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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, April 25, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1916-04-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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"STATE LOPS $7,000,000 OFF SUNSET COMPANY FIGURES
WE LIKE KICKS
Kick If you don't get your Times regu
larly. We are anxious to give Hie bent possi
ble service. Don't hesitate to call our circu
lation department, Main 12, and tell ua if
there's anything wrong.
PITY POOR OLD JOHN BULL!
MEANS
LOWER
RATES
The public service commission
fixed the value of the Pacific
Telephone A Telegraph Co.'b
•■property in this tsate In a decision
made public today at $19,7 64,
--418.
Telephone users will be requir
ed to pay mil- sufficient to give !
the company a Just and reaso- |
nulile return only on this amount i
%f money.
The rates will be published ;
liny 21.
In 11 in 11 ii n the value of the
coni|Mtn)'n |*o|j«»rly tlie coin
t mission adopted a new meth
od of procedure and squeezed
out m-l $7,128,282 u"illi of
wind, water and what not.
Vnder methods followed in all j
_^ornu r decisions in public utility .
cases in ibis slate, the "rate baisa"
Ivoui which fair returns were es
timated has been the 'cost of pro
duction."
It. |i< <l 27 Mlllm.ii>..
When the telephone case was j
callid nt Tacoma several months j
ago, tha conipiiiiy's engineers rep- j
resente™ that the cost of repro-1
Oucttun of the property, would
amount to $26,892,700.
Inder the old method the pub
lic would have been asked to pay
the company a fair return on
»16,892.700.
. The company did not care to
know the reproduction cost.
"We told them wo didn't
)«niii to know what it
WOI'IjO com to reproduce
the property," mi id Ohnlr
iiuiii Cluiiies A. KeynoldM,
"but whnt the |iro|ierty HAD
coht. We asked tliein to
'* kliow us how ii in n > post holes
they had dug. h<>w many
nnlf v of wire they had strung
and liow nuuiy switch
iionriN they liihl Installed."
The result was that the people
using teleuhones in tills state need
tiny a fair return on $7,0(M>,000!
jess money.
A fair return, Reynolds nays, is
from 6 to 8 per cent.
After the commission shut out
"cost of reproduction" figures,
the company threw up the sponge
and "came clean."
Hi inn In Kigur**.
"They brought in the figures
lowing liow much their property
hud actually cost and frankly dis
claimed any right to levy tribute
upon the people of the state by|
reason of the Increase in property
value which has resulted solely
from the acts of the public," the
M> decision states.
By acts of the public is meant
the addition of improvements
iii.-il- by other persona, such as a
city's paving over conduits andj
not paid for by the com
pany but at the same time en
hancing the value of company
property.
Will Ralne Some lime*.
The schedule of tolls to be fixed
by the commission next month,
Chairman Reynolds said, will re
duce the rate to telephone users
,ln some parts of the state and in
crease it In certain others, proba
bly, each community paying its
Just share, according to value re
ceived from the company in that
community.
ATHENS —A German powder
factory at Deadeagtch was blown
rp, a dispatch from Salonika
■tated.
J The City
Will Gain
The Saving* Bank
Section of the Ameri
can Bankers' Associa
tion have a slogan—
\
One Million New
Thrift Accounts In the
U. S. Banks This Year.
I The nation will also
gain, and you will be
benefited.
Puget Sound
State Bank
11 IB Pacific Ay«.
L f
The Tacoma Times
|26c A>JMtONTH. THEONLY JITDEPEyDEIIT IT3EWSPAPE^ IN TAOOMA. 25c A MONTH. j
"*" VOTrXTir.NQ! ios~ TA^MAVWASHirT'rifiSi^AVVAVM^yL^'iim?/''' lc A COPY
Millionaires Steal 320 Millions From the U. S.
Treasury Every Year By Evading Income Tax
TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE:
Three hundred and twenty million dollars
of your money was stolen last year through
basil m. manly. come t aX) failed to file
a return or a proper return.
At least TEN BILLION DOLLARS of
annual income, upon which the tax should
have been paid, succeeded in evading it.
THE UNITED STATES INCOME TAX
IS A FAILURE BOTH AS A REVENUE
PRODUCER AND AS A MEANS OK
.MAKING THE RICH PAY THEIR JUST
SHARE OF THE NATION'S BURDENS.
