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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, November 09, 1915, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1915-11-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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HOME EDITIUNJ
L PA
TODAY'S PRICES
VEATOEB FORECAST.
Kl Paw and west Texas. ". J"nfr
New Mexico. xeneraHy cloudy; Arisen",
-londr, Ical rains.
Mi xi can bank notes 1SS Mexican peeoa
lOUj Carranza currenc "4 Br silver,
fFandr & Harmon quotations) e-jfc Cop
per 91 12 018 21 GmfDK lower Live
stock tower Stocks lower.
12 PAGES. TWO SECTIONS. TODAY.
ELPASO. TEXAS. TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 9. 1915.
DELIVERED ANYWHERE CENTS A MONTH.
LATEST NEWS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
SINGLE COPT FIVE CENTS.
CHINA YIELDS; TO REMAIN A
9
cl'DtlStci
urrenoerm
ALD
REPUBLIC
A lui I IlillB I 21
Message To Carranza Consul
In El Paso Tells Of the
Zapatista Collapse.
MEN SURRENDER
AT EVERY-CHANCE
Message Also Asserts That
Rebels In Guatemala De
feat Cabrera Forces.
OFFICIAL advices to Bl Paso's
Mexican consul Andrea G. Garcia.
Tuesday morning frees tile Car
ranza governor of Chiapas, declared
iui revolutionary forces In Guatemala
have defeated the government troops
of president Estrada Cabrera In the i
alle de lxtatan, after having inflicted
severe losses on them.
The governor of Chiapas is reported
to have outfitted the revolutionists
against Cabrera in retaliation for Cab
rera a permitting a force of Viilistas
to arm on the Guatemalan side of the
line to attack Chiapas. Commissioners
sent by Villa some time ago to Guate
mala for the purpose of organizing an
expedition against the Camus fare .
in Chiapas have returned to Juarez, i
their mission a failure. : I
According t present prospects,
there will not be any Zapata followers
left to oppose the ad vane of the Con
stitutionalist forces Into the state of
Morelos, as Zapata adherents are sur
rendering m large anmbess." the mes
sage added -Three thousand of them
gave up yesterday (November 7) and
received amnestv from the de facto '
government of Mexico " j
CARRANZA CONSUL TO BUY
RIFLES SOLD BY VILLISTAS '
Carranza consul Andreas C Garcia I
in Kl Paso has launched a campaign to
bu up Mauser rifles second hand, be-
aure opponunu is given xor uk smug
Cling of them across the rirer to the
Jua rex financial and commercial
agency, -where a purchase price is al
ready set for them.
The Kl Paso consul will pay $5 per
rifle of the Mauser type brought to
him. as property of the Mexican gov
ernment, under the guise of reward for
the turning In of the piece
To Villlsta deserters,' read the no
tices posted by Mr Garcia "This con
sulate has notified munitions mer
chants that Villi ta soldiers are offer
ing Mauser rifles propert of the
government of Mexico for sale; that
tre government of Meuo is entitled
to retoer these at an time, being its
property, no matter which faction has
been using them jn Mexico, that they
tlt not to be sold, and that the mnst j
btr turned over to this representative I
of the government of Mexico. '
To reward the good fajtn of those I
returning said arms to the government
of Mexico through me, I will give 5- I
for each Mauser upon receipt of It. !
CHIHUAHUA TO FALL SOON,
SAYS ROBERTO V. PESQUEIRA j
Roberto V Fesqueira. director 'of the I
National Railways of Mexico, passing i
through El Paso en route to Agua
Prieta Monday night predicted a short 1
VH'fsta tenure of the state of Chi
huahua. Ten thousand Carranza troops have
invaded the state of Chihuahua out of
Tcrreon, declared Mr. Fesqueira. They
are marching on Chihuahua city and
are not a great distance from there
now It will be only a short period
before this force takes the capital of
Chihuahua state, and drives the last
of the VilliMas out
N0GALES, S0N0RA, IS QUIET;
FUNST0N RETURNS EASTWARD
Nogales. AN, Nov 9 with the
Mexican situation quiet as a result of
a failure to switch the allegiance of
the dogates, Sonora garrison from
(Centincra an pace 2. Oel. 2)
INVITATION TO
ALL ADVERTISERS
OFFICIAL reports of the Audit Bureau of Circulations upon
the circulation of The Herald, the Times (English edition),
and the Times (Spanish edition) are now at hand and may be
inspected at The Herald office by any advertiser who is INTER
ESTED IN KNOWING WHETHER HE IS OR IS NOT GETTING
THE CIRCULATION THAT HE PAYS FOR, and that is guaranteed
to him in his written contract. These complete official reports are
not the ex parte statements of one paper or the other, bnt the
formal findings of the great national standard authority on news
paper circulations, having headquarters in Chicago; the reports were
made public only after a most careful, searthing, and impartial inves
tigation sf this field, conducted here, consuming nearly two months.
