
1'esta. Aitken Rri rnnw..- PnmAratn ! apologies made in advance for the ae
i.esta. AiiKen. Karl Cooper. Forporato. . .- ot American life and nron-
ncox ana uurman.
D Palma's aterage was S 48 miles
an hour. Just before Resta hit the
wall. De Palma's manager lodged a
protest with the judges' that Resta was
zigzagging on the back track to fere
ent Xe Palma from passing Zrlm.
Chevrolet Is Out.
Louis Chevrolet's car was declared
officially out of the race in its 77th lap.
It was the smallest car in the race,
weighing only 1090 pounds.
A broken connecting rod put Ralph
Mulford out of the race in bis 124th
lap
President Starts Knee.
With Carl Fisber. president of the
speedway, leading the first lap, the
race started at 1 oclock this morning.
The first lap around the two and one
half mile brick track did not count and
was merely to give the drivers a flying
start. The skies were cloudy.
Cox's car was declared out of the
race after completing 14 laps. A
broken ocnection was given as the
cause. His was the first car to leave I
the race.
Cars Forced to Pits.
Hill's car went out of the race on the
back stretch on its 21st lap because of
engine trouble. Soon after the St mile
mark was passed a number of cars
were forced into the pits, Wilcox and
DePalma being among those who had
to change tires.
Resta pulled into the lead soon after
Anderson stopped for gas. oil and two
tires and was leading at the 109 mile
mark. He was closely folowed by De
I 'alma and Wilcox, and farther back
came Cooper. Porporato, Rickenbacker,
A an Raalte, Anderson, Grant and Bur
man, m the order named. The time
was 1.09:91, an aevrage of S6.8S miles
an hour.
liaise s car waa disqualified in the
S5th lap for leaving the track.
John De Palma Forced Out.
John De Palma. brother of Ralph,
a"i forced out of the race with a
broken fly wheel in his 43rd lap. De
Palma. was driving the car in which
Rene Thomas won the race last year.
lialph De Palma was in the lead
w hen the 206 mile mark was passed.
Resta driving in second place; Ander
son was third and Cooper fourth. De
Palma's time for the 200 miles was
2 14.29.58. an average of S9.22 miles an
hour. Last year the average for this '
distance was 83.36 miles an hour. j
Vt the 390 mile mark. Be Palma, who I
continued in the lead, bad increased 1
his speed until his average was a little I
better than 99 miles an hour. His
tune as announced by the judges was .
.; is j;3i. an average or 99.21 miles an
hour. Resta was still running in sec
ond place. Earl Cooper in third and
.Tohny Aitken, wtj replaced Anderson
.it the wheel, waa in fourth place.
Van Raalte Has Accident.
Van Raalte's car skidded off the
track in the rear turn but did not
turn mai TTa Ws i j. .
Connie n .,. , EZZZ??!
track, minus it hood, but it was
flCrD-al A ln n94. .. TU C-i
"a SldE: rY, V",""3-' i
More cars began to droo out l th.
-nri. rtM,n tntk..k
eari afternoon. , Rickenbacher was
bothered with enn. trouble and quit '
(Continued on Pace 10. Col. 1).
Tennis Players Thank Herald
Editor El Paso Herald:
In the name of the directors of the Border States Tennis association, and
of myself jiersonaly, we wish to tbank you for the interest your paper has
shown in the tennis tourney and for the courteous treatment we have" re
ceived from you. JmBM8 Lwtoll) President.
Germany
WIFE PLEADS
WQEIHJE
an reply
Editors Say Note Is Kb An
swer to the American De
mands and Is Insolent.
Newspapers throughout the United
States today Incline to bitterness re
garding the German replv to the Amer
ican note. Generally speaking, there
is a sentiment, as editorially expressed,
that Germany has made no answer at
all to the American requirements.
The expressions follow:
Chicago (I1L) Staats Zeltung The
administration cannot honestly dodge
the questions raised by Germany.
V-Shifty and Insolent."
Chicago (I1L) Journal The claim
that the Lusitania was an armed ves
sel is an unmixed Insult to the United
States, which cleared the ship ts a
merchantman; but the request for an
investigation of circumstances already
known to the civilised world is as.
shiftr as it is insolent.
