OCR Interpretation


El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, March 29, 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1916-03-29/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

Wednesday, Sltm-li 29, 1916.
EL PASO HERALD
V
1
UENICB
WANTS NEW LEG
Jesus Paez, Shot by U. S.
Soldiers at Columbus,
Has Legx Amputated.
l.ittle Jesus Paez ("Buen Muchacho")
v.mu an artificial leg and an Araerl-
aii education so he can stay in tne
nice United Stated and be a good boy.
Jesus la the 12 year old Mexican boy
who was shot tn the hip by American
kolrtiera at Columbus when Villa raided
that town. Jeaua was holding his fath
er i horse while the elder Paex crept
into Columbus with the Villa bandit.
HIi, hip was shattered by an American
bullet and he was taken to Dealing,
where the lg was amputated at the
lnp and where little Jesus is being
len every care by the American resi
iletits of that town-
"Grlncors Shoot Too Straight'
'Villa neer told where we were
uing or when we were across the bor-
ler ' little Jeeus told an EI 1'aaoan
Tuesday, while he -wan in Darning "The
first I knew that we were in the
I nited States was when I heard one
.r ilia's men shout- 'These damn
gringo shoot too straight. Let's get
j from here or we will all be killed.'
VTrnlil of llrlDK Killed,
i l Ktced them to take me with them
I ,i I had heard from Villa's men how
,h. Americanos killed all of the men
Hii- took prisoners. All they did was
to shove me to one side and ride or
inn away I was afraid I would be
killed and, when I saw an American
soldier tomlng toward me I thought
m time had come. Instead he picked
7ne up in his strong arms. Just like my
mother used to do and be carried me
into his tent and petted me and took
a re of my leg, which hurt, oh so bad,
i nd then the dctoor came and he wi
m entle that I Just cried. I promised
ihp do" tor I would be a good bov and
I am keeping iny word and I always
intend to be a good bo because the
Vtneriian people have been so good to
me
To Hare Leg and Kdnenilou.
The Paez boy Is et the ladle.' hos
pital In Fleming and is said to be rc
. -ilnj; eery care from the people of
licminp who hvc taken an Interest In
lus case A purse is being raised to
inn him an artificial limb and ar-ng-m.
nts are being made to have him at
tend school
F
T
FJ
OF Mil IS
TMEWn-FDUBTH iBQRDER TO HAVE
i
Lieut. Allison, of Texas,
Dies of Pneumonia Con
tracted in Mexico.
Second Lieut. Joseph W Allison, of
the 13th cavafry, died at the Fort Bliss
hospital at 3 a. m. (Wednesday from
pneumonia, which had developed from
a severe cold contracted while operat
ing in Mexico with Gen John J. Persh
ing s column
Texan Officer.
Lieut Allison, the first officer of the
American iinm to succumb as the re
sult of the punitive expedition into
Mexico, was a native Texan, having
been a rceident of Dallas at the time
he was appointed to West Point by a
Texan congressman He was 26 years
old and was w II known in Kl Paso, as
his lommund was stationed at Wash
ington park btfoie going to Columbus.
N M
Lieut. Allison is survived bj his
fath r. w ho is now on his wav from
Dallas, his mother, who lives in Homer,
La, and his wife, who has been living
at her home in Klizabethtown, N". J.,
since her husband has been on border
duty.
Illitarj Funeral.
No arrangements have yet been made
for the funeral of the Texas officer, al
though plans are being made for a
military funeral The arrangements
are In charge of the J. W Peak Under
taking comiiany. It is probable that
the remains of the officer will be re
turned to Dalian for burial His father
will arrive here this evening to ar
range for the funeral.
RIFLES AND AMMUNITION BE
LONGING TO HEARST, SEIZED
Centinard rrom rare One.)
i inches In Mexico, told the police that
Die ammunition bad been purchased by
him at an auction sale at the federal
building
He stated that be intended to ship
'he ammunition to the Babicora ranch
in be used by his emploves in protect
ing themselves against bandits.
Tlie rifles and ammunition are be
nir Imld and will be returned to Mr.
linen at tt,r an investigation is made.
