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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, March 18, 1913, Image 1

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A MILLION DOLLARS /WON'T SAVE THE LIFE OF MILLIONAIRE FINLAY'S SON
In a private telegram to the editor of the Times, Dr. Noble, representing this paper in New York,. says: "Friedmann's brother admits to me that he cannot cure patients in the third stage. That seems
to be the reason he did not treat the son of Banker F inlay who offered a million dollars for a cure. I understand the boy is now dying." ** \ "•:■ * ; )
Special Features Daily
Fresh News Pictures Daily
NOBLE SEES FRIEDMANN GIVE CURE
BUSINESS MEN GIVE STRONG
INDORSEMENT TO MUNICIPAL
COLD STORAGE PLANT
WOULD HIT IRE
HIGH COST OF
LIVING HARD
ESTABLISHMENT OF MUNICI
PAL COLD STORAGE PLANT
IN TACOMA MEANS THOUS
ANDS OF DOLLARS FOR THIS
CITY AND A GREAT SAVING
TO THE PEOPLE.
"I came here opposed to the
city going into this proposition of
a cold storage plant, but I am free
to admit I have change.'] my mind
and I see it Is the thing to do."
Such was the statement of C.
H. Dow, committeeman of the
Central Improvement league ap
pointed to look Into the municipal
cold storage plant, after a meet
ing with the mayor and business
men yesterday,
"I am for it and I think we
ought to go right ahead with it,"
said John Cannon, the other mem
ber, of the committee.
■ Senator Cotter of the Puyallup-
Sumner fruitgrowers was pres
ent. He said they had been do
ing all their cold storage business
with Seattle because they could
get no storage here. They had
1,200 barrels of berries in Seattle
at once last year besides tons of
eggs and other wares. He said
they would bring every dollar of
It to Tacoma if Tacoma puts in a
municipal plant.
, That means a couple of thou
l.fed dollars a year to start with
The Eggers fish business will
Itself pay the entire cost of op
erating the plant. -
The Bay Island Producers'
Union was present and agreed to
do all Its business throught the
Tacoma municipal plant and will
* ring all the Bay island trade to
•oma if it erects the plant.
. •fayor Seymour read letters
J> various Tacoma jobbers and
''^•erfers who Bald they now had to
-'jAW all their business to Seattle
■Cause they could get no cold
jHrage facilities here. One man
ihas 65,000 boxes of apples stored
lit Seattle, and he Is a Tacoma
man,-too. "-;»•- ■
The storage fees on this one
Item that would go Into the mu
nicipal plant if the city had one
would bring a revenue of $13,000
besides keeping the business here
' Superintendent - Hall reported
he had had conference with the
Yakima apple men and they were
going to establish a selling agency
for the whole ocean trade in
either Seattle or Tacoma. It will
depend on where they can get the
( best cold storage. Tacoma is out
of the race now unless she builds
the j municipal plant. And j this
means millions of dollars in busi
ness in the coming years. "'
.", Agents of the commercial activ
| ities in Seattle are reported out
now urging the Eastern Washing
ton apple men to ship everything
through ! Seattle | and unless Ta
coma acts at once she will be out
of: this business forever. : ,?
"We ought to stop this business
going j from tacoma;" said Mr.
Love. '•i-'VV'i-^'i '::..-;.-„'."- t; SJi'.- ,^'X
Swan* Sampson, who attended
the meeting,; suggested the city
get agreements with regular cus
tomers to patronize the municipal
plant when it is built. '"-^?-'■:""*:
IF YOU DESIRE
-- ; To Buy . 4111
■To, Sell
• * : ; To" Lease
Tacoma Property
We 'Are in a Position to
Greatly Aid You
Owing to our experi
ence : and f knowledge
conditions. ,"
j Calvin Philips& Co.
j \ 211 "California: Bldg. .
j MONEY TO LOAN:
The Tacoma Times
CAN TEACHERS BE MOTHERS?
*>** S> <» ♦<$* * <J> «J> <S>«>4> <3><3><*
NEWYORK BOARD SAYS "NO"
«j> <s> <$> «><»><s> <S> q ■* <&<*»* <&^<e*>
TACOMA BOARD SAYS "YES"
.This is Mrs. Katherine C. Edgcll, who asked New York Board
of Education for leave of absence so that her child could be born
and was refused. ;
V "
Miss Grace Strachan, who op
poses mothers as school teachers.
