OCR Interpretation


El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, March 10, 1920, HOME EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1920-03-10/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HOME EDITION
WEATHER FORECAST.
El Pass and west Texas, fair and wanner; Hew
Mexico, snow in north, rain in south; Arizona, (air and
cooler.
PASO HERALD
LATEST NEWS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
EL PASO. TEXAS. WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 10. 1920.
SINGLE COPT. FIVE CENTS.
DELIVERED AXTWHKRE. 70 MONTH
14 PAGES TODAY
PROCLAIMS ITS INDEPENDENC
TODAY'S PRICES.
Mexican bank notes, state bills, 7035SQ; pesos,
$100, Mexican gold, $50.50; naaonales, 26e; bar sil
ver, H. H. quotation, J1.Z7; copper, 185419c; grain,
higher; livestocks, lower; stocks, strong.
EL
EGYPT
T
u
Y
ARE 50JQ0J1
PEOPLE WORTH
Shall The Freedom Of
These Be Sacrificed For
Welfare Of Germany?
BIG QUESTION OF
HUGE WORLD WAR
Have New Nations, Freed
From Serfdom, A Right
To Their Existence?
By FRANK K. 9IMOXDS
ASHINGTON, XX C, March 1. In
W
all the welter of criticism of the
peace made at Paris last year,
i h 9tv ara certain thinKs worth re
membering. Today the criticism of
the domnent. based dsob tne eco
nomic aspects Is general, in addition
the conflicts between various races
fer relatively small strips of tern
torv serve to giTe the lie to the as
sertion tnat am oeace was made.
Americans, perceiving this confus-
rn and nroximate cnaos. are eraa-
a accepting the extreme views of
relatively sm&ii numoer 01 critics.
rj-riv Kntisn. wno styie uemsej
Liberal. and seek to achieve an en-
ire revision or the treaties with tne
lfous purpose to benefit Germany
it the exnense or all the nations
which recently united to defeat the
merman attack.
The truth about the war and the
r e lies patent in the fact that to
gether these two things amounted to
, st surgical operation. Upwards of
j ti 0,000 human beings were rescued
from slav ery and from something
worw than slavery The operation
mutilated German v and resulted In
t he actual extinction of the Haps-H
"jrg empire. Ana just as no opera--on
'an be accomplished without
Mending, the results have been such
as to arouse protest from the most
squeamish.
What of the Other Side
But granted that economic disorder
hs t resulted, does this Justify a
lanlcet indictment of what the.
Frencn. British and America it nego
t ators of Paris did in recognising
"ew facts" The burden of all crlti
csm now is that the treat terms are
too severe upon Germany, but at
est is it out of place to indicate
what was done for other than Ger-;
-lau interests and to recall that th
nar was mo't than once advertised
ANYTHING?
s a
war of Iteration? Must the-
'ect
upon uermawyT i
The truth Is that the peace
treaties libera ltd 5,000,000
Poles. 10.006000 Czech o-Slovak.
4JQWJ00Q senthera Sla-, 7,900.000
Romanian. IjlKM&OOO Italian. 1
600,000 Aiaaee-Lorralners. 250000
Diart, 156.000 Walloons of the
Belgian frontiers, at least 2,000,
OOO Greeks. All told, upward of
30000000 human beings vrere
set free from German. Austrian,
Hungarian. Russian and Turkish
tyranny. In accomplish! ag this
upwards of 5.060,000 of Germans
and Hongartans, bnt mainly
Austrian Germans, were Included
In Slav and Rumanian frontiers.
Are 50600000 People Worth While
We are now asked to regard the
territorial nhases of the treaty as
a'1ur, because the lines as drawn
in not arrive at comnlete justice.
n'ng totally impossible, given the
Tungling of various races at the sev-
-al meeting places of ethnic freo
. erfr and to set aside the gain of the
000 OGo liberated, because of the
f'00.000 nlaced under alien rule
Mot than thia. we are asked to re
gard the liberation of human beings
s unimportant because It is accom-
ar.ed ov economic cnaos.
