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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, July 09, 1913, Image 1

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-WATCH US GROW—THE TIMES BUSINESS SHOWS A GREATER INCREASE FOR THE YEAR THAN ANY OTHER TACOMA PAPER
The Times carries the cream of
the United Press leased wire serv
ice daily. The owners of the Times
own the service.
LEPER EARLY GOES MAD ON LEARNING
THAT WIFE IS DIVORCED AND REMARRIED
AN AIRSHIP TO CARRY 200
♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦ * «■ * ♦ <s> ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦« ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦ *>«>«> •>♦♦ «> <$■ <t>
WOULD CROSS THEJ ATLANTIC IN FIFTY HOURS
Aviator Louis Bleriot, who first flew across English Channel, tells Shepherd how trans-ocean air
travel can be accomplished— But he is not especially interested in doing it himself.
BY WILLIAM G. SHEPHERD.
PARIS, July P> —Louis Blcriot, the first air man
ever to fly across the English channel, has just told
me some astonishing
things about the possibil
ity of trans-Atlantic
flight.
One of the most aston
ishing is that he thinks it
impractical. Bleriot is as
great an expert in the
mathematics of aviation
as he is in the art of actu
ally handling a machine.
He is a scientist, who has
not flown for two years,
but who spends all liis
time operating his factory
and experimenting. Louis blekiot.
"Do you think it is pos
sible to fly across the Atlantic?" I asked him.
"Perhaps, but I would not wish to try it with the
aeroplanes we have today. Only the very best of
luck —miraculous luck —could get a flyer across.
An attempt would be full of danger, with many odds
iv favor of failure and death."
Why would it be dangerous?"
"Because, on the wastes of the Atlantic, the flyer would have
to alight beside shies several times to secure fuel, and how could
he be sure that he would find the ships. Even if there were a
string of ships 200 miles apart—and that is not a long distance for
a non-stop flight in these days—how could he find his way from
RIVAL LOVERS
MURDER
" OF GIRL
AUTOPSY SHOWED THAT
UIRK'K BODY WAS ISHIISKT)
HIV AI, SUITORS BOTH
I> KN V KNOWLEDGE OF
ORIMF—W lli L COMPARE
TEETH OF ONE WITH
MARKS ON DEAD BODY AS
- I'OSSIBLE IDENTIFICATION."
WILKBSRARRE, Pa., July 9.
—As the result of an autopsy on
the body of Miss Alice Criswell,
age 18, who drowned in Harvey's
lake on the night of July 4, Her
bert Johns, age 28, her sweet
heart, is today held on a charge
of murder. Coroner Marloy said
the autopsy showed bruiaes on
the body, but that no motive had
been discovered for the crime.
Johns denies all responsibility.
Harrison Cann, suspected as a
rival suitor for the hand of Miss
Criswell, haa also denied all con
nection with the affair. Imprints
of John's teeth were made today
to be compared with marks found
on the girl's body.
CITY DADS OFF
ON TRIP TO
MOUNTAINS
The city commission Is going to
the mountains tomorrow.
The morning train will be tak
en to the hills and then horses
will be used to push up to the
divide on the watershed. The
commission will camp out all
night and be gone two days, the
purpose being to look over the
land with a view to getting the
•government to give to the city
some 40,000 acres drained by
Green river so it can forever
kepe It free from contamination.
In purchasing a watch, dia
mond or a set of silverware,
It is necessary to know the
exact facts about any one
of them. We encourage in
quisttlveness In our cus
tomers, and delight In tell-
w . ing them the p.'aln truth
about all our goods. That,
with courteous treatment,
have won solid, lasting
friends for us.
And we propose to keep
It up.
ONE OF THE FAVORITES
AT THE NATION'S CAPITAL
Pretty,
Young,
Admired—
Miss
O'Gorman.
There are
few, if any,
prettier girls
in Washing
ton's official
and exclusive
social life thai
this New York
girl—Miss
Alice
O'Gorman,
daughter of
Senator
and Mrs.
James A.
0 'Gorman.
She has re
cently gone to
the national
capital to live.
HARRIMAN LINES
READY TO BUILD
TERMINALS HERE
President Farrell of the Har
riinan lines in Washington, an
nounced at Portland Tuesday the
early beginning of building oper
ations by the line in Tacoma.
Plans were made a year ago
looking to the expenditure ir this
city of nearly 92,000,000, and
Farrell sayg the work is about to
commence.
