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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, December 31, 1903, Image 1

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25 CTS. A MOJ^TH
VOL. 1. No. 10
SPECTRE OF DEATH BROODS
SILENTLY OVER CHICAGO
Nearly 600 Corpses Recovered From the Iroquois Opera
House Ruins-More Believed to be in the Debris-
Fire Escapes Were not in Position-Asbestos
Fire Curtain Would Not Work
CHICAGO, Dec. 31. —Still confront
ed by chaos that will take days to
etraighten, police and coroner's offi
cials at noon today, after 20 hours' con
tinuous toil, admitted their inability to
compile a correct list of the dead, injured
and missing in the Iroquois theater horror.
A revised statement has been issued
placing the number of dead at 531. The
number missing is now 200. Some are
undoubtedly among the unidentified dead.
Of the 300 injured the physicians report
that probably 100 will die.
Newspaper reports compiled at the vari-
ous morgues and hospitals up to noon
vary. The lowest list of dead is 564 and
the highest 576.
Coroner Traeger has impaneled; a jury
and this morning the jurors were conduct
ed through the numerous morgues, where
each body was viewed separately. Sev
eral times men were compelled to cease
their labor when overcome by emotion
at the spectacles. The bodies of burned
children affected them most.
Two jurors were unable to go farther
than the first morgue. They were ex
cused and other men were substituted.
The jury's unpleasant task will probably
take until midnight, by which time the
last victims will probably have been seen.
As soon as this is done the hearing
of' evidence will be begun. Investigation
will be complete.
Witnesses will be required to say why
the doors in the children's galleries were
not left open so that every means of exit
could be used; also why the asbestos cur
tain failed to work, why the fire escapes
were not completed, and whether or not
several building laws were complied with.
I All information now shows that had the
asbestos curtain worked the loss of life
would have been very small.
A profound air of gloom has settled over
the city. The death list is so great that
hundreds of thousands number either rela-
tives, friends or acquaintances among the
Victims. Business is practically suspend
ed. The board of trade closed at noon
out of respect for the dead, after the
morning's apathetic trading.
From morgue to morgue weeping ones
hurry in quest of missing, or emerge
from the charnel houses bearing evidences
that their search has ended and the worst
fears realized.
The mayor's office is buried in tele
grams of inquiry. From many cities of
America and Europe messages of condo-
lence have been received.
, Equal almost to the heart-rending scenes
at the morgues is that at the police cus
todian's rooms, where anxious ones are
going over heaps of garments and trinkets
left behind in the mad rush to escape from
the burning theater. Little children's
clothing, soiled and torn; sealskins of rich
value; slippers and skirts torn from
struggling women, and portions of waisti
complete the tragic evidence of that last
terrible rush. Five bushel baskets tilled
with purses, gloves, handkerchiefs and jew
elry have been collected. Two barrels were
required to hold the overshoes and shoes
alone.
All night long and yet ioday crowds
filled the streets around the scene of the
catastrophe, giving way, to traffic and
The Tacoma Times.
pedestrians only through the active enortg
of the police. The Iroquois stands to out
ward gaze intact, with all the glamor of
new construction. Its marble columns
and sculptured figures of tragedy and com
edy are not even blackened with the
death-dealing unoko. The grand entrance,
with its marble staircases and terraces, it
still beautiful and intact, but inside not
a vestige of anything inflammable is left.
HORRIBLE DISCOVERY.
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—Frozen into two
feet of ice which formed near the lro
quois theater the police today noticed
sirandg ot a woman s hair protruding,
iuey picked the ice away and lound part
ol a woman s skull, loreurm, two tingers
ami a portion of the thigh, it is believed
that sue must have jumped from a great
height and the remainder of her body was
either picked up or ground to pieces be
ueatli the trucks, heaicheis tins after
noon are continually finding fragments of
cuarred bodies within the theater.
The ice is banked up against the rear
wall, which has buckled out, towering I'ar
above the stage ruins. Giant props alone
prevent a fail, which must come it the
wind blows strong.
TALK OF ARRESTS.
