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The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, May 04, 1940, Image 8

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1940-05-04/ed-1/seq-8/

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- Few Women Can Afford to Eschew
All Mz and Beauty Aids
. Make it Possible for Her to Omit Cosmetics
E By CYNTHIA GREY
b Most women are agreed that overdone makeup looks no
~ worse than underdone.
-~ An article recently printed on this page, quoting a fa
mous moving picture director, who stressed the evil effects
~ of overdone makeup, occasioned a number of comments
~ from women readers.
"~ Here it the opinion of one woman. She echoes the =enti-
_-—_a W weve vl’lulull e Vasw A
ments of many others: ;
Dear Miss Grey: I noticed an
article in your column in chhl
Mr, Selmick, of the films, was
i 7Zrm & Pacific( GArland 165
Prices Effective FRIDAY, SATURDAY, MONDAY
WE ARE GLAD TO REDEEM YOUR FOOD STAMPS
Federal, Mt, V Tell
m or M':min’. sk 4 C:m 25'c
GRADE “A"
m LARGE Doz 22‘:
S e A e
'JELL-O0 ALL FLAVORS 3 pkgs. 13c¢
BUTTER—Fresh - - - - - - Lb. 30c
EGE NOODLES -- - 14-oz. pkg. Oc¢
PALMOLIVE SOAP - - - 4 Bars 25c¢
CRYSTALWHNITE - - - 3 Giant Bars 12¢
RED SUPER SUDS - - - - Pkg. 9c
PEET’S GRANULATED SOAP - Pkg. 19¢
BLUE SUPER SUDS _ - - Reg. Size 19¢
BLUE SUPER SUDS - - - Giant 57¢
" BRING IN YOUR COUPONS
SNOWDRIFT
Shortening 3 lbs. 50‘ 6 lbs. 99°
00—
You Can Save by Celebrating With Us!
SPERRY PANCAKE
do [— :R f.:.. & WAFFLE FLOUR
f :’afi;rfi? u ‘:il:.!. fi’:_" 16¢c :-:,M 26¢ |
. s SLTT|2 PKgs. .....23¢
T i ar—— < onight's the night
Wheat Hearts - 2ic fo e ‘it Fabi
o P g Wich the New™ " |
Wheaties, 2 pkgs. 21¢ BISQUICK
WiSfust of Chomplons Lo:: Packege .. ... 290
SOFTASILK CAKE FLOUR 2sc ‘
S
FAIRMONT COFFEE - - - - Lb. can 25¢
PEAS, No. 2Can . ... .. e
ac
SHREDDED TUNA, '3 size »
Peas & Carrols, No. 2 size l 13c
PLUMS, No. 2'2 can. ..
NBC SODA CRACKERS, 2-Ib. Box -28 c
‘ "" J) T
| Bl So fine! 3 ‘G'H
. ' So pure! -JSUGAR
“ ¥ So white!
B.&M.BEANS, 2Cans - - - - 25¢
/AT Shefford “O’“
‘ .....‘._,.‘.‘j‘,\._ 8-Ox, Pkgs. American, Pimien- ¢
, o te, Brick end Chevelle. 29
: £ ~*.4 A Genuine Wisconsin Cheese.
|SWISSorOLDYORK --- - . 16¢
I-lb. Loaves of GHEVELLE, ¢
|PENTO or SWISS - - .- . 25
NORTH STAR CHAMPION DOG FOOD ... .3 Ibs. 25¢
S ————————
MILD AMERICAN CHEESE ................Lb. 16¢c
O ——————
“ ready to eot. wi'..."'.'."i..u’. Lb. 19¢
BAGON—WhoIe or Malf ..** Lb. 15¢
PORK ROAST (o, 13¢ &, 16¢
PURE GROUND BEEF - - - - 2 lbs. 35¢
VEAL STEAKS—MiIk Fod - - - Lb. 20c
PORK CHOPS—Loin or Rib Ends Lb. 21¢
ONIONS or RADISHES .................Bunch 1c
LEMONS—Sunkist, Lorge Size . ........... Dozx. 19¢
'm B sscevenees .
B o e
R e BT NRWAIVVE LT Vaaweym
quoted regarding the awful effect
galned by women who overdo
their makeup.