THE INCOME TAX LAY WAS DE
LIBERATELY DRAFTED TO PERMIT
JUST SUCH FRAUDS AND TO REN
DER THEIR PERPETRATORS PRAC
TICALLY SECURE FROM DETECTION
AND PUNISHMENT.
These art the big facts that stand out as
the result of the first exhaustive investiga
tion of the workings of the income tax law.
1 HAVE THE FACTS as the result of an
investigation made especially for the Taco
ma Times and its associated newspapers,
extending over more than six months.
In a series of articles, beginning tomor
row, I will lay these facts before you clearly,
and completely. I will show you:
1. How tliase millions are stolen.
2. Who some of the tax thieves are.
3. How to stop the thefts.
"Preparedness" even on the moderate
program advocated by President Wilson
will create a deficit of $167,000,000, if the
sugar tariff and stamp taxes are discontin
ued.
BUT, if the income tax thefts are stopped
and the $320,000,000 stolen from the treas
ury are recovered, the administration will
have not only more than enough to pay the
entire cost of military preparedness, but al
so more than $100,000,000 which can be used
for old age pensions, unemployment insur
ance, and other social measures, which must
form the basis of any true national prepar
edness and efficiency.
The penalty for failure to make a return
is the addition of 50 per cent to the tax
originally due, and for fraudulent returns
100 per cent.
If the penalties which are now due upon
the $320,000,000 evasions of last year are
collected, the nation will have at its dispos
al $500,000,000 to spend as it chooses for na
tional preparedness and social welfare.
The committees of congress are now busy
devising new taxes to meet the impending
deficit. These new taxes will rest either up
on the common people or upon those of the
rich who are honestly paying their income
taxes.
DO YOU WANT TO PAY MORE
TAXES?
If not, insist on immediate action by the
president and congres* to recover these
stolen millions and punish the thieves.
income tax frauds and
evasions, involving
thousands of wealthy
and prominent citi
zens and thousands
of the most profitable
American corpora
tions.
The income tax
should have produced
at least $400,000,000
revenue. The total
collections were only
80 millions.
Two hundred and
fifty thousand Ameri
can citizens and resi
dent aliens, who
should have paid in-
Basil M. Manly, the foremost economic investigator In
America, who won great fame as the director of the Investiga
tions conducted by the United States conuniMlon on Industrial
relations under the chairmanship of Kmul I. Walsh and who
wrote the famous Manly report, has Juet completed for the
newspapers which are members of the 'Newspaper Enterprise
association, a deep and sweeping Investigation of the work
ings of the United States income tax.
The work has taken Manly and a corps of newspaper
men and statistical experts, SIX FULL MONTHS and the reve
lations he Is about to make to the people of America REPRE
SENT THE FINAL WORD on this subject. Manly's irre
proachable reputation as a social Investigtuor stands behind
them.
Manly'g academic training as an economist was gained
at Washington and Lee university from which he was grad
uated and at the University of Chicago, where he specialized
in the subject for two years under Prof, j,* Lawrence Laughlln,
the most famous economist in the United fctntes.
In 1907 he became attached to the United States bureau
of labor and was connected with that governmental depart
ment's investigation into the subject of w«*ian and ohild labor
in the United States, largely writing Hie "Report on Women
and children In the Glase Industry."
For this bureau he next had complete charge of Its In
vestigation into the steel Industry. This *as finished In 1912,
signed by Manly and published in three volumes, it is every-
GRONEN TO GET PUBLIC WORKS
JOB; WILL APPOINT M'GREGOR
Definite information that
CominiMflioner-elect (ironen
would take charge of the de
partment of public work*
np\i Tuesday when his term
of office begin*, i r today
when (ironen announced thut
he would appoint H. J. Me.
Uregor tmpperintendent of ■
Hiiwh and bridges.
McGregor formerly held the
office of public works, and was a
candidate at the recant municipal,
primaries.
Since the election there has
been much conjecture over the
department which Gronen would
assume. Many persons believed
that a general shake-up would
take place, with Gronen going in
to the light and water office, At
kiiiH into public works and Drake
into finance.
Have $75 a Month.
Gronen made his announce
ment to Mayor Fawcett a Few
minutes before leaving ou_a busi
ness trip for Portland.
J. F. Myhan, jr., is at preß«nt
superintendent of streets under
Commissioner Woods. C. O.