CHICAGO, DISC. 31.- -Chief of Police
O'.Neil resented the suggestions ot persons
who were ; demanding the arrest of the
owners of the theater. He refused to com-'
ply with the demand. -■
He said that if he believed any of the
syndicate owning the theater intended to
leave the city he would , arrest them, as
they are required at the coroner's inquest.
The playhouse was the pride of the syn
dicate and the calamity will doubtless have
a depressing effect on all theatrical pro
ductions under its control. •,'.,'
The managers ol the Powers and Illi
nois theaters closed their houses last night
and are undecided when they will reopen.
They are owned by the same people as
the Iroquois.
The syndicate owning the Iroquois the
ater will hold a meeting today to discuss
the advisability of closing until the horror
is effaced from the public mind.
PATHETIC SCENES.
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—Identification this
afternoon is very slow. Fully 99 per cent
of the unidentified dead are girls ranging
in age from 9 to 17 years. There are less
men and boys among the dead, and prob
ably a score of women past the age of
20.
A pathetic identification was made to
day when Dr. Alexander, who searched
among the dead all night, recognized the
headless trunk of his 8-year-old son by a
watch he had given him for Christmas.
E. Frady, president of the Stronge
Piano company, has identilied two out of
a theater party ot six given by his wile.
All were at different morgues and all
were relatives. The sixth one, who is still
missing, in his sister.
ONE Ulw.-.i iuORGUE.
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.-2:33 p. m.—The
mayor this afternoon issued a proclama
tion suspending all New Year ■ fettivi
ties. Tomorrow will be a day ot mourn
ing. Saturday will be set aside by the
supplementary proclamation. IJusiness will
be suspended during the religious services
that will be held.
In order to end the death march of sor
row which is being made by hundreds from
morgue to morgue, Chief O'Neil has re
quested the coroner to remove all uniden
tified l>odies to the Coliseum, turing the
huge structure into one great morgue. This
will probably be done. The police hope
to have half of the dead identified by
night. Of the other half many will never
be known, so charred and distorted are
the features.
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—Hospitals, police
stations and the morgues are (tacked with
the mangled, crushed and burned bodies
of the dead from the Irpquois theater fire,
which occurred yesterday afternoon. The
counted now numbers 591 persons, but it
is believed that many more bodies are still
in the ruined building.
The count was practically complete last
midnight, but there are inaccuracies, and
it is believed that many bodies have not
been counted. For a time during the
height of the confusion policemen carried
bodies to undertaking establishments and
did not report the number to the central
police station.
Of those who lost their lives in the
holocaust few were actually burned to
death. The number that met death in
that way ('imposed but a small proportion
of the dead. The greater number died
from being trampled to death by the fren
zied people who were trying to get out of
the theater. In the hallways of the big
! new theater the firemen who entered found
heaps nl dead bodiM. In some cases the
faces had been trampled so that they
were beyond identification. Cases were
noted where the entire body above the
waist was ground into pulp by those rush
ing to the outer air after the cry of fire
j had gone up.
Many of the dead did not have a, chance
TACOMA, WASH., THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER, 31 1903
to get out of their seats. From the po
sitions in which their bodies were found
they were evidently instantly killed by
the first fierce blast that followed the
catching ot the tire. These bodies wera
found on the second floor. Bodies wtie
lound seated with their faces toward the
stage. The eyes were burned out and
I the faces blackened and burned.
it was during the second act of "Air.
Bluebeard" that the lire started. It was
the first dramatic production in the house,
which bad been recently completed. In
fact, the house had not been fully com
pleted. The iron balconies for the fire
escapes wore up, but the ladders had not
yet bsen constructed. This proved to be
far worse than it there had been no part
of the lire escapes up. Frantic men and
Women climbed out OH these platforms,
lmpi'ig to make their escape down the
ladder*. Crowds rushed behind the first
thai Knight this means of escape. When
they reached the balconies they found that
the ladders had not been put in place
and they Here helpless. A struggling mob
was behind them and thin air in front.
Many were thrown off the balconies and
were either killed or maimed by falling
into the alleys and streets below.
The lire is thought to have been started
by a grounded electric wire. The flames
first ignited the gas tanks used in the
calcium light apparatus on the stage and
explosions resulted. Hardy had the tire
started than a loud explosion was heard.