NEGRO SOLDIERS OF 24TH
BROUGHT IN WITH PNEUMONIA
1 iv e sick soldiers came in from Co
lumbus on the Golden State limited
Wednesday afternoon One, a negro
from the 21th infantry, had pneu
monia. The other four were from the in-fantrv-
regiments at the front and
w ere suffering from intestinal troubles.
CARRANZA FORCES KILL
BANDITS IN TORREON ZONE
Monterev, Hex , March -9 Carranm.
forces under command of Kens Klizon
do, Ignacio Ramos and Matias Itamos
are in pursuit of Villlsta. bandits in
the Laguna district and large numbers
of them are being captured and shot.
Gen Jacinto Trevino, who will have
charge of operations in the Laguna.
district and supervise the entire cam
paign against Villa and his outlaws,
has arrived here on his way to Torreon
where be will establish permanent
headquarters. Gen Trevino sayB the
whole of his territory from Tampico
north Is now absolutely peaceful.
Large Laguna interests are delight
ed with the coming of Gen. Trevino
and believe his presence will result in
a coordination of his subordinates and
a quick cleaning up of the bandit
forces.
JUAREZ BARRACKS GIVEN
INSPECTION BY GAVIRA
Gen Gavira, commanding the Juarez
garrison, was not at his headquarters
Wednesday morning, but spent the day
instead in an inspection of the barracks
under his command. Ills aides stated
that no news had come up from the
headquartera of Gen Luiz Gutierrez,
and that they were in the dark as to the
whereabouts of Villa.
The general feeling among the of
ficers stationed in Juarez is that the
crux of the border situation has been
reached and passed and that the Wilson
administration will have no cause to
complain of the lack of cooperation on
the part of the Constitutionalists.
INFANTRY IS
Big Regiment of Negroes
and Part of Fifth Cav
alry Enter Mexico.
Arrivals from Columbus report Hiat
all but two companies of the 24th in
fantry (negro) entered 'Mexico Tues
day morning. The long column also
included the larger part of the Fifth
cavalrs', save several troops that are
being retained at Columbus for border
patroL T train of auto trucks loaded
with supplies accompanied the new
column.
Great quantities of supplies are be
m grecclved in El Pabo bi the quarter
master's department and onlv the most
urgent consignments are going on to
Columbus. This fact is taken to mean
that the matter of shipment over the
Mexico North Western is ncaring set
tlement. Mnlex Supplant Trucks.
Already the mue has supplanted the
costlv motor truck, after the Casas
Grandes countrj has been negotiated.
A shipment of 179 of these animals was
received Tuesday from St. Louis and 800
more are due at the base within the
next several davs.
Tha mules, according to reports
brought to Kl Paso, are given a two
weeks' rest after they make the trip
from the countrv "down there" and full
peace rations That the animals are
standing up well under the tax upon
their energy and strength is shown by
the fact that one of one batch of 108
which did strenuous work, only seven
died.
Hookies llroken In.
In addition to Columbus being a ren
dezvous for mules that are being bro
ken in, there are also a colony of raw
rookies that are learning the ropes.
Kightv -seven of these chaps arrived at
the base a week ago and In another
week will be in readiness to be sent to
the front to fill the gaps and vacancies
caused by sickness and misfortune
among tbe Infantry ranks
Uncle Sam Seizes Relics
Oi Villas Columbus Raid
Doming. N M.. March 59 Uncle
Sam stepped in and spoiiea a line ais
play of souvenirs from the Columbus
raid which Morris Nordhaus was tak
ing east in a packing case
He had gathered a number of saddles,
blankets, pistols and otlfer relics of
the raid and planned to show them in
Kansas City, Chicago and other eastern
cities. When he reached Kansas City
government agents met him at the
train and informed him that the gov
ernment considered his souvenirs as the
property of the United States.
