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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, May 03, 1904, Image 2

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THE TACOMA TIMES
Every Evening Except Sunday by The Tacoma Times Pub. Co.
■ I at the portoffice at Taeoma, Wa»h., ai vecond-clan matter.
S-M'RAE TELEGRAPHIC NEWS SERVICE.
OKKICE. 788 COMMERCE STREET TELEPHONE MAIN 733.
One Cent a Copy, Six CcnU a m^SUSS^. 23 Cent* a Month, 13 a year,
Week, by Carrier or by Mail. '•'£' ■** -> by Carrier or by Mail.
TACOMA'S ONE GREAT NEED
There i* a growing sentiment among the boainaN men ..f TaCOMH lint aomething
mn-t ba dime to >!<■( ni.-i. raOraaaa into the oity.
(ml* tint the time haa gone 1> whan any aapiring city upon Poget
I to 1h- a one railroad 'own.
Dwring the laat eoaple of noatha The Tacoma Timei hat printed i nombac of
interriewi with leading <iti/.en«. aU rowing the — lliarnl above notad, They want
'•' ' them, they want an) and all tvanacontinm'ta] linca which will build
m(.' thi> citj on any raaaananla indoatnanta.
There i- nothing the matter with Taooma today except that it is ■ one railroad
town. The other progressive cities upon the Sound are reaching out and gathering
in all of the transcontinental lines that they can reach, Seattle 1.,,- not only got the
Great Northern, it- original backer, but it has reached out and captured the North
.in Pacific a« well. It includes bow in it-, lint the Burlington and the Canadian
Pacific.
Why do four Iranaeontincntal line* END at Seattle?. Why do they not continue
down the Sound a few mile* to this city, the second largest in Western Washington,
when extension* can lie no eauily built through the White River valley at ■ minimum
of cort?"
-\nain. Whj does the Qreal Noith.-in reaefa Oat ('[' the Sound in all dire, lions''
Whj does a evea penetrate into Vaaoosvec Island and reach Victoria, while omitting
to hiuid a .hort extension down to tin* city?
Thoe questions are not hard to answer. Taeonu has not taken the trouble to
go after additional transcontinental lines. It hat been inclined to stand upon its
dignity and »ay, "If the Great Northern or other roads want part of the business of
this oily, let them come to us. They are simply hurting themselves by not coming
uric
This i- ■ a shortsighted policy. The oilier roads ARE NOT COMING thin way
unless determined efforts are made by the people of TaeoaM to get them here.
Somehow- the feeling 1,,,. grown up in railway circles that Taeoma wants no railroads
■ except I In- Northern Pacific, and this feeling has much to do with the fact that
few railroad'officials except Northern Pacific official* ever visit this city. They all
go to Si ittle and stay there, until they leave.
The waiting policy i, a losing policy, so far as railroads arc concerned. As the
railroads flock into one city and pass by another city, population and prestige will
follow them. :
Taconm is in the fight for position find commanding prestige. She cannot afford
to tsit idly by and walcrh" armthpf city capture first one railroad and then another,
without making the slightest effort to got them here alto.
Such a policy is suicidal.
_lint some,old mosslxtck will exclaim: "We don't want the Great Northern rail
road in this city. It has always played Beat) game. The Northern Pacific has al
ways been the friend of Taeoma."
.Poor old duffer! Don't you see thai the Northern Pacific is over in Seattle
nowadays, plugging for all it is worth to get business there? It is giving Seattle
ineichiiiits rates thai enable them to enter territory that ii claimed by Taeonu mer
chants. It is no more the friend of Taeoma nowadays than it is the friend of Be
attle.
Bear thie fao( ip mind. The dayi of foollah antagonian are over. The Seattle
had no casea t'> I^m- the Northern Pacific, bui they knew ■ n'"»l thing and
they went after that raiiread, and finally got it. One additional railroad meant
nd b] psnea rat v Bgure.
The people ol Tacoma il 1.1 be ihrewd snoagb to adopt the same policy toward
the Urea! Northern. Yea, ti waj Seattle'i friend, but it i» ■ tranaeontinental line.