A sheet of flame ehct out over the heads
of the auditors on the first floor and struck
those in the balcony full in the laces.
It w.is there that the dead were found in
their seats as they had sat during the
play a few minutes before.
Alter the fire started, Eddie Koy, the
chief comedian with the company, shout
ed to lower the asbestos curtain. The
htngi! liai.il>, started to do this, bin w+ieTT
it was half-way down it stuck and before
it could be started again the flames had
driven them from the stage.
V.'ill .1. Davis, manager of the theater,
lias made the statement that had the cur
tain been dropped soon enough no one
would have been killed. While it is be
lieved that the fact that the curtain was
up had considerable to do with the loss
of life, it was not wholly responsible.
One of the first to discover that the
blaze had started was a man whose first
thought was to cry "Fire" as loud aa his
lungs would permit.
The people on the lower floor where he
was rose as one and started for the exit.
It was after they had reached their feet
that the sheet of flame shot over their
heads and did its deadly work on the
second floor. The maddened people rushed
over each other and many were left dead
underfoot in the rush.
After the alarm reached the outside the
first to enter the building was a newspaper
man and a fireman. It was but ten min
utes after the fire started that they made
their entrance into the building, but dur
ing those brief minutes nearly 600 people
had lost their lives.
The fireman and the newspaper man
crawled up a stairway leading to a bal
cony. They held wet handkerchiefs over
their faces to prevent suffocation. As the
two reached the door of the balcony the
fireman gasped for breath and in horror
remarked to his companion, "For (Jod's
make, man, don't walk on their faces."
The thick smoke had blinded them and
without knowing it they were walking on
the faces of the dead. Thousands of fren
zied men and women had walked over the
bodies before and some of them were
trampled into bloody heaps of shapeless
matter.
The door they wanted to enter, leading
from the stairway to the balcony, was
blocked so that they could not force it.
They returned and reported to Chkf
Mnabam of the fire department the awful
find they had made. The chief at once
■topped work on the lower floor and sent
all available men to the second floor. The
dour that had resisted the effort* of the
fireman and the newspaper man to enter
was blocked on the inner side by stacks
of dead bodies packed as high as the
top of the door. A stream of men carried
I lie (lead out of the building and to the
Thomson restaurant, which is next door.
The manager of the cafe put all available
•pace at the service of the firemen and
police. The restaurant was transformed
into a morgue in less than ten minutes.
All of the city ambulances, patrol wag
ons and other conveyance! were inadequate
to carry off the injured and take the dead
to the morgues. The big merchants in
the neighborhood of the theater sent wag
on loads of linen, cotton and blankets for
the injured and lent every assistance pos
sible.
Physicians stood at the entrance of the
theater and when a body that appeared to
have the least sign of life wj J taken out
il was examined by them. If dead it wag
placed in a pile at the side of the entrance,
and if alive it was whirled away to a
hospital or a physicians' office in the neigh
borhood. 1
Every manner of conveyance carried
away the dead from the scene of I
One large truck was so heavily loaded wilh
dead bodies that the horses could no:
until the police had helped start the
wheels.
"There was no need of any loss of life,"
said Will .1. Davis, manager of the {he
ater. "There were 40 exits and the build
ing was fireproof. Someone in the audi
ence yelled lire and in the wild stampede
occurred th» Teat loss of life. Had order
been kept those who suffocated would have
ban taken out before they could nave
perished.. There were about 1,300 pepple
in the theater."
It was through the quick work and «00l
beaded judgment ol \V. A, U. Sellers, <.lie
bouse liiLUi.in, Him the iui-.s ana acireiis-
M in UN company ■ eucupea willi ■:> tbeir
liven. tSt'Ueiu: pieveutea ; any di mciii
Horn taking their street wotnes, but forced
an to gui: uui on I lie street clothed: in
likii tin-Mi ami (UK stage clothing.
Hie iiiunager oi, the meater docs not
believe Uial ■ the mv Malted Horn Ue
leelive wires gruunuing, bill troni the ex
pioaiou oi ii qua laiiK on the stage.. Ilia
uutor) is snuitrrcu i)} the statements ot'
those who were in Hie theater, xhey .-.ay
that they saw Humes and heard the crj
ot lire beiore the explosion came.