The goods were seized after Nord
haun offered to give bond for the safe
return of the articles he was taking
east for his display
$8,611,502 AVAILABLE FOR
ARMY IN VILLA CAMPAIGN
Washington. D C, March 39 The
sum of $8,611,502 will be immediately
at the disposition of the war depart
ment for the pursuit of Villa, congress
having rushed through an emergency
appropriation to that effect
The money will be available for the
purchase of aeroplanes motor trucks
and all needed supplies, as well as for
the equipment of the additional troops
which the army is allowed to recruit
Explains Why
Coffee Hurts Many
Dr. W. A. Evans, prominent Chicago physician, who edits the "'TJow To
Keep Well" columns of the Chicago Tribune, said in that publication, under
date of March 7, 1915:
"Coffee is a drug. Those who are addicted to its
use are drug addicts." "From the standpoint of
public hygiene the coffee question is worth while.
It is the most widespread form of drug addiction."
Some coffee drinkers go on for years without seeming harm, but with
others the telltale effects of the drug, caffeine, in coffee, show in various ills
and discomforts, such as headache, biliousness, indigestion, nervousness, sleep
lessness and heart disturbance.
Kins
coffee.
When the health of a coffee-drinker bc-
to suffer it s high tune to quit the
The change to
Instant
Postum
is easy and pleasant. Better health usually
follows, and a ten days' trial proves.
Postum comes in two forms. The orig
inal Postum Cereal must be well-boiled
lor and 25c packages. Instant Postum a
soluble powder is made in the cup. No
boiling required. 30c and 50c tins.
The two forms of Postum are equally
delicious, and the cost per cup is about the
sime.
IHSTANT POSTUM
I artU.0 AlV V I
T h. tr rvQulirPeSTurn n concnttt4 form ftoiWlJ
rvrarj 3eairCH0nl0rprwpanr-y wv .... . I I f
S
'
C
V
r
t
i.
i
i
id
... .-..., I..MllftUl
"compcunan'.or o oiiie-'e-"- ' I
ana as'"Fl,0"w, v-"
MMimrrjitr& ir I V.
r. , 111
rostum cereai urnpdnjr.s"b
Bniix Cbeek.Hich.U3A.
L"' MET WEIGHT EIGHT OUHCES J 1
P0STH
H GEREUr
"There's a Reasoiv" for Postum
RADIO STATIONS
High Power Plants May Be
Installed at El Paso and
Fort Huachuca.
Washington, D. C. March 29. High
power radio stations may be built along
the bqrder to provide for continuous
communication, night and day. The
army now has a 250 kilowatt station at
San Antonio, and the construction of
two more, one at HI Paso, and one at
Fort Huachuca, Ariz., has been recom
mended. It is possible that some army
plant elsewhere in the United States
ma be moved to the border for this
purpose
1 Ith the high power stations it w ould
be possible, signal officers say. to reach
the field troops far south in Meilco at
any time The low power field equip
ment would not be able, however, to
reach the border stations except under
favorable conditions.
The San Antonio plant is now able
to talk with Omaha, direct.
N Excitement in Mexico.
Official reports from consults in Mex
ico again today dwelt on tho lack of
popular excitement there over the en
try of American troops. Consul Letch
er at Chihuahua city, s6nt the follow
ing "Gov. Enrlquez published yes'erdav
(March 26) an address to Chihuahua
citizens recounting circumstances of
the Columbus incident and the Ameri
can expedition consequent thereupon
and calling upon their patriotism to
remain calm and give the Mexican gov
ernment the fullest support in the pres
ent crisis. This address. In my opinion,
will have a favorable effect locally, in
v lew of frequent publication at the bor
der of alarming reports regarding con
ditions here.
'Under these circumstances. It ap
pears most regrettable that border news
agencies should continue to Impute to
authorities and people here, actions
eontrarj to the foregoing facts."
Vb llnnslnc of Mexican Troops.
The following paraphrase of n offi
cial telegram from Douglas also was
made public:
' I have Investigated statements tele
graphed from here to the effect that
there has been concentration of Mexi
can troops at Agua Prieta. opposite
Douglas
"I saw Gen. Calles. in command of
the forces of the do facto government,
who gave me permission to Investigate
personally. I found 400 men at Agua
Prieta, but saw no artillery. I found
all trench wires removed, no troops In
anv trenches, and no troops on any
side of Agua Prieta.