But is this a Just demand9 Was it
-pcessary that the Poles should con-
xinue under German rule because! to
f them meant to shake the edifice
of jfrmtn industry Ought the world
n accept as legalised the stealings of
Frederick the Great and his success-
u'-s because the result of the stealings
d been tne erection or an economi
.a" efflcien state" Is efficiency so
i uch more Important than liberty.
zict au7 if it is. then we made a
Teat mistake in opposing the Ger
man The New States
The new states, which emerged at
Pari, had emerged actually from the
war for Paris did not do more than
-. cognise existing facts. They will
n easily find their foot. They have
aspirations not differing from those
-( the older states, just as our own
hi id re n will sooner or later give evl
nre of appetites like our own. They
i ave necessities, dangers, external
'enare which stimulate a desire for
strategic frontiers, but Is this human
tendency to damn them forever and
o vitiate the work of liberation?
It is an odd clrcasoetauce that
tvose who call themselves "liberal"
iince little or no interest or concern
o the human aspects of the question
and concentrate upon the economic
HdMs. They would deprlTe the Poles
yf regions in which the population Is
'wo thirds Polish, because the regions
.ire economically "necessary to Ger
n au But when German speaking
str'ctp necessary to the Csechs, are
s'gned to the Cxecho-Slovak state.
ro denunciation of this iniquity Is
-o great. That Germany should hold
he Lpper Sflesi&n Coal Basin, with a
i'olish population, strikes them as a
-hr roughly Just thing, but French oc-
jpation of the Sarre is a crime
cainst the Fourteen Points, tntoler-
le and nnforgiveeble.
Undeserved Criticism
And now, for political reasons,
hes denunciations of the treaty of
p-ace are seised upon in America.
where the actual knowledge of the
-tv provisions is very slight and
otallv colored b the domestic politi
cal differences But do the oO.Aoft.aa
luffiin beings set free count for noth
ing Is there no such thing ao a
-ompartson of evils. In 192 4 Ger
many occupied lands inhabited by be
tween 4.M0.OM and S.0M.090 Poles.
ard in certain regions had been for a
century expelling the Poles to make
the districts safely German. Small
sections of these regions have bees
(.Continued en page 2, column 4.)
Tif proved drcolatloa of
The 131 Pam Herald la nearly
twice that of any other El
Paso paper.
i iiittnTriT-nT Whissisi lififWiJM lHJ!i aate 2t contents public until the
D3cifications For
DOSTER NOT MARRIED
SAYS 'OTHER WOMAN'
Letters Written By Array
Captain Reveal His
Love Affairs.
MT WAS engaged to Capt. Wade Dos-
X ter.-
Thus Mrs. Lulu Beckley, a pretty
young girl now living in 1 Paso,
threw more mystery into the killing
of tbe army officer at Columbus
early .Monday morning, by a woman
who claimed to be his wife. Mrs.
Beckley said this in a signed state
ment and not only added mystery bat
set many new tongues to wagging
over one of the most sensational
shooting cases the southwest ever has
Known.
The woman who says she is Dos
ter"s widow still lies in the military
hospital at Columbus; fighting for her
uie. one una a coroners Jurr she
j WM married to Capt. Doster.
Jirm. urcKiear atalenraf r.
nents a thousand new aagles.
Did the woman wounded know
she could not retain Capt. Dos.
terr
Was she n neglected wife who
knew the hnaband s affections had
fled.
Did she plan to kill Dosler and
herselfr
Did he fire flrstr
Did she go to Doster while still
the wife of another man and
travel about to different nrray
camps with him 7
Sirs. Deckler has letters from
Doster protesting love and draw
ing m glowing picture of the
future when they could be to
aether. Read the statement. Read the let
ters. Too: will know the nnextiAns
uhi raoet oe answered. i
Columbus. N. SL, yesterday that she
killed her husband in self defence
after he had shot her .
The first story given out by the
authorities concerning the shooting
was to the effect Mrs. Doater. from
her bed fn a local hotel ffred nhnt
at her husband, the bullet entering;
MM. auu iuru, wueu us luruco.
fjred another shot, the last entering
bis breast and killing Capt. Doster
instantly. Capt. Doster'a body, it
was said, fell across his wife's bed
and then Mrs. Doster fired a bullet
into her own bosom, but without
fatal effect. According to the ffmr
version of the affair hotel guests
on orensruig aown tne ooor found
the captain's body and Mrs. Doster
ootn m oeov
Refuse To Publish Xote.
A note written by Mrs. Doster be
fere tfre shooting is in rntfriritrn of
iustfee T. J. Cole '
e refused
comes oexore a court.
is incruniuauBg, was his only
oninssenx.
Mrs. Doster told the coroner's Jury
that Capt. Doster first shot her. and
then she struggled with him. She
grabbed and held fn th revnlvr vrlth
her husband, she said, and In the
struggle it was fired. The struggle
continued and they wrestled about,
she said, until the second bullet killed
him.
