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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, October 17, 1891, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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OFFICIAL PAPER" ”
o———o F-———o
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
Thurston County: 7
VOLUME 11. NO 148 >
~ MISCELLANEOUS.
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROBT. F. WIII'IHAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRACT Ar TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
" (INCORPORATED) -
Draughting and Blue Printing.
Our Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and _m'e the only complete set of Abstracts from
. Government to date 111 the county.
Upstairs in Chambers Block - - - - - Olynlpla, “rash.
W
G- NOSCHKA,
Leading Merchant Tailor.
> -——-—Always keeps alfull assortment of»—
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
REPAIRING NEATLY DONE- ‘
W
C 1 NE W. OAASTIJBu C H
“AND—
-081 BUG ODA ’oa
Tl/‘le Best, Cheapest and Cleanest Fuel.
FTHOMAS HEACOC K AND A. D. GLOVER, Exclusive Agents.
Dealers in all kinds of fuel. Orders left at R. FROST‘S store will receive prompt attention.
Wm ,
T. J. MCBR ATNEY i
Fa ' ?’ Dehverv W 100113
2‘
. 1 H 1 6 _ c
. , b
Carriages, Buggies, Road Carts, Plows, Etc.
Agricultural Implements of Every Description:
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIFTH STREET:
WWW—
OLYMPIA HORSE AND MULE MARKET .
O
LIVOIV & FOOC Stable.
J ,
When you want a single or double rig or a saddle horse, give us a call. Every
xhing new. The finest turnouts to be'fonnd in the city. Charges reasonable. A share
of the public patronage is respectfully solicited.
A. J. MOSES. Manager.
Second Street, between Washington an]. Franklin, Olympia, 'Wash.
mW
» C - BEARY,
. GENERAL REPAIRING.
CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KINDS.
Silsby Block, Main Street, (Olympi'a. |
aw:
H.ARNED & BATES 1
Un del takers and Funeral Dlrectorse
: Emecial Attentionfliveu to Embulming for Shipment. ' I
1 OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TEL- NO. 7- ,
2 116 “fest Slxlll Street. I
Mama“ ' '
W Bilger 81 Gomg
\l . >HARD WARE.“
2%2
M—
THE STA’I‘E‘PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY;
Book and Job Printing specialties. Northeast corner of
Fourth and Adams street, Olympia. Wash
~___ _ TACOMA ADVERTISEMEEIEA *—
KIMiRALL BROTPIFJRS
{Agilesvgllzlaiiilyrellgllfio send to us for prices on Guns, Ammunition. Bicycles, Etc.
KINIBALL "1:08., I 132 PncliicAvcnnc, 'l‘acenln, “lash.
Mm”
SCI-IOLL & HUTI—I, IProp. ‘ '
Tacoma - ‘ - - - -, Washington.
M
Music and. Instruments.
‘l‘
Standard and Popular Sheet Music. Latest Songs and Piano Music. All Kinds of
Instruments, Strings and Fittings. ‘
A. AA. TA.YLER 875 CO‘! 910 13 STREET, TACOMA, wnsn.
il OLYMPIA- ’ TRIBUNE
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. SATURDAY. OCTOBER 17. 1891.
OUR ADVERTISERS
I
ABSTRACTORS.
Capital City Abstract & Title Ins. 00.
Olympia Abstract & Title Ins. ()0.
AMUSEMENTS.
Olympia. Theater—The Burglar.
ATTORNEYS.
Atwell, Homer 0.
Bailey, Laughton & Church.
Crawford, J. W.
Eddy & Gordon.
Fitch, A. P. '
Franklin, H. P.
Gaby, Daniel.
Henry, Francis. .
Kleber. J. C. ‘
Linn, 0. V. .
Root & Mitchell.
Simmons, E. B. ‘
BANKS.
Capital National.
First National.
State Bank.
BOOK AND JOB PRINTING.
State Printing Co.
BREWERS. .
Puget Sound Brewery.
BUILDING ASSOCIATIONS.
Olympia Building and Loan.
COAL (ND FUEL.
Heacock & Glover.
Reagh, John D.
' COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Emerson & Bradley.
COETRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Gard & Brown.
Libel-man, J.
Roberts, J. \A’.
Rogers, W. A.
Savage& 00., G. M.
Weeks & CO.
' DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
Hong Yek Lee.
DENTISTS.
Carlyon, Dr. P. H.
Oliver, Dr. A. S.
Woodard, Dr.A. B.
DRUGGISTS.
Capital Pharmacy.
Croniby, F W. .
Marr & ROSS.
DYE WORKS.
Capital Steam Dye Works.
EDUCATIONAL.
Olympia Collegiate Institute.
FLOURING MILL.
Capitol Mills, Tumwater.
' rIRE ARMS.
Kimball Brosm
FOR RENT.
Four unfurnised rooms.
Furnished EPartments.
Eight room louse.
FOR SALE.
Sfimn or mules.
0 d papers.
Steam saw mill.
Timber.
FURNITURE.