"However, there aro 1000 at Cobul
lona. IS miles south Gen. Calles in
vites all citizens to go and make a per
sonal investigation of this matter Co
chise county at present is very quiet.
' I also Investigated the statement
that there are S00 Villlstas at Dragon.
The report is absolutely untrue
"A few United States troops, even -v
squad, in our outlying camps and towns,
would absolutely insure peace therein
inder present conditions "
FALL PROBING
II.iJli.li 10
Confers With Deputy Col
I lector, Commandant and
Other Officers There.
! Columbus N M-. March 29 United
States senator Albert B. Fall arrived
here this morning and went into con
ference with deputy customs collector
Lee Itlggs. who was on duty nt Ms
, otnee on me iiirui. " - " --- i
has been securing statements from I
i civilians here regarding what hap- j
i pened on that night.
, After having a conference with dep-
uty collector Kiggs senator Fall went .
to the neauquarifrs u "'j -" i
I! Sample, the commandant here and,
after staying a short time, left in an
automobile for Itachlta. M.
Senator Fall denied that he is mak- j
ing an investigation for congressional
action, or that he is looking into tlu
military administration of the cavalry
troops on the niKht of the raid.
"I am here for information and I am
alwavH mad to get Information from
whatever source," said the New Mexico
'"Before leaving for Hachita senator I
Fall returned to the custom . office and
had another conference with Itiggs and.
when he left, he carried a bundle of
papers and reports with him.
He will go from Hachita to Deming
and from there return to Kl Paso.
TOWERMAN DOZES;
TWO TKAINS CBASH
(Cpnilnued from paie 1.)
Don't wait until the tube is entirely
used keep a supply ahead of
rfe
PERFECT
S.
A Standard Ethical Dentifrie
Send 2c stamp today for a generous trial package of
Dr. Lyon's Perfect Dental Cream or Tooth Powder.
I. W.Lyon &. Sons, Inc. 582 W.27th St, flew Tor ui;
STATION MAY BE BUILT
AT FORT BLISS, BELIEF
A high powered radio station may be
erected at Fort Bliss for communicat
ing between the American troops in
Mexico and the fort. Three months ago
an officer of the signal corps was here
and made an inspection of conditions at
the fort and in Kl Paso with a view to
establishing a powerful wireless sta
tion at the fort. It is understood that
this recommendation favored the erec
tion of such a plant In Kl PaBO.
The present radio plants In use for
communicating between the border and
the front in Mexico are said to be too
small to carry the valume of business
made necessary by the operations in
Mexico.
The original plan of using the old
federal wireless station near Washing
ton park has been abandoned. The
equipment is not of the same design as
that now in use by the army field wire
less and the only things that could be
used about the old plant would be the
high towers These, however, are not
suitably loiated for the use of the army
and it Is doubtful if anj part of the
plant will be used by the army
AIRPLANE MAKERS WANT
. TO AID WAR DEPARTMENT
"Washington, p. C, March 29 Air
plane manufacturers have evinced a
desire to cooperate with the govern
ment in developing satisfactory war
planes, secretary of war Baker said to
day. They have suggested a testing
ground at some central point where new
types may be tried out. Secretary
Baker said that some such plan would
be adopted Planes needed by Gen.
Pershing would be supplied as Boon as
possible, the secretary said
The Aero club of America has offered
the war department two of the latest
type of airplanes at Jl each. The nomi
nal figure was placed on tbe machines
because an outright gift would be illegal.
OPHELIA
Ci HWKWfaOw II ,,,l,.fc I
at Elyria Memorial hospital. Charles
Nelson died on a train on the way from
Amherst to Blyriau D. F"i""adl.?f
Toronto, and R. Thomas o. Philadel
phia, were killed in the wreck.
.Some of Crew Escape.
Tbe body of one fireman, badly
crushed, was found on top of the boiler
of one of the engines.