The audit was made at the request of, and upon the insistence of, the
Times, and was agreed to, by The Herald, both papers-being members
of the Audit Bureau of Circulations. The reports are convincing,
and should be read and studied in full by every advertiser who be
lieves in giving, 2nd demanding, "full weight and full measure."
'The Herald "Cooperates" With Scuiare Men,
i
INDIA
The War At a Glance
INFANTRY activities have been
renewed on the front in France,
Paris reporting continued fight
ing by the infantry arm in the vi
cinity of Loos, where the allies
gained much ground in Septem
ber. 31ay Dissolve Greek Cfaamber
Premier SKouIoudis, of Greece, is
quoted in Athens as declaring the
Greek chamber will be dissolved
unless it. supports the new cabinet.
Italy Jlay Aid Servia
A hint that Italy mav aid Servia
indirectly by sending troops to Al
bania to meet a threatened Bulga
rian Invasion of that country. Is
contained In a semi official note is
sued in Koine.
Greece Needs Financial Aid
Greece, under heavy expense
through her mobilization, desires
further financial assistance from
the entente allies, Paris hears.
Russian MlnlMcr Retires
Reports of changes In the Rus
sian cabinet are confirmed. In part.
at least, by an announcement In
Petrograd of the retirement of min
ister of agriculture Knvoshein, be
cause of ill health.
Former American Ship Torpedoed
The steamer Dacia, which, after
after being changed from German
to American registry, was seized
by the French while on a voyage
from New York to Rotterdam with
a cotton cargo and later sold in
prize court proceedings, has been
torpedoed by a German submarine.
Illndenbarr; Claims Succe-
Field marshal von Hindenburg
reports & success for his troops in
the heavy fighting near Dvinsk.
The Germans have recaptured to
the west of the city the portion of a
first line trench position. In Wol
hynia a. victory for Gen von Lin
singen's forces, north of Komarow.
is recorded.
UI1PGIS i
Kioto Japan, Nov 9 The United
States cruiser Saratoga flagship of the
Asiatic fleet, arrived at Kobe today for
the emperor's coronation and gave the
salute. After official visits had been
exchanged, rear admiral Albert J. Win
terhalter and his staff came to Kioto
and called on American ambassador
Geo. W. Guthrie.
American officials and civilians are
predominant among the guests at the
Kioto hotel, at which there is being
held a series of luncheons and dinners.
Diplomat Are Decorated.
Kmperor Yoshihito, in commenora
tioa of the coronation, bestowed deco
ratlensx today on the ambassadors and
ministers to Japan, with the exception V
of the American and bwtss representa
tives, who are prevented by the laws of
their countries from accepting such
decorations. In view of this fact, the
emperor presented to -Mrs. Guthrie a
golden lacquered box.
Kmperor Receive Gifts.
Gifts for the emoeror are beinc re
ceived in great numbers. Emperor Nich
olas, of Russia, seat a huge and rare
vase of pink jade from the Ural moun
tains. President Poincare. of Franca
sent Sevres vases.
SOUTHERN MEDICOS PLAN ;
WAR ON TROPICAL DISEASES j
Dallas, Tex. Nov 9. The Southern
Medical assocation, an organization
with nearly 5060 members in IS
southern staes, form all opened its j
ninth annual convention here today.
The official announcement says that
one of its main objects is "to eradicate
the tropical diseases which have Inter
fered 30 much with the agricultural de
velopment of the south.