Hie scene was one Uiat words are in
adequate to describe. Hard-hearted men
who hail seen . the worst side of' life all
their lives were moved to tears when they,
say . tue shapeless masses ot what' had
once been human bodies earned from the
building. Bodies, of little children and
strong mien were' trampled under ■ foot.
Some lew women reached within a lew
feet of the outer I door when they , lost
their strength and fainted, only to be
trampled to death by those who were just
a little stronger. "
• The citizens •of Chicago are dazed by
the awful catastrophe, ■; The speed with
which it came and went staggered
belief. The news spread with great rap
idity and before the lire was out the
streets for blocks in either direction wer«
jammed with people. Some were looking
lor wives-, sweethearts or children. Others
were there from idle curiosity. : All were
struggling to get near the,theater and it
required every ' policeman who could be
(.pared to be on the spot. • ■
. The, building stands on Rudolph street
between State and Dearborn streets. No
one was allowed to enter the street on
which the theater is located for a quarter
of a mile on either side of the theater. -
V The lire itself was put out by the firemen
in a short time. , ■■ ■ '< '■ •, .
Eddie Foy, the comedian, says that the
sticking of the curtain saved the lives of
the members, of the company, though
their salvation was paid for with the lives
of those iii the audience.
' j "After 11 called for the fire curtain,"
said Foy, "I roused the members of the
company, some of whom were almost suf
focated by the smoke.' They all got out
into the alley. The asbestos curtain re
fused to come down and that is what
saved us all. If those tanks had exploded
when the curtain was down not one ol
us would have lived. There would have
been no escape from the lire, smoke and
gas, and all would have been doomed. | A«
it was the: gas :and -fire, escaped under
the curtain and dill its terrible work in
■ the I audience.'' >V ■; ;„y 'i :;■ ... ; ;,- ;,'.-_ y/^;:
(*^ia{oO^^cr«l^4t''Blo^iock this
I morning the-police compiled a list of the
bodies recovered from 1 the Iroquois holo
caust and. found 591, with a prospect of
discovering others in the debris. It is al
most certain that the total number will
exceed 600. ,' , •'-. ; '
The coroner still believes that the total
will reach 700, as the basement and upper
dressing rooms of the stage and part of
the upper galleries have not been thorough
ly searched. •.
At the city hall lists of the victims and
descriptions of the unidentified dead were
being compiled. Sobbing men, women and
children throng the corridors. The death
list is being added to by reports from the
hospitals where the injured were taken.
The police believe that at ' least 250
persons were injured. Pumps are working
in the basement, which is flooded. At
every step in the building the police find
diamonds, jewels and furs. No one i* per
mitted to enter the building without a
special permit from the chief of police
and accompanied by a special guard. Thoir
sands of dollars' worth of wraps and jew
els have been hauled to police headquar
ters. , '■ ' ■■■! ■ ■
The rear and side walls of the stage
are in danger of falling. Architects today
warned the firemen that the rear of the
building might collapse at any moment and
crush to death all persons working in that
portion of it.
William Dee, a wealthy contractor,
whose two children, Edward, aged 6, and
Louise, aged 3, and their nurse, were miss
ing, chartered a special train from Mecca,
Ind., today. He found the nurse and
Louise. The latter was picked up cry
ing in the street in front of the theater.
The nurse, badly injured, was found in
a hospital. The boy is missing.
Mayor Harrison this morning received
the following telegram from President
Rrosevelt: i:
"In common with all our people through
out the land, I extend through you to the
people of Chicago my deepest sympathy
in the catastrophe which has befallen
them." 'i^-r ■'■ ■ ' :i-;'\-<
LONDON, Dec. 31.—The lord mayor to
day sent to Ambassador Choate the fol
lowing telegram:
"The citizens of London offer their deep
est sympathy and sincere condolences to
the American people for the awful loss
of life through the fire in Chicago."
SEATTLE (iIRL ESCAPES
SEATTLK, Dec. 81.—"Mr. C. 11. Kan
ford.—Escaped from theater safely. Am
all right, so don't worry. AJMEE."