Some of the members of the crews of
the three trains involved in the wreck
tscaned with scratches and bruises,
escaped b"ngon ToIed0t engineer of
the" Twentieth Century, crawled unin
jured, from under his engine after It
had plunged 400 feet along the, ties.
His fireman, Walter Mann. Toledo, and
the conductor, M. V. Burke. Buffalo,
also were hurt .,,
Search was being made for the bodies
of two express messengers, expei ted to
be found among express car wreckage
piled 20 feet high.
official ory of Wreck.
D C Moon, general manager of the
New- York Central lines at Cleveland,
gives this story of the wreck as it
was given him from hisfeubordinateson
the road at 9 oclock. .
'The engineer of the first seetion of
train No 8 was stopped at Amherst
..I.-....I T Ann linnw 1llHf HOW
! The second section should have stopped
Oecause Ol me amwiimi". r.(.. . .
the signal of a flagman on the first
section. . . . ..
"The second section ran into the end
coach of the first section. The wreck
age from both sections went over on
the westbound high speed track. It
had 40 passengers. The next car ahead
of the coach was a club Pullman car
The cars ahead of the coach and club
car were sleepers.
"Nobody In them was hurt "
S. P. CONDUCTOR
DIES SUDDENLY
Death came quickly to A. E. Yates,
a passenger conductor on the western
division of the Southern radfic rail
road Tuesday night in Ms room in a
local hotel. Yates died following a
stroke of aDODlexy soon after he
reached his room, after returning from i
his run Tuesday night t
Conductor Yates was about 50 jears
old His body will be Bent tonight to
Tucson, Aria., his former home, where
relatives reside
Soon after he reached his room
Tuesday night Mr. Yates became
alarming! ill. He summoned assist
ance ind Dr I J Bush was sent for
but Yates died before the physician
arrived.
JOHN J. WATSON DIES WHILE
orbnuiMU mum wunrrucnu i
John J. 'Watson died suddenly at 3.3
Wednesday morning at B06 South
Stanton street of heart disease. Wat- j
son went from his room at the Arllng
ton hotel to spend the night at the j
romo of a tnend on soutn Stanton
whon he was stricken
The dereased was SI years old and
was a member of the local Bricklayers
union The body w.vs taken to the
undertaking parlors of McBean, Sim
mons & Hartford. J. M Deaver. the
ccroner. rendered a verdict of death
caused by heart disease.
CONFEDERATE VETERANS HAVE
CHARGE OF VETERAN'S FUNERAL j
Funeral services for John C GIbb,
a pioneer resident of El Paso, was held
Wednesday morning at 11 oclock from
the parlors of McBean, Simmons &
Hartford. Itev. Henry Easter offi
elated.
Ti rnnvrl watt in nhnrcrn of the
John f Brown camli of United Con- I
federate Veterans Mr Gibbs was SO
vears old and bad been a resident of
Kl Paso for more than 20 ear-"
BROTHERHOOD BIBLE CLASS
ELECTS OFFICERS FOR YEAR
Officers for the vear were elected by
th Men s Brotherhood Bible tlass of
Westminster Presbvterian church Tues- I
evening, at a meeting of the class held
at the home of J G Lowman, in High
land Park The officers chosen were:
J W. Kirkpatrick, president; J. K.
Proctor, vice president: B. M. Smith,
treasurer; J. D. Morrow, secretary; Jno.
A. Cuhbs, assistant secretary, Bradford
Hardie, teacher, and Prof It. K. Jones,
assistant teacher.
The new president appointed his com
mittees and outlined an aggressive
campaign to increase the membership
and the efficiency of the class. All the
members pledged their hearty support.
After the business metirg the even
ing was concluded with a socia1 hour,
Mr. Newton, of the lass, rondi ring sev
eral numbers on the violin, accompa
n'l . Miss Kdith McKnlght The hot
ees, Mrs Lowman, served ice crcr-m a'id
cake
FAMOUS AS "EVERYWOMAN"
ontagu Love Edwin Stevens
Three Big .Stars in the Super-Sensation
JT..7?
I gJUV.1 SIUV
Taken from the poem, "The Mills of the Gods"
A startling, stirring, real human play.