FIRE OUT. R0CHAMBEAU
IS ON WAY TO BORDEAUX
New York Nov. S The fire in the
hold of the passenger ship Rocham
beau. which broke out after the liner
left here last Saturday, has been ex
tinguished and the steamship is now
proceeding to Bordeaux, according to
a wireless message this morning from
Capt. Juham It read-
"Have succeeded in extinguishing the
fire and am proceeding to Bordeaux.
All on board well."
INDIANA ATTORN ITT. GENERA I.
IJIKS OF HEART LEAKAGE
Indianapolis. Ind., Nov. 9. Richard
M. Milburn, attorney general of In
diana, died at a hospital here today of
leakage of the heart. He took office
last January- He was SO years of age.
1PMSALIITE
AND EGYPT
DEPUTIES MUST
REPLACE THUS!
Gov. Hunt Says Greenlee
Must Share Burden of
Mine Guard Expense.
Phoenix. Aria, No.. 9 When governor
Ilant decided to remove rrwm tne Greenloe
count r strike zone all hut 1M of the S2S
naOo&al guardsmen stationed there, he ad
vised sheriff James G Cash to employ a
number of extra deputies for the protection
of property He has been informed that
sheriff Cash has asked the supervisors for
the necessary authority to Increase his force.
County Should Share "Borden.
A fairly large force of troops has been
maintained in the strike district tor aver
a month. said the governor. "The sheriff
has been given ample opportunity to swear
la an the deputies he seed, it ta only
proper that Greenlee county should bear her
proportion of the expense connected -Uh
protectlBg the property within her border.
Ilard&hlp to Guardsmen.
"The withdrawal ef the Uoops has been
hastened because of the attitude of the
auditor, who has refused to sasue warrants
for their pay because of the ponding litiga
tion over the general appropriations MIL
Many of the guardsmen left families who
are now without any support. Many left
positions that they may lose Iff they are
compelled to remain longer away from borne.
"Two full compsn.es are to be retained at
Clifton and Morenci till all danger of trouble
Is past These companies will be made up ;
of men from all the commands who are j
most able to stay "
llfflulW
SEESffEMTIIS
Hwel Pavies. commissioner of con
ciliation for the United States govern
ment, arrived in Kl Paso Monda even
ing for the purpose of conferring wth
Joseph H. Myers and the mine opera
tors on the issues Involved in the
Clifton-Morenci mine strikes.
Mr. Davles stated that be would be
engaged for several days in making a
digest of the, facts from the viewpoint
of the operator and the employes,
that he would then go on to the mine
camps, making a personal survey of
the conditions as he found them there,
and later hoM a conference with gov
ernor G. W. P. Hunt, of Arizona.
Not to Mediate.
"It was sent out by the Associated
Press," said Mr Davles. "that I came
here for the purpose of mediating.
This Is a mistake. I have served in
this capacity so many times that If !
start out for any place the inference Is
that I am on the way to arbitrate. 1
do not know what the conditions are,
and uritil I do I cannot say anything;
I shall discuss the matter thoroughly
with the mine managers who are in Bl
Paso.
Mr. Davles Is from Lexington, Ky
and has been Identified with the coal
operators of Kentucky for the past -1
vears. I have usually been the spokes
man for the operators, but I believe is
fair play for both." he said.
COUNSEL IS COMING HERE
TO MEET MINE MANAGERS
Phoenix. Ariz.. Nov. 9. Ernest W.
Lewis, counsel for the Shannon Copper
company and now representing mana
gers of all three mining companies af
fected by the Clifton-Morenci strike,
is on his way to El Paso to confer with
the managers.
Mr Lewis Monday met with governor
G. W. p. Hunt. Both said no definite
basis of strike settlement was sag-
gt-siea. liorernor Hunt aaaea tnat mere
would be a settlement whenever the
mine managers decided to get together
with the men."
. Four of the six companies of militia
on duty in the strike district will be
withdrawn immediately, said governor
Hunt, because their presence Is not
needed. The other two companies will
remain until the strike is settled.
EL PASO UNI0NSD0NATE
$25 TO CLIFTON STRIKERS
Local unions continue to contribute
to the Clifton-Morenci strike relief
fund. The Sheet Metal Workers re
ported to the Central Labor union Mon
day night that they had raised 110.
the Retail Clerks 55 and the Black
smiths' unton J16
All of the local unions reported work
plentiful and their organizations In
prosperous condition.