Discovers Letter.
Mrs Doster returned to Columbus
from California Sunday night follow
ing a separation of some weeks which
is said to have followed her discov
ery and perusal of a letter addressed
to Doster from another woman
couched in affectionate language.
The couple quarreled throughout Sun
day night in their hotel room, accord
ing to other guests, about this second
woman.
Mrs. Doster told the coroner's Jury
her maiden name was Maude Cos
grove and she was born and raised
in Tennessee. She went to Cold water,
Kan, she said, with an invalid sister
and there met Capt. Doster. who was
a practicing physician. They were
married in September, 1916.
The coroner's jury returned an
open verdict, whfeh merely was
to the effect Capt. Doster came to
his death from two wounds
front n revolver.
According to a signed statement?)
mane m ki paso Tuesday nlgbt, Mrs.
Beckley alleges that the woman who
shot Capt. Doster and then turned the
weapon on herself was not married to
the army officer. In her statement
Mrs. Beckley declares she was en
gaged to marry CapL Doster and was
to do so as soon as he could obtain
discharge from the service and "rid
himself of the "other woman," whose
maiden name is Maude Musgrove. but
who married a Cold water. Kansas,:
man named Harry Can fie Id. Mrs.
(Continued on page 5, column .)
II. S, WS FAILURE COST WORLD
Hlttf MILLION LIVES. SAYS SUB
WASHIXGTOX, D. C March 10
Failure of the navy department to
fully cooperate In the war during the
first six months after America's
entry cost half a million lives, 15.
OOO.fteo.aoo 0f dollars, 2.5efi.ftv0 tons
of sbipping.,and prevented a victory
over Germany by July. 1918. rear ad
miral Sims told the senate investi
gating committee today in present
ing documentary evidence in support
of his charges of delay against the
depart men L
The officer read to the committee
recommendations he bad made to the
department Immediately upon his ar
rival in London In 1&1T. A cable
gram sent late in April. 1917. said the
critical area where the war would be
won or lost was in the eastern At
lantic at the focus of all lines of
ocean communication to Bn gland and
France.
Hecoatmendatian Ignored.
Admiral Sims told the committee
that although he repeatedly urged
that every destroyer and small craft
that could be sent to sea be dis
patched immediately to this area, his
recommendation was not complied
with until about six months later.
He also recommended, he said, that
two divisions of the American dread
naughts be sent to base on Brest to
guard against raids In the English
channel by German cruiser forces, but
these recommendations were entirely
Disregarded.
Failure of the department to throw
I the full force of the navy Into the
struggle, he said, resulted in the "un
Corners
APT- WADE DOSTER, medics?
corps. United States army, killed
ai toimuDM. 3. 21 ny n woman
claiming to be his wife nd Mrs.
Lulu Beckley. of El Paso, the other
woman in the case. Mrs. Beckley
asserts that the captain vrn not mar
ried to the woman vrho killed him.
but was engaKed to marry her
soon as he eon Id get out of the army
The captain was formerly married
and leaves two small children with
his father. Judge virank Doster. for
mer Judge of the Kansas supreme
eonrt, now a resident of Pasadena
Calif.
Letters Show
Others In Ruth
Randall's Life
Hilmffn Til Utirii la Th.t it.l
were other men in the life of Mrs
Ruth Randall, divorcee, besides ClJf-
ford M. Bleyer. wealthy advertising :
man. with whom she was found slain I
In her apartments Monday evening,
was said to havevbeen revealed yes
terday In her personal correspond
ence, which was examined by coroner
Hoffman la an effort to find a mo
tive for the crime.
Many of the letters were written
by Bleyer. others ware said to be
from other men. and a few were from
women wnn wnoee husbands Mrs
Randall was alleged to have ln-
TCVr.i.. w m ...-
he-sleitl and""thSrok heTo TufS
was the belief of the coroner fm
evidence introduced at the inonest. .
Testimony developed the fact that
oieyer anu jars. Randall had amr.
reled at a cafe las Saturday night.
Mrs. Blever notified the roronr
that she would have nothing to do
with the funeral and refused to al
low tne Docy oi her husband to be
brought home.
necessary loss of 1.500 000 tons of
shipping by submarine attack in
1U7 and l.WO.00 tons in 1918.
Victory Feasible In July.
