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The San Juan islander. [volume] (Friday Harbor, Wash.) 1898-1914, June 02, 1898, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085190/1898-06-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Islander
CULVER lIKOS., rublinhergj
Entered at the postofflco in Friday
Harbor as second claws mail matter.
~~~ "subscription PRICE,
♦ 1.50 per year Strictly in advance
ADVERTISING KATKS:
Display standing ads, $1.00 per inch per
month. clßcenta per inch, yer week, sin
gle i«luiun measurement.
Reading business locals, and notices .
such as Wanted, For Sale, etc., 10 cents
per line for li-st insertion ami 5 cents ptr
fine each week thereafter. :
Legal notices, at customary legal rates.
All communications to Thk Islander
must be signed with the name ol the
Writer, not necessarily for publication,
bat as a guarantee of good faith.
The Official Paper (ft San Juan County.
THURSDAY. JUNE 2nd, 1898.
FACTS ABOUT THE PHILIPPINES.
The seizure of the Philippine islands
and the apparent determination of the
United States government to hold
them as a permanent possession natur
ally make important facts concerning
their history, extent, resources, trade
and climatic conditions of special inter
est in this country. From the best
sources of information at our command
we have compiled the following for the
information of our readers.
The island;: lie just east of the China
sea, midway between the equator and
the tropic of cancer. They were dis
covered by Magellan in March, 1521,
and named by him the St. Largarus
islands. On the 27th of April following
he lost his life on one of the small isl
ands of the archipelago, called Mactau.
The great navigator was a Portugese,
but he was then in the Spanish service.
Though claiming the islands by right
of Magellan's discovery, Spain did not
take possession until 1564, about which
time they were named the Philippines
In honor of King Philip 11. They re
mained in undisputed possession of
Spain until 1762, when they were seized
by a British force under Gen. Draper
and Admiral Cornish as a partial pun
ishment to Spain for aiding France in
the seven years war. Havana vas cap
tured in the same year. Then, as now,
Manila and the neighboring fortress
and arsenal of Cavite were the strong
holds of the islands, and on or within
the fortifications of the two places were
625 cannon. In 1764 England reliu
guished possession of the islands to
Spain upon receiving a ransom of one
million pounds sterling, and on March
31 Manila was evacuated by the British
garrison. From that time until May
1, 1898, when the United States
squadron, under Commodore Dewey,
destroyed the Spanish fleet at Manila
and Cavite, the Spanish remained in
possession of the islands, undisturbed
except by occasional ineffective native
insurrections.
The Islands have never been thor
oughly explored or surveyed and even
their exact number is unknown. It is
believed to exceed 1,400 and this com
bined area is estimated at over 114,000
square miles. Luzon, the largest island,
is 340 miles long and has an area of
almost 41,000 square miles, making it
nearly as large as Cuba and consider
ably more than half as large as the
state of Washington. Mindanao, the
second largest, has an area of over 37,
--000 square miles, and there are a num
ber of others of considerable size. Hun
dreds of the small islands are little
more than barren rocks of volcanic
origin.
The large islands are very rich in
natural resources, both agricultural and
mineral. The chief products are hemp,
tobacco, sugar, coffee, indigo and copra.
In 1890 the export trade amounted to
about $37,000,000 and imports to about
$11,000,000. Most of the larger sugar
plantations, some of them exceeding
1,000 acres in extent, are monastic prop
erty and are leased to Chinese half
breeds. There are large deposits of iron
ore of excellent quality and consider
able deposits of copper. Gold has been
found on many of the islands, but not
as a rule in paying quantities. Coal Is
abundant.
The climate of all the islands is tropi
cal, that of Luzon being the most en
durable for Europeans or Americans.
At Manila three seasons are recognized
—a hot, a cold and a wet. The hot sea
son extends from March to June inclu
sive, during which time the average
temperature is a little over 87 degrees.
The "cold" season, which would be
considered hot here, extends from No
vember to February or March, and the
average temperature is reported at over
72 degress. The months from July to
October inclusive are known as the wet
season, during which the mean temper
ature is nearly 85 degrees aud the aver
age rain fall over 66 inches, or double
the average annual rain fall of this
county.
The population is a heterogeneous
mixture of nations, or Negritos (not
now numerous), Malays, Chinese, half
castes, or Mestizos, and probably not
more than 10,000 Europeans, which is
a pretty small percentage in a total
population variously estimated at from
five and a half to ten millions.