It would l.rint; mole liii-iihv, to this city and il would accept the bnsineu of tins
Htj with ai great w&lingneM aa the Northern Pacific accepti Seattle's traffic.
I-. i the people pull together tor more railroad*, l.ci them move vig
at N'.H tlii'i n and all of the Other*. Instead ol Waiting, let the
■' nmeree nend a committee to see Mr. Mill and Urge him to bnfld down
t , i mil' to t.uid on ilimuly. It is a time to pull off coats and go nfter
whiit we want. •
The race between l'uget §BBad cities will be e\ erlasi uigly settled within the
next lew jreara, and bute i> the only w.ilihword for sue, esq.
No policy could be more foolish tlur-i to sit idly bmnoraiag animoeitiet, while
time i« living and pwd— l op[Kirtunities are being lost.
The Tatonia 'I'mies i s vitallj inteioted in the growth and prosperity of this city.
As it gPOWI and |iro-pers, The Times will be beneliled. If it should not grow as
rapidly a- it might, The Times will guffer proportionate loun.
If no other sentiment can arouse citizens to action, let each figure out how mm h
be "ill lose by ,i continued policy of inaction in railway matters.
A SAFE OF PAINTED TIN
One of the imposing assets of the Globe Security company, which failed in Xew
York the other day for nearly a million dollars, was an -imposing safe and great
piles of gilded Globe securities. I
The Globe company made loan* on chattel mortgages and gold the notes. When
the borrowers paid installments these were not turned over to the holders of the
notes, go the poor people had to pay twice. This ought to have been ■ profitable
business, but it failed, owing almost a million. ,
Then, was the Ih'h safe that had commanded imieh confidence. It leemed to
•aawe enormous tntnre. Its air of Bnancial retpontibilit) Impreseed the moel ikep.
tii at \utli a sense of »ecurity.
When, after the lailure, the office was examined, this big tafe WU found to be
nothing Imt a tin shell, supported by Mantling* and painted with a lavufa expendi
ture of gilt.
The big M : y a (Kirt of the big blulV. It wan in keeping with the real "f
the fraud.
The big tin safe i» nilent proof thai then MVec WU any intinlion to eondur! thit
business honestly, althoujjli had it be. n condui ted honestly there WU ample palion.
Bge to have made it pay iuindsoiuely.
It* pionioters bmm to have preferred the gmokad way to failure rathai than the
straight ro*d to »ucee*«. And they are by no means alone.
How many tin safes there are, in one form or another, in the buMDMi honail
of the land there is no means of knowing. Hut fur them the bueinew panict that
jn rnulnally aiHiet Ui would be unknown.
Hut for the large element of bluff that eaten into OllllnaH. protperit) would rest
•ecure and stable on a solid foundation.
There was the Franklin njndieate, that fSeaed the pennic» of the poor by pre
tending to pay great profits from stock gambling.
There wag the shipbuilding trust, that gave a hard blow to Aiinriiin finance bf
trying to cheat lurge inventoi- we!l at at home.
n hundreds of other big graft game* expoaed, and there are him
dredu oi other* still in operation, with no oilier capital than bluff,
And the dear American people seem to like, as K.unuin said, to be btuebugged.
An imposing safe with plenty of gilt on it seeing to *uiMy. Duoded by the j;'!t. we
•top not to examine whether it be mere tin or not, but turn over out money and go
to a|eap to find fixilish dreams.
Th« discovery that the Globe's big safe was only painted tin startled New York
lor a moment. But them is no good reason why it t>hould. The tin safe is truly
typical of a large part of the business done in this country in tins day and genera
tion. ,
WHAT WILL BECOME OF TURKEY
If Russia, with her growing mountain of u.ir expense, should become so hard up
that the money lenders lock their vaults, what will happen to Turkey?
It it- not generally known that the </.u is a creditor of the Turkish government
to an enormous extent. There is over 125,000,000 of the war indemnity of 1877
■till unpaid.
Turkey, as lias been bbown by history, pays when she must pay, and seldom at
my other time.
Rum lia* let the account; stand, evidently, with an object. Tlie other day •
Bin*< minister called on Abdul llamid, and i>olitely reminded him that Nicholas
bad not .forculten ih» matter, even if it had dipped the mind of the Turkish ruler.