Ought a school teacher to be
the mother of a baby?
Tlie New York jj school board
says— No! '■'■''■ '"■ ■
| The Tacoma school | board says
-—Yes!— a reservation. - - -
-1 Mrs. Katherlne Edgell, a New
York teacher, - says—Yes!—with
out the reservation. ./' '"'"■,,-.
The reservation that the Taco
ma board makes is that the moth
er-teacher must not be encumber
ed with a husband. g§ When a Ta
coma , teacher " marries, she auto
matically loses her job. She may,
however, |be re-employed on be
coming a widow. "" --.'. ' .|
--;■' There are among *J the Tacoma
public school teachers eight •wid
ows. with; children. ,' ■ ../;/;.:
11 Marriage, ethical If leaders all
unite in saying, must mean moth
erhood. 1. ";-:-*'!-""-'."' -:.-'- '-.-.;■ , ' i*.t
And Bo does $ Mrs. "-Catherine
Edgell, a married I woman ' and j an
instructor. of j physical' training In
Erasmus ball high school . at an
annual salary of $2500. «
, - Mrs. Edgell \ has «asked J for a
year's i leave Jof absence In J order
that she ; may; become, a mother.
7- The board members have re
fused, voting 2 9 to 5 against her
request -on the $ ground ,- that g| a
prolonged j absence $? from ;•' school
should I mean the automatic drop
ping «ofi a | teacher jon the charge
of neglect of duty. --. «;.,. V, ;i
•> < "The duties of i a; teacher
'- and those of '; a"- mother • are C
*'both very fine, but they can
-. not ggo together," declares
';'-, President? Churchill of 5 the 1}
board. "It iis : the C duty >' of "*;
. married women to bear AND <0i
J,i to rear; children and ;to i that J» >
■ ~ end ,? the &"" salaries of .' male I*
8 teachers are fixed 'on | the as
: ' sumption; that '• the | men will«;
be fathers and j properly dis- •
■,; charge their duties ;* to I their
„*■ families." - ;4, *- ,
30c A MONTH.
VOL. X. NO. 74.
But, asserts the majority of
the club women of New York, the
present discussion does not con
cern the ancient rule that a hus
band should support his wife en
tirely. ' " .: ■
Instead, they say, the question
involved is this:
HAS NOT A WOMAN A
RIGHT BOTH TO MOTHER
HOOD AND A CAREER JUST
AS A MAN HAS HIS RIGHT
BOTH TO FATHERHOOD AND
A CAREER? -
And they say that they will
back Mrs. Edgell to the limit In
an endeavor to make the New
York board of education rescind
its ruling and to allow this
woman time off to become a
mother. •?.. •
Friends of Mrs. Edgell, who
was recently married to the pro
fessor of mathematics in Erasmus
Hall High, declare that her loss
to the school children of New
York would be - almost irrepar
able. * ' - . - .
A woman of strong character
and. wonderfully gifted with
charm, 1 they recount how she in
fluenced hundreds* of girl pupils
to discard 'cosmetics, corsets and
school-day flirtations, and has
made them natural, womanly and
frank.. - .:'.■'.■'■"; —.--:■■'-Y-.~:
.And so, true to her own teach
ing,' Mrs. Edgell decided that the
next step in her life as a woman
was to be a mother. And she re
solved to be truthful in asking a
leave of absence —not to use as a
pretext that "she wished to spend
a year studying in Europe." ,"- f
If You Earn $63
| a Month, Marry
(By * United j Press Leased l Wire.)
i.e.LOS ANGELES,i March 18.
No couple; can, live comfortably in
Los Angeles . for less j than 1$ 6 3 '. a
month, according to jSStifS sample
budget submitted to the Los Ant
geles Industrial commission by
B. F. 5 Butterfield, % a bookkeeper,
who! urges I the commission. to I in
stitute an inquiry j Into' the - high
cost of living here. 4^l--',«''tSSSsl
ATTACK NEGROES
KNOXVILLE, Term., March 18.