UNION OKKICIW, Sl'IM'ORTS
N VTIONAL, GUARD MBMBKRS
Springfield. I1L, Nov. 9 President
Frank Farmington. of the United Mine
Workers of Illinois, Monday gave out
correspondence in which he declared
tbt hostility toward members qf the
Rational guard must cease.
President Partington cites the inter
national miners' constitution and the
action of the 1914 conventio in support
of his position that militiamen cannot
be debarred from the miners' organisa
tion. Such recommendation was made by a
special committee appointed to investi
gate the cases of several miners who
were expelled from the Hilsboro local
because they were members of the na
tional guard. They were afterward re
instated. niRL. -SHOOTS MN MIK
CH UIGKD V.1TII SKDlCTIO
Corsica na. Tet Nov 9 llan Godle .
charged with seduction, was shot this
morning by Miss lma Morgan, the
prosecuting w ltnets in the distru i
court room. iiulltt struck lodle
in the neck making j. serious wound
III TCHEIEI lSlFHEKH-BOUD UHB III U. S.;
SENTTIE1
UNREST
Overthrow Of Indian Prince
By Natives Is Evidence
Of Disquietude.
CLAIM GERMANS
FOMENT TROUBLE
England Exercises Close Sur-
veillance Over Foreigners
Entering Egypt. '
XT TASHINGTON. D. C, Nov. 9.
Earl Kitchener's ultimate des-.
tination during his mystertoys
absence from the British war office. IM
said by confidential information re
ceived here today, to be India, where,
according to the same information.
British rule is confronted with a more
serious state of unrest than has gen
erally tx-en known outside of British
official circles.
Through the thick veil which the
British censorship has thrown about
the events in India and Egypt comes a
statement that Nawab, sultan Ul Mulk.
the Nisam of Hyberabad, one of the
most influential of tha aativ princes,
and a staunch supporter of the British,
has been deposed by hie people.
German Agents Active.
It has been officially turito-asced that
the bead of the British war office was
on his way to the theater ef operations
in the near east. Coupled with report
ed rumors of activities of German
agents fomenting discontent among the
native population of India, have come
reports of disaffection in Egypt, also
ascribed to the same sources.
Pom Foment Rebellion.
Since the Turks failed to cut the
Suez canal, mainly through the prompt
arrival of colonial trooos from New
Zealand and Australia, it has been re-
ported tnat agents Irom Constantinople
and Berlin have been conducting a per
sistent propaganda among the natives.
Some time ago Great Britain imposed
'.he most stringent restrictions against
He entry of foreigners to India and
Egypt with the announced purpose ot
keeping out the agents of Great Brit
ain's enemies.
K!tchrnerM Experience Help.
Karl Kitchener's selection for the
task of holding Britain's oriental em
pire intact is viewed generally as hav
ing been caused- by his long service in
India and Egypt, his intimate knowl
edge of the native temperament and his
large personal following among the
leaders of the natives.
Earlier In the war the disaffection In
India and Egypt was evidently of such
threatenin-r proportions that the use of
Japanese troops was being suggested to
take the place of native forces which
had been withdrawn for the European
fields.
May Ask Japan's Aid.
It was announced at that time that
no Japanese troops would be used out
side the theater of Japanese-German
hostilities at Kiao Chow, but since then
a new situation has arisen in the Bal
kans and Japan has announced her ad-4
nouncea ner aanerence 10 tne agree
ment of all the entente allies not to
conclude a separate peace. Competent
observers point out that Japan is
strategically in much better posit-" on
than England to land troops in India or
Egpt If the reports of a serious situ
ation in India are confirmed it would
not cause surprise here if the proposal
to use Japanese troops 'were revived.
The Singapore Revolt.