It i» doubtful if Abdul H.nnid can pay. He "ill not <!• |f. Such a thing
aa economy in his palaces is not even a possibility. He has never ahown a dis
■it to prune his own gl|MUau in order to settle with a creditor.
Wine men say that when the czar becomes sufficiently cramped for money he
may Bell his claim against Turkey to some European syndicate for what it will bring,
and transfer the mortgage that he holds on that country.
The possibility of nomething of the kind U dose emHafn t 0 Beta worry for th*
Tuili>h ruler. Syndicate- have no aOttU, Neither liuve they patience with royal
spendthrift*, v ho revel in bankruptcy and born up millions on whim.-, while lionet
'1 (if tlllil jll-t
All thing-- arc working together to tventuall) change the map of Europe again.
I' - not too much to expect thai when the great change comes the Turkish govern
nii iii. m „!i independent n.ition, will have been practically obliterated. How it will
lie dene it ia too soon to pr^hct.
A TRIBUTE TO LABOR
•I. I' Morgan, the Puke of Weatminater and eight other men of great wealth
have contracted to pay 1130,000 each for a iet of thi complete m irlea Dick
ana in 130 returnee, The work will reqairc ei«lit yean to complete. The stock will
ba genuine parchment and famoua artinta »ill decorate the page*.
At tn-t bln-h thai name like a great waste of good money.
And on taeond thought one wonder* whj more rich men do not inveal surplus
wealth on similar line*,
The making of those book* calla for skilled labor of the ino-t advanced type.
rhere *ril| be no place for the banglei or tlip man who b*< failed to perfect him
s''H in In- trade. There hi to be no ikimping, no mnke-rteli#w, no ahoddy, no haste.
ii- the l«'-i that i- humanly po^kible and never miml the coHt," i- the
older.
! ia .\n encouragement for art. for effort. Men's braina pnd skilled fingers are
to be uaad, an. l the reward for talent and geniui ia to be ample.
When the booka are done they will i nl foi no more in literature il ,tho
cheap volume- „i Dickena to bi found in any 1 1; -tore.
The rent ol the invettment will belong to labor. The wonderful binding, the
artistic sketching, the clear text will ail be monnmentt t" the Bite work that is clone
bj mm.
<^NT^ri^\ (jrR.-&r
Household Tests— *Bedbxigj
BY PROF. H. D. GOULD, I!. C. s.. M. S."
Though prone to gorge themselvei with
huniin blood bedlnigt i in live a long time
Without citihtf. llou-es lli,il have loli|{
been vacant have afforded ipecimem of
bteresting peel that were perfectly
tranaparent from kmg fasting, bu< itill
alive. One case is ,in record "here a bed
bug was still living that bad been confined
in ,i bottle for more than ■ year without
—]
■ ...» _ .
any kind of food. He cannot be exterm
inated by starvation.
The bedbug hat a hi-lory which entitles
it lo fuller disillusion than is generally ac
corded it in polite society. In fact, mod
ern tociet) taboo* evel the name, and
many are the nickname* and aliases assign
ed lo the well known bug. In Xew York
the] aii' styled "red coats." Around l!on
ton they are "chintwe." From Baltimore
pome* the name "mahogany llats." The
old Kll^ll^ll name u,is "wall louse." The
Romana i;a\o it the name "<'imex." which
iv |i;u( (1 i i|, icientiflc name. In the old
Kngliah bible reads. I'salin xii. S: Thou
.shall not uode to be afriad of euey Buggeaj
XOriggling Toes a Sign of Weakness
If wnnm would learn t<> sit itill when
lii '. tit, I" stand still when thoy stand,
to lii' si ill tvhen 111< y lie, they would suve
in a Wfi-U m nun h ttrength aa most
wonnii iii'\"W' to a hard » i-liing.
l*tii woman when ahe nits twiddles her
fingtff, taps her toes on the floor, rocks
nervously anil without rhythm; rhythm
produces I restful sensation, but »he
doesn't rock easily and evenly —she jerk*
the chair back anil forth irregularly, When
aha lie* down she continually move* her
hands mill feet, and even resorts to wrig
gling her toe*, fur no other reason under
the sim than that* »!»• ie rentiers and
doesn't "know how to' ml 'without expend
ing more strength in the process.
