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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, February 26, 1915, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1915-02-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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IT LOOKS AS IF
FAWCETTMIGHT
PLAY SOLITAIRE
■mr A came of poker, the man wtio "bluffs" and Is |
I jl| "caUed" by another player, generally lays doww Ida i
* hand, loses the "pot" aad stolidly prepares for the
next hand.
Mr OW yesterday, at the city hall. Mayor Fawcett was j
111 "railed" for the first time wince he haa been mayor. '
He was called by tlie entire count-11. Commissioner
Atkins, the sopkeaiuan. lield the winning hand.
Fawcett was ao chagrined thai lie didn't even show his
cards. Instead he got up and walked oat of 'ie room.
Fawcett may play solitaire at the < ity> in the days
to come. • •
WHEN Mayor Fawcett took office In May, he waa ac
companied Into the commission hy James t'. Drake
and Charles D. Atkins, neither of whom ever had j
held a city < ommisslonershlp before.
At tlie very first, Drake and Atkins stood wttli Fawcett I
on all measures, while Mills and Woods, hold-over rommls- |
aioners, voted together In opposition. It wasn't long until
Conunisisoner Drake swung over to the side of Mills and I
Woods, and the trio formed a winning majority In many
' matters.
Atkins stood with the mayor. At frequent Intervals
Fawcett would make a bluff, and the commissioners, afraid
of the mayor's strength, voted with him.
The mayor still seemed to he the city hall "bom."
THKKK months ago Fawcett "bluffed" and it happened
that llrake held a winning hand. Fawcett maligned
Drake* faintly, and Drake warned the mayor not to
talk too much again.
Still Atkins stood with Fawcett. Rut last week the
mayor told liln friends that he had the entire council "buf
faloed." That was his bluff. Why Fawcett said it in a mys
tery.
Yesterday Atkins "called." And beside that he raised
.j. tlie bet on Fawcett so high thai Fawcett just sulked out <>r
the game.
FHOM NOW ON FAWCKTT MAY HK A MINI'S
EQUATION AT THK <TTV HAM.. POOR COCX<TI_»!KN I
IRK AGAINST HIM. Ills PRKBTIGK 18 GONK, t M.I ss
III: I'IjAYH THK (..IMF miMHHi
NOW LETS HKK HOW THK (XH'NCII.MEN RUN
THINGS WITH A FIGI'KKHEAD MAYOK. FHOM Till lit j
ATTITI DX, THKY AHK GOING TO IGNORK FAWCKTT,
AND IMiAY THK GAMK STRICTLY AMONG HUM- I
SKI.YKS.
Bloodhounds Trail
Demented Student
Without.hat or coat and in scanty clothing,
Merritt Baird, 19, former football star of the
Stadium High school and son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Baird of Sunset Beach, has been wan
dering since Wednesday afternoon in the thick
ly wooded district, somewhere near his home.
He was released two weeks ago from the in
sane asylum at Fort Steilacoom on petition of
his mother and was taken to hia Barents' home,
where it was hoped a
mentl disorder would
be completely reliev
ed.
County officials were notified I
of his disappearance today, lie,.
tity Sheriff jFrauk I-ongmlre left
for Sunset Beach with blood
hounds to aid a searching party
'In a hunt for the lost boy, which
began soon after be slipped awuy
frmn home.
Fear His Death.
It Is feared that, owing to his
scant attire, exposure to Incle
ment weather will result in his
death if he Is not soon discovered.
The boy was apparently weil
pleased when he was returned to
his home.
According to the report of his
parents, he was sitting on the
front porch Wednesday afternoon.
They declare that five minutes
before he disappeared they saw
him, apparently contented with
his freedom.
Young Baird was one of the
popular high school students at
the Stadium three years ago.
Studied Too Hard.
Young Baird broke down men
tally from over-study, It was as
serted at the time lie was com
mitted to the asylum. His par
ents, eager for his release, were
advised recently that It was pos
sible he would improve if taken
to a quiet country home.
They sold their city house and
purchased one near Carson's
Crossing.
Baird is described as being five
feet 11 inches ln height, weighing
about 160 pounds, handsome,
with medium dark hair, brushed
straight back.