This telegram was received la«t night by
Clarence Banford, of the Lowman & Han
ford company of this city, from his daugh
ter, who succeeded in escaping from the
Iroquois theater, which burned yesterday.
She was attending a liox party and Irom
the box at the side of (he theater all the
members of the pal ly reached the street in
safety.
The following list of known dead ha*
been compiled, It is only partial, as many
bodies have not yet been identified and
many persons are reported missing whose
remains may yet Ik: in the opera house
ruins:
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—The following in
a list oi the dead thus for identified.:
ADAVECK Mis. John, Bartlett, 111.
AUSTRIAN, WALTER D. Laporte,
Ind.
ALDRICH, MRS. JOHN.
BOETTCHBR. MRS. CHARLES F.
BICKPORD, HELEN.
BLOCH MRS. ROSE.
BOWMAN LUCIEN.
BUFFIE, REBECCA,
lillil) MRS., Neola, 111.
BETSFORD, MRS, MABEL, Racine,
Wis.
BUSS, H. K. Racine, Wig. , .
I'.UAim KLL. MISS MYRA.
BOI£N, PAUL/:
BARKER. ETHEL.
BARTLETT, MRS. C. I)., Bartlett, 111.
HARNIIKISIX, cIIARLKK U. *„ :.;
m i i.i,, william c.
BUTLER. MRS. 8. 8.. Evanst6n,' 111.
BOYUE. MRS. W. F.
MYKRSI.OI 11, HELEN. - • - - • :
BISSINGER, WALTER B.
BIRNDSLEY, AIRS. 11. C.
BODICE, N. W.
BRINCKLEY, AIRS. EMMA.:
BEUHMANN. MARGARET. -
BUTLER, AIRS. L.. RoNhill. N
BUTLER, ROSE.
BUAIFURTH, RUTH.," '
BOYER, ALEX. • '
BREWSTER, JULIA.
BRENNAN, PAUL.
BROWN, MISS, Evanston, 111. *
BOYCE, \Y. W. ■ •■• ;
BARRY, MISS WILMA. .
BECKFORD, GLENN. '
OUAIAUNOS, MISS IRENE.
CHRISTOPHER, Miss L.
COOPER; WILLIS W., Keriosha. Wis.
COOPER, CHARLES. Kcnosho, • Wis.
CURDELLMAN. SOFIA.
CHAPIN, AGNES.
CLARK, F. D.
. CORCORAN, MISS. *:
COOPER, C. L. • •/;
COOPER. W. W.
CONTELL,; THOMAS.
COOPER ' HELEN. X*
COULTER, R. 11.
CROCKER, MRS.'MILLIE J.
CURRAN. MAY; . ,
CLAYTON, VINTON.
COHEN, AIRS. JACOB.
CANTWELL, MRS. T. A.
CALDWELL, ROY A. |
COPLER, DOLA.
DIFFENDORF. LEANDER 8., Lincoln,
111. 1 ' \- ■.-;•■•. '-•
DICKIIOUT, MRS, MAY.
DONALDSON, MRS. CLARA.
DOUST MRS C, Evunstno, 111.
DRYENFORTH, HELEN, iCvanston,
111. -•• ..-.■•■/'•>■ '• ■ ■;;■ '
I">OUNE(SAL. MISS MARY.
dallely,;airs. J. L.r
i : DOLAN. MARGARET.
1)1 ALL, SARAH, Zanesville, O.
LILLIAN PHILLIPSON, 0 years old.
BOY, 17 yean old, of Lafayette, Ind.
AIRS. I'o'KMAN. "-<.."/
WILLIAM RATLEY.
William M. reijl>, Waukegan 1; 111.
HOYT FOX.
AIRS. L. H. BUTLER.'
;S. A RDM AN. '■■-■'.
EDAIUND W. MORTON. ' . l
NKAVHY.
; .1. \. COOKEMS. ! - iv
MRS. A. J. STEARNS. [ /
'•'■ .1. 11. DONALDS. •
■■ , REV. : GEORGE DUDLEY. |
AIRS. J. H. DODD of Delaware, Ohio.
MISS V. DELEE.-
W. W. HOOPER of Kenosha, Win.
FIVE CHILDREN OF 11. S. VANIN
OEN of Kenosha WiH. (probably.)