- These physical indications of weariness
express not only weakness of the body,
but weakness of the mind. The woman
who constantly tap* the door with her loot
while »he is sewing or while she is talking
with a caller, is mentally unstrung. Her
mind is wandering. This is always notice
able. Whenever a woman gets in earnest
she forgets to tap the floor with her foot,
though she may sump the floor with her
heel.
The toe tapping woman is not capable of
settling down to a long and complicated
problem of any Nit. She is easily swayed,
easily disturbed, easily turned from a line
of thought.
If anyone wishes to stand for the
strength which she hopes she ponaesaes,
let her remember that all unnecessary
physical movements express both physical
HOTEL ROCHESTER
New Management.
If you wish for tit the comforts of a home, without tlie annoyance*, go to tbi
Rochester. Everything the best. Families given weekly "i monthly rate*. American
plan. Mrt. Elisabeth Forbes, Manager. F. .1. Carlisle, lessee.
THE TAOOMA TIMES
by m«lit." Thw proves, that the family
i- ,in old one,
Besides the cockroaches as their enemies,
the bedbng, which i* such « ISu-^ian l>im
bear to man, li»* a lively little Japanese
enemy In the rod arita, winch, on discover
inu a house infested with bedbugs, "ill
invade In full t<■ i<■•■. and maj often l>e
Men carrying the dismembered parti ol
their vanquished foci, and rushing in great
excitement to their headquarters under
some rock in the yard.
Bedbugs are known to travel from house
to house, anil for tins reason ii is no re
flection on the tidinSM ol tin- housewife to
tin, l them suddenly appearing in a well
kepi bed, They Usually leave the lied
during the day and crawl into cracks in
the wall <>i floor, KHiik gregarious, thfey
are usually rotmd in little groups. When
they sin ;> ('I up in a tliin scale,
i tntei ver; small ciHvno.. When
hey tire enlm fed considerably.
As tit g'siitt|(^t. may '"■ mud thai in
sect pow4»:.» • "7s>fit-*??M&.,lhe™. except
that I'YUrrTUWSW SPRIXKUCD UK
TWEEN THE SHKKTS, WILL PRO
TECT THE SLEEPER FOR THAI'
NIGHT, and any such preparation is use
ful to travelers.
The best remeSjr, also the simplest and
cheapest; is bcnaue'or any other form of
petroleum oil, as gasoline,' turpentine, etc.
Apply freely to cracks and crevices in fur
niture and walla, and repeat the applica
tion a week or later to kill those that have
hatched out since, M benzine does not al
ways kill the eßgs. Corrosive sublimate
is also effective, and a little more lasting,
but it is very poisonous to mmi, and its
use can be avoided.
The origin of the buy odor lies in the
fad that in the dim past bugs needed a
natural protection against their enemies.
the birds, and Nature provided the linn
with a secretion that would be sufficiently
obnoxious to protect them, With (he bed
bug the possession of this odor is an illus
tration of the Very 'common phenomenon
among animals, the persistence of a char
acteristic which is no longer of any special
value to the possessor.
J!V CYNTHIA GREY.
and mental weakness just as clearly as a
wandering tongue discloses a lack of
though*
TEMPTING DISHES.
As the warm days come on the appetite
needs a little coaxing. A complete change
of the table is not possible, but just a bite
of something new pleases the eye and
tempts the appetite. Here are a few sug
gestions:
Tomato Relishes. ( ut toast in round
pieoea mni put on each a rather thick slue
of tomato and grate a little cheese over the
top. chop a Btfmuda onion rather fine,
let stand in .salt an hour or two. drain ami
pour on a little vinegar when ready to
serve. Also nakas good landwiehen be
tween thin slices of bread and butter.
Wilted Lettuce. —Shred lettuce and put
in bowl) Add a little chopped onions, salt,
pepper and sugar to taste. Put over the
fire a small tablespoonful of bacon drip
pings, add one-half tup of vinegar, and
when it boil* up pour gently over lettuce,
tossing it up with a fork. May be served
as a side dish with lOUD or main course.