British People
Oppose Leniency
I,ONDON, Feb. 26.—Taking it
for granted that the American
note, which remains a secret,
suggests that England refrain
from a food embargo on Germany
and that Germany and her sub
marine blockade of England, the
British press and . public have
risen up in strong opposition to
the suggestion. The cabinet is
considering the note. Britons scoff
at the shipping loss thus far and"
commend the government policy
of "starving the Germans."
A NEW DRY FIGHT
PIKRRR, S. D., Feb. 26. —The
South Dakota senate haa passed
a resolution calling for the sub
mission of the prohibition ques
tion to a vote of the people at
lie next general election.
WILLFIGHT
$1,000,000
DYKE JOB
If County Commissioner Will
lams attempts to put over an ex
tra $1,000,000 appropriation to
be spent in dyking the Stuck riv
er with concrete he will meet
strong opposition from Commis
sioner Reed.
Williams asserts the project
now under way will not be per
manently beneficial unless more
money Is sunk, while Reed In
sists the original appropriation of
$1,500,000 made jointly by Kl.ig
and Pierce couutlcs is enough.
"A board .of eminent engi
neers," said Reed today, "went
over the field in 1909 and gftve
their opinlou that the White,
Stuck and Puyallup rivers could
be permanently confined for
$600,000.
"Mr. Williams seems to forget
that there are only. 9,000 acres
of farm land to be benefittsl.
If it is to cost more, It appears
to me, the saving of the land Is
not worth the money."
Williams recommends the ap
pointment of a special commission
to have charge of the project.
Cily Dads Wont
Boost New Road
To Hit. Tacoma
Instead of boosting for a
"north side boulevard to Mount
Tacoma, the city commission to
day asked the Commercial club
to lend their efforts towards Im
proving the present mountain
road.
The new proposed road, which
was refused recognition by the
legislature yesterday, Is sought by
Seattle because It will cut the
distance between Seattle and the
mountain by CO miles. It will
also take all traffic away from
the Tacoma boulevard.
The' city commission attended
today's luncheon at the Commer
cial club, called to consider the
North Side road, with the avowed
Intention of fighting the propos
ed road, and asking Tacoma to
unanimously support her own
mountain road.
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B. km _B B B_> Aw _B B B B_ _B B_ B_ _B B B km * tu_^_F B_ Bl __i B Bl __r B
MMm mmm 4mf eMmmm u^—wL a^ m x mmm \W JB—M. —m^—L _■ _^^L J^^g __^__ wkmmm^mmw .MmW. _^_L. .kmrnm. L^dfl mm .MmmmL.
The Tacoma Times
30cA
MONTH
VOL. XII. NO. 59. TACOMA. WASH.. FRIDAY..FEBRUARY 26. 1915.
Girl Found
Her Father
In City Jail
Separated from her father
after a pickpocket had rob
bed Mm of his money, Jane
Taylor, a 11-year-old Sum
ner girl, wandered about
the street-, of Tacoma until
2:15 i bis morning search
ing for her lost parent.
When she finally walked tim
idly into police headquarters
early thla morning and asked for
a place to sleep, she was sur
prised and pleased to learn that
her father, unable to find her,
bad already applied to the police
for lodging.
He was slumbering peacefully
in the "lodgers" room.
Henry Taylor, 49, the father,
is a well known rancher of Sum
ner. He came to Tacoma with'
his daughter yesterday, and
while they were enjoying a mo
tion picture show last, night,
pickpockets took his money from
him.
The father left the girl In a
confectionery store und sought
friends for money. His search
took him until after midnight and
the two became separated.
They held si joyful reunion to
day and obtained transportation
homo.
Mayor Peevish;
Snubs Council
Yesterday's clash in the city
coilnt-11, when Mayor Fawcett was
"roasted" by the commission,
caused an unsual situation today.
When Fawcett entered the
council room for today's session,
he ignored the commission, omit
ting even his customary "good
morning."
Fawcett "looked through"
Commissioner Atkins without the
slightest hint of recognition.
During the entire council ses
sion Fawcett addressed his few
remarks to the empty audience
chairs. At the adjournment he
hurried to his private office.
NAIL MAY CAUSE
LOSS OF MEMORY
Spencer Thompson, 65, a car
lien ter, will probably lose bis
memory as a result of an acci
dent yesterday, when a six-penny
nail wag driven full ength Into
his brain, while he was building
a fence at Gold Hill, near Puyal
lup.