Indianapolis (Ind.) Star Level head
ed Americans wjll await the progress
of events with calmness. -
"German Note a Quibble.
LouisTtlle Kv.) Courier Journal
1 The German ans er to the American
note is a quibble. The time is at nana
when the president must. meet the de
mands of his countrymen that nothing
must happen to trail our majestr be
fore an- other majesty, and that the
United States shall lay down 40 bel
1'gerents certain rights and laws of
neutrality which they shall be required
to obev, if need be. by all the force we
mwa .hi. (a nut in th fild
""r"" " "S --"-
Tbne Is Contemn
Tbne Is Contemptnnns.
Albuquerque ,. M.) Journal TM
Albuaaeraoe K. M.) Journal-
' tone of Germany's reply is as con-
SSwitSLi ,,. Yi.r w.r In
would admit without making war ln-
evitable. The cynical assumption that
, ,k.,m ..,i. . w.-..hi.7An
government, makes it necessary that
nresident Wilson send an answer prob
ably so positive in its statement of
American requirement that the ques
tion of peace or war will depend upon
whether German) agrees to them re
servedly fn her actual reply to the
American note.
-Still Stand Behind 'Wilson.
Cheyenne (VTyo-1 Tribune The na
tion stood firmly behind the pretjdent
in the earlier stages of the crisis which
made his protest to Germany necessary.
It-will stand as firmly behind him in
-any further action which may be neces
sary to convince Germany that Amer
ican honor. American lives and prop
erty and the principles of humanity
must be respected upon the high seas.
h. S. Is Disappointed.
Washington (D. C.) Post Germany's
failure to measure the depth of Amer
ican feeling over the Lusitaaia case
will cause profound disappointment
and uneasiness to the United States.
Ttnstan IIJaeilI TTrald The reclr Of
the imperial German government to the !
note of president Wilson maKes a very
specious presentation of a very bad
Wants Further Infonnntlon.
Indianapolis (Ind.) Dally Telegraph
Tribune We believe the German gov
ernment has answered every question
in the president's note satisfactory ex
cept one and on that one it desires
further Information.
Pittsburg (Pa.) Gaxette-Tinies The
lives and rights of American citizens
cannot be legitimately constructed as
contingent upon a readjustment of war
conditions to meet the necessities of
Germany.
"German Xote Courteous.
Cincinnati (Ohio) Freie Presse The
German note is courteous in tone. The
note does not say that the American
position is untenable It 'merely de
mands that the facts in the case be
first established
Let Its Deelnrr Emliars
Detroit (Mich.) Journal Without
despairing of final agreement one is
obliged to regard the German replv
" as unsatisfactory. Tne
placijig of an embargo on alt ttiunltions
of war. all food, all passenger travel
with all belligerent countries will best
insure us that safe and "peace which
we desire.
"Keep Cool) Stand Firm.
Ballas (Texas) .Tiraes-Het-aH Ger
many has spoken. Its words are not
welcome to American ear. Yet to
American people this duty still re
mains, "Keep cool and stand by the
president.''
Kansas City (Mo.) Star There is
nothing in the German note to alter the
position of the United States as set
forth in nresident Wilson's communi
cation of May 13.
CREW IS CUT .lliniFT.
London. Ens, May 31. The crew of
eight men of the Russian ship Mars
has arrived at Aberdeen after a peril
? yaPf- Their. ship was shelled
. anre on rnoay ny abwmu
nomanne on rair lstana. ine anei-i
i.j tw. ...i.-.h.. in- ih. ,o,
, , sma boat for 40 miles and then
cut it adrift without warning.
Probes Our
I
i
I
I
GERMANY'S REPLY TO PROTEST
OVER SINKING OF LUSITANIA
iERLIK, Ger May 31. (Via
London, 1:08 a. m.) Follow
ing is the text of the German
note to the American government,
' replying to the protest on the sink
ing of the Lusitania:
"The undersigned has the honor to
submit to ambassador Gerard the
following answer to the communica
tion of May 15 regarding the in
jury to American interests through
German submarine warfare:
"The imperial government has sub
jected the communication of the
American government to a thorough
investigation. It entertains a KEEN
WISH TO COOPERATE IN A
FRANK AND FRIENDLY WAY IN
CLEARING UP A POSSIBLE MIS
UNDERSTANDING WHICH MAY
HAVE ARISEN in the relations be
tween the two governments through
the events mentioned by the Amer
ican government.