Grated horse radish ii excellent with all
meats.
Horse Radish Sauce. — half a cup of
grated horse radish add the yolk of an
egg, half a teaspoon of salt, a tablespoon
of vinegar, and beat; then out into it gent
ly a cup of whipped cream. Excellent
with fish or meat.
Egg Vermicelli. — the whites of
hard-boiled egga and put into • rich cream
sauce; pour this over pieces of rich brown
tout, tliiri put yolks through ■ potato
ricer and scatter over top; garnish dish
with spring, of parsley.
Uhe Otiitng
Elizabeth Van Orm may be distinguished
with ■ "Van" and she may be as delicate
and dainty as a flower, but she i* not
afraid to wear shoes big enough and a
skill short enough and a blouse loose
enough to enable her to get over a glass'
tennis court in a hurry. It is a sight for
sore eyes to see her, Xo wonder tin' men
are .ill »il<l met- her. The sriH- in Tog
town stand back and wonder why the boys
have nevei been eager to play tennis with
them, I could tell them. The uirl* of
fogtown are either too namby-pamby or
too boyish, IQixabetfa Van Orm is neither;
.-he i> simply merry ami natural. And how
she does nit alionl! Martha is to have a
blue leimis >uit exactly like Elizabeth Van
Orm'a green one. made of serge, with a
moderated sailor collar, « deep cvi yoke
and a lull sleeve. Mis, Van Ol'lu's is
stitched with white and she wear* a white
loin in hand tie with a white pique n-sl
and collar. Martha's i- to he stitched
with white, toft.
••••••••••••••••••A
S Social and ;
• Personal I
•••••••••••••••••••
.Vii eujoyable afternoon was yes
terday bj the Women's league of the First
Congregational church, at the residence of
Mr-. \\. R. Pease, si I A »treet.
The Autumn Leaf club will be enter
tained tomorrow afternoon by Mrs, J.
W eh !i si .the home of Mm, V. 11. Colbj.
312 North Tliinl street.
Tin. I'iiterpp society has ismum! novel
mvi tilt ions to a feries ol dancing parties
in In given duriiij; the month of Max- in
Coliunbia hall. The dates of these dames
are announced as follows: Tuesday, the
3d; Wednesday, the 11th; Friday, the 20th.
and Tuesday, the 30th.
Rev. A. B. Eddy of Seattle will speak in
Alliance hall. Eleventh street and Yakima
avenue, at l!:.'! 0 o'clock tomorrow' after
noon.
Kureke Degree of Honor will give a eanl
and dancing party tomorrow evening in
Ihe hall out the postofflce. .leimen's or
chestra »i!l furnish the music.
James Dickson will leave this week
for a visit to Portland.
J, \V. Lincoln and Klwood Wright, of
Fillraore, Mo., arrived tn Taconsi yester
day. Mr. Lincoln li a son of John Lincoln,
niie of tlie turnkey* ut t lie Pierce county
jail.
WEATHER FORECAST
|:i;|ii!:;|;;i:!!;!i!!!!J!!J:!!!!;!i!J::l!l!!l!i!;:::!i
6 VINDT •
Tacoma and Vicinity. —Threatening to
night: probably fair tomorrow; freth
winds, mostly wi'stirly.
MARINE GLIMPSES
Preparation! are being made to load the
six locomotives which are to go on the
Trenoal to Kobe. fafiaA, An extra strong
tackle is being rigged to handle the en-
I iines.
The lieameWp .Teanie, from San Fran
\m due here Wednesday.
