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El Paso herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, December 14, 1920, HOME EDITION, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88084272/1920-12-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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EL PASO HERALD
Tuesday s Dec. 14, 19
OWNER PLANS
GOLDEN RULE'
FOR BUSINESS
ncinnatl. O.. Dfc 14. Tfa g-olden
-( r i th dlTn law governing" hu
t.h relationship, accepted by all
-- ipions and proclaimed by all
ropliets and la-hers of every creed.
f-d is the only workable, industrial
nd economic law in the univerta to-
r j . according to Artliur Nash, formrr
" r's:r and president of the A. Nah
'"'thinfr Manufacturing company, of
, s city who ha injected the gtlden
lil- into the conduct of his business.
'ntly the 5A employes of the com
jrny, actuated bv the spirit of the
qMden rule, agr-ed to surrender their
tobs for a month, either January or
FVbruarv. fo that unemployed work
in.! In the clothing industry could b
aivn employment. In June 191 the
pompanv was incorporated with a.
. -ipitnl stock of $SU,G00 and Mr. Nash
tY prime mover and principal ir.-ut-or
was elected president.
BUSINESS DEPRESSION
ENDED, SAYS GOVERNOR
Phoenix. Ariz.. Pec. 14 The coun
'i han passed ttiroujrh the depths of
Impression and Is on the upward
Trnd. in the opinion of Gov. Thomas
K Campbell, who has returned from
th" corf ore-nee of povrnors in Penn
svjvania H salt sentiment in the
east was that business was about to
expericne a revival.
CHICAGO ART
COLONY LOSES
STUDIO HOME
Chicago, III.. Dec- 14. Chicago may
lose its art colony as the result of the
recent sale of the Lambert Tree
studio buil dinar to Medina temple,
which plans to build the lara-eet
Masonic temple in the world on tike
site.
The Tree studio bnilding was erected
nv the late Lammert Tree as a home
for artists, and about It has grown
up an extensive art colony. Many of
the painters and sculptors in the
studio building have lived there for
from 15 to 25 years. They are plan
ning to remove to New York, unless
another suitable home can be found
here for the colony.
Chicago's art center occupies a
favored district on the near north
side, just above the loop district. At
one end it rubs elbows with the ware
house district bordering the Chicago
river, and ten blocks north reaches
tli- opposite extreme, mingling with
the brownstone mansions and tall
apartment houses of the "gold coast.'
On the east is Lake Michigan with a
bathing beach conveniently located,
and on the west is Clark street the
highwav of pawn shops, theatrical
hotels and, in the near past, cabarets.
Within this district live several
hundred artiBts. musicians, writers
and students. The commercialized
bohemianisni of New York's Green
xiich village is missing, for most of
the members of the colony are earnest
K. OF C. NIGHT
SCHOOL OPENS
IN COURTHOUSE
El Paso's Knights of Colsmbus
i night school for exserrlce men was
dedicated Monday night in the J4th
district courtroom, where classes will
1m? held Monday. Wednesday and Fri
day nights.
City councilman M. It. Swenev
presided, and city councilman It. C
Sample, taking mayor Davis's plae
! school on behalf of the city. J M
Nealon also spoke, and the principal
of the school, J. E. Gilkey outlined the
courses and said all exserrice men
would be welcomed and that no
tuition would be charged.
The American legion is backing the
school, helping especially with the
enrolment.
School headquarters are at 1!H
Mills building.
workers, and few poseurs are to be
found.
INSPECTORS CHANGE POSTS.
' Frederico Salcldo. inspector of fed
eral reenue in Junxes. has been
transferred to Monterey. Nuevo Loon,
changing posts with Francisco Davila.
Swimming softs worn by girl
shimmers who compete In future
amatesr athletic union contests must
come higher around the neck and be
cut with a due allowance (or shrinkage.
GERMANS TRY
TO IMITATE US
JAPANESE OPEN
SHRINE COSTING
WARE IN SHOPS! TEN MILLIONS
The Gift Supreme for All the Family
America's Greatest
SEDAN VALUES
There never was a better time than now to place your
order for a Sedan. And while you're doing it, better choose
a Sedan that gives you the maximum value in quality,
performance, appointments and -enclosed car comforts . . .