"If the tonnage lost In 1917 had
been saved by the prompt coopera
tion of the navy." he said. "America
could have had l.vov.000 men in
France at the beginning of 1918 in
stead of aoo.aso."
Admiral Sims said the German of
fensive ot 1918 was due to the fail
ure of the German submarine cam
paign and that in all probability it
never would have been undertaken
and the morale of the German people
would have broken if the American
troops had been more promptly dis
patched to France. He estimated on
the basis of what happened when the
American forces did arrive that "vic
tory could have been achieved by
July. 1918, if the tonnage had been
preserved.
War Plana JDeUyed.
The navy department's first real
decision as to participation in the
war, admiral Sims said, was contained
In & cablegram to him 27 days after
America entered tbe struggle. The
message said the department intended
to send 2 destroyers, one tender and
a mother ship to tbe British Isles and
rvBKea i or minute information regard-1
ing the possibility of obtaining .
necessary supplies at Here haven, the
probable base. i
"All these plans should have ben,
worked out long before we entered
the war." said admiral Sims, and "we
should have been placed In effect in
(Continued on page S, column 3.
Two
BsmUKtgiaK'e;y-& :: ' ''NHTsH
IBHBffBIByffWf MaffTriMlPV ifrr- v '"SSSl
bHSk ai9BSBSBSa3Hfe' T - s-' i, ' &BS
HSM JWQKSsHHBBMgBp 'i"; -wBs?
Hsagy fnEjBBftBLBssEEt " ' 'ssHTB
(BMtXgBOmSslKHKK!- ""f nEsHfssBl
Hk&c ssmBmCTMJBssmmmBoMsmSIB
HsSffib Vsss5s8tHBK' wSiMJHsBslHBBmsfiHS BEsfissV
sssssxsSsvBf 2bbss BkSSSfISEbBBwBuSSsSHSBkl
snWsnTsJpiKS 'P SnfE
sbssmbK Steir ,K1Hs?i Mz tSPWH
' sssBBKSls&lk. 4&3&8S
IsHHmni
PBmlKa-BHBBBrilBSSBBmH
BBBBJ SJBBBnSSS. KBSnBBB)BmTBBBH
SBSnS-' sflPSSJIHiSTiXSSnBSBBBBl
IIHS' niMSBSssSSR nsMBsmssBnl
t yS iSmswiBeaE.gig- jf ; sSbSjSBSsbBsSs9
1 hjm JsBsSS r"'' ,MsBBnmnsssnl
iSsssBnsftasE&&Smsnl
asmssmssmssmssBsmsssBssn&al'' ji!
,M,B,"" "
c
The Pavement Should Precede All New
Of Triangle
i s9ss&ssB9mb1bsILBbS
i BBBKaBmHsnfflHBBnH
STEAMSHIP LINE PLANNED
FROM CADIZ TO NEW YQRK
Cadiz Spain, March l A new line
of steamships to vtly between Cadiz
and New York Is to be Inaugurated
shortly. Tbe vessels will be operated
b the Compania Trans Mediterra
nean and wiM sail from Cadis on the
eighth day of each month.
TURKETV HAS XBW CABI.VET.
sJ2'!S?ti'U - rkeyi Sta7 t
Faaha, the new grand vmler. has
announced with the sultn 's -approval.
the formatloB of a nw cabinet, tbe
eighth since the armistice. Diplo
mats; here attach little importance
to the changes made-
R.L. Winfrey Backs Bailey Campaign
ThomasonPlansNorth TexasManaser
rALLASv Tex, March 10. Luther
J Nickels, of Sastland, Joe Bailey's
campaign manager anoolnted
Tuesday the committee to handle
Bailey's campaign in Dallas County.
This was his first official act.
R. L. Winfrey, who reeentlv re
signed as chairman of the state prison
board. Is a member W A. &L Thomas
is chairman. Alex Pop and Judge J.
M. Terrell are other members.
Lather Nickels Is now arranging a
The Soviet Riddle Solved
THE HERALD wants to remove for its leaders the bate of misunderstand
ing tnat envelops the government set up by the Bolshevists in Russia.
It has an information bureaa in Washington which is an intellectual service
sUtwa for its readers. This bureau has a little book which makes this
question dear, and will give one free to every reader who wants it
Tbe book was written by congressman Burton L. French, of Idaho, and
riited and pubHsned by the chamber of commerce of the United States as a
part of its Asetkanisation work. It compares the method of choosing the
chief executive in Russia with that of the United States, measures the soviet
eosf rets by the American, shews the relative degrees of self govmment is
the two countries.