See the Beautiful Models at the Fashion Show.
See the Ice Skating at the Hotel Biltmore Roof Rink.
Iwifi
3
HOME OF THE $10,250.00
HOPE -JONES UNIT
TODAY TOMORROW
William Fox Presents Herbert Brenon's Great
Film
e Ruling Passion"
WITH
WSL.LlA.Vi SHAY
An intensely gripping and spectacular production. Presenting scenes of
tropical splendor and picturing an ORIENTAL HAKEM, a mighty love
and the incense of the Warm East. Produced by Herbert Brenon in
Jamaica, West Indies.
Special Music on the Largest Hope-Jones Orches
tra in Texas. The .expert, Henry Francis Parks,
plays from 10:30 to 12:30; 3 to 4:30; 7 to 10:30.
CLIP THIS COUPON!
LADIES FREE TONIGHT ! !
This coupon, accompanied by a person with one paid 30c ticket, wfll
admit any lady free to the CRAWFORD THEATRE TONIGHT.
to witness the opening performance of the MANHATTAN MUSI
CAL MERRY MAKERS, m the tabloid musical comedy.
"THE PLOTTERS."
Pretty Girls, Funny Comedians, Good Singing and Dancing.
Two Shows Nightl 7:45 and 9:00. 0-20-30c
Matinees Sat.-Sun. 10c and 20c
Cletn. Wholesome Entertainment For The Entire Family.
WHEN YOU WANT A CAR
PHONE PHONE
265 3 7575
MONTANA ABTO LIVEBY
IMCE S-FASSEMCEE CUES FOE H1EE, 51-50 FES HOBI
WE ARE DESIROUS OF PLEASWC ALL WHO CARE FOR SURE
ITIOMPT AND COURTEOUS SERVICES
e MTXTLC AVCNUC
M A. UOLTJERT FBAK M. mtl.I
Aztec Auto Service
MONTANA AND STANTON STS.
Only Stand North of the Tracks
pi- SEVEN, SEVEN, SIX, SIX
GOOD GOVERNMENT CLUB
HAS ITS FIRST LUNCHEON
Tho first luncheon of thp executive
committee of the Good Government
club was held at noon Wednesday in
the dining room of Hotel Sheldon, J.
It. Campbell president, presiding
There was no set program at the
meeting. A definite program will be
announced later. Those present at the
luncheon were. J. I Campbell, Rev.
Perry ,T. Rice. Rev Henry Raster, C. V
Nafe. J U. Gwln. Dr. Paul Gallagher,
rabbi Martin Zielonka. II B. Durkee.
V IT Carre. P E. Partillo and K M.
Bray
MONITION Notice is hereby given
that there has been seized In this col
lection district for violation of tho U.
S Customs laws, 1 bay horse with
Mezicin brand, which will be sold at
amtliMi in front m the Custom House,
Thursday pril i, !91fi at tu a m.
n one lalmln th propertj is re
M'llrpi! tu ippeat ithin th tiK pre
svili. ,1 In li . 11 h Tjim.ii Cobb,
l .1' i.I'H . f 1 lt Mils t
ORAMD THEATRE
Kg NOW PLAYING IS
ENGAGEMENT CLOSES SATURDAY NIGHT
World's HiSGBTSEST Spectacle
D. W. GRIFFITH'?
i ij
18,000 People
Battle of
Petersburg
Sherman'
March to
the Sea
Lee and
Grant at
Appomattox
5,000 Scenes
k r iITl if
3,000 Horns
WiidRidtt
of the
KaKIax
Klans
Assassination
of Lincoln
The Part tie
Women Played.
Cost $500,000
Symphony Orchestra of 30
. NIGHTS Lower Floor, ?1, $Z; Balcony, Z5c, 50c, $1
. MATINEES Lower Floor, 50c, ?1; Balcony, 25c, 50c
SEATS SELLING AT RYAN'S
Mrs. Clark's Cafeteria N E f a t i o n
SVMK f.OUII HOMF. I OOKIM.
20S ME1 VAili.
OI'ICN til. WtY

xml | txt