While many of us agree, we
Answers to Test Questions
Below are the answers to test
questions printed on the Editorial
page.
1. Cannibals,
2. Newpaper editor.
3. Moscow,
4. No.
5. Bones of a prehistoric man
discovered in Germany.
6. Both are carbon.
7. Senate and chamber of depu
ties,
8. Scotlard.
9. Tennessee,
10. Equir.oxes.
A oo
women who realize the value of
artistic makeup must admit that
the woman who does not care
whether ghe uses rouge and lip
stick and other cosmetics, usually
looks even worse than the painted
lady who does not know when to
Use restraint, |
’ It is as bad to wear too mtle}
makeup as it is to wear too much.
| That washed-out look is something
to avold and does not give th# im
}pruflon of ultra-refinement as
much as it does of biliousness,
I The new trend of naturalness h(
fine, of course, but it would be a |
mistake for any woman to stop
using any makeup at all chi
women can boast of natural color- l
ing and health that makes this
possible, |
Of course, cosmetics must bel
applied sparingly and artistically,
but they should never be elim
inated from the daily groomln(’
routines. Any man who is uaedi
to seeing his well groomed wife |
look as charming in her house
dress as she does when “dolled
up” will agree that the woman
who lets all thought of “gilding
the lily” go, is not as pleasing to
the eye as her carefully madeup
sister,
Few women have rosy cheeks,
naturally red lips and complexions
that never get shiny.
Colorless eyelashes and eye
brows, for instance, are respon- |
sible for an unattractive appear- |
ance. Their owners can do much |
to improve their faces by the |
careful use of dark eyebrow pen
cils and eyebrow makeup,
Another contributor to the
washed-out, faded look is dull, |
lifeless hair. The woman whose |
hair is “just plain brown" ouxhtl
to take care that it doesn't be
come mousey brown. Daily clean
ing and polishing with a hair
brush will help. A weekly sham
poo and a series of scalp treat
ments will do wonders. [
Lipstick (which MUST be unedi'
carefully) also can do wonders |
for a colorless appearance, butf,
lhe woman who does not like the ‘
shape of her lips only succeeds |,
n looking like a comic vulentinel‘
when she paints a false mouth |
over her unpretty one. When the 1
natural outline of the mouth is
followed it is never as umttnc-‘
ive as a perfectly painted false
ne.
Powder is supposed to drama
ize the skin-—not hide it com
sletely. On the other hand, it
yught not to be used so stingily"
the face looks like a greased vis- '
age and all women who are in- :
slined to be sallow should never |
forget that rosy tinted powders ]‘
can do much for them. ‘
No woman who wants to have :
the reputation for good looks can |
afford to ever have that “washed |
put” appearance, That is why
we can't shout “be utterly nat
ural,” for few of us have the nat
ural complexions and points of |
heauty to stand such a strict|
course, MISS A. B. C, ‘
. e
Asparagus |
Dear Miss Grey: Can you sug
gest a few ways to serve aspara- |
gus that will relieve the monotony |
f just boiling it in hot water |
and serving it with butter, salt |
and pepper. HOUSEWIFE. !
While fresh asparagus is |
plentiful and reasonably priced, |
the housekeeper is lucky to have
it on her menus. It can be
served in a variety of ways
that need not be monotonous.
Try it with melted butter or
Hollandaise sauce, or creamed;
also as an appetizer with an
chovies and hard-boiled eggs on ||
toast rounds; or with boiled |«
ham and seasonings as & main
dish en casserole; or combined |
with chicken and eggs in a
loaf; or French fried with
grated cheese and thick white
sauce,
bz
not ftay at
the edgel
.""‘“
R -0 I
SHOE STORE .
When You Need ;
DENTIST f
Think of !
DR. BURNS &
937% Broadway p !
Over Grayson's ‘
The Tacoma Times
Reputation
' John Reid was standing by the
window looking out at the blank
windows of th: building opposite.
When he saw Gail his expression,
already moody, darkened.
He said curtly, “What do you
want "
Gall closed the door behind her.
The conversation with Chris had
'made her realize that all the keys
!m this situation were in her own
hand. Bhe had never feit calmer.
‘ “I'm leaving,” she informed him
standing proudly beside his desk.
“But before I go there is some
thing I'd like to say to you.”
Hig thin lips tightened.