It is yoar doty as a good dtiien to get this puzzling matter straightened
out ia your mind. Send for this little book today. Remember that it is
free, with the compHnwats of this paper. Fill out the coupon below and
mail as indicated. The book will come to you by return mail.
THE EL PASO HERALD INFORMATION BUREAU
Frederic J. Hassjn, Director, Washington, D, C
I enclose herewith two eeaU in stamps for return postage for a copy
of the Soviet Book.
fliy BAine .... . ... .......... .....
aHy IXeet 3001698 ......... - . .
My city My state
THOIHSDN GETS
OVATION AT
1B0R0
Defends National Admin
istration In Opening His
East Texas Campaign.
'CONSTITUTIONS
MADE TO CHANGE'
El Paso Man Favors Stale
Budget System And Abol
ishment Of Prison Board.
fTTINNSBORO. Ter, March 18-
Vy E. E. Thdnason. of EI Paso,
opened Ms east Texas campaign
for goTernor when he spoke to a large
I crowd here last night. Tbomason de
fended the national administration
and kent clear of Dersonal nolitiea.
His praises of the administration irera
greeted with ringing cheers. Many
of the audience pledged themselves
to defend the administration when -
nertie occasion arises.
-The time has arrived," said Thorn -
ason, "for all loyal Democrats to go
to the defence of the oarty to prevent
attacks from those who would stab
ft in the back."
Tbomason read from the life of
Thomas Jefferson to show that
the man frequently referred to as
n great Democrat believed in
progress and that eonstltutlans
are made by the people, to be
ekanged as conditions change.
Tho mason said that a Dallas news
paper had misquoted htm in writing
up bis Gainesville speech. T am In
favor of the state agricultural de
partment, he said, "but I want the
sirricnltiiral department consolidated
with the warehouse and marketing
department. I want to see the pure
i food and health departments consoli
' dated. I think they could work to
gether. The reclamation and water
1 engineer's departments should work
under one head. I am not a reformer,
but I believe in progress. I believe
the government should be economical,
but not stingy- State institutions
snouia oe property enpponeo.
"I am for prohibition and woman
dffjaff , . . . . . .
"To economize, the state should
have a budget system.
T-oo Slanylrdons Granted.
iahed and a big man placed in control
inn uiiDUU otjoiu ouuuiu mra mwwe-
of it. Too many pardons are granted.
The suspended sentence law should
be amended or repealed. Lawbreak
ers shoald b property pamteto4
Thomason begged the pardon of 1st
audience for talking about himself,
saying be bad dona so because he
would pot have opportunity to speak
in Wood county again.
A committee of 15 men and women
met him at the station. He was the
guest of honor at the annual banquet
of the chamber of commerce and was
taken around tbe jlty In an automo
bile and shown tr-. sights.
DAVIS, U. S. AtrtoASSADOR, I
MUM ON WHITE HOUSE RACE ,
London. Eng. March IB John W.
Davis, American ambassador, declined t
to comment today on the action of the
West Virginia, Democratic state com- )
mil tee in endorsing him for the Demo- j
cratic nomination for president. The
ambassador said he had not yet re-
celred the message which Parkers
burg. W. Va- dispatches announced
naa neen sent to nun oy tne commii
ee to ascertain his attitude relative
to entering the race.
"ROP." HFNDvlJn&CTC WITC.nN
BOB HENRI K0AST5 WILoUN, !
PROHIBITION AND SUFFRAGE
Washington, D. C March 10.
Former representative "Bob Henry
of Waco, who made an unsuccessful
race for United States senator from
Texas some years ago. is here "boost
ing" the Joe Bailey gubernatorial
campaign. In an interview Henry
"roasted' president Wilson, woman
suffrage and prohibition.
LABOR FIGirrJFcbNGRESSMEN
WHO VOTED FOR R. R. BILL
Philadelphia, Pa, March IS. De-
dslon of American Federation ot
Labor officials, reached In Washing-
ton two weeks ago to oppose all can-
(Continued on page 5, colama 3.)
schedule of speaking dates for Bailey,
who Is expected to arrive in Dallas
Wednesdav afternoon. A large dele
gatlon from the panhandle Is coming
to iaiias to sear uaiiey cpe-aK xuurs
day night.