Smith is superintendent of
bridge*. Myhan draw* $125 a
month and Smith $100. Gronen
proposes to let McGregor handle
both-offices on a salary of $150,
thus saving $75 a month on his
salary-roll.
City Attorney T. L. Stiles is
elated for removal, according to
Who Basil Manly Is
definite information obtained to-
The selection of his successor
in up lo Urn new council, wiM
J. M Harmon, W. W. Keyes and
Robert 1.. Kvaus an the three rao^t
likely candidates. Harmou i
said t» be supported by PettU
and (JiViiumi.
Bttlep is at present drawing
$350 a month, the largest salary
of anyxity employe.
Stiles' action on recent big suits
FINAL DASH
TO GET VILLA
(X)I,IMBIH, N. M., April
9». —A detHthinent of I'nit
«H Stad'v troops In refmited
today to huvc »t<trt«d the
final' (lush ii ll«i Kriim isco
Vflla, while the main unlta
of the expeditionary force
are roiit'entratlnfc at Nainl
q«l|>a ami Ihiiilnii.
A cavalry column is understood
(o be clflviun toward Villa's last
reported hiding place in the Chl
luiahuH |tate Sierras near Nonova.
Two new army aeroplatys are
undergoing final tests here. They
are expected to join in the chase,
beluf used for scouting in the
rough country where Villa Is
thought to be biding, resting and
one* more assembling hit scat
tered followers
where known today as the autlioiitttive work on the steel
industry, and quoted as such by ail writers on economic sub
jects.
In Ifl I:! Manly nmde for the Tnited States labor bureau
the famous inquiry into tin- rise of prices* in anthracite coal,
reporting to congress thai miners' wuges had increased but &
cents a ton while the wholesale price of coul had increased 2."
cents per ton, with the result that the operators were netting
an increased yearly profit of $lo,hou,oou.
The next year Manly IftMMM the director of public, hear
ings and director of the department of research and inveKtiK"
tion for the United StateN commission on industrial relations
and wrote his famous Manly report, presented to the public
by t'liairmnn Frank I. Walsh. Thin report is the greatest
analysis of the relation of Capital and labor in the I'nftrd
States in all its \arying phases ever made, and immediately
han placed Manly in the supreme clans as an economic and
social expert.
The United States government tried to fecure his services
again, but the Newspaper Knlerpiint' Association, of which this
paper is a member, persuaded him to undertake for them thin
searching investigation of the workings of the l'nlted States
income tax.
He has done so. having now worked on this inquiry for
over six months. The first of bis findings are presented hero
today; others will follow in quick succession.—KDlTOH.
over municipal contracts, and nls
unusual attitude last year in j
drawing up a T. R. 4 V. power j
franchise, which wa« favorable -|
(o the company aud a lons lo thej
city, are said to have liroim'nt him
into bad repute among business
men and city officials.
TODAV'M CUBAIUIfOS
Clearings $ 309,244.t>2
alances 6<i,2'l'>.'M
Transactions 1.040, .".23. u:i
NO FUNDS FOR
IMPROVEMENT
With more than $14,500 worth
of improvement!* contemplated
for this Bummer, the Metropolitan
park -iioaril. checking up it*
iio(il;.s this week, found that it
had only 18,000 left for con
struction.
Among the Investment!) con
templated by toe board were
$6,000 worth of preliminary work
0(1 the mammoth play field at
Point Defiance park, over $6,000
for a permanent coarretc seawall
along the beach at Point Defiance,
and 11*8*4 ror paving a boulevard
into the park.
The board haa not yet decided
which work to eliminate. All pe
titions for new tennis courts and
other expenditures are Iteing
turned down for lack of funds.
JMsMMMttN IGHT EDITIONaSaMaMaMaMT
WEATHER
Tacoma: Showers tonight and
\ Wednesday.
Washington: Showers west,
partly cloudy and occasionally
threatening east portion.
Sink Dutchman
LONDON, April It.— Two Her
man submarines shelled and s.mk
the Dutch steamer HerleHtroni, it
was reported today.
Talk o' the Times
GtWtlHSjp, does it look to
you ;i- if Khlkpt Hill MM Ik
iii inu nil decomtiiiK I'ih'lo
Hhjii with the order of tlin
douhle-troKN or sometliiiiK
like that?