MRS. JOHN M'MENENGAN.
AIILDRED MEREDITH, 3 years old.
BEATRICE BALLHY.
A. A. AIALDEN. , k
C. A. \\ [NBLOW. Three Rivers, Minn.
DONALD WELLS.
BURR SCOTT.
FORNETTA PETERSON.;
HARVEY KIELLY, St. Louis.
THOMAS COUTELL. , v
EMI'ERLY HALL.
THOMAS FLANAGAN, Indianapolis.
MRS. A. 11. HENRY.
ROSE K. ROGERS.
11. P.-MOORE. • ;
C. L. COOPER.
HORTENSE LANG, nged 10.
i IRENE LANG, aged 11.
E. A. WILSON.
ANN* FITZGIBBON.
AIRS. W. T. MARSH.
LOUISE BUSHNELL.
AIRS. A. LAKE.
Miss a. DONALDSON.
.MRS. Patrick p. o'donnell.
R. 11. (HILTS.
Miss howard.
MISS ROSS.
FLORENCE AX.NAM.
ROSKMOND SCHMIDT.
Elvira OLSEN. :
IIIOLKN M ( ,\l „HAN
HELEN HOWARD.
LILLIE POWER.
RIliA MAKER,
MRS. F. A. MORRILL.
AIRS. A. SI MIN.
MRS. EDITH NORTON of Ontongon,
Mich.
MISS HARABAUGII.
C. W. FORBUSH and family. •"■•'
ANNA STERLING.
THREE MEN employed in the flic* on
the stage, name* unknown.
FLORENTINE, a German performer.
ETHEL BLACKAIAN, 13 years old.'
MRS. C'AVANAUGH, of Indiana ave
nue.
__ . '' ' ■'.■'' '■ ".
UNKNOWN BOY. 8 year* old.
BIGHT UNKNOWN WOMEN, met
death by jumping from rear fire escape.
LOUIS K. Hi ( IIRAY. . „<
MARIE WALSH, aged 15 years ,
MRS. I.Wills I). MALONEY.
MISS SPENCER.
ETHEL JONES
MRS. JOHN 0. KING.
MAY UURRAN. HI
MARTIN, a boy of 15.
E. MOSES. .-•- i irJilll
11. W. WILLIAMS.
li. REGENBBERG.~*r"(
ELLA LINDEN. --A "
IIKNMNO, a boy. . x"
WALTER It. EISLER. '
Ml lit.
MRS. EMMA BRINOKLEY. '^jrS
RICHARD and 'ALLEN HOLBT '
HAROLD MARTIN, Pullman, ::: >%
JOHN HOLLAND. '
LULU SHABBAKD.
' W. S. SPRANG.
CHARLES 11. KOLL.
MRS. DAWBON
WILLIAM BUTLER.
ROBERT MARTIN. '
JOHN VANINGEN, Kenosha, Wi» ,
WALTER" B^SINGER.
MARGARET BUERMAN.
MRS. LEO WOLFF/Hammond, In.l
ALICE KA! ISM AN.
HELEN HOWARD.
Mill COOPISR
B. K. GOULD.
WALTER I! ZEISLER.
MOKTIMKI! BLDRIDGE
BEYER SLOTH, Evan»ton.
IJVDEPE/tVEffT I,
yiLL THINGS
ONE CENT
REV. lii:\i;\ L. RICHARDSON.
J.Ol l.s MSNIA aiul WIFE,
J.Ksrio; DOTY.
MRS. A. .V MENDEL.
WALTKB I) At IKI.VN, aged 14.
G. SIDNKV FOX.
MRS. C. I). BAKTLETT, Bwtlett. HI.
MliS. ,IOII\ \lli:.\H X, Hurtled, 111.
GKRTRI DX !■ \I.KK.\MKI.\ lkirt-
U-tt. 111.
WLRB. W. T. HOICK.
MRS, WILLIAM Q4WBON. U«rring
ton, 111.
WILLIAM BUERTBX
M -\n\ D, GARTZ.
LUUISK BUSOHWAH.
LEIGH HOLLAND.
\\ ARNER S. EUIJ i.