A telegram announces R. S. Tboma
son will name a north Texas man as
his campaign manager. He will not
be a Dallas man. It was announced at
Tbomason headouarters in the Linz
building here today.
Villistas Free American;
Mexicans Dynamite U. S.
Company's Mine In Sonora
Rebel Band, After Wreck
ing Plant, Take All
Gold And Silver.
AGUA PRIKTA. Sonora, Max, March
!- Franklin B. Harding, con
sulting engineer of the Chicago
Exploration and Development cor
poration, stated upon his arrival here
this morning from the company's
properties north of Toaschi, Sonora.
that the mine buildings at that place
have been completely destroyed with
oynamne, wniie it win cost his com
pany many thousands of dollars to
sink a new shaft, the old one having
rcea wncsta in a nice manner witn
the buildings.
Blamed on Roving Bandits.
According to la formation gathered
by Mr. Harding from Mexicans living
In the vicinity of the mine, the prop
erty's destruction was completed
about two weeks ago by a roving
band of renegades who have been
operating in that district for some
time past.
According to Mr. Harding, It was
this band which compelled him to
close down the workings at the time
the Mexican goTernmeat withdrew
' tB smal military garrison from the
1 property.
Gold and Sllrer Stolen.
' shortly before the shutdown, how-
ever, gold and silver bullion valued
at approximately ,18.000 was stolen
by the bandits In a raid on the prop
erty, but later recovered in an old
abandoned mine tunnel, where It had
been secreted by the outlaws.
Mr Harding leaves for the east to
night to lay the matter before oom-
l Continued on page 2. column C)
FEM ESTRADA
Juan Estrada, 24 years old, died
suddenly at his home. 610 South Ore
gon street, early Wednesday morn
ing, under circumstances wnicn
county officials believe point to foul
nlav.
Tuesday night Bstrada was
, brought to his home by two negroes,
wno myA f00n(j him lying in
the street. He was placed In bed
( and uM nothing of his condition.
and relatives believed he had been
drinking Wednesday morning he
awoke and called his mother, saying
that he was all right and that Min
ing was wrong with Mm. A few
mints latw person in the navi.
found that k. toil dted.
Coroner R. B. ttsvrims Investigated
the death and ordered an autopsy
performed to determine the cause of
death. The autopsy m oe per
formed Wednesday evening. 3i
whlle the
body is held
local
morgue
CHINESE OPEN
L
I Shanghai. China, March M.-Bv the,
Associated Frees.) Warfare has
broken oat in Honaa province because j
.k. .. ik. t.v4. ..,
- . . . U JL.
, meat to appoint Wa Kwang-Hsln
governor .f the province to eopplant
Cnao.TL -w. ,--. m oDooslnK
S I) ZrZJZZSJ? f
th onthreak of hartilltiM In Kwaae-
MET FOUL PLAY
T
MR
tung province where fighting Is pro-1 pany, has not been kidnaped by Mexi-
eeeding between southern facttonalcaa bandits, but is safe sear XogalesJ
nas orougnt to lignt a league oietgn;
provinces Fugien. Kiaagsu.
(.mail,
Honan, Ssecbwan. Hnpeh. Shantung
and Kiangsi aiming to effect peace
by uniting against the militarists
both of Peking and the south and
forcing dissolution of the parliaments
ana iancon ana retting.
The Kwanatune warfare ia the out
growth of an attempt by the governor
ox x unaan to sena a new eommanoer
of the Yunnan troops in Kwangtang.
me new commanaer, uen. u uen
Chan. Is attacking the old leader Li
Kung-Yuan. who Is supported by the
troops in Kwangtung and governor
Moh Tung-Hsia.
Refugees from tbe fighting areas
are pouring Into Canton and Hong
kong WILSON'S LETTER
I
PS DFIWQCRATIG CHIEFS IN LINE
By DAVTD- raAWHENCE.
WASHINGTON. I C March 10
Were It not for the fact that
I tne political ctoua nangs neavy
'over everything nowadays, Mr Wil
son's desire to go campaigning for
a third term being suspected on Capi
tal Hill just as much as the white
house holds the treaty foes guilty of
political motive, the latest contribu
tion by president Wilson to the
literature of tbe treaty debate his
letter to senator Hitchcock on ar
ticle ten would hae fallen on more
fertile soil.
But the white house and congress
have rubbed each other the wrong
way so long that Mr Wilson's ap
peal on the merits of article ten it
self wherein he nointed to the
dangers of militarism and tbe re
turn to tne om order or things in
Kurope on lees the United States put
the weight of Its moral Influence on
the scales hardly had the effective
ness which might have attended the
same argument under other circum
stances. Continue, to tlnrt Sensibilities.