Besides development of ocean
terminals on> the flats the com
pany will put In the big bridge;
TACOMA BOY
SCOUTS CALL
ON GOVERNOR
\, OLYMPIA, July 9.—Accompan
ied by P. J. Soule, scoiut commis
sioner," ten boy scouts from Taco
ina arrived in Olympta this morn-
Ing and called:, on Governor. Lis
ter. They had walked ,to ; Steila
coom and j rowed from the pioneer
town to the capital. • Later in the
day. the boys. made. a formal call
on • Mrs/| ListerS at | the executive
maylon.. ;. .'-../
GIVES REBATE

Because the city water was
dirty and caused' th# laundry,'
trouble, the city iCommlßsioatthts
morning ; rebated % the . Stand a '
Steam laundry |311 on Its
bHlaiforUbi'yeap/aBMiWa :/'
TheTacoma Times
VOL. X. NO. 171
30c A MONTH.
one ship to the next? There is no known way by which an aviator
can follow a trail across the Atlantic; his compass might show that
his machine is headed for America and the west, but, in reality, the
moving air might be carrying; the flyer southward, without his
knowledge, away from the next ship that he is seeking. It would
be much the same as being lost in a desert!"
"But would it be possible to build an aeroplane that coould
carry enough fuel for a non-stop flight across the Atlantic?"
"Now you're tatking," Miiil Hlciiot.
"If I had the money and there was a commercial demand for it
I could build an aeroplane within two years (Jiat would cross the
Atlantic ocean in 50 hours! 1 Imve figured i( all out and iiiude all
my calculations."
"How many persons would such an aeroplane carry?"
"It would easily carry two hundred persons, in addition to the
fuel!"
The great airman drew a pencil from his pocket and made some
hurried calculations.
"My plan would be," he said, "to have an aeroplane of 10,000
horse |K)wer. You see," he explained, "we figure that every horse
power carries 'J2 pottßdk, so our big trans-Atlantic aeroplane mJu'tt
weigh 080,000 pounds or 110 tons. The engine and the fuel, to
gether with the necessary lubricating oil, would weigh about 2."> tons.
1 could build a very safe aeroplane that would weigh 10 tons, aside'
tram the engine, and this would leave un 40 tons for the passenger*.
This would mean about 200 passengers, unless it was desired to use
some of this passenger-tonnage in supplying luxurious ■arroundhm
lor the passengers."
"How soon, do you suppose, will such aeroplanes carry passen
gers across the Atlantic?"
"Just as soon as thero is a demand for such transportation
It is a problem of commercial demand; not of aeroplane buildiiiK
But T do nor think that aeroplanes Will ever take the place of shins'
for 1 doubt their commercial OMfUlneu in crossing oceans Airships
Will always be dependent on the weather.
"It's a simple problem in mathematics. Suppose an aeroplane,
no matter how gigantic it is, lias a spoed of 100 mile* nn hour md
suppose it encounters n triad of 120 mile* an hour The result
would be that the airship would travel backwards 20 n,||,. an | 10111 .
You see the difference between a water ship ami an «ir.shii> is that
the ocean in which the water ship sails always remains stationary"
"Within a very lew years," he concluded, "a rans-Atlaiitie
aeroplane that is safe in ordinary weather may be built but the man
who crosses the Atlantic in the ordinary aeroplane of today must be
an exceptionally brave and a miraculously lucky flyer too much so
across the city waterway at 15th
street, erect a great freight ware
hoiiße just across the city water
way and make other extensive Im
provements.
There are rumors that still
other steps will be taken of great
er importance even than these
projects, but word concerning
them has not been given out.
A representative of the Har
riman interests was here last
week making preliminary ar
'angements for starting work.
WANTS A CHANGE
The city council this morning
authorized the changing of the
name of the city dock to the
"Fifteenth Street Dock" to avoid
confusing it with the Municipal
dock at 11th street.
LIKE A-CHANDAUER AJSTD
GET LIT UP EVERY NIGHT.
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
TACOMA. WASHINGTON. WEDNESDAY, JULY 9,1913.
35,000 DEAD
ON FIELD OF
BIG BATTLE
AWFIX SFi.VrGHTRR OP nr,,.
KARIANM ANI> AKRVIANS AT
BATTI.K OF KOCHAKA
ARMIKK STIIiL IN DKADIA'
CONFLICT.