—Slaying I Russell I Mann, a negro
youth, and J beating ' Superintend
ent Matthew R. Mann, his mother'
and .two negro attendants, a .'nob
attacked the negro department of
the Tennessee Home for the; Deaf
and i Dumb 1 here. No ■ reason "?5, is
given"*for]the assault.
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
TACOMA, WASHINGTON. TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1913.
KING GEORGE
OF GREECE
SLAIN ?
(United Pi-ess Leased Wire.) i
LONDON, March —King
George of Greece was assas
sinated in Alliens today, ac
cording to an unconfirmed
dispatch from Salonica to a
local news agency.
King George was assassinated
at Salonica, where he was at the
head of a division of the Greek
army, according to news agency
dispatches. News of his death
reached Paris, Berlin, Rome and
other capitals simultaneously but
confirmation still is lacking. King
George had been at. Salonica since
December when the city surrend
ered to the Balkan forces.
Queen Olga had been in the
field much of the time with King
George. An attempt to assassin
ate the king in 1898 failed.
TACOMA SUPEIICKDIIVG
| AI, COAST POINTS
Tncoraa luformntlon LviKue
CHAPTER XIV
The advantage of a fraction
of a cent a bushel in favor
of a shipping point will Bend
grain to that point....
A cargo of given tonnage
which can be handled from the
ship's hold to freight cars in
less time at one port than at
another port, gives the trade
to the place of economical
movement.
An Insurance charge and a
liability risk upon a ship and
a large cargo la to be consid
ered. To cause a delay of sev
eral days of a cargo In transit
Is an additional cost of oper
ation, insurance and Interest,
upon money invested by tho
shipper.
"It Costs Less" to handle
freight in Tacoma for many
reasons, viz: In all cases the
tracks parallel the docks,
vessels unload all hatches at
once through the warehouse
to the train In waiting.
There are no bars or shal
lows in our harbor or on the
way to it. There is absolutely
no physical cause for delay.
The cargoes are shifted in
record-breaking time. A cap
tain of the Boston Tow Boat
line said that there was only
one other point in the world
which could handle a cargo
more rapidly on account of
natural advantages.
The great railroad men know
all this. To accomplish what
the shipping- men Know to be
.a fact, that Tacoma is fie point
where It costs less to 'handle,
freight, the railroad systems
are now completing a double
track, Joint user, water grade,
railroad from Tacoma to East
ern points.
It is here that the Northern
Pacific, the Great Northern,
the Union Pacific, and the Mil
waukee railroads have center
ed their interests and have ac
quired Immense tracts of land
to handle the enormously In
creasing- commerce of this
port. Economy builds great
cities. ■ -- . >-v* J
New York city superceded
In turn as a shipping . point,
Boston,' Philadelphia and Bal
timore. Philadelphia lost, out
upon account of the Delaware
river bar, also the other cities
for physical reasons. ' J
Upon the Pacific Coast, • his
tory is more.recent." San Fran- '.
Cisco, ' Portland. - and • some
Sound cities, are now. In y the
process of giving .way to., this '*
point In the north, where It
costs' less—Tacoma. "**£*&
Wife Came
| Over; : Asks
Separation
Andrew and Steenie.Falk' were
married' happily and lived togeth
er :in I Sweden until * four healthy
children, two boys and two girls,
were .: born. Andrew g* thought
chances j would be belter in I this
country, so j he* came over, • leav
ing : Steenie;with £; the ; , children.
For 'j sixteen years - he worked
-along alone in this country. Then
he sent I money for :,: the *. family.
When his , wife * came j slip brought
him ! not only ; the j four children,
hut a little girl IS years, old also.
."> They lived together some time
and , finally he brought suit for
divorce. Vti She*, replied %in a ; cross
bill | saying . he 1 was a shiftless | fel
low and . had ; accumulated noth
ing ; but j a farm which -was given
to him ' and' asked ' for ; the "■ divorce
herself.'Jrit^si'^^^'^-v'-.^r^^iti
Judge « Easterday Is trying to
unravel 1 the j domestic i tangle this
afternoon ""with the help of :an ;. in
terpreter -for' the | woman.^tSlpjJf!