The president continues to hurt
the sensibilities of senators, both
Democrats and Republicans, for-
' getting that while they themselves
may not be disposed to see the
broad outlines of international policy
with the same clarity that he does,
they nevertheless have enough votes
jto ratify or reject thj treaty
Mr. Wilson is naturally impatient
with Democrats who are ready to
surrender to the Lodge resevatton
lets. He minces no words In bis let-
Joseph Williams, El Paso
Citrzen, Released By
Bandits.
JOSEPH WILLIAMS, of HI Paso, an
employe of the American Smelting
ana Kenning company, wno
captured and hold for ransom y
Francisco Villa when the bandit
wrecked, looted and burned a train
on the Mexican Central railroad
Thursday last, has been freed and
sew is in TofTeen, accordisg to a
telegram received from WHHams by
nis employers aero tooay.
Xe Ransom Paldf
The message merely said Williams
arrived in Torreon last night and
would leave there tomorrow, arriving
here March IS, and that he was In
good health. From the message It
was oeuevea no ransom bad been
poKi. it was reported or xeuow trav
elers on the train WHHams was be
ing held for ISo.vOO ransom, but offi
cials of the smelting company said
no ueroana was maoe on tnem.
Relieves Anxietv.
Renort that Williams's health was
good reueved xrtends nere oi con
siderable anxiety, as ho was suffer'
Ing from the effects of a wound and
gas poisoning suffered in France. He
was en route here for treatment when
captured by Villa.
in tne rignt ior tne train re was
resorted more than a score of train
guards, passengers and train crew
were killed. Two other Americans
on the train with Williams were
robbed. A Syrian passenger was re
ported to have been hanged. Wil
liams was a satire of Bknry, Vir
ginia. a
Yeoman Missing
In Mexico From
El Paso Station
Chief Yeoman K. C H In ton of the
El Paso navy reeruKlag station la
missing In Mexico, according to re
ports made by Lieut- J. B- Hops to
the American consul at Juarez. Lieut.
Hnnn aH Kj had lsrnoH Ulntnn w
, last seen In Joares while visiting
there Saturday. H In ton had but two
years to serve before being retired,
according to Hupp. Htnton's home
was In Chicago.
Wire For Money
Leads To Fear
Of A Kidnaping
Nogales. Ariz. March .1. A
tele-
t gram from James M. Arthur.
raaa-
agr of the Mexican OossoUdaUd
Mlulne company, to Mrs. Arthur, who
lives here, asktas tor tM In con
nection with a bwlaess deal, caused
her to conclude he bad been kidnaped
and was betes bald for ransom by
Mexican bandits. Mrs. Arthar said
todajr.
Upon receipt of the message from
i her husband, which was garbled Is
I traaambMion. Mrs. Artbar tele-
: fffankavl ka. .. L via.
5hio7 where a 7ort L itveTot
that Arthur had been kidnaped,
Th American coasal at Negates.
Sonora. adviaed Mrs. Artbar not to
communicate with federal officials in
I Wash lac ton. she said. beeuM h. iw.
j Ueved there was sots, mistake.
y Arthur Is safe.
fSSt r -
I...USI.. ... ATifliir. nuiujr nr ...
Mexleas Oiuniuu Wl.l- -.,
jtex, the Amerteao consul there re-
ported t4ay to tbe state department,
MINERS AND OPERATORS MFPT
TO AGREE ON WAGE SCALE
New Tork. March 10. Negotiations
looking toward the working out of a
aew wage agreement for anthracite
coal miners to become effective April
1. will be started here tomorrow by
a subcommittee of operators and
miners. There are eight men on tbe
committee, four miners and four
operators. It was said today no final
decision will be made until the soft
coal miners' wage dispute has been
disposed of
TO HITCHCOCK
Here Are Two Short
Sentences Upon Which
Treaty Fight Pends
WASHINGTON, a a, March 10
Here Is article 'Q. on which
the fate of the peace treaty
again is suspended Just two com
pact sentences act in the midst of
an SO. 000-word document
"The members of the league
undertake to respect and preserve
as against external aggression the
territorial integrity and existing
political Independence of all mem
bers of the league, in case of
any such aggression or In case
of any throat or danger of such
aggression the council shall ad-
tse upon the means by which this
obligation sball be fulfilled."
ter to senator Hitchcock because ho
does not think the senators have
been particularly mindful of his own
sensibility
To catalog the e f f ects of Mr.