Thompson held a nail In his
hand and was lifting a heavy
timber above his head, when the
timber fell, striking the nail and
driving it through his skull.
ThompFon was brought to the
county hospital, where the nail
was removed last night.
The carpenter lapsed Into un
consciousness. When he woke
today he could remember noth
ing of the accident or his past
life. The nail penetrated his
brain for two inches.
WOMEN FIGBT
CHILD LABOR
The Tacoma Business Women's
club, meeting last night in the
Tacoma hotel, adopted resolutions
asking Washington state members
of congress ot work for anti-child
labor legislation.
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPEB IN TACOMA.
Street scene In Dayton, <).. d uring the record flood of mil. Will It lie duplicated t lit- year?
<$> *
# The expenditure of $600,- I
♦ 000,000 or even a part of *
♦ that amount In reclalranlg •
<3> the .0,000,000 acres flood- *
4 menaced area along the ■»■
4 Ohio and Mississippi rivers, V
<r- would be a good Investment ♦
# for the country. •>
♦ As a reclamation Invest- |
4 inent It would open vast »
*• tracts of marvelotisly rich *
• soil to cultivation. This land •■
4 would be worth $100 to |
4> $200 tin acre. <*
♦ The project would add m
4 millions to the w-Hter power •
i production of the country. i'
4 For countless centuries, -I
•>• uiion this rich land there has §
i> been showered upon them i
-$> the alluvium or soil which -4
'" has been washed down from I
# the entire Mississippi water- •
■k> shed. They are made up ♦
4 from the cream of the entire '^
4 continent. 4
•■ In the palmiest days of »
4 Egypt there never were more 1
+ than n,000,000 acres cultl- *
<*< vated. 4
4 Here we have the equlva- ♦
»> lent of four Kgypta! ♦
• *
*>44444> + 4>**44444
SMASHES
TURKEY'S
DEFENSE
LONDON, Feb. 26.—Preceded
by mine sweepers, the. Anglo-
French fleet today moved past the
Dardanelles forts. TjX^Ba It ha*
demolished after . several days'
shelling, says an Athens'dispatch.
A terrific bombardment, of the
land fortifications oh both aides
of the strait has been opened.
No resist anco was offered: by
the main Turkish' fleet, lying 20
mlles> way.
If the allied fleets succeed in
battering thejr way past the' chain
of forts lying ahead, a decisive
naval engagement is anticipated.
Present Arguments
OLYMPIA, Feb.-' 26.—The nine
members of the supreme court
are today.hearing arguments pre
sented in the iietitlon of the da
posed members of the state land
board for a writ to restrain tlie
secretary of state and the state
treasurer from serving on the
board.
• CINCINNATI, 0., Felt. _«. —
AlihtHigh the Ohio river has ro
c#iletl from its threatening coudl
tl.n of a few days sgo, there will
'•• great danger of devastating
Hpoda in the Ohio nnd Mississippi
imsiiiK |f the rainfall continues
nlnl heavy snows should ctiino.
J Iteilef from this annual bugii
!«.'•> lias been sought for years by
the people of this district, tlintt
aantls of whom have l.een mi
IMverishetl r.utn its deiMKlittltinr.
I Remeiiibei- Dayton?—that tec
i "f.!•• Hniiil, which devastatetl Ohit>
ai a cost of nearly ftOO lives und
"i.c KiHti.4iiiii.tiiH> liefell nearly
tin years ago. Hemenilter help
ing raise v relief fund?
.In those two years whut has the
I 'litnl Stales government ■Intu
it) prevent a recurrence of such
fl4**i? rractlcally NOTIIINti!
'May He Calm Disaster Neut.
- lv March, i»l:i. It was the iMy.
it... disaster. In March, tut:., It
way be the Cairo disaster.
' Cairo, HI., a >*..-> ;.ng town of
l.i i inhabitants, suddenly cut
$t hy the swirling torrents of
c Mississippi, smashed anil cur
ried down In pict-eniael chaos to
the gulf!
; ll Is inevitable some day as
list one little item In the vast toll
of destruction and death wbi<-h
frill surely be wreaked upon litis
fountry unless the great work of
fastening the Mississippi in its
bed is speedily accomplished.