There is certainly room for honest
difference of opinion as to the wisdom
of such a radical departure from the
traditional policy of tho nation in re.
epect to territorial expansion beyond
its natural borders as would be involved
by the retention of the Philippines and
their occupation as a permanent pos
session of the United States. But it is
not easy to see how any loyal citizen j
can deprecate the fact or the manner of
their seizure, nr how any one who justi-!
fies our intervention to Spain's barbar-!
ous rule in Cuba could look with equa
nimity upon the restoration of the
Philippines to Spain and the perpetua
tion there of the tyrannous misrule
Which has characterized Spauish gov-
r '■' ■ ■ ■■- ■".■ ■ ■ -;>t>v" ■
eminent in Cuba. Circumstances un
foreseen and conditions which our gov
ernment did not create led to the
seizure of the Philippines, and how
ever desirable it might be to dispose of
them to some friendly, progressive*
and humane power, such a solution of
the problem does not now seem prob
able, because of the relations existing
among the European nations with re
spect to territorial extension and com
mercial expansion in the Orient. We
may have to hold the Philippines
whether we want them or not.
There are In the United States 83
military posts, garrisoued by the reg
ular army, besides 18 depots and arsen
als, distributed among eight general
departments, knowu respectively as
the departments of the East, of Mis
souri, of the Platte, of Dakota, of Colo
rado, of the Columbia, of California,
and of Texas. Cavalry companies are
stationed at 32 posts, of which only
three are east of the Mississippi river.
Previous to the recent large in3rease in
the standing army by the authority of
congress there were altogether in the
permanent staffs of the army only
about 540 officers, 115 of them being in
the engineer corps. Chaplains, of whom
there were only 20 until recently, have
the rank of captain, and the head of
each staff department has the rank of
brigadier general. Under the new
army bill, 11 major generals and 25
brigadier generals were" appointed by
the president May 4.
There is a report current that Spain
has offered to cede Tangies and the
Philippines to France if the latter will
aid Spain in the war against the United
States. There may be less reason to
doubt that such a proposition has been
made than there is that there is any
likelihood of its acceptance, if the re
port has any foundation in fact. Spain
undoubtedly could, if she would, de
liver to France possession of the North
west coast of Morocco, but with the
Philippines it is a different matter.
She can't.''deliver the goods" there.
She might execute an instrument
somewhat in the nature of a first-claim
deed, but it would have little value,
with the United States fleet under Ad
miral Dewey in Manila harbor, and
thousands of American soldiers hasten
ing across the great Pacific to hold fast
to the rich possession which the gallant
admiral and his brave men secured.
Our present war fleet, in both the
regular and auxiliary branches, may be
summarized thus:
First-class battleships .......... 4
Second-class battleship ; 1
Armored cruisers . v 2
Armored ram 1
Duble-turret monitors 6
Single-turret monitors 13
Protected cruisers.. 13
Unprotected cruisers 3
Gunboats 18
Dynamite cruiser 1
Torpedo boats 11
Total—Regular navy 73
Auxiliary cruisers, gunboats, etc 60
Total .' i 133
Besides these the battleships and tor
pedo boats building, iron and wooden
cruisers of the old navy, receiving
ships, small tugboats and miscellaneous
vessels would make the total number of
American ships-of-war of all classes al
most exactly 200.
The shells of the 6-inch cannon of
our navy are twenty inches in length,
six inches in diameter and weigh 100
pounds. It requires fifty pounds of
powder to discharge them and their
muzzle velocity is 2.150 feet per second.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
In the Superior Court of the State of
Washington, for San Juan County.
IN PROBATE.
In the matter of the estate of Philip
Wenzel, deceased.
Notice to creditors of the estate of Philip
Wenzel, deceased. ,
- Notice is hereby given by the under
signed administrator of the estate of
Philip Wenzel, decease;!, to the creditors
of ana all persons having claims against
said deceased to exhibit them, with the
necessary vouchers,within twelve months
after the first publication of this notice,
to the said administrator at his office in
the town of Friday Harbor, San Juan
county, state of Washington, . the same
being the place for the transaction of the
business of said estate in said county of
San Juan, state of Washington.
Dated this 18th day of May, 1898.
GEORGE S. WRIGHT,
Administrator of the Estate of Philip
Wenzel, Deceased. ~ : . .