... in other words, a Studebaker Se4an!
Such quality as you find in a Studebaker-built Sedan
such stability of design and refinement of appearance is
possible only because of Studebaker's great resources and
manufacturing experience, and the fact that these cars are
bu3t complete by Studebaker in Studebaker factories.
The Light-Six Sedan The Special-Six Sedan
S-fanaetn 404arxpawert 112-ixh trftrrirnr
Lmr-haag, instantaneously responsive,
easy to drive, and remarkably safe and .
comfortable. Its light weight, & combina
tion with Us mechanical efficiency, insures
nnnmint economy in sjasoiiae and tires. In
its qntetnesa of power and freedom from
vibration, it sets new standards in closed
car coarfort. Distracting noises and dis
comforting body -vibrations bare been
efininated,
2150
Card Tire Equipped
... Sntk Bad
S-pasxngcn 50-borjtpaweri I19Jnch ccAee&o
Everything essential to the owner's satis
faction, pleasure and comfort has been
provided. Nothing that would add to com
fort and convenience to protection and
utility has been neglected. Its f oar doors
offer easy entrance and exit for all pas.
sengers. Its performance and appearance
are combined with features of appointment
that every connoisseur of closed car quality
wSl quickly appreciate.
52750
Cord Tira Equipped
. - i. Dunk
OX. STUDEBAKER CARS ARE EQUIPPED WITH
CORD TIRES ANOTHER STUDEBAKER PRECEDENT
Garrett Motor Co;
W. S. COOKE, Manager
Sas Aateafe as Bw&ago Telephone 953
There is a Studebaker Dealer Near Your Home-
J
Berlin. Germany, Dec. 14. German
manufacturer have flooded the mar
I kets here with imitations of Ainen
i can, Enphsh and French wares, some
bo cleverly made It is difficult to de-
ludicrous clumsiness.
A purchaser ho goes into a to
bacco shop and asks for a standard
English or American rijrai't probably
will be handed a pakay with a label
closely resembling the trade mark of
tht original. Tee price -will be much
jess and frequently, pleased with the
bargain, the customer puta the box fn
his pocket without closely examining
it. Iater he discovers that he has a
German cigaret. The few imported
tobaccos on sale are very expensive
and those- which have not been smug
gled in n. ir the import tax stamp.
Mreet Yc-adora GJe Away Scheme.
Street endors of tobaccos, candies
and othf r articles display imported
m!:ic os and Germin imitations side
ly sid so that eventually purchasers
karn the duference and become wary,
although the German tobaccos art not
inferior to some, imported brands.
In some of the h-gh class res
taurants only imitation tigarets are
sold.
The drug stores are perhaps the
chief dispensers of the German imi
tations. Imported toilet articles, and
particularly soap, shaving cream,
tooth paste and fac lotions are very
scarce. But all the well known
American brands have been imitated.
Trade Mark Imitated.
Trade mark imitators have dis
played their beet work in the saloons,
where whisky bottles bear thejabels
of well known English manufacturers.
But either the signature or the brand
or a word In the name. Is inverted, or
the trade mark slightly distort a.
The bottles have Wn filled with German-made
whiskies, often white but
sometimes colored and the substance
reeks of grain alcohol. The effect of
the drink is about the same as that
of the Kentucky, Georgia and W est
Vt rari n 1 n "m rmnih in e.
French liquors and imported gins
are virtually never sold.
The German inventue talent has
Kpn mrHort further, to include all
sorts of wearing apparel. A suit of
loth.es, displayed in a wmaow ana
bearing a remarkably reasonable
price taff catches the eyes of the
passersby. Upon careful examination
it will be found the cloth is made of
paper. Many hats, caps, vests, trousers
and even shirts are made of paper.
Paper atrmgs are in general use.
Shoes which can be purchased for
a small sum crack and dissolve in
water. They are made of paper.
American and English made cloths
have been so carefully imitated that
only an expert can detect the difference.
