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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, October 23, 1912, Image 1

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"Governor Hay spent $13,000 just to get the barren nomination for governor. They are willing to pay him damages in libel suits now, apparently, if they can ruin his reputation
His slanderbund backers are willing to pay several times this amount if they can deceive the people and kill him off before the people.
rough purchased affidavits and slanderous political canards against Bob Hodge and keep their grip Are the people going to stand for this sort of crooked politics by would-be bribers?
l the state machine through which they thrive. Will voters of Washington settle their questions of state on the basis of scandalmongers?
They tried to bribe Bob Hodge to get out of the race, and failed. We do not believe it.
I ♦-■-.;- -;;■■■■-■: • ,- • ■ "■- -■' •-:• : -^V -,~ ;,-. : . <8>
$> . 15-YEAR-OLD LOVER SUICIDES. <"> «■
■-♦' .—— .-*" :i. ' ■ *
<€> ... (By United Press Leased Wire. .", ■- ,- ... ♦
«> - • NEW YORK, bet. 23. —Despondent because- he -wha re- <S>
- 4> fused admittance to the home of At»a Ross, his 13-year-old <3>
<& sweetheart, Toby Tyson, aged 15, shot himself in the 9 head <s>
<$> and is dead here today. " ' *
S> . ' In a letter written by the boy Just before he committed <$>
'-<$> suicide and found after the shooting, he said: -—!• «>
*♦ "I want to conquer the world. Oh, God, I want my Alva. <S>
.♦" I want my Alva! Yes, I have the audacity to cay that I <J>
S> want her—to say so.—Toby." . •$>
<$*S><S«M> <S*s><s<!><S><S><S><S>«*s4><e>^<^^
IDAH M'GLONE GIBSON is writ
ing about fashions for the
women of Tactnna. Sin- is wan
ili rinii about tlie fiishion shops
' In New York ami telling yon
all about 'em in the woman's
page today.
VOL. IX. NO. 268.
NEGRO CHAMPION IN MURDER MYSTERY
POLICE PROBE
GIRL'S DEATH
It Is Believed Plot to Assassinate Young Woman
Was Hatched in Chicago—Card of Woman
Prosecuting Jack Johnson Found in Dead
Girl's Purse.
(By United Presg Leaned Wire.)
BRIDGEPORT, Conn., Oct. 23.—Searching for the motive
_»hlch led five men to shoot pretty Rose Runnie to death on a
lonely road near here last night, detwtives today found In the
dead girl's pocket the card of Mrs. Alice Aldrich of Chicago, the
woman who Is pushing the prosecution of Prize Fighter Jack
Johnßon, and they believe that to the other malodorous features
of the Johnson case may now be added the crime of murder.
The belief of the police Is that the girl victim of the quintet
of atisassinH was killed either because nlie Is connected with the
Johnson case or because she was involved in the recent vice crusade
in Chicago. They are convinced that her death was plotted in
Chicago.
Of the five men who were driv
en to the scene of the crime with
Miss Bunnie, three were captured
and are in jail here. All three —
James Mattio, Frank Plscella and
Joe Buonommo —at first were si
lent on all phases of the case. The
other two men involved in the
killing escaped.
After being sweated by the po
lice, Buonommo, however, con
fessed he murdered tho woman.
He declared she was his w,ife, who
had come here from Chicago yes
terday, and with the other four
men entered the automobile and
were driven to the scene of»the
crime. Buonommo declared his
only reason to kill the woman was
that he was drunk. He could not
explain the presence in her
pocket of Mrs. Aldrlch'B card, and
the police are skeptical of his
story.
The other two men captured are
being sweated for their version of
the tragedy, and posses are on the
trail of the two who escaped.
The clothing of the woman who
was found dead with five bullet
holes in her body was of the most
costly material, and her Jewels
were untouched by her assassins.
Buonommo, after further sweat-
Ing, finally admitted that the
woman was his sweetheart, not
his wife. This has convinced the
police that the crime was planned"
In Chicago, and that the couple
came here at Buonommo'g desire
that the murder might be safely
accomplished.
JUDGE CUSHMAN
REFUSED LOTS
The city council looked over
Vine and Alkl streets adjacent to
Judge Cuahman's home, yester
day. Cushman wants them va
cated. Commissioner Woods
' measured the land and found It
meant giving the Judge Just about
five and a half lots.
"As the judge offers no consid
eration I recommend the petition
be denied," said Woods, and It
went.
Attractive rooms on
ground floor in the
Mason block; plate glass
and marble front with
tiled entrance, steam
heat, electric light, etc.
Can be leased for term
of years. Telephone or
call at our office for full
particulars.
Calvin Philips &Co.