“l don’'t care to discuss it
You've played your cards very
'cleverly, Miss . . . Trenton.”
Galil did not wince at the sound
of that unfamiliar name.
“Don’'t think I am ashamed to
use it, My father was one of the
finest men who ever lived. He died
because you didn't have enough
faith in him to wait until you
found out who really was the thief.
It's you, Mr. Reid, who ought to
beg my forgiveness. And if I didn't
love Chris so much I wouldn't even
bother to speak to you.”
He stared at her, too astonished
to stop her as she continued.
~ “We're going to be married, no
matter what you try to do to stop
us. But you're making a mistake
to let anything come between you,
especially now when you've just
begun to understand each other.
“You seem to think this was all
a deliberate plan on my part to get
revenge. Well, I don’'t mind telling
you I did come to work at the store
to see if I could find out who was
really to blame,
“Everyone seemed to think that
the jewel robbery must be an inside
job. So 1 knew that some one must
have put that emerald in my fath
er's coat. I thought if I worked
Case Dismissed When Judge
Learns Colors of Pajamas
The color of Ed Nugent's pa
jamas-—and Mrs. Varian Nugent's
too, were figuratively waved about
the courtroom of Justice Clarence
E. Layton Friday.
It was all part of a civil suit
involving just $7.65 that ended
without costing anybody that sum
except an insurance company.
The Nugents—he is the former
Todd shipyard official—live at the
Crescent mpartments, 324 No G st.
They like their sleep and agreed
they were irritated no end by an
auto horn which roused them from |
it the night of March 1 at 1 a. m.
But whoever threw the rock
that shattered the windshield
wing of Verl M. Tetherow’s ex
pensive coupe just after the
horn blew, it was not the Nu
gents—not legally, anyway. |
Tetherow, dark-haired young
salesman living at 816 So. Bth st.,
and pretty, blond Miss Margaret
Annabelle who lives in the apart
ment above the Nugents testified
they had just returned from Olym
pia. Miss Annabelle said she was
sitting in the car with Tetherow.
Somehow, she touched the horn.
Her escort testified it was a hair
trigger horn and subject to sudden
‘blowing.
~ Then a rock crashed into the
glass,
Tetherow gaid he jumped out
of the car and said:
“I don’'t appreciate having peo
ple throw rocks at my car.”
“I'll throw worse than that, if
you don't stop blowing your horn,”
said a figure in a doorway of the
apartment. Tetherow swore it
was Nugent and saild somebody
‘was standing in the doorway of
thei rapartment in a long white
nightie,
“It must have been a ghost,”
retorted Mrs. Nugent, “Why
I was wearing a pair of pa-
Jamas the color of Mr, Teth
erow's necktie (bright red)
and JEd had on his blue ones.”
Tetherow and Miss Annabelle
had to admit they didn't see any
one throw the rock.
Then, said Justice Layton, he
couldn’t charge the Nugents $7.65
I e W
'g TTRR O
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wne ‘ \
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- ol A ;";,“_
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@'\z M N P _
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,ben for awhile I might find out
{who it was, but I didn’t have any
designs on your son,
“As a matter of fact my mother
is just as opposea to our marriage
as you are”
His unhappy eyes scanned her
| face.
| “That's possible but it doesn’t
|interest me. If my son marries
{you I never want to see him again.”
| “You won't,” she assured him.
“Why can't you understand that
Chris is just as stubborn as you
are? That's one of the reasons I
' stopped to see you. Chris is leav
ing the store when I do. I've tried
to persuade him to wait awhile but
'he insists that he can find work
znomewhere else. I thought perhaps
if you would stop being so angry
‘md talk to him ~ ~ .”
I “Why should 17" he interrupted.
'His voice was cold but never had
& man appeared more miserable.
I"Chrutopher is at liberty to sup
port himself in any fashion he
pleases. And now, Miss Trenton,
if you don't mind I'm very busy.”
“Chris was right,” she thought.
“He doesn't dare admit even to
himself that my father was inno
cent.” Aloud she said, “All right,
I'm going, But I hoped if you could
realize how much unhappiness your
‘attitude is going to cause, you
might act a little differently.”
To this he made no reply, so she
left him. Yet in spite of his harsh
ness, Gail felt sorry for him.