As part of her outward cargo the steam
•hip Alaska will have 1,200 barrel* of lime
or the Hawaiian islands. From the islands
ihe vessel will take a cargo of 1,000 tons
A New Ice Box |
should be cbown for five things. First, its >Bpak I
economy. Will it preserve the ice or melt y^ \ Cs?#f if TTpeMUJH *r~l I
rapidly I.' Second, it« efficiency. Will ilm '7* ' *r~*M ifsT II I^^W 1 I
food chamber* be really ice cold even for [ |Jl _jfi^ | t Er'-ffILJI I
a reasonable time after tin ice man has j^naa—i _^ l____rEl^ SHIS-^l I
failed to come? Third, it* cleanliness. Will IT 6 |__ 7i EKa I 5* fc» >
it be easy or difficult to clean every pill .' II |H| KJJ IeSS? || Ipi rjc
Fourth, its appearance. A nice looking re- |L kJ r^ W^^SlL-t I
frigerator adds /<>!•( to your appetite. A »^£ j|Hil|Br** >*- «>-^ y»
poor looking one does exactly the opposite. (iT^'N. M; Ha
Fifth, its price, which must not be more l^ j /rJ^
than moderate. tf^ B& Vr^i tl)\
Refrigerators I),.^^^^
embodying all these points are now on |\ g^fl sfl W^ f
view at our place. The morning is the \t ■"* "™ |SJJWWf.
best time to call.
11. W. Myers cS: Co. I
l>ealers In Hardware and Furniture |j
Phone James 2576 Corner 11th and X 1
r^j^^|3^p^*^^^
Must -Tell
Now if your chance to buy Wall Paper, Mouldings and many other articles
to decorate your homes. Having decided to close our retail store we are
offering goods at 50 per cent of former prices for cash.
Tactfic Glass and Taint Co.
1305 Pacific
of sugar for Philadelphia, The vessel
has 2.HIH) tons of coal in her bunkers,
which will last until sh ( . gets to Coronel,
Chile, where enough fuel will be taken
on to cany her to her destination.
CLAIM FISH BONE
CAUSED DEATH
In a rather unusual >uit filed in tlie fed
eral court yesterday Addie A. Burns of
Seattle Mies tlie Fidelity &i Casualty coin
pany, of New York, for sjio.OOO damages
for the death of Francis J. limns, her hus
band. In lS9(i Burns took out the accident
policy in his wile's favor. The premiums
and policy were kept paid up until October
19 last year.
Six days prior to that date Burns was
eating breakfast in a Seattle restaurant,
when a lish bone penetrated his mouth.
Blood poisoning set in. and be died No
vember :l. After hit body had been em
balmed and buried it was exhumed and
dissected by surgeons in the presence of
representatives of the insurance company.
Although it is said proof was found in
the form of wounds in the throat and
mouth, the insurance company refused to
pay the !f.").IKI{I accident policy.
CITY OF PUEBLA
HAS BREAKDOWN
The steamship City of Pnebla is due
here this afternoon. She comes from San
Francisco and is loaded with fruit and
vegetables for Sound points.
On her tail trip to San Francisco the
vesae] broke down, and, as a result, was
delayed .some time in arriving at lier des
tination. The accident to the vessel's
machinery occurred when she was only a
few hours out from Cape Flattery, just as
the passengers were about to sit down
to their meal, and they were alarmed until
assured by the officer* that there was no
danger,
The City of Puebla was forced to lay
to all that night, while the engineers were
working on the disabled machinery, and it
was early the next morning before the
damage waa repaired to web an extent that
-lie was able to proceed on her wa> to San
Francisco. She arrived 12 hours late.
BUILDING PERMITS
Building permits were issued yesterday
aa follows W. S. O'Brien, one-atory dwell
ing, corner of Twenty-second street and
Union avenue, $50; John ('ail. »Tory ant]
a half dwelling, corner of Fast A and Tiir
tietli si reels. $1,200; K. E, Roiling, re
taining wall, 727 Commerce street, $62;j.
Repairing Done. Tel. Red 955.
Tacoma Trunk
Factory
Trunks, Traveling Bags,
Suit Cases, Telescopes
730 Pacific Avenue. Taooma, Wash,
LEGAL NOTICE.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.-No. 3990.
In the Superior Court of the State of
Washington, for Pierce County.
In the Matter of the Estate of Adolpb
I.ainhreclit. deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the under
signed, duly appointed administratrix of
the estate of Adolpb Lambrecht, deceased
to the creditors of and all persons having
claims against said deceased, to exhibit
them, with the necessary vouchers, within
one year after the h'rst publication of
this notice, to the undersigned, at office
of R. H. Lund, 206 and 207 Bernice Bldg.,
Tacoma, County of Pierce and State of
Washington, being the place for the trans
action of the business of (aid estate.