2U California Bids. Mala I*
TheTacoma Times
WANTS LAMPS ON
NEW BOULEVARD
John Arkley of the Tacoma
I.ami company came before the
council this morning to see if the
c(ty ould help put lamps around
the new boulevard being put in
the gulch below the tennis club
grounds.
The light question was turned
over to Lawßon.
LAMPS CHEAPER
The city is going to sell tung
sten lamps cheaper. Lamps that
have been sold at 50 cents will be
35, those heretofore 70 cents will
bo 50, those at 95 are cut to 75,
those $1.45 are reduced to $1.10
and $2 lamps are cut to $1.75.
PREACHER QUITS
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
ALPENA, Mich., Oct. 23.—De
claring that his collections were
so small that they "wouldn't feed
a sparrow," the Rev. A. J. Tay
lor, pastor of the Hillman M. E.
church here, has "lumped his
job,' 'and is today on his way back
to England.
MR. C. PEEPUL IS VERY POPULAR JUST NOW.
♦ <
♦ DEAD MAN SHOWS UP. „-• .:.'.>■-<
♦ ■'• '- ' .h- -'.:\ .— :-± ■ : ' --„■.<
♦ -- •" (By United, Press lieased Wire. . .| •<
<& . - LOS ANGELES, Oct. 23.—Suppose dto have died In ».<
<$> hospital, Charles E. Wilson walked into hie , former . lodgro*..<
<•> house and caused a scattering of his friends, who believed <
<s> him to be a ghoet. "• .■/ .-- . V ■ .''. J ';<
<$■ .'Wilson's body was supposed to have been sent east for J
■•< burial. It developed that another man of tho same name had*<
<$> died while Wilson was in the hospital and the body was ship- <
<$■ ped to Wilson's relative*. . -'■ -' .• - -*
♦ ■.. . . ' . ' . - s - ■ >' • " - i
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
GOODNIGHT! YOU MUST BE
18 TO STAY OUT AT NIGHT
If you go out at night now,
either powder your hair, put on
false whiskers or carry a cane, for
otherwise you may be pinched un
de"r the new curfew law.
Council amended the curfew or
dinance this morning and raised
the age limit. Heretofore young
sters under 15 were not allowed
to roam at night. Now the age is
18.
None under this limit may go
out alone at night after 8 o'clock
unless sent on business by par
ents.
"We are going to do our best to
enforce it," said Commissioner
Mills.
BRIDGE TENDER
MUST PUT UP
The bridge tender swung the
11th street bridge against the
steamer Iroquois and damaged
the railing. Commissioner Woods
said the damage was probably
$15, but that the company claim
ed $200. The council agreed to
pay $25 and charge It to the
bridge tender.
W.C.T.U. HEAR
SEATTLE MAYOR
(By United AMI Leased Wire.)
PORTLAND, Ore., Oct. 23.— W.
C. T. U. workers here today are
discussing salient points of the
stirring speech made before their
national body by Mayor Cotterill
of Seattle. Cotterill told of the
efforts that are being made all
through the state of Washington
to heighten the moral atmosphere.
He referred to the recall petition
that is being directed against him
in Seattle, stating that the voters
would this time sweep him into
office with a majority of 4,000 in
stead of 400, the marginal figure
CONGRESSMAN WARBURTON
SPEAKS TO BIG GATHERIN(
SHELTON, Oct. 23. —Congress-
man Warburton held a meeting
last night at Shelton and had a
great crowd. Over 400 turned
out which is a big house for this
section, taking most of the voters
In the whole neighborhood.
TACOMA, WASHINGTON.WEDNKSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1912.
in the last election.
Chief Loomis found Contractor
McHugh wearing a cap just after
council meeting and took him
nside for a fatherly talk. It is be
lieved the chief -will pinch all
with caps, as that will be as good
a way to distinguish juveniles as
any.
"Oh, yes, it'll be easy to enforce
that," said the chief significantly.
MANY KILLED
IN BLOODY
BATTLE
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
LONDON", Oct. 23. —Contradic-
tory reports continued to pour in
here today regarding the situa
tion at Adrianople, where Bul
garian and Turkish troops are
locked In a terrible battle. Thou
sands of men, latest reports say,
have been killed and wounded on
both sides.
It is regared as almost certain
here that the Bulgarian advance
has been checked, although ad
vices from Sofia declare the Bul
garians are again advancing. Re
ports from Constantinople, on the
contrary, say the Bulgarian forces
are disorganized, and indicate
th.it the invaders attempted a
flanking movement east of Kirk
Kiliss*, and fell into a trap.