Delau Aclion On Public
Utilities Bill To Jan. 10
AMtin. Tex.. Dee. 14. Final action
on the public utilities bill wMeh la to
be introduced at the cominB session
of the leirislatnre will not be taken
by the public utilities committee until
January 10. it is announced by A. B.
Curtis, of Fort Worth, chairman of
the committee.
At a meeting of the committee. 30
of 46 sections of the bill were ap
proved. The remainder will be acted
on at ths January meetinir.
The bill has not been very mate
rially changed from the draft pre
pared by tsie subcommittee of seven.
The bill will increase salaries of
m.mKr. nt the railroad commission
from J4000 to 17500 a year.
Engineer Recommends
$1 25 JWO Selling Tank
A settling- tank unit costing 155.
000 would provide sewajre treatment
facilities adequate for the present.
E. K. Sands, designer of the plant at
Houston. ' told the city council.
Th, ntifnninflr nla.nt and outfall sew
er now under construction would form
part or the new unit, ne saia. wniie
growth of the city could be met by
providing additional treatment units.
An expenditure of tliS.000. he esti
mated would care for needs of a popu
lation of lJj.000.
German Cable Dispute
Is Reported Settled
Washington. D. C. Dec 14 The
international communications confer
ence has "reached an agreement," it
waa Kt&tv officiallv today, at the
state department. A formal announce
ment, U ruixiie"u iwi iit
day and. meantime, official? would
not add to their brief oral statement
on the subject.
Texas Hotel Fire Costs
2 Lives; Damage Is Large
Fort Worth. Tex.. Dec. 14 Two
persons were burned to death and
heavy property damage resulted from
a fire which destroyed a hotel at
Hamilton early today. W. W. Trimble,
an aged Confederate veteran, and
Robert Nichols, a boy, were the victims.
Hotel Men Will Meet
In El Paso In 1921
Texas Hotel Keepers' association
will hold its annual convention in
El Paso, it was decided Tuesday at
the convention in San Antonio
Percy Tyrrell, of San Antonio, was
ejected president of the convention.
NEW BUILDING PLANNED
FOR BIG DEPARTMENT STORE
By 6. AMARTIX.
(Cmtlflsed trea pace l-
Fair." After several years on Over
land street. Mr. Schwartz secured a
location on the corner where the
Popular now stands and moved his
stock into the building, then owned
by the Masons. He occupied only a
small part of the Masonic building and
only one floor not half as much
space as the present first floor of
the Popular occupies. The store con
tinued to be called "The Fair."
In 190S Mr. Schwartz sold out the
business to J. M. Cannon and Carl
Klrcher. For awhile A. Schwarts remained-
out of the mercantile busi
ness and made his money buyimr and
selling; real estate. He bought and
improved the old Myar opera house
property after the theater was de
stroyed by fire. Another piece of
property that he bought and later
sold at a big profit was the old Ket
telsen and Deeetau property at Fifth
and El Paso streets, which he bought
I in 1907 for S.00O.
rreeeat l-opeuar urganizea.
While he was out of the mercan
tile business, some of his nephews
and other relatives Organized "The
Popular Dry Goods company" find
opened a store where the Grecian
theater is now located. After a couple
of quite successful year? Joe Zel
man. Sam Schwartz. J. f Zozaa and
I. Weiss Wrre among the organizers
of th compir.v itacqulre-l the old
"Fair stnrt :tt Mesa and Sai An
tonio. Cannon and Kircher having
dissolved pi'int-rship and "The Fair"
having ey-nr out of huln-s. The
Popular irn -d ba'k into the old
"Fair" local on and A. Schwartz took
stock and became tl c KUldinc hand.
It was nnt Ionic until more since had
to be a! el artl ti v- as repeated
several i-in.ti!- Mr. Pi'nartz,
bougnt t - l ri' rfy lrm the Masons
and e.-tfl "f irtK--nt hand.ome
Popular 1-UiM r.
crvES srsPEXDF.n sentence.