Wilson's letter to senator Hitchcock,
Is only to paint the perplexing pic
ture not only of the legislative and
executive branches of our govern
ment still at odds since the people
voted for a divided government In
191s. but to add now the obvious
break between the titular head of
the Democratic party and senators
of that political faith. For Mr. Wil
son s letter defending article ten
4 Continued on page Z, column 3.)
Road Bond Issue?
SEMBLY
CASTS OFF
RULE OF
ITAIN
Members of Legislature
Meet at tbe Home of
Said Pasha.
SEDAN INCLITDED
IN NEW NATION
Head of Egyptian Peace
Delegation Leads in
Movement
T 0NDON. Ens-March 1Q.-Fiftj-two
mcabexs of the Egyptian
legkktxre aisembly reesntiy met at
the boose of Saul Zagloul Pasha,
who headed the Egyptian oission to
the peace conference, and adopted
a resolution proclaiming the inde
pendeace of Egypt and the Sodas,
accordisg to a dispatch from Cairo.
RilLLClE
BEFORE CUT
Austin. Texaa, March lo. la the
court of criminal appeals was sub
mitted today on oral argument th
case of W. Q. Russell, from EI Paso
county. Russell was given a term ot
It years fn tbe penitentiary on convic
tion of the killing of Charles Qoale
on January 2. 13 IS. The traeedr oc
curred in front of a hotel at Fi Paso
This court today affirmed the case
of J. C Moore from Reeves coun
Moore was given a term of tvo vears
in the nenitontiarv on conviction an s
awtedttng charge.
L DtsOrofc afttozsoy Leigh Clark of
SI Paso presented the oral argument
before the court which confirmed the
case. Russell was tried twice :n the
El Paso courts on the same charge and
each Jury returned a verdict of 14
years in th penitentiary as "i
penaltv for the alleged murder of
Quale.
ULROIDSflPEII
ICE PARLEYS
Washington. IX C. March 10.
Wage negotiatiens between the rail
roads and their organised employes
i were formallr reopened today when
..rf f w.1" w.
i T"1 ,n a "
Association ot Rallwav Sxecutlves
" ers- organization-met to be-
,,. . .
Bra us lormauon or
Joint board
tc baaate !' labor controversies,
Bach side was understood to be
prepared to lay a definite pros-ram
before the conference witn nmact
xo tne wage demands which the
' VM "? x&"- ' P""
it.. TX7I1.A.
i t tnet propositions to t
vBiQ.re oy we joint ooara are
tbe union demands, the reported pro
gram of the railroad executives, and
the suggestion made by president
WUeon.
CARPENTERS WANT UNION
MAN PUT ON CITY JOB
Representatives of the carpentars
union will meet with the city council
at 10 ocloek Prhxay morning on be
half of the anion's demand that a
union carpenter be nut on a iob of
f
deep sewer worlc Heretofore un
skilled labor, under the direction of
tne sewer foreman, has been oc
casionally boring a bole or sawing
a plank In two when occasion de
mands in Duttfog In the braclnsr far
rtkotwa-watuoenhnolnnnaaoiata e tm
the sewer work, bnt now the car
penters ask that a anion man be put
on the pay roll to stand ready to do
any carpenter work which may have
to be done.
COAL MINERS OF ENGLAND
I FAVOR GENERAL STRIKE
) London. Sng. March 10 The na
tional conference of coal miner, a
Its session today declared In favor of
a general strike aa a means of enforc
ing th. demand for the nationalisa
tion of the mines.
Tbe decision of the miners ociv
will be referred to the special trades
union congress which meets tomor
row and opinions which hae been
expressed by leaders give rise to the
expectation that this body will decide
on th. oontiBBatlon of constitutional
means for achieving the end desired.
instead of a resort to direct action.
Headliners In
Today's Theaters
.VUtAMBRA
-Out Yonder." Olive Thomas.
BIJOU
"Should a Husband Forgive
"in OM Kentucky." Anita Stew
art. iItRCIA.
"Sir Feet Four." Wm. Russell.
HIAIVTO
"Soldiers of Fortune."
I MQCE
"Nothing But tbe Truth."
winwAji
The Romance of the Air."
Lieut. O. U Locklear
(Read Amusement Ads on Page 91

xml | txt