PARIS, Oct. 23.—Conflicting
reports were received here today
concerning the clash at Kirk
Kilissa between Turkish and Bul
garian forces. It is the belief of
diplomats here that the battle is
still in progress. The Kirk Kilis
sa clash is considered here as the
biggest battle since the Russo-
Japanese war.
Warburton made a great speech
and had the crowd right with
him. There will be nothing to It
but Warburton in this section.
Tonight Warburton and Poln
dexter hold a meeting at Aber
deen.
- ' i -■ .•* ■ .v*
KILLED IN REMARKABLE WAV. «'■s>
*<, „ ..« ■ <$>
HAMILTON, Ont., Oct. 23. —William Henry Fox of Wat- <!>
erdown, 47 years of age, Is dead today by a remarkable ac- <5>
cldent. Last Thursday night he took a short cut across a<&
tramway near Waterdown to John Callaghan's brickyard, <J
stumbled and fell Into a tree 30 feet below.,' One foot was <S>
caught in the crotch of the tree, and although he screamed <£>
for help no one was near and he hung in that position all <$>
night. In the morning he was discovered by employes of the •♦
brickyard. Both arms were paralyzed. He died soon after- <$•
ward. " * - , ■ . i. . <?>
"PARIS OF AMERICA" IS
TO PROTECT ITS GIRLS
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 23. —
San Francisco, the "Paris of Am
erien," the city of many scandals,
of dives of the "Harbary Coawt"
and the Infamous French restaur
nuts-, has at last taken up ser
iously, through its women, the
wnl.v of protecting young girls.
A semi-official adjunct to tho
eoiirts and police department has
bf!«'i created. The new social work
has been started with the appoint
ment of Mrs. Cora Humphries,
•who has had a wide experience in
prii■■■in and probation work, as
ooijrt worker for women and
ffcrlx. Promises of support have
be»n given by judges and muni
cipal officials.
' MRS. CORA HUMPHRIES.
%
It is to be a work of protection agencies of large department
operating under the theory that stores and other establishments
the Kroat city can be made safer which employ many women.
and more comfortable for the
young women who goes out alone
into the world by creating better
conditions about her than by pro
viding means for her rescue after
she lias gone wrong.
Most of the women who get In
to the hands of the police are
without homes and for these Mrs.
Humphries and her assistants will
find homes.
To Prevent Disgrace.
One of the most effective parts
of her work. It is expected, will
be the reclamation of working
girtis who are first offenders be
fore they are sent to prison. Mrs.
Humphries has already begun to
get in touch with the detective
VERA CRUZ FALLS AND DIAZ'
NEPHEW IS TAKEN CAPTiV E
(RUIjLETIN)
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
. MEXICO CITY, Oct. 23. —The
fall of Vera Cruz and the capture
of Qeneral Feliz Diaz, head of
Mexico's newest rebellion, is re
ported in an official communica
tion received here this afternoon
from General Beltran who led the
federal troops in the attack on
MILLS' ORDINANCE
IS UP TOMORROW
Commissioner Mills Introduced
his new street railway ordinance
by title this morning and it will
be perfected tomorrow. Just
what he expects to do does not
yet appear. Complaints have been
regular on the service, however,
and Mills says he will try to get
something that will bring relief.
The South Tacoma Improve
ment club sent a letter to the
council this morning complaining
of service and against the din
courtesy of •mplojr**.
"If a girl is caught stealing, in
stead of the detective taking her
to the police station, she will be
brought to us," said Mrs. Hum
phries.
"One of the biggest problems fa
to provide pleasant social life for
the girls. If a girl Is taken out
of an unwholesome environment
and placed In a home where the
influence is good she may become
lonely and homesick if she does
not have good amusement as well.
The work is to be entirely non
sectarian and under the auspices
of the Women's Prison League of
California and the Young Wom
en's Christian Association. Sev
eral women's clubs are support
ing It.
the seaport. The fate of Diaz, who
Is a nephew of Porflrio Diaz, the
deposed president of Mexico, is
not known.
If Diaz is still alive and noth
ing to the contrary has been , re-'
ceived here. It is believed that Tie
will be permitted to leave the
country If he promises to never
return, -r — •■:'■- , ■ ■■ -■
REMOVES ALL
DOOR BELLS
(By United I'i.ss Lrnscd..Wire.)
OYSTER , BAY, Oct. * 22.—8y
order of Mrs. Roosevelt, all door
bells at ; Sagamore Hill were dis
connected . today. The 1 colonel
spends most 'of bis time sleeping
since *he .reached > home and ' Mrs.