BELGRADE, July 9.— (By
United Press.)—lt is estimated
today that 35,000 Bulgarian and
Servian soldiers were killed in
the recent battle of Kochana and
Istip. The war office claims a
great Servian victory, asserting
that the troops occupy, both
towns. Over 200,000 troops are
participating in the struggle. Tlie
fighting about Istip will go
down in history as one of the
bloodiest battles of modern times.
Reports indicate that fighting wili
continue for several days.
CONVICTED
POLICE ARE
SENTENCED
SAN FRANCISCO, July 9.—De
tective-Sergeant Arthur McPhee
and Patrolman Charles Taylor,
convicted of conspiring with Ital
ian buncolsta to obstruct justice,
were sentenced to one year In
jail today by Judge L»awler. Mo
tions for new trials were denied.
For Tacoma and vi
cinity: Showers to
night and Thursday.
For Washington:
Showf^s^west ; tonight
and tffursday; fair
east portion *} tonight
RECORDS SHOW THAT
MRS. EARLY MARRIED
The leper received his first
news of the second marriage of
his wife, it Is said, in a letter his
brother, a sergeant in the United
States army, stationed at Vafe
couver, Wash. The letter" told;,
It is reported, that Mrs. Early
had married George N. Tauson of!
Tacoma, a prominent member of
the Spanish war veterans, almo^
Immediately after she. had obf
•talned her divorce from the leper.
WOMEN GET 'EM NOW
«♦ ♦ » -, » ♦• « '■ *« ♦«« *♦ *
And With Suspenders, Too
NEW YORK, July 9.—New
York was first astonished and
then ttiimsed today' when the
suffragette trouaer sldrt ar
from Paris by Mrs. Nat Spi
who ts known u>
Madame Frauds.
The Leper in His Home
The leper a» the temporary Colony lit Diamond I'olnt listen
ing' to I>r. K. O. Sawyer, liealtli of Acer <>f L(M .Inu'eles <-<>un(.v, ex
plaining! his plans for a nalioiuil leprosarium. The arrow point*
(o .folia l{. I'itil.v, who contracted (lie (lUcase in ill,- l'liili|i|)iiu-s
and went Insane yosterilay upon learning (hut his wife hart mar
ried one of the Spanish war veterans.
LEPER TRAGEDY
SHOWS NEED OF
FEDERAL AID
Dr. E. O. Sawyer of Los
Angeles, who was visiting
ihe leper rolony at Diamond
Point yesterday when John
R. Early went insane, de
clares that the new tragedy is
a further evidence that Uncle
Sam should establish a na
tional leprosarium. The es
cape of the lei>er-companion
of Early, according to Dr.
Sawyer, clinches the state
ment that the United States
lannot protect its citizens
against the dreaded disease.
• The Los Angeles physician
came north for the sole pur
pose of interviewing Early
(fh~. the subject of placing a
national leprosarium on an
island in the Pacific. He
will send a petition to con
gress, together with the facts
of Early's case, as substanti
tion of his arguments.
telegraph
Operator
Murdered
SPOKANE, July 9.—Edwin B.
Irwin, -a telegraph operator em
ployed by the International rail
road, web held up and brutally
murdered at Grand Junction, 20
miles from Spokane, early this
morning. The robbers fired three
shots into Irwin's body and then
ransacked the office. No clues
have been found. Posses are
working on the case.
CLEARINGS.
Clearings ....,..$ 391,376.59
Balances- • 44,904.55
Transactions ..... 1,415,233.19
anil that the marriage ceremony
hafc been performed recently a
second time In order to make it
Utcal.
JAccording to the records at the
KijHK county courthouse, Seattle,
Gtforge N. Tauson and Lottie I>a
n»#ur were married June 21.
Mfb. Early, when divorced, was
gtVen her maiden name of La
m6ur.
v T " ■ ■.■■■■■ ■ ■'■.■ ■•■■.• ■:.■.■. i*
feThe skirt Is equipped >iib.two
P«ketß. while reftl eusponder bnt
i(g§B rouge around the .waistband.''
arhaiit the mo-jt «t;irtlinger
iS>^* 'irOl'iire^ !i? the s!rov«>Jesa
HOME EDITION
A famous specialist, while not diagnosing Early's trouble as leprosy, ad
vised him to "disappear," which he did.
Through a representative he bought a small ranch near Summit station
on the Puyallup electric line. There was now a third baby. The neighbors
learned his identity, and the feeling against him amounted to a scandal. -*» t
George N. Tauson, himself a Spanish war veteran, was asked to adjudicate
the matter, and it was thus he became acquainted with Early and his family.