The last reports to the state depart
ment on political conditions in British
possessions in Asia were received more
than two months ago when details came
or the mutinv of natives at Singapore
in which practically all officers and
most of the troops of a British regiment
were killed. An expeditionary force of
British bluejackets scoured the interior
for the native leaders, captured many
of them and after a brief trial they
were executed
I TORPEDOED
Algiers. Algeria. Nov 9 The French
steamship Yser. formerly known as the)
Dacia. which w as seised by a French
cruiser last February while carrying a
cargo or cotton from tne united Males;
to Germany, has been torpedoed and
sunk bv a German submarine
GERMANY PLACES PASSPORT
BLAME UPON GREAT BRITAIN
W ashinrton. l C . Nov. 9 State de
partment officials are tenia y consider
ne Otrmany's communication of Mon
day denine the truth of teMimonv in
British courts that German officers
forged American passports mad deliv
ered them to secret agents, !
Germany places responsibility upon j
En eland by sug-gesting that if Robert
Ro?-nthal and George T Breckow tes- j
lined a reported In their trials under
espion iLf t h rees, it must be asstimeil j
th re mdmed to do so h threats, I
r other pressure
STEIEUI
MAY REVOLT
MIS IK STEEL, UN IBS
Announceas Contemplated $160,000,000 Expenditure for
, Rehabilitating French Industries After "War; Com
mission "Wants to Establish Reciprocal Trade Re
lations "With America; Visit Business Centers.
NEW YORK. Nov 9 Five mem
bra of the French industrial and
commercial commission landed
here today from the steamship La
Fayette and said they came to arrange
for the purchase, at the conclusion of
the war. of at least SlM.Me.M6 worth
of structural iron and steel machinery
and industrial supplies. All supplies
of this character, the commissioners
said, formerly were imported from Ger
many. The commissioners said that while
they are here primarily to purchase
supplies mecessary to reconstruct and
modernise French Industries when the
war is ever, they will endeavor to es
tablish reciprocal trade relations be-
FIES GDNTRDL" "
MOSTf HUH
Campaign in Balkans Goes
Smoothly, But Entente
Army, Shows Resistance.'
Ixmdon, Bng. Nov. 9 The central
powers and their Bulgarian ally now
control about two-thirds of Servia and
within a few weeks probably will have
the main Servian railroad running
through Belgrade and Nish. in full oper
ation. This will give them two routes
to Constantinople, as communication
by way of the Danube to Bulgaria Is
already open.
That this has not been accomplished
without weakening the other fronts is
indicated bj definite news of Russian
advances on the Riga-Dvinsk front, the
last part of the eastern battle line on
which the invaders kept up anything
in the nature of a definite offensive.
Allies Gain Against nulgarx.
Thus, far the plans of the central
powers In the Balkans have worked
like well oiled machinery, but the
latest news from Macedonia, indicates
the Initiative is not to be left entirely
to the invaders much longer Reports
come by way of Paris that the Anglo
French forces are making their pres
ence felt against the Bulgarians. The
entente allies claim their operations are
proceeding along the whole front with
-success.
Serlm Now Check Enemy.
It is reported also that the Servians,
holding part of the Macedonian front,
have checked the Bulgarians after 'n
flicting heavy losses on them.
The Russians continue the!' policy
ot sharp and unexpected Attacks at
various points along the front.
TBOO Serbs Cajtured.
Berlin. German). Nov. 9 (By wire
less to Sayvllle. L. I ) Capture by the
Germans of the main Servian positions
south of Kralievo was announced to
day by German army headquarters.
In the capture of Krusevac by the
Germans. 7000 Servians were mads
prisoners. '
TEUTONS SHIP SUPPLIES
VIA DANUBE TO TURKEY
Bucharest. Rumania. Nov. 9. The
Teutonic campaign against Servia In
order to get war supplies through to
Turkey has alreadv been effective to
the extent that supplies are now get
ting through
Last Saturday there arrived at
Rustchuk three barges escorted by
Austrian monitors. Troops and a large
quantity of munitions and motor cars
were landed for the army of field mar
shal baron von Her Goltx. commander
of the first Turkish annv.
BRITAIN HAS PURCHASED
109,000,000 YARDS KHAKI
London. Eng Nov. 9 The British
government has purchased, since the
outbreak of the European war. 169.
000.000 yards of khaki cloth, including
shirting and overcoating material- Of
this. t.eOO.OOO yards were purchased In
the United States.
This announcement Is made by the
war office in reply to a recent criti
cism that large orders for khaki had
been placed In the United. States while
English manufacturers were Idle.