W. H. Thacjkeb, Attorney for Adminis
trator. ■■ - .' •'.-.. ;, - - * ; "
First publication May 26, 1898.
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NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
United States Land Office, I
Seattle, Wash., May 13, 1898. I
Notice is hereby given that the follow
ing named settlor has filed notice of his
intention to make final proof in support
of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the Clerk, of the Superior
Court, at Friday Harbor, Washington, on
Tuesday, July 5, 1898, viz:
ALEXANDER TIMOFEHEY.
Homestead application number 14,274,
for the Lot 7, of Sec. 21 and Lot Bof Sec.
20, Tp. 34 N, R 1 W.
He names thfl following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of said land, viz:
Charles Anderson, Sampson G. Cliad
wick, Victor Anderson, Philip Fager
holm, all of Edwards, Wash.
Edward P. Tremper, Register.
First publication May 26, 1898.
NOTICE TO SETTLERS.
Settlers desiring to make final proof on
their claims can make their application by
writing to the Islander for information,
thus saving a trip to the county seat, the
only trip needed being on the day of final
proof.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
United States Land Office
Seattle, Wash., May 2nd, 1898.
Notice is hereby given that the follow
ing named settler has filed notice of his
intention to make final proof in support
of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the Clerk of the Superior
Court at Friday Harbor, Washington, on
Saturday, June 11th, 1898, viz:
ERNEST C. THOMPSON.
Homestead application number 14,177
for tho Lot 3, Sw. I Me. i and tho Nw. i
Se. i, Section 12, Township 36, North of
Range 3 West.
Ho names the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of said land, viz:
J. TsStroud, F. R. Gray, P. Norton,
W. Scott, all of Deer Harbor, Washing
ton. Edward P. Tremper, Register.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
United States Land Office,
Seattle, Wash., April 23, 1898.
Notice is hereby given that the follow
ing-named settler has filed notice of his
intention to make final proof in support
of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the Clerk of the Superior
Court at Friday Harbor Washington, on
Saturday, June 11, 1898, viz:
PETER SEREY.
Homestead application No. 13,649 for
the Ne i Swi Sec. 13, Tp. H7 N R 3 W.
He names the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of said land, viz:
E. Graignio, Thos. Middleton, Eben
Wood and Win. Doucett, ail of Waldron,
Washington.
Edward P. Trempek, Register.
First publication May 5,1898.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Land Office at Seattle, Wash.,
Saturday, April 23 1898.
VOTICE is hereby given that the fol
■*•" lowing-named settler has filed notice
of his intention to make final proof in
support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before the Clerk of Superior
Court, at Friday Harbor, Washington, on
Saturday, June 11,1898, viz:
THOMAS MLDBI.ETON,
Homestead application No. 14.023 tor
the lot 1, Sec. 15, Tp. 37 N R 3 W. f
He names the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of said land, viz.:
E. Graigni<\ Peter Serey, Eben Wood
and S. A. McDonald, all of Waldron,
Washington.
Edward P. Tremper, Register.
First publication May 5, 1898.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
United States Land Office, )
Seattle, Wash., May 14, 1898. }
Notice is hereby given that the follow
ing named settler has filed notice of his
intention to make final proof in support
of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the Clerk of the Superior
Court at Friday Harbor, Washington, on
Monday, June 27, 1898, viz:
ALEXANDER SMITH.
Homestead application No. 14,461 for
the Lot 4, Sec. 23, Twp. 37 North, Range 2
West.
He nam^s the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and
cultivation of said land, viz:
F. J. Geoghegan, C. B. Bnxton, Wm.
Hambly, Sr., Wm. Hambly, Jr., all of
East Sound, Wash.
Edward P. Tremper. Register.
First publication May 19,1888.
iHERIFPS SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of an order of sale issued out
of the Superior court of the state of Wash
ington for the county of San Juan, and to
me directed and delivered, for a judgment
rendered in said court on the 18th day of
May, A. D., 1898, in favor of The Canada
Settlers Loan and Trust Company, Limi
ted, a corporation, plaintiff, and against
Christian Olsen, Henry Olsen, a minor,
and Christian Olsen, guardian of said
Henry Olsen, defendants, for the sum 01
$556.27 with interest at the rate of 9 per
cent, per annum, from said 10th day oi
May, A. D. 1898, and the further sum ot
$50.00 attorney's tees, and $33.60 costs of
suit, I have levied upon the following de
"scribed real estate, to-wit:
Lots numbered one (1) and four (4) of
section number thirty-three (33) in town
ship thirty-six (36) north of range two (2)
west of Willamette meridian, and con
taining 38 40-100 acres, and situate, lying
and being in San Juan County. State of
Washington.