Saitl Colonel Roosevelt In his
talk on ill" flood situation:
I "I KARNKHTIjY WISH THK
NATIO NA 1/ GOVBKNMKNT
fOril) AT ONCE START
S 'tilth TIIROFGH THK RKCLA
AT ION SKHVICK, A N D
THHOI OH THK l(l\l Its ANI>
II licitoit SFHVICF. IN si til
WAYS AS T(» RKMKVK I'NKM
WXIVMKNT. . . .
"ON SOMK M YMF Its WORK
(nn.n RK iim;i'\ WITHIN .to
Bays. . . if thk ma
CIHNFKV NO IjONGKR NKFD-
Kl> AT PANMA WKRK AT ONCF
rSf'.D ON A t.ltlt I sen I-; Mi
di FLOOR CONTKOI, IN THK
MIKSISSIIM'I HASIN. INCM'D
INt; THK OHIO AND THK MIS^
OI'Ul. MI'CH WOI'M) RK AC
QOMI'I.ISHFD."
In other words, he says we've
got the time, and the place, and
the men.
Survey Already Made.
I'nited States army engineers
have made a surven of the work.
The scientific methods of attack
ing it are fully established.
It is universally granted that
anlv by comprehensive federal
nnfertuklng ran the floods which
hove been a disgrace to. this
cotlntry for years, as well as its
most destructive scourage, be pre
vented.
In haphazard, here-and-there
levee work, $200,000,000 has al
ready been expended by the states
mv the federal government along
WHEN A MAN'S MARRIED
Hhndetl iMirtions Indicute ure.i
subject to I'ltM.d at annual spring
rise of Oldo aud Mississippi
rivers.
the banks of the Mississippi.
Yet the Horn I damage of 101 _
wits bigger than any preceding,
ami the I Hilt floods were even
more destructive.
Six hundred million dollars- -
thut is the sum which Cncle Bum
litis got to dig out of his pocket
to pay for the great work of pro
venting huch tics-ruction from
floods.
KnormouH as it is, the sum
would be repaid in less than Hi
years hy the saving In flood dam
age alone!
Ileside revetment and lev»«
work, tho principal job on the
upper river would be tho build
ing of two huge dams, one across
the stream about eight miles be
low St. i.niii:-. the second Just
above Cairo.
Congress Ones Nothing!
Below Cairo the work will con
sist In building retaining walls,
revetments and levees, not only
to prevent floods, but also to save
the 400,000,000 cubic yards of
best soil which are annually
swept out of the gulf and lost
forever.
THK NRWI.ANIW RII.L,
WHICH HHI tli I'ROYIHK FOR
THIB YABT I NDKRTAKINO,
si,i;i i-s THK BI.KKC OF THK
DKAH IN A COMMITTKK TIG
KONHOFK IN WASHINGTON.
Will Show Stamp Books
A variety of stamp collection*
will be placed on exhibition In Ta
coma by their owners some tlnn
In March.
F?*^ f^\ WKATHKIt FORECAST
• fiSlt /) Kt>r Tatwiia: Rata toaigtit
L—L j V and Hatarday.
],j) LJIJ *-» Waahlngtoßt Fair Mat,
L_ I—OOr1 —OOr r~'" ***"* P°r,'«"*« Uaaighi. ttat
ff V nrday, rain.
FEB. 26
HOME
EDITION
Jus! Home From
Asylum, Farmer
Takes Own Life
Scott Mi Arthur, TiD years old,
paroled yesterday from the Fort
Stellacoom asylum at the request
of his wife, Mary X, McArthur.
was Instantly killed In his home
at 1/akevlew early today. Au
thorities believe McArthur took
his own life.
Mrs. McArthur says she was
outside the house about 10
o'clock, when she heard a gun
discharged Inside. She found
her husband, she sa>s, lying on
the floor of his bedroom, his
head nearly blown off, and a
shotgun at his side. A stick,
whittled as tr to fit the trigger,
and long enough to permit dis
charge of the gun by McArthur
himself, whs also found.
McArthur was declared by
Judge K.isteril.if, at the time the
former was being tried before a
lunacy commission last month, to
be suffering from one of the most
peculiar cases of loit memory the
Jurist Mad ever observed.
lie bad been found wandering
about ln the vicinity of his home
shortly arter Mrs. McArthur be
gan a divorce suit, which has
been dismissed.