ItUSUN TltBAsntY SUPFKRS
FUOM LOSS OP IHOVINCK.
Petrograa. Russia. Nov 9. The bud
jdi of war expenses is now about to be
ffihaed, on the assumption that the war
ijSfnVIhat another vear. The treasury
XaUlfjarKered heavy loss of revenue by
inmtii of the fact that the nation's
richest industrial provinces are now
held by Germany and Austria, and the
revenue will have to be made up by the
rest or the country.
The seized portion comprises an area
exceeding 133.000 square miles with a
population of 15.000.000 and with S53I
miles of railroads
LOHD hiTi:KV Ol KVCI.IM)
IS KII.I.KD IN Till-: HM.KVNS
London Kns Nv 9 Lord Kest-
. n i.tl Jl. the sixth peer of lireat
P.nt nn to nil n the pres nt war. has
t.en killid whil. -, -ving with a cav-
alr r piment in th. I.alkans
and Not With Convicted Frauds
Itween the United States and France.
Damonr Heads Commliuilon.
I The commission is headed by Maurice
Daraour. formerly French consul gen
eral at New Orleans, now secretary ot
appropriations of the French chamber
of deputies.
Although this commission is not a
government organization it is backed,
the commissioners said, ty all the large
industrial and commercial organisa
tions of France, and a majority of the
bankers.
Will Remain Several Months. -
Mr. Damonr said the commission will
remain in this country several months.
j with headquarters in New York, but
I trips will be made to many of the larger
cities and virtually all ot the important
manufacturing centers.
rPEERS CENSURE".
GONOUCTQFWAR
i
t D enonncejBntish Losses and
Failures in Addresses Be
fore Kous'eVf" Lords. .-
London. Eng . Nov 9 Denouncing
the censorship and the conduct of the
war generally, a number of peers of the
realm delivered addresses Monday in
the house of lords. Earl Loreburn,
former high chancellor, was one of the
principal critics.
Earl Loreburn spoke of what he
termed "The misadventures" of the
Antwerp expedition, the loss of rear
admiral Sir Christopher Craddoek's
squadron the Dardanelles operations
and the Balkan expedition. The speak
er said he had been told two months
ago that 1S.V00.900 men had been killed
or disabled for life and that multitudes
had been added to this number since,
and that if the conflict continued in
definitely, revolution or anarch"
might follow in Europe.
vnrr Criticises Censorship.
Earl Lorebur. who was one of the
radical stalwarts who criticised the
South African war. oddly enough found
himself supported by viscount Mllner.
former high commissioner for South
Africa, who was one of those largely
responsible for the South African war.
Viscount Milner. however, largely con
fined himself to a criticism of the cen
sorship. He declared that the news had
been "doctored in an optimistic sense"
and also denounced the government for
not going sooner to the assistance of
Servia.
Baron Courtney of Penwith, well
known as a peace advocate, followed
viscount Milner. He said the govern
ment should show itself ready to ac
cept any suggestions which would end
the war, concluding, however, that the
Germans must agree to evacuate Bel
gium and France, and that no indem
nity should be demanded of Great
Britain.
GERMANS COMMENT LITTLE
ON U. S. NOTE TO BRITAIN
Berlin. Germany. Nov 9. Berlin
newspapers as a rule make no com
ment on the American note to Great
Britain relative to interfering with
shipping. Summaries of the note as
received In Berlin are "published with
out headlines of significance. The Mor
genpost, however, makes the following
comment
"It is to be hoped the lesson In In
ternational law which the Washington
government gives the British a-overn
I meat will make the desired tmpres
j sion in London. The bare fact that the
j American government uses such decid
j ed and firm language shows that the
uwnieui oi wme ana inuneniun
American circles with Great Britain
must be assumed to be very earnest in
character.
"It is to be hoped America will not
content herself with a bare protest,
but will proceed to energetic measures
if the case demands and Great Britain's
gross arbitrariness does not cease."
ENGLISH THINKPRESIDENT
IS JUST PLAYING POLITICS
London. Eng.. Nov 9 "Enlightened
opinion here is not uneasy over presi
dent Wilson's note," savs the London
correspondent of the Manchester
Guardian, who is in the closest touch
with public men.