John Stankev, charge '1 with forging
tl o name of C Wohefton. police
tan, to a cie-. k foi JIT tvas given a
l ' ,, - - ,-D' r-!' d sentence by a
j .r; . ' i MM-l c-.urt.
Tokio, Japan. Dec. 14. After six
years' labor and an expenditure esti
mated at $10,000,000. the national
shrine to the lata emperor Mutsuhito
has been opened with solemn Shinto
ceremonies and amid impressive
manifestations of loyalty. Every
street was decorated with bunting
and from the humblest door lanterns
were displayed at night.
The municipality gave a flower
hnw inH mien air nexformances and
theatrical performances in Hlblva
park, but for the most part the
iestlvlTies were toiitoutoj w
ganixed by the citizens in different
wards. At hundreds of central points
stages had been erected where vaude
ville shows were given and there
were fire works both nlstht and day.
More than 350.000 persons from the
country districts visitea tne city dur
ing the festival.
The shrine Is a typical Shinto build
ing of plain wood and of the simplest
possible construction- The opening
ceremony was attended by more than
2.M0 priests and officials and lasted
about three hours- The central fea
ture was the delivery to prince
Ichijo. warder of the shrine, of the
name tablets of the late emperor and
their installation in the inner sanc
tuary. Prince Knjo. a relative of the
emperor, delivered a commemorative
oration to which prince Iehljo replied.
The shrine was thereafter opened to
the public and at least S80.000 people
worshipped before it.
The scene where these multitudes
of people were paying their respects
to the memory of the dead emperor
was lmpreesive. The main entrance
to the shrine Is by means of a new
and broad road about two miles in
length. Along this road two great
strings of people poured, one going
to the shrine, the other returning.
The whole of this roadway was
brilliantly lighted sad decorated with
flags snd ornamental lanterns. But
once the tori! at the entrance to the
shrine had been passed a great
change came over the scene. The
modern world was left behind, the
gold and red ornamentation ceaseo
and the rest of the way was made
under the shade of gigantic pine
trees which might have been part of
the virgin forests of old Japan.
COAST TBAVKI. HKAVT.
W. c. MeOormlek. division freight
and passenger agent of the Southern
Pacific said that owing to the In
creased amount of travel to the
coast, it was necessary that the
Southern Pacific add an additional
staird ear to the Golden State
limited Monday night.
SAN CARLO CO.
GIVES OPERA
FOR MASSES
Probably no city In the world has
mere grand opera, of the finest
Quality, than New York city. The
wonderful Metropolitan company ha4
neia sway in tnat city tor many years.
The Chicago Grand Opera company
has also bad successful seasons there
for the past few years.
So when the San Carlo Grand Opera
company, which appears at Liberty
hall. El Paso. December 21. tS and 23.
under the aaeplees of the Orpheus
club. Invaded the Manhattan Opera
House. New York, the company was
challenging comparison with the
world's best. That the San Carlo ar
tists were more than just successful,
is beyond dispute.
Ferty-eix thousand dollars per week
In paid admission, for four weeks Is
the htgn record attained by the San
riiliiie.il ad. tkair New Tsrk season.
which opened there on September 2.
this year.
Over five thousand people were
turned away after the capacity of the
house had been sold on the opening
niirtit Sni-h a thine- had never been
done before In New York by any grand
otiera company, otter tnan. possioiy,
the Metropolitan. New York's own
company, which Is supported by
popular aubscription. and in which
local pride plays an important part.
The San Carlo company has no
subsidy, no subscription list, and has
succeeded by merit alone.
High Sew York Pradee.
The New. York Evening Mail in an
editorial on September . 120. com
ments as follows on the San Carlo
company:
"In all European continental cities
of the first size and in many of the
cities of the second and third size,
grand opera at popular prices grand
opera for the people, that Is to say
is an established institution, either
with municipal support or on purely
private Initiative. . (
in aow iwK cinj cute
grand opera in the past has been at
i.mmxi or carried out on a scale that
limited the attendance to the re
stricted part of the cemmnnity able
or willing to pay tne high Prices In
separate to so costly an undertaking.
Grand opera tor me irewyw '
conspicuously wanting.