He was a lonely man and she
suspected that while he pretended
not to be hurt at his son’s desertion
he was secretly torn with anxiety.
He had been in his office all morn
ing with the door closed. He had
not even gone out for lunch. He
was suffering more than Anna,
who was really the injured one.
Because John Reid could not bear
to admit that he had been to blame
(Continued on Page 14, Column 8)
for the damage because they de
nied it, and nobody could prove
who did the throwing.
————— e e
Society Gets
Two Coaches
And Engine
Rail-pounders of an earlier day
will become museum pieces Satur
day when members of the North
west Railroad Historical society
augment their equipment at their
grounds in South Tacoma,
Plenty of work will highlight
the occasion, when an old ‘‘con
solidation” type Jlocomotive, an
ancient Milwaukee line dining car,
and an out-moded N. P. coach are
shunted into the yard at So. 50th
and Adams.
The equipment being added to
the society’s headquarters was
given by the railroads, and is on
hand awaiting the final trip. At
present, the society owns one of
the old-time tourist sleepers, with
wooden bunks, once used by the
North Coast limited.
J. L. Roberts, president of
the society, said the move
probably would start about 10
A m. and be completed by
noon Saturday. During na
tional reilroad week in Sep
tember, the society plans to
weicome the public to the
grounds,
Members of the group have been
working for the past few weeks
laying track from the main line
of the N. P. in preparation for the
transfer.
The locomotive is one of the
first used over Stampede pass, and
was built in 1888, All the equip
ment has historical value as mu
seum pieces. The track into the
five lots owned by the society will
be torn out after the move is
completed.
e il
If you're not using it, sell it with
a Fast - Action Times Want Ad.
Phone MAin 3151,
By EMILY POST
Dear Mrs. Post: I am going to
take a first cruise, alone. I know
that I shall be put at a table with
other people in the dining room,
and I am wondering just how the
problem of introducing myself to
them should be handled. I am a
widow and I won't know anyone.
Answer: There are very few
‘rules further than those of natur
‘ally tactful impuilse. But at least
you do not go down to the table
and abruptly announce, “I am
Mrs. Brown.” Whether you say
anything at all at the first meal
depends upon how many are at
table and whether any of them
setem responsive. At a table for
six, let us say, if two are talking
together and the three others are
also together, you say nothing un
less something is said to you. If
one alone is sitting next to you,
you perhaps make a remark. If
this is encouraged, you go on; if
not, you stop.
According to best taste it is
always bad form to mention names
~your own, or that of your
friends—to strangers. But if oth
ers introduce themselves to you,
you cannot very well refuse to
give your name as Mrs. or Miss
Whatever-it-is. When you leave
the table, you nod good-bye to
anyone who may be looking at
you, And at future meals you
say “Good morning” or “Good
evening.”
If you are encouraged to talk
you do so. The fact that you have
never been introduced is of no
importance whatever. If you get
to know them at all well, they wfll“
perhaps tell you something about
themselves and you tell them
about you. But not the entire his
tory of your private life! As al
ready said, there are no rules to
fit all people. Some people are
lo PARK 'N SHOP © PARK 'N SHOP © PARK 'N snof:
NIDARK' N CHOP:
8 =
@ 98th and PACIFIC GArland 9149
i.z WATCH THIS NEWSPAPER EACH TUESDAY FOR OUR MIDWEEK SPECIALS
x |__SAVINGS ON [¢
: MEATS|;
O
.| WEDONT HAVE THE .