Roosevelt; Is determined that .' big
re«t shall < not be lbrokenfe<*^j£^
■3> LAFOLLETTE BXI'BS THRKE. ♦
♦ ♦
<»f (By United Press Leased Wire. *
■;?> LACROSSE, Wis., Oct. 23.—Neither Governor" Wilson, ♦
<?> Colonel Roosevelt nor President Taft will *et Senator Robert ♦
•M. LaFollette's vote at the national election in November. ♦
♦ The position of the Wisconsin senator is clear today, follow- ♦
♦ ing his speech here last night In opening the state campaign. ♦
■$ "I intend to maintain an independent position in the ♦
$• presidential race," sold LaFollette. "If Governor Wilson ♦
<£> shows power as a progressive I want to help him, but I do ♦
# not know what a two year old progressive can do." ♦
HOME EDITION
T. R. LEADS IN
STRAW VOTE
Progressive Candidate Draws Good-Sized Vote From
Four Cities in First Count of Biggest .Straw
Vote Ever Taken in the Northwest. ,
.. lull. Wilhon. IMw. Cliafin. Roosevelt.
TACOMA 2 28 15 9 141
SEATTLE ....31 190 174 17 762
PORTLAND .1 10 23 1 59
SPOKANE .... 0 16 15 0 25
TOTALS .34 244 227 27 987
TOTAL VOTE—I,SI9.
The first test in the straw vote being taken by
the Tacoma Times, in conjunction with the Seattle
Star, Spokane Press and Portland News shows either
that the people are very much Rocs«velt or else that
the Roosevelt boosters are much more in earnest in
their campaign and more industrious in voting.
PROGRESSIVES
HOLD A BIG
MEETING
The progressives literally cap
tured I'ny.-i 11 ill ■ last night.
Without feeding tlie voters at
all, neither offering ire cream,
clam chowder or giving them any
thing else for the inner man,
they had out a house full of en
thusiastic citizens.
Lorenzo Dow, candidate for
prosecutor; J. A. Sorley and W. H.
Paulhanius were the speakers.
Puulhamus made a great speech
to his neighbors, and thoroughly
exposed the disreputable cam
paign being made by the special
interests through their slander
bund against Hob Hodge.
In the city W. W. Keyes spoke
at Pacific Heights to a fair
sized crowd. He told them to
jump at no conclusions on the
slanders published against Bob
Hodge, for when they are exposed
the people will be treading on
each others' heels trying to get to
Bob Hodge.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Oct. 23.
—Six prominent politicians of In
diana were examined today by the
senate campaign contributions in
vestigation committee. Former
Senator Albert J. Beverldge was
among the witnesses.
The Clapp committee will ad
journ this evening until after the
Novoniher elections.
Square Pegs Don't Fit
Round Holes
Butchers are not successful operators as manicurist*.
A man with managerial talents chafes as a subordinate.
Ambitious people Bee more ahead of them than a mere to*
morrow.
If you're a square peg In a round hole, get out.
If a position more to your liking and ability la not offered yon
In a Times Want Ad today, tell about yourself to U>* firm that need*
you in a Times Want Ad tomorrow.
«■* ■pKWMAX is writing articles on
■L I Woodrow Wilson, for tho
■^L I Tillies. You may want to know
NEWMAN Is alxiul die dcinorratlo
Woodrow \\ il-i.n. for lli«
I'lrms. You may waat to knn\T
-oiik-I liliik iilm.iH Hi.- il.-niix rnllo
■ >^H ' candidate for president. New*
J V iiinn's second - article i>i>|H-ura
■^ » on |iii|{e 3 today. .
. 30 CENTS A MONTH.
.Teddy has a clear majority over
the whole field in the Brat show"
In*.
The ballots were counted thJs
morning that have been collect*.
tng In the four officers In tbe fouf
big etUca of the Northwest in tba
past four days. They will l>«
counted again Saturday.
Tho total of 1,619 ballots la
considered an excellent showing
for the very beginning of the con
teat which has not yet warmed
up In any of the cities., More in
terest was Hhown In Tacoma and
Seattle than in either Spokane or •
Portland. The Roosevelt vote was
also relatively larger In the West
ern Washington cities than In th«
other two.
The readers of the Times will
watch with interest for the next
count to see whether there ara
any changes. ,
- The ballot box Is open at th»
Times office and voters of all par
ties whether men or women ara
Invited - to" register their cholc*.
The ballots are being preserved.
NO, SHE WON'T
v.ly I iiii.il Press leased Wire.)
PARIS,. Oct. 23.— Personal de
nial of reports that she Is about
to undergo an operation for , ap
pendicltis was made here today by I
the Duchess of Marlborouith, for
merly Miss Consuelo Vanderbllt -
of New York. The duchess U
spending a few days here as th#
Kueat of Mrs. Clarence H. Macfcay.'

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