Through the good offices of Tauson, Early was employed at the Port
Townsend leper colony which occupies part of the grounds of the quarantine
station, though isolated.
Early, himself a leper, was given charge of Petorio Dominik, and the two
became fast friends.
Early receives $65 a month salary and a pension of $30 a month. The au
thorities at Port Townsend, when seen by a staff man from The Times, said
that Early had been making regular remittances to his wife in Tacoma.
The lepers—there-were five before Dominick decamped—are not permit
ted to write letters, though they may receive them from the outside. Early
complained that his wife seldom wrote.
According to the story given out at the quarantine station, Early last week
received a telegram from his brother telling him to send no more money to his
wife and that he was writing to explain.
The letter, it is stated, gave Early the first information that his wife had
.divorced him, and further stated that Mrs. Early had married his former friend
and benefactor, Tauson.
Early's reason tottered and fell under the blow. He cursed horribly ar
who approached him and loudly demanded gin and brandy, though he nev
had the reputation of a drinking man.
On Saturday he hatched a plot, it is said, with the cook to smuggle in
liquor, but it was frustrated.
Dominick escaped Saturday. The station is on a point of land jutting out
into the Straits. It is not fenced in or guarded, as the lepers realize that, if
they ran away, they would run the risk of rough treatment at the hands of any
one they chanced to meet.
Escape is made difficult, however, by an almost ixnpenetratable jungle.
Into this Dominick disappeared. \
"Dominick has gone to 'get' Tauson," Early said over and over again in a
demoniacal rage, but he would not admit that he connived at the escape.
The authorities attach significance to the fact that, while Early's face is so
prominently marred by the disease that he could not long roam at large and es
cape notice, Dominick shows few leprosy signs. There are a few "nodules"
on his face, but that is all. The "nodules" would be mistaken for warts by the
ordinary observer. Dominick is strong and' active, and devotedly attached to
Early.
That is the story as it comes from The Times staff man at Port Townsend.
The Tacoma end of the narrative has loose ends.
Neither Tauson nor the former wife of Early
could be located today. Though members of the John
R. Thompson camp, Spanish war veterans, to which!
Tauson belongs, will not talk for publication, a num
ber admit the camp is divided in its opinion of Tau
soiTS reported marriage to Mrs. Early, who, at the
time when the Earlys lived at Summit station,
stated emphatically and repeatedly that she would
never forsake her husband whom she loved.
Tauson is no longer employed at the county
treasurer's office.
"Tauson has resigned," says Treasurer Carr.
Following his resignation, he was taken sick
and for two weeks was ? patient at St. Joseph's hos
pital.
Inquiry among Tauson's friends today did not
disclose his whereabouts nor the whereabouts of
Mrs. Early and her children.
TAKES GOOD JOB
The Newspaper Enterprise Asso
ciation has writers and photogra
phers everywhere. Tacomans re
ceive its every feature in the Times.
Quarantine Authorities Think
Dominick, Early's Friend, On
Way To Tacoma On Errand
Of Vengeance For The Leper
John B. Early, the leper, is a raving maniac, fol
lowing the discovery that his wife and the mother of
his children has divorced him, and the report that
she has married again.
Petorio Dominick, another member of the leper
colony at Port Townsend, has escaped, and the mad
Early is charged with helping him make his get
away.
Early in his ravings says Dominick has gone to
"get" George N. Tauson, until recently head cashier
under Treasurer Carr of Pierce county, and promin
ent in Spanish-American war veteran circles in Ta
coma.
The authorities of the quarantine station at Port
Townsend have warned the police at Victoria, Seat
i tie, Port Angeles, Tacoma and other Puget Sound
ports to be on the lookout for the escaped leper.
Early, the world's best advertised leper, originally
of Virginia, served in the Philippines. Returning to
his Virginia home, he married a pretty Salvation
Army lassie. A year after his return a strange rash
appeared on his face. Experts diagnosed the malady
j as leprosy and the government gave Early a large
home on the Potomac river, opposite the national
capital, and a soldier guard.
A brick wall divided the house in half, and Early
and his wife, and later a baby, occupied one side.
Another expert said Early did not have leprosy,
and he was turned loose and disappeared. He turn
ed up at Lcs Angeles. He and his wife had another
baby.
COMMENDS POLICE
-1
JOff
ON ALL
SUMMER
SUITS
Excepting Black and
Blues.
Menztes &
Stevens Co. jj

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