Judge J Easterday ' this " morning
granted a . divorce fto i Irene Annis
against W. A. Annis, whom | she
says if ast V? picked iup f4* nd Sfir left
home » last "* May and I never til has
been heard from ■ since. Three
children 1 were left for. the mother
to support. — , - - " *»*-*,-»«
HIS DOOR WAS WIDE OPEN
«3> * <£ *<£<«•> <$><$>$> 4> ■§> <$ <$> $• •s><s><s>
BOALT SEES THE MANAGER
TRACTION CHIEF SMILES
Lewis H. Bean
f* By Fred Ij. Boalt.
j It is « privilege to be known by
the" name of Bean. Living up to
Hie name. is not easy. One ex
pects much of Beans.
Beans are 1 more than whole
some food. /* Boston beans, • like
the; Sacred I Codfish and pic for
breakfast, stand for culture.
S§ On, the other ' hand, If *we de
scend 'to the -vugar jf language of
the j street, we! mention "spilling
the beans.".' ''Spilling the beans"
has mnch Hie same.. meaning as
"upsetting the apple cart."- Beans
are j desirable, , and.; to "spill • the
beans" is a -catastrophy. - .
Jg| Heneev we j have come to look
upon beans; as symbolic of all ex
cellent' enterprises and institu
tions. We should be careful not
to "spill the beans."
Lewis H. Bean Is an excellent
institution. It would be a dis
aster if the Tacoma ' Railway . &
Power Co. were to, spill ' Bean.
About three years ago the com
pany spilled Dimock and brought
young Mr. Bean down from Bell
ingham to be general manager of
the traction system." ( v
".. Dimock ran the system with a
snarl. Bean runs it with a smile.
Smiling is the best thing Bean
does. They say ho takes off his
smile with his clothes and wears
pajamas and a frown until break
fast time. This, however,lis idle
conjecture.* The general public
has never caught Bran • when he
was not fully clothed and smiling.
gg We —the photographer and I—
interviewed -Bean ■ today. .;. The
most remarkable • part Jof the . in
terview came before it began. We
walked fright., into Bean's office.
■ Ponder that '■'« statement. - ,:\-t We
walked right into the office of the
general man&ge-r of a street rail
way, system,, and said: "How-de
do, Mr. Bean." And "How-de>
do," said Mr. Bean. | "What, can
I do for you?"
He was smiling. /'v •
"You can let us take" your pic
ture," we said. ■'""
m "Certainly," said * th© ft t. smiling
Mr. Bean. * * At l my desk? Si How
dots this position suit you?"
i.. Vtfc talked. •" V ,v -** "
•^"U» told Mr. Bean we had heard
he had the most trying job in Ta
coma, '4«-iv'fijr"t !: tg.Bl,-.. ■.'. hi- Uv'v
m "»», no!" disavowed the • smil
ing general manager, "it is true
I receive many complaints.*. Some
justifiable; and "some; foolish. The
door is always open. You experi
enced no difficulty ill getting j In?
Good!
t-S "H. earing; complaints ; and * rem
edying defects in the system is," in
my opinion, the;mostsglmportant
part of my, work. I i have capable
men iin ' charge iof the; mechanical
end. in 'the occoutin department
and so on. May I ask if it is the
intention lof | the Times Jto roast
me?"
W© "hastened \to $ assure Bean
that such (was' not i our! intention'
His smile 'widened *^^S^3®
"I am used to being roasted,"
HOME EDITION
he added. "I do not mind it any
more. Lots of people come here
every day and roast me -to my
face.. I just smile." '
We asked Bean what complaint
was occupying his attention at
the moment. „ * " :*
j "The ' smoking complaint," he
replied, smiling, "Perhaps you
didn't know - it, but Tacoma : has
more miles of .track per capita
than- any. other city in the wOrld.
Fact! . Necessarily there are long
hauls. It is a hardship on a man
who-cannot smoke at his work
not to be allowed his pipe or cigar
on the car. . It's about the only
chance he has to smoke. I have
to explain.. this to a great ninny
women every, day. They say to
bacco smoke makes them ill." ,;
"There are complaints about
transfers,' and about the conduct
of conductors, and about sched
ules. | The. door, as I said, Is al
ways open. ."The ■ only way to
please our patrons, the public. Is
to get their views and adopt their
suggestions wherever possible. *
[There are pessimists in Tacoma
who say our street railway, char
itably viewed, is the rottenest in
the world. And - even our most
"incorrigible optimists do not call
it good.:-'»-.'..'"•• .--- • , -."* ;: v
But this much can bo said with
truth: that it is better than it was
when Bean took hold. •:: Personal
ly, Bean is a ' pleasant -mans to
meet. He is j tall, smooth-faced
and calmly smiling. . His ,; eyes
smilo j even f when § his J£s lips *S are
grave. „ ... His close-cropped |H black
hair is tinged with gray, and there
arc tiny wrinkles about his eyes.