"Regarding, first, the cases of the
American steamers Cashing and
Gulflight, the American embassy
HAS ALREADY BEEN INFORMED
that the German government luu so
intention of submitting neutral ships
in the war zone which are gaitty of
no hostile acts, to attacks by a sub
marine or submarines, or aviators.
On the contrary, the German forces
have repeatedly been instructed most
specifically to avoid attacks on such
ships.
"IF NEUTRAL SHIPS IN RE
CENT MONTHS HAVE SUFFERED
THROUGH THE GERMAN SUB
MARINE WARFARE, OWING TO ,
MISTAKES IN IDENTIFICATION,
IT IS A 0UESTION ONLY OF
0UITE ISOLATED AND EXCEP
TIONAL CASES WHICH CAN BE
ATTRIBUTED TO THE BRITISH
GOVERNMENT'S ABUSE OF
FLAGS. TOGETHER WITH THE
SUSPICIOUS OR CULPABLE BE
HAVIOR OF THE MASTERS OF
THE SHIPS.
"The German government, in all
cases in which it has been shown by
ITS INVESTIGATION that a neu
tral shin, not itself at fault, was
damaged by German submarines or
aviators, HAS EXPRESSED reftret
over the unfortunate ACCIDENT,
and. IF TUSTIFIED by conditions,
HAS OFFERED indemnification.
"The cases of the Cashing and
Gulflight will be treated pn the same
principles. An investigation of both
cases is in progress, the result of
which will presently be communi
cated to the embassy. THE IN
VESTIGATION CAN. IF NECES
SARY, BE SUPPLEMENTED BY A
CALL ON THE INTERNATIONAL
COMMISSION OF INQUIRY, as pro
vided by article III of The Hague
agreement of October 18, 1907.
"When sinking the British steamer
Falaba, the commander of the Ger
man submarine had the intention of
allowing the passengers and crew a
full opportunity for a safe escape.
Only when the master did not obey
the order to hove to, but fled and
summoned help by rocket signals, did
the German commander order the
crew and passengers by signals and
megaphones to leave the ship within
ten minutes. HE ACTUALLY AL
LOWED THEM 23 MINUTES' time
and fired the torpedo only when sus
picious craft were hastening to the
assitance of the Falaba.
WHAT THE GERMAN, NOTE MEANS
." ERMANY'S reply is no answer. It does not meet one single point In the
- American note. It ignores our -good will, questions our good faith, doubts
our facts, brushes aside our arguments, overlooks our threats, acknowledges no
wrong, transfers all blame, claims full justification, declares her policy fixed,
avoids the whole question of duty to humanity, and awaits our next move.
SEE EDITORIAL PAGE FOR FULL INTERPRETATION AND
DISCUSSION.
Wound Rather Roughly, While Harshly
FOR
"Regarding the loss of life by the
sinking of the British passenger
steamer Lusitania, the German gov
ernment ALREADY HAS EX
PRESSED to the neutral governments
concerned its keen regret that citi
zens of their states lost their lives.
'On this occasion, the imperial
government, however, cannot escape
the impression that CERTAIN IM
PORTANT FACTS HAVING A DI
RECT BEARING ON THE SINK
ING OF THE LUSITANIA MAY
HAVE ESCAPED THE ATTEN
TION OF THE AMERICAN GOV
ERNMENT. "In the interest of a clear and
complete understanding, which is the
aim of both governments, the im
perial government considers it first
necessary to convince itself that the
'information accessible to both gov
ernments about the facts of the case
is complete and in accord.
"The government of the United
States proceeds on the assumption
that the Lusitania could be regarded
as an ordinary unarmed merchant
man, the impbrial 3rvsyr-
MENT ALLOWS ITSELF' DTTHIS
CONNECTION TO POINT OUT
THAT THE LUSITANIA WAS
ONE OF THE LARGEST AND
FASTEST BRITISH MERCHANT
SHIPS, BUILT WITH GOVERN
MENT FUNDS AS AN AUXIL
IARY CRUISER AND CARRIED
EXPRESSLY AS- SUCH IN THE
NAVY LIST," issued by the British
admiralty.