Notice is hereby given that on Saturday,
the 25th day of Jane, A. D. 1896, at
the hour of 11 o'clock a. m., of said day, at
the court house door, in Friday Harbor,
in said county of San Juan, I will sell all
the right, title and interest of the said
Christian Olsen, Henry Olsen, a minor,
and Christian Olsen, guardian of said
Henry Olsen, defendants in and to
the above described real estate, at public
auction, to the highest and beat bidder, to
satisfy said execution and all costs.
Given under my hand this 23rd day of
May, A. D. 1896. Newton Jones,
Sheriff of San Juan County, Washing
ton.
Hastings A Stedman, Attorneys for
Plaintiff.
First publication May 26,1896. ♦
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SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE.
By virtue of an order of sale issued out
of the superior court of the state of Wash
ington, for the county of San Juan, and to
me directed and delivered, for a judg
ment rendered in said court on the 18th
day of May, A. D. 1898, in favor of Joseph
Elliot, plaintiff, and against Isaac Dillon,
John Coffelt, School District No. 18 and
Edwin H. Dillon, defendants, for the sum
of $1470.00 with interest at the rate of 8
per cent per annum from said 18th day
of May, A. D. 1898, and the further sum of
$50.00 attorney's fees, and $15.00 costs of
suit, I have levied upon the following de
scribed real estate, to-wit:
An undivided one-half of the following
described property:—Beginning at the
northwest corner of the southwest quar
ter (Sw J) of the northeast quarter (Ne I)
of section four (4) in township thirty-five
(35) north of range one (1) west of Willam
ette meridian, thence south eleven (11)
chains and eight (8) links, thence south
thirty-three degrees east five (5) chains,
thence north forty-one degrees east ten
(10) chains and fifty-seven (57) links,
thence north eighty (80) degrees east four
(4) chains and sixty (60) links, thence
south eighty-nine degrees east five chains
and forty (40) links, thenco north seven
(7) chains, thence west twenty (20) chains
to place of beginning, containing nine
teen (19) acres and fifty-six (56) rods.
Also all of the following described real
estate adjoining the above. Commencing
c.t the southeast corner of the above de
scribed property, thence following the
southern shore of the lagoon and lake to
the section line between sections three (3)
and four (4) in township thirty-five (35)
north of range one (1) west, thence north
to the southeast corner of lot one (1) in
section four (4) in township thirty-five (35)
north of ranee one (1) west, thence west
twenty (20) chains to the southwest corner
of lot one (1), thence south seven (7) chains
to place of beginning, containing twenty
acres more or less. Also all of lot one (1)
in section four (4), township thirty-five
(35) north of range one (1) west, containing
forty (40) acres. «Also the undivided one
half of lot six (6) in section four (4) town
ship thirty-five (35) north of range one [1]
west, containing sixteen and 75-100 acres.
All of the above described property sit
uate, lying and being in San Juan Coun
ty, State of Washington.
Notice is hereby given that on Saturday
the 25th day of June A. D. 1898, at the
hour of 10 o'clock a. m. of said day, at
the court house door, in Friday Harbor,
in said county of San Juan, I will sell all
the right, title and interest of the said
Isaac Dillon, John Coffelt, School District
No. 18 and Edwin H. Dillon, defendants
in and to the above described real estate,
at public auction, to the highest and best
bidder, to satisfy said execution and all
costs.
Given under my hand this 23rd day ot
May, A. D. 1898.
Newton Jonpks,
Sheriff of San Juan County, Washing
ton.
John H. Sargent, attorney for plaintiff.
First publication May 26,1898.
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Syndicate Pub. Co., Seattle, Wash.
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WHATCOM, SEATTLE AND TACOMA.
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CARRYING FREIGHT ONLY.
Leaves Whatcom at 8 p. m. on
Sunday, Wednesday and Fri
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SAMISH, ANACORTES, SEATTLE
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Returning, leaves City Dock, foot of
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Samish, Fairhaven and Whatcom on
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
For through rates on freight apply on
board, or address
W. H. ELLIS, Manager.
Notice of Administrator's Sale of Real Estate.
Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of
an order issued by Hon. J. P. Houser, Judge of
the Superior Court of the State of Washington,
in and for San Juan County, made on the nth
day of May, A. D. 1898, in the matter of the
estate of Thomas McKenna, deceased, the un
dersigned administrator of said estate will sell at
public auction to the highest and best bidder for
cash in hand, paid in lawful money of the United
States, and subject to the confirmation of said
Judge of said Superior Court, all the right,
title, interest and estate of the said Thomas
McKenna, deceased, at the time of his death,
and all the right, title and interest that the said
estate has by operation of law or otherwise ac
quired other than or in addition to that of said
Thomas McKenna at the time of his death, in
and to all those certain lots, pieces or parcels of
land, situated, lying and being in the said
County of San Juan, State of Washington, and
particularly bounded and described as follows,
The South half of the Southeast quarter of
Section two (2), and the Northwest quarter of
the Northeast quarter of Section eleven (11) all
in Township 35 North of Range 4 West, W.'m.,
San Juan County, Washington, or so much
thereof as may be necessary to pay the debts
against said estate and the costs and expenses of
the settlement of said estate.
The terms and conditions ot said sale are for
cash in hand to the highest and best bidder.
Sale to take place at the front door of the
Court House at Friday Harbor, San Juan Coun
ty, Washington, on Saturday, the 18th day of
June, A. D. 1898, at 11 o'clock a. m. of said day.
Dated this 18th day of May, A. D. 1898.
. „,« J. L. FARNSWORTH.
Administrator of the Estate of Thomas Mc-
Kenna, Deceased.
W. H. Thacker, Attorney for Administrator
Date of first publication May 19,1898.
NOTICE TO CBEDITOBS.
In the Superior Court of the State of Wash
ington, for San Juan County.
IN PROBATE.
In the matter of the estate of Cora Wright, de
ceased.
Notice to creditors of the estate of Cora
Wright, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned,
administrator of the estate of Cora Wright, de
ceased, to the creditors of and all persons hav
ing claims against the said deceased, to exhibit
them, with the necessary vouchers, within
twelve months after the first publication of this
notice, to the said administrator at the office of
his attorney, H. S. King, in the town of Friday
Harbor. San Juan County, State of Washington,
the same being the place for the transaction of
the business of said estate in said County of San
Juan and State of Washington.
Dated this 18th day sf May, A. D. 1898.
GEORGE WRIGHT.
Administrator of the estate of Cora Wright, de
ceased.
H. S. Kino, Attorney for Administrator.
Date first publication May 19,1898.
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Lake, Halated and Fulton Streets, Chicago*
, Branches— New York, London and Hamburg.
Send ten S-o«nt .tamp, for a deck of Monarch Playing Card, illustrating
Lillian Russell, Tom Cooper, Lee Rlohardson and Walter Jones.
HOTEL STEVENS^"-^
StoTens 4 Grant, Proprietors.
The most conveniently located hotel in the city. TVo blocks from
depots, and close to all the principal steamer landings.
CORNER FIRST AVENUE AND MARION STREET.
-' "~ ■--:•- " " ~~ ' ' ... .;•:
Equipped with all modern conveniences. Nearly all rooms face on
street and are large and well lighted. Prices reasonable.
SEATTLE, WASH.
fc-^ BORN
OTOraS^s SEPTEMBER
For more than fifty-six years it has neyer failed in
its weekly visits to the homes of farmers and ,
villagers throughout the United States.
IT HAS faithfully labored for their prosperity and happiness, for the
r j improvement of their business and home interest, for education,
for the elevation of American manhood and true womanhood.
IT HAS told at the fireside, interesting and instructive stories of the
doings of the world, the nation and states. -
IT HAS advised the farmer as to the most approved methods of culti
vating and harvesting his crops, and the proper time to convert
them into the largest possible amount of money.
IT HAS led in all matters pertaining to the welfare of fanners and
. villagers, »nd for over half a century has held their confidence
and esteem. - .
It is the NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE, and we furnish it with .
THE SAN JUAN ISLANDER, one year for $1.50, cash
in advance.
Address all Orders to THE ISLANDER.
Write your name and address on a postal card, send it to Geo. W*
Best, Tribune Building, New York City, and a sample copy of THE
NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE will be mailed to you.

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