"The president's attitude." continues
(Contlneeil oo puce X, Col. fi)
LIBERTY BELL EDITION
EL PASO HERALD THIS WEEK
The Week-Knd edition of the El Paso Herald will be imuc1 ui celebration
of the com in-; of the Liberty bell to El Paso next Tuclay.
Historical articles concerning the famous relic of revolutionary days,
illustrations appropriate to the occasion and new matter of snteregt ia
connntion with the vmt of the 1m II will be published im hiding the official
piuj'rain lor the VI Paso celebration.
Realization of Yuans Dream
Of Monarchy Is Delayed
. At Least Temporarily.
MANY PROVINCES
VOTE FOR KING
Japan Announces No Mili'
iary Or Naval Demonstra
tion Had Been Planned.
PBKIN. jChtea. Nov. 9. The Asso
ciated Press was authorized to-
i day to state that the Chinese
( government has decided no change wtH
be mset this year in the form ef gov
ernment of the country.
France, Great Britain and. Jaaa
i
reogfat pressure to- bear spas Ckasa,
neea a apnMg to
r tuna II In at this time, fewtatr such
' nn 11 i ,n.4, - W attS I
ef the far east. CajferaJegW this
request. The United SSatea deeUaerL to
Ijejji'he concert of paffers petitioning
it natf recently Deett, announced teat
13 of the IS provinces ef China had
voted in favor of the restoration of
the monarchy fc
The onlv assumption new is that
y president Yuan bhi fflK, to whom Is
attributes ehier impetus for the
monarchical movement, haa decided to
court the good will of the petitioning
powers bv assenting to tneir request
I -after having first shown a. spirit of m
i dependence by declining. How long
1 after January 1 China will remain a
republic is not disciosedL
t Japan Will Not Threaten.
.Kioto, japan, aot. h. japan has
assured the powers she has no inten
tion of maktug a military or naval
demonstration against China In connec
tion with the pending negotiations for
postponement of the reestablishment of
a monarchy If this change in the form
of government should be decided upon
According to a report current in
Kioto, which is believed to be authentic,
president Yuan Shi Kal intended to pro
claim himself emperor of China on Nov
If, the day of the first coronation feast
in Japan. The. idea of the enthronement
ef Yuan Shi Kal simultaneously with
tne orronation of emperor Ycsh'h-to
was aiiRpleasing to representative Jap
anese. FEDERALS AND ORGANIZED
MAGNATES TO GET TOGETHER
Indianapolis, Ind-. Nov. 9. Directors
and owners of t,he Federal legue held
a lengthy informal session here todav.
j the regular annual meeting of the
I league being postponed until this af
ternoon. While no Intimation ot tie
purpose of the informal meeting was
given, it was generally understood
that the league leaders were determin
ing the course thev would pursue in
the. 'peace" negotiations with organized
baseball
It was said that Barney Dreyfus of
the Pittsburg Nationals. Jacob Rup
pert of the New Tork Americans, and
Chas. Coraiskey of the Chicago Amer
icans were at French Lick today.
Later Charles Weeghman stated pos
itively that the Federal league owners
would go to French Lick.
CHILD IS KILLED WHEN
TEAM RUNS AWAY IN FIELD
Uttlefleld. Texas. Nov 9 When a team
of horses attached to a binder in D P Grif
fin! field, ran away, the four year old sob
ef Mr. Griffin was throwa from the binder
and fatally Injured. The child's skull wax
fractured, ceasing his death. The father
was Bear bet was enable to reach his child
In time to save him.
LIBIT. FW ND OTHER
GEHMINS 1'LKtD NOT GUILTY.
New York. Nov 9 Lieut. Robert
Fay. late of the German armv, and the
four men whom the United States has
grouped with him as defendants to a
charge of trying to blow np munition
carrying ships, todav pleaded not
guilty to the indictment found against
them. They were denied a reduction
in bail.
Fay and his brothennlaw Walter
Scholz and Engelbert Bronkhorst,
were sent back to thee Tombs. Max
Breitung and Herbert Klensle who
have been at libertv under 115,00" bond
each, were released, their bondsmen
agreeing to continue their suretv.

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