"It is further known to the im
perial government, from trust
worthy reports from its agents and
neutral passengers, that for a con
siderable time practically all the
more valuable British merchantmen
have been equipped with cannon and
ammunition and other weapons and
manned by persons who have been
specially trained in serving guns.
"THE LUSITANIA. TOO. AC
CORDING TO INFORMATION RE
CEIVED HERE. HAD CANNON
ABOARD WHICH WERE MOUNT
ED AND CONCEALED BELOW
DECKS.
"The imperial government further
has the honor to direct the particu
lar attention of the American gov
ernment to the fact that the British
admiralty, in a confidential instruc
tion issued in February, 1915, rec
ommended its mercantile shipping
NOT ONLY TO SEEK PROTEC
TION UNDER NEUTRAL FLAGS
AND DISTINGUISHING MARKS,
BUT ALSO, WHILE THUS DIS
GUISED, TO ATTACK GERMAN
SUBMARINES BY RAMMING. As
a special incitation to merchant
men to destroy submarines, the
British government also offered high
prizes and has already paid such re
wards. "The imperial government, in view
of these facts, indubitably known to
it. IS UNABLE TO REGARD
BRITISH MERCHANTMEN. IN
THE ZONE OF NAVAL OPERA
TIONS SPECIFIED BY THE AD
MIRALTY STAFF OF THE GER
MAN NAVY, AS -UNDEFENDED.'
German commanders CONSE
QUENTLY ARE NO LONGER
ABLE TO OBSERVE THE CUS
TOMARY REGULATIONS OF THE
PRIZE LAW, which they before al
ways followed.
FRANK'S LIFE
.
"Finally, the imperial government
must point out particularly that the
Lusitania on its last trip, as on
earlier occasions, CARRIED CANA
DIAN TROOPS AND WAR MATE
RIAL INCLUDING NO LESS
THAN 5400 CASES OF AMMUNI
TION INTENDED FOR THE DE
STRUCTION OF THE BRAVE
GERMAN SOLDIERS who are ful
filling their duty with self-sacrifices
and devotion in the fatherland's
service.
"THE GERMAN GOVERNMENT
BELIVES THAT IT WAS ACTING
IN JUSTIFIED SELF DEFENCE
IN SEEKING WITH ALL THE
MEANS OF WARFARE AT ITS
DISPOSAL TO PROTECT THE
LIVES OF ITS SOLDIERS BY DE
STROYING AMMUNITION IN
TENDED FOR THE ENEMY.
"The British shipping company mast
have been aware of the danger to
which the passengers aboard the
Lusitania were exposed under these
conditions. The company in em
barkinz them, notwithstanding this,
ATTEMPTED DELIBERATELY TO
USE" THE- LIVES OF AMERICAN
CITIZENS AS PROTECTION FOR
THE AMMUNITION ABOARD and
acted against the clear provisions of
the AMERICAN LAW, which EX
PRESSLY PROHIBITS the forward
ing of passengers on ships carrying
ammunition, and provides a penalty
therefor. The COMPANY, THERE
FORE, IS WANTONLY GUILTY OF
THE DEATH OF SO MANY PAS
SENGERS. "THERE CAN BE NO DOUBT,
ACCORDING TO THE DEFINITE
REPORT OF THE SUBMARINE'S
COMMANDER, WHICH IS FUR
THER CONFIRMED BY ALL
OTHER INFORMATION, THAT
THE QUICK SINKING OF THE
LUSITANIA IS PRIMARILY
ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE EXPLO
SION OF THE AMMUNITION SHIP
MENT, caused by a torpedo. The
Lusitania's passengers would other
wise, in all human probability, have
been saved.
"The imperial government consid
ers the above mentioned facts impor
tant enough to recommend them to
the attentive examination of the
American government.
"The imperial government, while
WITHHOLDING JTS FINAL DE
CISION ON THE DEMANDS AD
VANCED IN CONNECTION WITH
THE SINKING OF THE LUSI
TANIA UNTIL RECEIPT OF AN
ANSWER FROM THE AMERICAN
GOVERNMENT, feels impelled, in
conclusion, to recall here and now,
that it took cognizance with satis
faction of the mediatory proposals
submitted by the United States gov
ernment to Berlin and London as a
basis for a modus Vivendi for con
ducting the maritime warfare be
tween Germany and Grea( Britain.