-This want Signor Fortune Gallo.
with bis San Carlo company. Is en
deavoring to fill with an experimen
tal four weeks- season. The success
of his venture is astonishingly at
tested by the audiences that nave
completely filled the old Manhattan
Opera House at every performance.
The San Carlo company for its tl
Paso engagement plays the most tune
ful of all grand operas, the double
bill of "CavaUeria Rustlcana and
"Pagllacci." on Tuesday the -Lst.
"Faust" for a matinee and Wednesday
night "Rigolletto-' and Thursday
night -Carmen'.'
r
FREE $m RECORDS
rrrlME U fleeting. Your Pathe should be chosen NOW. With ihe reg
i tiitr $125 Pathe or ihe regular $150 Pathe or vith anr higher priced
model you will be given $25 vorih of records
FREE.
We ru'dl receive no more Pathe this year.
Our line of models is still complete, but there
are otiy a very feu of each. Our stock of in
stumenls is being depleted rapidly.
Our Free Record offer mill be discontinued not
later than Christmas Eve Perhaps earlier, de
pending altogether on the number of our sales
during the next fev days.
Hear"SaentNigiit,HtvlyNigbt"
Hear das beautiful and heart touching Christ
mas song as Tendered bp the great contrdto.
Margaret Maizenauer. Its beaats proves Ae ,
Pathe' i supremacy.
When you HEAR the Pathe, you KNOW why it a me SUPREME pho
nograph. We mil be satisfied mth your decision when you compare iL
Foutz-Moore Furniture Co.
-111-113 N. Stanton St
30 MILLIONS
NEEDED TO RUN
TEXAS 2 YEARS
Austin. Tex, Dec 14. Estimates of
appropriation ' needed for the next
two fiscal years submitted by state
department and institution heads
have ben reduced approximately $1.
000.000 by the state board of control.
S B. Cowell, chairman of the board,
said there may be still rurther reduc
tions before the appropriation budget
is ready for snbmiasion to the legisla
ture. , ...
The various departments. Institu
tions and others for which appropria
tions are made estimated that they
will need appropriations totaling ap
proximately I40.8O0.O09 for tie next
two fiscal years. The board of con
trol has cut these esrlmsys to about
UO.tOO.OOO. as compared with 121.5&0,
00 appropriated for the support of
the state government during the last
two fiscal years.
unainnan uwi ww w
will attempt to stay safely within the
estimated income of the state for the
next two years, which he placed at
$13,000,000. He added that he expects
the appropriation budgets to be com
pleted and ready for submission to
the legislature within the nevt week.
Taxable values In Texas increased
from JJ4J91.1T5 in 14 to $1.20.
295.205 in 11- These figures were
given in the recent annual report of
tax commissioner James A. King. His
table showed the values passed the
billion mark In 1P02. In 1M the two
billion mark was reached and value
went above three billion In 1911 when
they totaled M.S12.M9.2I7.
FOREIGN TOYS
GIVE WAY TO
U.S. PRODUCTS
Washington. D. C Dec 14. Some
r h. nt to which foreign
I made toys have been replaced In
America by the home mnoe article
given by the estimate of the Ameri
can Forestry association that close
to 20.000.000 feet of lumber was
used this year by American toy malt
By adding the millions of toys made
from this wood, to the enormous
quantity made of other material, the
Forestry asaociaiio'i ;i
of the immensity of the industry will
be gained. If the buying public will
"look tor the label." it adds, the
foreign toys will be eliminated.
"The main consideration which
holds wood la its place as toy ma- j
terial Is not cheapness," says the as- (
sociatlon. "though that has something
I would be too heavy IT made of metal.
I but many articles a no made of wood
i because it is the brst. irrespective of
cost or weight. Sleds are a good ex- i
ampie.
EKK EW YORK WOMAN. .
Information regarding the where
abouts of Mrs. Bertha lwandowskI.
ulso known as Bertha Lavender, is ,
sought in a letter received by Oscar ;
Harper. American consul, at Juares. .