| 100% UNION MARKET
2| But We Do Have the Biggest Bargains! Marsls Prid 15 c x
U | ——————————————————————————————— enderize
- Lb. 5
Tt ‘‘BABY WEEK'' SPECIAL! sndd + »
|"D & i T7RO| VEAL CHOPS |»
|-~ BORDEN'S v MILK afi’ T s
:' &P 3 tall cans ......21c %= (b, 25¢ :
o| HEINZ FOODS—AII Varieties |, BACON 3
Z|he 12f0r95c oo 2 for 23¢ il lOC |
z| CENTENNIAL FARINA & 4 Ibs. 25¢ I;OT ROAST |2
§|RAROSYRUP siL.il3s¢ siuitale | e ggß
< ecommen y Many Doctors uts
2| EAGLE BRAND MILK.. .Lge. can22¢ |*_ ~ 7 |o
(‘ PALMOLIVE SOAP i " sbars29c| EGGS >
|PR— T e |e, Dol am e Fem |
[ 310'000.020!*:2_“__:*: yY€ aol : All Our Eggs Are Grade ‘A’ »
Pfl:fifivfififiifl— 00"“}.-' , u.: :'::d-. 20¢ ;4::_ 18¢ :
IR AARIA RA L o $1.79 OXYDOL o
| _—_——_—‘——-————_ anhu Everything Cleaner—
S| HONEY ourcone save 5.1 pail 35¢ [t ocose -- - 19€ v
). SNOWDRIFT (7.0 3-Ib. can 49c | Crystal White |2
o|WESSON OIL 3'.\i° Qt.cangic| CHIPS |-
S|CORN MEAL A%, 9-Ib. bag 25 [>twn -- - 33¢ .
“|MAYONNAISE i, Ot jar 33¢ [JTREEP2% °
® |SALAD DRESSING or VEGETABLESIDE
&| SANDWICH SPREAD . Qt. jar 19¢ RHUBARB |7
@|CHEESE 245 amr— 2.1 b. loaf 49¢ [+ 5. 10¢ 2
Z| COFFEE 0. wouse .25¢ 22.48¢| SPINACH |
| CRACKERS [O. 15¢ So°%i. 17¢ (L 0 " 5..10¢,,
e e eean e ANMMANS B
. WELCOME BACK SALE! Lo Gren 4go €
al E % ,’é/ Let’'s Wish the Tigers New POtatQCS ;
WS 5= oo | "o e
z V\"“‘j % o isien'ta Waeaties 2 Phgs. ORANGES »
: \a Wheaties, 23¢ |~ _ '2c.115 S
I s . LEMONS |
& | “CALLING ALL WIVES!" | S [ vex. 9€ | B
3 BANANAS |*
“ ’ Shortcake
z| i e BISQUICK . . 29¢ e .6c |2
x| MATCHES I KETCHUP GRAPEFRUIT T
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*“PARK 'N SHOP & PARK 'N SHOP oPARK N SHOP @
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il
.
' Skillet Biscuits And Maple Sugar
FRIED CORN CAKES
(Makes Eight)
Two cups cornmeal, 4 teaspoons
’hkin. powder, 13 teaspoon salt,
|3{ teaspoon sugar, 2§ cups boil
ling water (about).
Combine and mix cornmeal, bak
ing powder, and salt and sugar.
Add enough boiling water to make
]mlxtun stiff enough to mm
{1 inch high cakes. Fry in et
!in hot fat 13 inch deep. When
| brown on one side, turn and cook
| until golden brown on other, Serve
| hot.
| SKILLET BISCUIT
| Old - fashioned skillet biscuits
’wm\ this season’'s maple sugar on
top—how's that for a spring temp
i tation ?
unreserved; some people very re
served. The tactful person adapts
himself, within the limit of his
| own abilities. to both.
THE WHOLE FAMILY VOTES
-, “YES” FOR TRIANGLE HOTCAKES
a) ‘W, t.: - | .
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.)a\-fi(' p”
A,N notm-ur BREAKFAST '\ ?.‘\\l3' Q‘\\.—-" ..4 )
Y e
0y N
MILRL!NQHQPIA‘E\WK R\'S!lN[;
Two cups sifted flour, 15 tea
!:poon salt, 4 teaspoons phosphate
!blkin‘ powder, 3 tablespoons
| shortening, % to 1 cup milk, 1
‘cup soft maple sugar, 2 table
| spoons butter, melted, shaved ma
| ple sugar.
, Sift flour, salt and phosphate
baking powder together. Cut in
' shortening. Mix in the milk
| gradually, adding enough to make
'a dough which can be handled
| easily. Break up the soft maple
|sugar and add to the dough, cut
| ting it or working it in.
Grease a frying pan, fit the
rolled-out biscuit dough into it, or
|if preferred cut into biscuits and
| fit into pan, brush with melted
| butter and sprinkle with shaved
maple sugar. Bake in a hot oven
‘450 degrees F.) 15 minutes or
until done. Serves six to eight.
If maple sugar is not available,
slightly lumpy brown sugar may
be used.

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