The imperial government, by its
readiness to enter upon a discussion
of these proposals, THEN DEMON
STRATED ITS GOOD INTENTIONS
in ample fashion. The realization of
these proposals was DEFEATED, AS
IS WELL KNOWN, BY THE
DECLINATORY ATTITUDE OF
THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT.
"Ihe undersigned takes occasion,
etc,
(Signed) "JAGOW."
U BOARD
LISTENS Tl
PETITION
"My Husband Was Cour
teous, Gentle-, Respectful,"
Says Frank's Wife.
SAYS HEUPHELD
HIGHEST IDEALS
Other Affidavits Brought by
Counsel To Attention Of
Commission.
AXTAMTA. Ua.. Mar XL Barred
br tae .Georgia statutes from
testifying for her husband at
his trial on a charge of murdering
Mary Phagan, Mrs. Leo M. Frank ap-
seared today before the state arUoa.
commission and preeefcted a. Piee. that
"i7enXreinm:e,S,tl0n
Frank was not present wnen tne
commission's hearing began. Mr., How
ard read the prisoner's brief applica
tion for commutation of sentence and
then offered documentary evidence. In
eluding records of court proceedings,
the affidavit of Jul.?e Roan and atate-
mA-nt- A 1V(----a T an hf "C"vratV-
..?:.. ... - ..
Judge Roan's affidavit toM of the
hostile atmosphere surrounding the
trial which induced him to urge that
Frank be absent when the verdict waa
rendered.
Mr. Howard said Mrs. I'raBk's
statement waa the chief new evidence
to be presented.
Says Husband Upheld Ideals.
Mrs. Frank's statement said she waa
born 'n Atlanta and had lived there all
her life, accustomed to the courteous
treatment which is characteristic of the
south. It continued: -With the ideals
I had. and which had been inculcated
in me from girlhood. I expected in my
husband nothing less than that to
which I had been accustomed and to
which every woman looks forward, and
wnlcn l fully- realised m my husband.
When not occupied with his bust-
ness, the only dm he spent away from
me was when he was occupied with
his charitable work, which took him
away from home about once or twice
a montn
Praises Frank's Character.
"Our married life had been exceed
ingly happy and never bad been marred
by the slightest, cloud. He was re
garded and loved by my parents as a
son and was always courteous, gentle
and most respectful in his relations
with them, and our families always
"VS. J"0 " Jntim"ieJ.e"m"' . .,
"t'"8.!
i,;:k;.rf:.,?..,Tr , ",
"":?- "-.-. -. -v. "'",
29. ISIS. I hurried to the police bar
racks, accompanied by my father and
brother-in-law. r was not allowed
to go up to see my husband and re- j
-naiaea in ine omce 01 ine pronation
.2.r?Di.Wll!?fe my lrU5" "-
vailed on me to return home. Being as
snred that my husband would be re
leased at any moment. I remained at
borne, but aa soon as it became ap-
parent that he would be detained in-
fS-'nV Went, t0.hlm. '
and have been going to him every dav
since and spend most of the day with
hlm in jail.
Movements on Day of Murder.
"On the Sth day of AnriL 191S. mv
mother and I had tickets for a grand
opera matinee and in order to get
there on time we sat at table at 1.10 n,
S-lb-ft rmotSeandTVrt '
J-li"' uJKi.'- JL.Le"i
were left at the table eating. Return
ing home from the opera at : I
found my husband there. Therf. was
V -- - j Huvvttuu mm
nothing unusual in his manner or
appearance to attract my attention.
Rehd During Bvening.
"That evening after sapper, a num
ber of friends of my mother and father
came over to the house to play cards.
My husband and I did not nlav. but he
sat in me nail reading. I watched the
game for a while in the dining room
and then would go into the hall and
talk to my husband, and would then go
back again to watch the game.
."My husband read In the hall until
some time after 1 oclock, and we re
tired about 16 Jo. We were awakened
about 43 by the telephone ringing.
My husband got out of bed. nut on his
bath robe and went down to answer the
telephone.
Informed of Tragedy.
"When he came back again I asked
him who it was. and he said some detec
tive had telephoned him to come right
down to the factory, that there had been
a tragedy down there and that they
were sending an automobile for him.