Wo would r say they were wrin
kles of worry and care if he was
not always! smiling. ;•,-.,, •"jX*g:| i
NEVER AGAIN
SAYS THIS
PRINCESS
(By : United = F?cas Leased ;Wire'
j." NEW s YORK, March 18.—With
all her ideals of married life shat
tered % because of I' alleged cruel
treatment > on the part of i her hus
hand, Princess- Ibrahani Hassan,
the California girl who ' married
a cousin of. the khedive of Egypt,
is here today from Bremen.
"Don't" is ; the j only word 1 she has"
to ' say Ito American it£ girls'! who
would! marry titles! of i any kind.
. , V" —' ,' '-" ■" f. ■.-. - -n
'-. z WOT guilty?"V,; "i.% ,
(By United I Press 1! Leased Wire.)
m SAN RAFAEL, Cal., March 18.
"Not guilty" was the plea enter
ed fin * the j superior J court here to
day by Fred CtMathieaonTSwhp is
accused of | shooting and killing
his | wife, Mrs. Gertrude 'Mathie
son, '.. at their Ross* Valley, Cal.,
, home. Mathieson is a prominent
San Francisco bay pilot.
.■. ■ . ■ " -j *■ -■■■■ ■ -■■•"■' . ■>"■':.■
Advertising that pays grows
Advertising that grows pays
GIVES INTERESTING
INSIDE FACTS ABOUT
FRIEDMANN'S CLINIC
Dr. Charles S. Noble, special commissioner for the Times, wad
present at the clinic at Bellevue hospital yefterday when Dr. Fried- ■
mann gave his treatment to 12 sufferers" from tuberculosis. Do.
Noble, in the following telegram, gives Times readers the latest
inside facta concerning the situation with regard to Friedman and
his supposed cure:
Now York, March 18.
Editor Times: I interviewed Dr. Friedmann this morning
and find him more serious and under greater tension than lie
was before lie left here. This is due, I think, to the opposition
of the hoard of health and medical societies. -
- All clinics must now be held under the government's super
vision. Dr. Stinison informed me that Dr. I'lietlmami will not
be allowed to sell or charge for his cultures until the govern-".- .
ment surgeons rVfOrt favorably to the navy department. ,
Many patients are here to see Friedmann. There are law
yers, doctors, dentists, veterinary surgeons and priests among
the hundreds waiting, It is Impossible for them to receive any,
treatment here at the present time, as they cannot be treated in
, New York hospitals nor privately. ,
SEES TitEATMENT GIVEN
As the representative of the Tacoma Times and Seattle -
Star, I was permitted to attend the clinic at Hellevue hospital
yesterday afternoon, mid 1 closely observed Krledmann. Ills
technique is very good, but not up to the American standard.
He Inoculated eleven men and one woman—all in the sec
ond stage of pulmonary tuberculosis.
Tubercular bacilli was present in the sputum of all of these
rases. None of these cases have night sweats at* the present
time, but they have a cough and show lows of weight, - rapid
heart action and weakness. The clinic was held under lie super
vision of the government doctors, Stlmson and Anderson, in the
large Amphitheatre, and all the medical officials of the city and
Bellevuo hospital were present. - ■ •' «_,_.
Friedmann was very composed. He worked rapidly, ' but I*,;'"
seemed to lie under a great tension. * ... - : ;J
He injected every case intramuscularly in the hip.' *';f7y''i
Seventeen years ago I worked in this same old Amphitheatre. '
All of Friedmann'B party were with him there. The dose
of the serum culture injected was about two-tenths of a centi- .
; gram..;;':;"; "," " ■'.-'. *.':-?' ■■.■■■ ■■.. ; - *s"fS
You already know the physiological action and reaction.