Yesterday, It is said, Mrs. Mc-
Arthur went to the asylum and
asked for the parole of her hus
band, who bail improved consid
erably since he was ndmitted.
Speak Minds On
High Tax Topic
Indlgnaiits protests against
high taxes and 1..ml demands
I'm- a road In their vicinity
were expressed today by a
i fit Illee of Woodland wo
men wlio visited the county
commissioners:.
Mrs. M. Swit.er declared she
bail helped to clear the only trail
by which she and members of her
runiily could reach the outside
world, and declared as outrag
eous their 1914 tax assessment,
more than three times larger than
that of the previous year.
"And all the improvements we
ndded during that year," she em
phutically added, "wag palatini
our house and barn."
Others members of the com
mute are: Mrs. and Henry Heck,
Mrs. Father Martin, Mrs. Clara
Stone, Mrs. Lizzie Johnston, Mrs.
Jennie McOougall and Thomas
(iullagher.
Sore On Jitneys
Btreet car conductors will here
after act as deputy policemen for
Tacoma.
Commissioner Mills today
asked Manager Rean of the T. It.
ft P. company to order his con
ductors to turn In the license
numbers of jitney busses violat
ing the city traffic laws.
"I fonnd three jitneys yes
terday blocking the street at
the end of sixth avenue aad
preventing persons from en
tering the street cars," said
Mills. "It la unfair. I or
dered those jitneys off the
street in a hurry. I want all
street car conductors to re
port the jitneys In the fu
ture."
OFFER 3 PRIZES
The Commercial club has offer
ed prizes of ||S, $15 and $10 for
the best suggestions as to how tlte
slogan, "Motor From Tacoma to
the cinders" can be put most
forcefully before the traveling
___ltc.
SPY QUITS
IN DREAD
OF DEATH
NEW YORK. Fab. «.—Fur
ther questioning of Richard Steg
ler, a German held on a charge of
endeavoring to perpetrate paaa
port frauds, today developed the
fact that he feared ha would he a
second Carl Hans body, executed
as a spy In tha tower of London,
and for that reason he aaya he
confessed to the conspiracy to
obtain false passporta for use ot
German splea In England.
I.ody was shot In November.
Htngler declared that It waa
Captain Boyed, a naval attache In
the Herman embassy at Washing
ton, who sent l.otly to hia death.
"The same officials who are re
sponsible for I .oily's activities,
capture and execution." aald Stag
ier, "also arranged for my pro
posed visit to England under the
name of Richard Maddon. I wag
Informed by friends that Capt.
Unveil was only one of many who
knew the details of the mission on
which Ixidy was sent abroad."
As a result of Stegler's confes
sion, officials In the department
of Justice believe they now have
sufficient evidence to warrant
other Indictment!.
"The German government
wanted certain Information very
much," Stagier told federal
agents. "I learned that I waa to
be ofrered up as a aacrlflre so
that aaother spy might escape
with the desired Information.
That was the way Lody went to
his death."
TACOMA DEMANDS
COUNTY'S MONEY
Tacoma will ask Pierce county
to turn over $24,000 from the
road and bridge fund for helping
to pave the Mount Taeoma boule
vard. Inside the city limits. The
commission decided today to
pave as much of the road this
spring as will be possible.
This money will be used for
paving a mile of the Pacific ave
nue portion of the mountain
boulevard, north of South 96th
street. This will leave only one
mile of unpaved boulevard be
tween the city and I.oveland,
half way to Mount Tacoma.
countTTurns
0.-w. ry. down
After a lengthy consultation,
the county commission has decid
ed to fight the 0.-W. R. ft N.
company's demand for a red'Jc
tion In delinquent tax Interest.
It. B. Hollock, special tax agent
for the railroad, declared he was
prepared to continue the case in
the courts, but the commission
with not in favor of establishing
a precedent by granting the re
duction.
Wasn't State Senate
Cute on First Aid Bill?
OLYMPIA, Feb. »«.—The sen
ate Is today patting Itself on tho
back because of Its adroitness on
first aid legislation. Yesterday*
instead of passing the bill prepar
ed by employes, that of the em
ployers or the third that ha|
come from the administration, it
put through a composite of all
three.

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