My husband began to dress right away,
(Cesitnsed on Pace t. Oel. 4).
Herald Leads All In Sport News
Fort Worth, Texas, May IS, 1915.
Editor 1 Paso Herald:
I have been r-jcerring The El Pao Herald for the past two months as a
complimentary s-abraiptioa from a friend in El Paso, and I want to say that
I consider it one of the newsiest newspapers in the state or southwest. It
lead all of them in sporting news. Chas. E. Bedgood,
1414 McKnnrht Street
Explanation Concerns the.
Steamer Gulf Light; Wil
son Ponders Situation.
MEXICO GIVES
SOME CONCEFiM
Note To Mexico May Be
Delayed By Developments
Relating to German Note.
'T WASHINGTON. D. e. May 30
yy Ambassador Gerard, at Berlin,
has beer-, formally notified that
I the American steamer Gulf Light was
"k through mistake. The German,
i aubmarine commander reported that he
j " not.ee the Uulf Ir. Amer-
1 - e. - low nex 10 3. omisn
vessel.
The crew of the Gulf Light waa ua
injured, with the exception of the cap-
M.,u, wuv aiea ai nearx zauure abouc
1 tw hours after the sinking of his ship.
. dnnsfiit in as &.. - -
regret for the Sinking- of the Gulf
, ""-
IVtisoa Studies SHn.l.ii
In an atmosphere of holiday calm.
I Pr.e"idot ilaon today studied the
! '"" prooiema confronting
J hinJ J respect to conditions in Mexico
. " t-eroan submarine warfare. The
J Pfa,t motored most of the mornings
) Mnron ,ne front seat of his car. ap-
1 Parentiy in deep thought.
, . The reply of the German government
to the American note protesting against
the sinking of the Lusitania and other
violations of American rights in the war
zone brought disapointment here and a
revival of the tension which preceded
the dispatch of the first communication
to Berlin.
At the white house it was stated that
the administration plan in the Mexican
, xiuatlon would not be interferes win.
, by the new developments with respect
to Germany, except that the president a
j warning to the Mexican factions might
noi ue issued on ine same day as the
second note to Germany is made public.
The Mexican statement had been ex
pected Tuesday
Sllently Studies Problem.
SVhat the president's answer will bs
to the German note is undetermined.
He saw no callers early today, turning
, over ln soiitui. the !. ouestVoni
, before him much as he'dtd Vth? "a"
'mmedUtely following the sinking of
L3itanla. At noon he , returned
! .,rom n mo,or -- ? started for Ar-
unzion cemeteri
where he was to
speak at the Memorial day service. Sec
retary Bryan and other members of his
cabinet also were to make speeches la
memory or tne uay.
A the arrangements for the dav are
' t CoL John icBtaJy. acnnl
departanent commander of the G A. R
who ! also one of the principal speak
ers. If -sareaa nvf a-fnaiim) ! V 1 j a.
would give anV .ntin.at.on a? to T?h
cour fo be"ursue eiore .ela?'s
j cabinet meeting - a
1 official t rw.h..-..-
The official text of the German note
on which the action of the United States
will be based, was deciohered toda. It
differs in phraseology from the unoffi
"i !"i.T.-. "' J""""" "l
cial text sent ln press dispatches Tues-
" & lSE however.
"!fh attracted attent.on I. "the Lusi-
tanTa undonhtArilv h.il cn An ,.,.,
which were mounted under decks or
masKeo. The word "undoubtedly" waa
omitted in the text.
"Was Germany Certain f
This was taken to mean that the
German government was not altogether
certain of the authenticity of Its infor
mation. The unofficial text of this
point read'
"The Lusitania. too. according to in
formation received here, had cannon
aboard, which were mounted and con
cealed below decks."
The official text reads:
"Accordine to reports at hand here,
the Lusitana. when she left New York,
nnodubtedly had guns on board which
were mounted under decks and masked.'
State department officials said this
was the principal difference ln the text
noted.
tLLIKS -MARSHIPS BOMBARD
COAST OP ASIA MIXOIl
London, Eng.. May SI. Allied war
ships on May 25 bombarded Adalia.
Hakrl. Kakava and other places along
the Turkish coast of Asia Minor, de
stroying government buildings and
public works, according to a Reuter
dispatch from Athena. Greece.
Criticism
cx

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