Mrs. Lewandowski left New York city t
about September 15, taking with her
nAAA and has bol been heard from
since. She is S feet 7 inches tall and
weighs about ISO pounds. She Is 49
years old. It Is thought that she may
be in Mexico.
Rare Bargain
re eJese partnership win sB at
flO eaefc Bp Iota SSxlSB.
ta tewnsHe. surrounded by 40
seep test tveils drilliag. War
nmtr deed, oil rights, and all.
Write for parrienlars.
J. M. ROBERTSOX
Bex SeS, EI Paso. Tex.
Office, Lebky Hotel Sheldes.
fNOURtSflMENT'
( is Natee' first aid to
. tfre bed? in timet of
! weakness.
! Prlfirr'n CrMIIIrttftM !
unMK-passed in purity
and goodness, is 1
BoerkfesieBt in a form
that seldom fails.
1 gsattsVr.l,iiniliill.K.JL SMS
Use Herald Want Ada
WHY MANY MEN START SO WELL
BUT AFTERWARDS FAIL IN LIFE
IRON STARVATION OF THE- BLOOD saps their physical strength and
weakens their "will power"
THE WEATHER
T S DEF RTMKNT OF ACRICCLTTH
.. an. .wuru arRVir.
Observations taken
at S a. m- 75th mf
ridan 1 1 m . Dec
14.
Tmnemxtm tttt P. X.
Kl Paso and Icln
it : Fair tonltcht
nd Wednesday . not
much chance
tcniperatnr-.
New Mexico: Fair
tonicht and Wednes
day; little change In
temperature.
Arizona- Fair to
nicht and Wednes
day ; not ranch
chanf in ttmptn
tare. Wst Texas: To-
.( snrt WeMltlM-
daV fair; colder Wednesday.
The i-aiattve hnmldtty for El Paso and
vicinity at noon Tosaday was li percent,
temperature at noon, 47 decrees-
PrecipttaUoa last U hours inches)
State of weather I
Uwrt Temp. l-rt nlcnt ; I I
HtRhes Temp, yest'dy I 1
Temp, at 8 a. nv I I j
9k MORE
DAYS TOR
4tt
:t
... .4-
Zi
AZ
Abilene . .
Amanllo . .
Atlanta . ..
Chicago . .
Cincinnati .
Denver . ..
Puiuth . ..
FX PM .
CaH-tlo'i .
Kansas City
Little Bock
New York. 54
Phenlx 2
BoswpII
St. lou!s 3
salt I-akc City ...3
Sin Anton'.o 40
.in Francisco ...4S
Santa Fe 1
Sfattl -4
Washington . . . -
... -2
...26
...4J
..."
...3
. . .52
M 2S
41
CO
Clear
Clear
Cloudy 1.
PtXldy. .
Pt-Cldy. .
Clear
Cloudy .
Clear
CMar
C)ar
C1-ar
( iar
Clear
Rain
Clear
Cloudy
Clf.-r
CIa.r
ss? I rr i ...-'--is .safsBBstawffiasaa cs. mmK
tsaMPTj riU tOSaSBBSBBriSBBBBBBBsW V.A. tSBCT - ' I Tnu Ull Lb MAPI I
.J' .j; 'MS&tk ' CRUEL HAND OF IRON
"mr i ir s&Ws starvation of the
. vh r jdgammm Mi. i 1 BLOOD PULLSHIMBACK
td'W-&i&FT j( (50 OVER AND OVER AGAIN just
C 'A WSSi'yy0) &- ssrft&gi a.ytDgskok bright and cfleerfol
AS HEN GROW OLDER, THE IRON IN THEIR BLOOD IS
APT TO THIN QUT and as a cooaeqoence tbeir nerrca and wtH
poww become waXeoed and tfaey steadily lose both in mental .
andtodilTvmr Dotfl AT LAST THEY FALL EXHAUSTED BY
THE WAYSIDE, physical wrecks or financial failures or both,
wnca tbey oagbt to be at the height of their success and in the
Tnry prime oflife.