IlKliM \\ ISI.NSIADT
UNIDENTIFIED QIRL;
CAERIE .1. SAYOKK
ii.\i;i;i HUDSON.
H. E GOI i.D. Xl K in, 111:
MRS. W. A. SPRINGS.
PRED U. LEATIN.
BEANE BOISE
C. M. BICKFORD.
MRS. .1. 11. STINGER, Lovrall, Iml
INIDKNTII'IKD WOMAN.
C, R. HARIIKIM
ESTHER ItAHKKR.
EDWARD L, VANINiiKN, K«no»h».
MRS, SARAH KRAXZ. l^tine Wjh
WINTHROP SPRING
HILDA HOLMES
BXIZABETH HART and MAITIE
MARTIN. Kvansi,,,, in
SAVILLO, ii jrmn old.
HERMAN VKIN '
HARRIETT WOLFF.
I>..\llN<!, \\. G
DELEE, MISS N
DELEE, VIOLET
IK>I)I). MRS. .1. 1), Delaware, Ohio. ■
DONALDSON IT.
DONALDSON Miss A
DRYDBN, tXYLOR.
DRYDSN, MRS. JOHN
THREE DEAD
GENEVA, 0., Dec. 31.-A Lal» Shore'
limited-.double-header struck ' tin ' Ofptm
switch while running .gix.niileß ans hour -
west of the city this morning. ■ , Kndneerii';- '<
.Sprinii i\ii<l Mclntogh anil Fireman,KeJiiifl^Mii'
"WeTe killed * outright.' A: number, of pnm
enscrg were injured,, three I seriously., The
reck caught fire. -
ON JAN. 13
I'AlilS, Dee. 31.—A die»pateh from St.
PetarsbllM hhjh Hu».ia'« reply lo .liipali
will be delivered Jan. 13. ]t in inti
mated that it will be concilatory in termi
CAPTURED
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 31.-A; dii
patch from Minister Powel, dated yoster-, /
day,. says that i two sailing • vaMala i from i
Curacao, bound for Aniaa and loaded with '
arms and ammunition for the insurgent*,)
were captured by t the provisional Domin
ican government. The latter is aaaumlni
the offensivel, : having, been auccegHful at
Querin. The prisoners are ; ,being Kent to
San Domingo City.
STRUCK RIVAL
WITH HATCHET
It. 8. Heale was arrested by Patrolmen
Smith and > Gordon at 3 o'clock thin morn
ing on a charge of assaulting John'Wick
strom with a deadly Weapon. ilealo is
boarding with Mm. Kate JUndiger, the, di
vorced wife of a dentist now practicing
in . Everett. . John j Wickstrom formerly
lived at the name place, but he and the'
woman were constantly having trouble, so
lie hag remained away for < gome' time.
YVickstrom claims that the household fur
niture really, belongs.: to j him/and several
time* the police have arrested j him for
stirring up trouble in the Lindiger family
and breaking up . the furniture. .; lie nays"
that ,the woman; welcomed .him' to her
home while his money lasted, but run him
away when it. was gone,; ;•',: '
; -Karly' this , morning, according.' to. the
story.'. Wivkatroin tells/ he received a, tele
■ phone call from | Mix. Lindiger and went
to the resiilenee, ' 1205 South | Thirteenth
street, at her request. lie «mg the door
bell and the trouble began.
Heale nays that, he ' opened he door to
prevent it» being battered down and Wick
atrom: began striking ,at • him. f. He • ways
there wag a man with Wickstrom and that
he was getting worsted when, be stepped
back to where ;a < hammer and '% shingle
hatchet lay. He threw the hammer, first
and missed,,but hit hi* antagonist with
the hatchet. A deep wound wa» cut in his
head.
Both men engaged in the fight • are
known to the police. . • ..•.,;<>.
NEW, YORK,' Dec* 31.—Otto Alilinann,
a reputed millionaire '; and for ■18 ; year*
caßhier of the I (.ink of Staler, Island at
Stapleton, conunitted suicide ■ today by ■
shooting himself.; He was practically the
Me owner of the bank. The cause is a
'ntnUry. .The bank closed jt« doors pend
ing an investigation.'

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