Date of laming and first pub.* ition of
this notice, April 19, 1904.
M \Y LAMBRKi HT
Administratrix ol sui I !
GRAIN SHIPMENTS
The report of the state grain inspector
for the month of April shows that the re
ceipts were very light, although they were
not less than what is expected at this time
of the year. I The total number of curs
■hipped whs 248, as folio Wheat. 162
cars; barley, 54 ears; oats, 25 cars; corn, 7
cars.
CLASSIFIED ADS.
ROOMS AND BOARD.
TABLE board; first-class service. Mrs. E.
ll.ivert.v. Eleventh anil .1 streets.
GIRL lor general housework and to take
care of children. Apply Mrs. L H.
Milliter, 1014 E. 30th St. '
For Rent— floor, 4 rooms, bath, hot
and cold water. So. Tncoma Aye., $14.
For Sale—Team horses and harness,
weight 2,800.
Grocery business, with or without prop
erty, good business.
5 choice lots, corner Center and Alaska
streets.
4 lota and 4-room cottage, new $800.
JOHN H. PALMER,
424 California Blk.
GENTS' TAILORING. /
GENTS' TAILORING, and all kind* of
cleaning, pressing and repairing. 131.1
South C Street. Red 6851. —
* FOR SALE. [ ~~~~~~
7-room house and 2 lots, all impts; fruit;
a nice cor. in North End, above grade,
$1,500.
An improved business corner in city of
North Yakima, Wn., would trade for Ta
coma property.
5 choice lots, cor. Center and Alaska Sts.
A good grocery business, with or without
property.
Team of horses and harness, weigh*
2,800 lbs.
Will exchange lot* for clearing land.
JOHN H. PALMER,
Room 424 California Block.
FOR SALE—HOUSES.
FOR SALE—No. 5420 So. I St., four-room
cottage, new; city water. House and
four lots $750, or with seven lots, $900.
Close to school and street car line. Terms:
$200 down, bal. in monthly payments H.
G. Palmer, 5402 So. I St. '
$735 SNAP in lodging house. Parties with
the cash can get. a bargain. G. B.
Aldrieh, 525 California Bldg.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE.
FOR SALE—Small 4-room house, 1% lots,
graded, planted in garden, for $600. 4319
So. Yakima Aye. On Puyallup and Span
away street car line.
FOR SALE— MISCELLANEOUS.
ALL kinds of second-hand clothing bought
and sold. 1311 So. C St. Red 6851.
CIGAR and. ( fruit stand in heart of city;
party going east. Enquire McKea
Candy Co.
FOR RENT!
House, seven rooms, 2813 A street.
Suite of four rooms, 1921 Yakima.
Suite of seven large rooms, 1921 Yakima
avenue, can be occupied by either one or
two families.
Suite of three rooms at 618 So. 13th St.-
Suite of five rooms in Grandin Apart
ments, 919% So. C street.
LARGE STABLE, cor. 26th and Pacific
Avenue.
JOSHUA PEIRCE, 726 Pacific Aye.
FOR RENT-ROOMS.
FOR RENT— attractive suite of four
rooms in the Grgndin Apartments, 919V4
C street. Joshua Peirce, 726 Pacific Aye.
' OSETOPATHS. ~
W. T. and Bertha L. Thomas, Osteopaths,
814 California Bldg.; i years of success
ful practice.
MONEY TO LOAN.
TO LOAN- ff.OoTor less on real estate,
J. A. Trost. 524 California Building.
RPET" WEAVERS. ==
RAG Carpets and Ruga. Rugs mad* from
old Ingrain or Brussels carpets. Hoi*
Bros.. 717 So. 11th St. Black 2323.
~"~~ ULKANINU.
O'NEAL & HIUVK-U .ot cleaning, up.
hoUu-rin^. furniture repaired, fuatberi
retrovnhnl. RG9 So. .1 St. *kova Main 32&

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