Dr. James Francis Sullivan, formerly physician
oi tne iieiievue aospitai (Uatdoor JJept.) and
tne westcnester Uoanty Hospital, New
York, says: that MORE THAN ONE
HALF THE POPULATION OF
AMERICA PERISHES BEFORE
MIDDLE AGE, and that one of
the chief con tributary causes
of this TERRIBLE WASTE
OF HUMAN LIFE is the de
vitalizing weakness brought
on oy the oi sumcieat iron
in the blood.
THERE ARK XL 000.1
OajttKKD BLOOD COR.
rueuusB IN xuuk
' IROM.
vyy j too can so longer do ytscr d
VjOy work without Mae aO tsse4
SS at night: when your dbrestjao aB i
24 1? Clear
CIou.lv
i-ninsion . . . " v mum
rnesaraSaPSktisA Kl PASS) I'TetrftUtatitMI.
Jan. 1 to !ec. IS. inclusive. 191G, 7.49 tn.
!. inciusiv-.
Pec.
xa Iec.
tj rvc.
tn r
J-n. 1
1917 6 49 tn
13. Inclusive, 191 ft. 7.73 m.
11, lactute, 1919. t 7i :n.
11, !n-lunle. 120. ri n
j Dec 11. Ini-lusne 0 j4 'n.
s.ti. TiiiinsiTirii of txoole baa swrpeisaearfr bv
tJsBoC taebtood erensd tbsir strsisth. casrrr fud endu races
and all ha anes- tn tw resaa tbn by Out sunpio aroenmsafc
dutDv. Wam Bat la taaMag this test be mm am troo yoo
fan si stiuk iroo aoa nox niswnc or nunerai
-J tb saoraaas, wbss yew troa voich peofs u9aaily take. Organic trac im
' first. Twrutf iiiisniri fcrri- alca tbe troa fa your bfood and hit tna iron j
table, and caaOj aaset: wttea spinacn. tsa tils and apples, whi metallic iroa
r oay B p imi tssnsijusxiis uma uw acJQn niiiW,
S oat aooa on caiau ntcces or iron. Lrar&nic iron may
t n.ohe- vfasm woar dteestittn aB coas bo bad from your duaattt txnder tha name of
nwii ns Kat nuflj sir ifsws th back Nuxatcd Iron. Naxatsd Ironiwreseatiornriic
. e and roar foco looka pJo aod drawn, do not Iron msnchahiahiy eooeantrated form that ors
W hea jqkit b4ood u itarmc tor iron, to piecea and eoHapsa deoiaestimatrdtoN"appraxir3ater:aiTaiT. '
BO mere tootcacor stimaUnts can rmt in a state, of nerrooa prostraooo. or aaal in Cin or-caiuc iron coctnt) oaun- half a cart
vnta rwW .Urrmi- blood matt Kava your weakened cooditwo yoa contract some of spinach, or one quart of -een Wfcsub'ea.
ToangK, itarTBiS wooa ronit cava ditemmm. but consult your famtiy pbyai- Itialikatakintrextractof beef insteadof a&r
iroa tae umo a a itaxTwff person bavahfan taJce a apeeimsnoX your blood pounds of aveat. Always inait on banns gin-
tx2tt hxrc food iron U red blood food, and make a "blood count" of your red btood isaae organic iron Nuxated Iron. If yocare-.ot
corpuselas or test ths tron-pow? of your blood fading Quite np to the martc t!ethoca for a
Nature put plenty of iron fn tfea bmks of ytmraaf by addinit plenty of spinach, carrots, package to-day. In talet f-rm o.-ly. Lrok f r
rntejritlB)mariiy&lctTteetbieixi baked applaa or other ron-eoBtaininr fraita theJettenN I. oneTery tabr.-, Ycurmor.er i
iWtstoearieii your blood but nwdern methods and vetretables to your djuiy fwxJ and take or- b- refunded by the rrart jfacrcrr -f ic - t
of cookery threw all these things away hence ranic iron with them for a while and sea how obtain perfectly satisfactory rej.3."ora- v -
the alarming mereaaeinrecentyearamAieJainia much your condition tmprwea. ail drugsbtx
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