The same secrecy and mystery about the cure Is in the air.
CAItF.LKHS OF INJECTION. - ;
"All present at the clinic were astounded by the lack of care
against possible Infection shown by Friedmann and his brother,
" both of whom handled the patients' skin and the hypodermic
needle without taking any precautions. ■■ The German physicians
. : evidently do things different than we do. ■ v.. ' •« :.
, The earlier cases treated by Friedmann are steadily improv
ing, but accurate information Is now impossible, an these patients
are also now under government supervision, and the federal,
doctors are preserving absolute secrecy.
NO HOPE FOB 111 'MiliFlis
- It is pitiful to contemplate the disappointment of the out
of-town sufferers coming here in large numbers for treatments
which Friedmann cannot give them under the law. The influx
of patients from all parts of the country should be stopped.
There are plenty of patients here for the test , treatments. ;
There will be time enough later for the country as a whole if
Friedmann's claims are substantiated." : NOBLE.
Preacher
Confesses
His Graft
SAN QUENTIN. Cal., March 18.
—Confession that he collected
$1,500 graft from prisoners in the
state prison here, upon represen
tation that he would use his in
fluence to secure their pardon or
parole Is on * file ] today by - Rev.
William J. Call, chaplain of the
prison". - Following the confession,
Call was rivaled before * the state
prison commission and discharged
from his office. :*"".' ; ;.' .- "
In his confession , the chaplain
declared he could not support his
family of seven children on his
salary of 8100 a month, and was
therefore ■ forced | to 1 obtain g more
money through! graft in the pris
on. ,-
ALLEGED SLAYER!
OF TACOMA BOY
WINS A POINT
. The state supreme % court Jin-
San ] Francisco granted ! a rehear
ing of the case in which Daniel
Fleming, an ' Oakland special g po
liceman for the ] Southern V Pacific
railway,^ was convicted if of the
murder of George Vallier of Ta
coma at Redding, Cal. s4&3&&£Li
is The ' rehearing will * come ;up at
the May term of court in Sacra
mento. •■..} •; ■■~:"'- J*^:JJ: .'.'. :":'~~' '--■[■%* -J
County commissioners are get
ting ready to begin concrete road
building from-Fife to the Milwau
kee crossing. , \. ,-, ,"
p , ,—I
For Tacoma ; and vi- i
.cmity:; Occasional
■ rain tonight and
■ tTIT Bj' ■*"J*" ■"*. *",- ."* ""
Wednesday.
i" , For YVashington:
I Occasional rain sMorj
I snow tonight and
1 Wednesday, !| cooler
east . per v/w.i feWigh.t.V'J
BAKER BAKED]
HIS WIFE I
TO DEATH
(By United Press Leased Wire.)'
WARSAW, Russia, March ** 18.5
—M. Kwiaalkowskl, the M baker [
who baked his wife to death, ;is
to be placed jon trial next week, .r
He married a strikingly beautiful
girl, or, aaj is I hinted, [ practically
purchased her from her, parents.
He became insanely jealous of her
because ; of., the many j her I beauty j
attracted. 5 One * day, he ' Bred up '
his big oven to an unusual heat.
Going into an I adjoining room he I
seized ; his ' ; sleeping < wife lin ; his
powerful j arms J before ft; she t was \
aware of what was happing, threwl
her into the ' big redhot oven and I
slammed the j door.c;;,;•- :'-v-- : ." .-- *^"
•"'-; With ;; a I revolver in hand ]he
held off his 'employers until I the 1
muffled screams of his wife idled I
away. , When the 1 police i reached I
the scene, the woman's body was g
a charred, ,; unrecognizable mass. I
"A*Store for Every-\?
body and. Everybody I
' * Is Welcome •
.-■'•'-"■ v.';-." • , - *
|U This store Jis your store!
felt's] policy is dictated and j
i/directed '. by your de
mands. It has grown
and become great only
by pleasing you. Your
£3: every dollar weighs a full
one hundred cents of
value at all times.
Whether you look lor buy,
you are always welcome
'■■* to % visit f ourl'store^S^S
§llfcSS!#"> '' ' - 'QlaßeeHnMel
' " ■' ' ■'
PACIFIC AVI

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