1 I
smr i
i
Now that (he
city campaign
and rlean-up
week are out
of the way, we
ask that you
Join Doc Wnll
and us and —
I
IT!
"My word," NHld ntnr.
Sfiuuiir Irf>riiner in hi«
trial in Chlrago, "Ik as Rood
at in) 1m.m.1." \V« I ••hi- tins
la true.
There are a lot of things we've
done tbat we're sorry for. but la-
DUBLIN
RIOTS;
COAST
RAIDED
LONDON, April Mi — A
«.l'llllllll vipilMtl'Oll of liklil
CVfJsMn lioinbiiriloil I in-.-
htoft »t I Iliis inoi'iliiiK, kill*
■UK Ihii men. v Human mill
a child.
liritish mM**Upi drove
• hem (iff after 'M ininuteii'
Imt tie.
Simult;«ii.-ini^l, ;i floct of Zep
! iiciins appear 'd in the hw \\
rllltj Did iliuppcil 70 boml^ i>\
jthe western oouatiM, injuring one
i man.
The ndniirall> xlalcd the inu
| lerial (liiiuj^e us the result of
11 hi* cruiser raid wag Inslgßlfl*
i ant.
Ihortly after the (iermaiiK a|>
peared Iwo Brit tall ervlwra and
I a destroyer opened fire. The
j Uermans fled.
Tliree Hritlsh ships were lilt
but none wcr» sunk. The sfnte
nient did not mention any cuMiai
tieß aboard.
The public imnicdlntely con
nected Sir Rogtr Cii.sinicni with
I he 111 IHlks.
It is believed the German*
planned a triangular campaign of
terrorism, expecting on uiiri^l.i.^
in [relainl ami jii attack on Kim
laml l>\ air ami se;i.
Twenty moiiis Tr-^fore, British
warwhips raided Zeebraim nnd
Btlglaß coast towns, Aiusterduiu
reported.
IRISH REBELS
TAKE DUBLIN
LONDON, April Hi — Irish
i.-i><-ls tiro in |M»sN«MNl'>n of
four or fi\e |Ktr(- of Dublin
after a il.m of most NorioiiH
riotiiitt. Aiiiiiisiinn Klrrell,
clilrf McNtaq fiir IreUiKl,
told Hi.- house of i-oiiinioiis
to<l«y.
Tlie telegraph lines to
i>ii.iin ham Imth cut, iiniii.it.
in' HuM iplh-K liolil I lie pi-in.
■ ■ipiil poi-lion of the city.
Oruvc riots broke out in Ire
land yesterday.
Tlib rioters seized tho Dublin
postoffice. Boldlan arrhrUi from
CnrraKli aj«*ll«d the dislurbnncij
after a street battU, in which II
persons were Killed. The sit ia
tlon is now controlled, Hirrell in
noiinceil.
Tho out''iir>! of rioting wgj
considered purl Of uwell ora;ini»
od Cermiin alii'inpt to Htir up a
Ki'-at revolution.
Tlie effort tn land Sir Roger
Ciiscinent and a strong force . f
• Jerman sailor-; \v,t> part of tb«
:< hcnie. It \>- i-Minved the- Ce'.
nutis though C.ise nentV dr;';n.v
tlc appearon-i. M I lie head of ,\
force would BWMp tin- country.
eluded in llio lint is no hand in
I depriving Uncle Sam of any part
of that missliiK ♦•!20,000,000 tt
Income tax.
They »ny Villa 1$ dcml.
Vpm, and only Iwo or three
year* ago they said (In- smut
iimin hlkmu t. i; Aba about
Ty i'obb.
Who paj-6 thp freight on that
Tacoma-Seattle auto booze line?
Hi.- lady next door Kuys
•:.«• lihs iti-1 houKht a piano
on tlie insolvent plan.
The phone company still neenti
to be Koveral millions of dollar*
ntiy.
Friends of Rranrtel* nr«
■ iixiiix liini to resign ufln
ho In < unfta hkc! :m<) run lor
I. S. «en«te in Mason
cliii'.ottt.. |*okml>l\ we Hiioiild
1)0 iiiimr mk (irwlc and f«,i
"iHTHonn calling lh«a»«>lve^
friends."
Don't forget to be o/ie of the
ir>,ooo ut the opening baseball
cam* In tbe Stadium.

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