T. S. Cantril.
FURS.
M. Scully.
GUN AND LOOKSMI’I‘II.
C. Beary.
HOTELS AND LODGING.
Arlington House.
. INSURANCE.
Chandler, W. M. ~ ’
JEWELERS.
Rose & Godard.
Simenson, O. R.
Talcott Bros.
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLES,
Olympia Horse and Mule Market.
Drewry & Son.
Foster & Laberee. ,
LUMBER.
Westside Mill 00.
George S. Allen.
MEATS AND VEGETABLES.
Brewer & Wright.
Tinkham, F. W.
MEDICAL.
August Flower.
Big G.
Castoria.
Dr. Powell Reeves & 00.
Electric Cough Cure.
Electric Liniment.
Hibburds Pheumatlc Syrup.
Oregon Kidney Tea.
System Builder.
' MERCHANT TAILORS.
J. Noschka.
MILLINERY.
Miss Dora Sternberg.
MUSIC DEALERS.
A. A. 'l‘ayler & Co.
NEW AND EECOND IIAND STORES. ‘
Bernhard & Fisher.
Bickford & Co., E. C.
PHYSICIANS.
Ki.ncaid,;Dr. R. ,
Armstrong, Dr. (1%. S.
Adams, Dr. M. L.
lngham, Dr, Geo. W.
Jento. Dr. J. P.
\Vatt, Dr. J. F.
PIPE COMPANIES.
Puget Sound Pipe 00.
‘REAL ESTATE.
Case, Chas. C.
O’Brien & VVoodruli.
Seammell, G. B.
Thompson & Mumford.
Thurston County Land 00.
STEAM TUGS.
The Doctor. .
- TO LEASE.
Six room cottage.
STONE YARDS.
Carkeek & Nicholas.
UNDERTAKERS.
Harned & Bates.
STOVES AND HARDWARE.
Bilger & Going.
Frost, Robert.
.. TRANSPORTATION,
Steamer Baily Gatzert.
Canadian Pacific R. R.
Steamer Fleetwood.
Northern Pacific R. R.
Olympia. and Chehalis Valley R. R.
WAGONS AND FARM IMPLEMENTS.
Mcßratney, T. J.
WANTS. '
Furnished rooms for light housekeeping.
Room and board. ¢
—-—NEW AND— 1
S (:0 d Ha (1 G 0 (‘1
Bought and Sold.
Highest price paid for Second Hand Goods of
allkinds, Culland see us, Corner Second
and Mull: Streets, Olympia.
Dissolution of Partnership.
Lock Let, of firm of Hong Yek Kee& 00.,
dealers in Chinese groceries and provis
ions, and also of the firm of Hong Yek,
laundrymen, has this day withdrawn from
the partnerships heretotore existing. All
bills will be paid by and accounts settled
with the old firm. .
HONG YEK KEE & CO.
HONG YEK.
Fifth and Columbia street.
TELEGIIAPIIIC TALES.
Brother Andrews Decker, the first and
oldest member of the Benedictine order of
the Roman Catholic church in the United
States, died at Pittsburg, aged 79. .
George Dyer, under arrest in Eastville,
Va,, for the murder of Mrs. Fannie Fad
den, of Cape Charles City, was taken from
jail by a mob and hanged.
Commodore Nathaniel Duear, living in
Graham, S. 0., formerly of the United
States navy, died there this morning.
At Snncook, N. H., Irving A. Evans, son
of Hon. Alonzo Evans, Boston, committed
suicide by shooting himself.
It is semi-officially announced in Home
that the government will raise the Prohibi
tion placed upon imports into taly of
American salted meats.
The buildings of the Lawrence Cement
Company at Bonnewater, N. Y., were to:
tally burned last night. Loss, $300,000; in- .
snrance, SIOO,OOO. ‘
The president today issued a proclama
tion reserving from entry and settlement
tracts of timber in Colorado known as the
White river plateau.
Haly, the deposed president of the Ad
ams Express Company this morning ten
dered his resignation as manager of the
company. which was promptly accepted.
All property in Bridgeport, Conn, of
Clapp Spooner, ex—vice president oi the
Adams Express Company, has been at
, tached for $850,C00 in the suit brought by
1 the express company.
1 Professor John Larkin Lincoln, for 52
years instructor in the Browne’lt. 1,) uni—
versity, died this morning. He was 75
years old. ~ ~ J
A regular monthly dividend of two cents
per share has been declared. by the Cwur
d‘Alene Silver Lead Mining company, nay
able November 10th.
Ncnr York Stock Market.
New YORK, Oct. 17. Noon“ Money
closed easy with no loans. Bar silver 526%.
Stocks closed active, heavy at small frac
tions better than openinfi. Fours cou
pons, 16%; Pacific 6s, 11; Atchison, 44%;
Central Pacific, 30%; Burlington, 98%; Den
ver dz. Rio Grande, 48%; Northern Pacific;
28%; Northern Pacific preferred; 75%;
Northwestern, 15% ; New York Central,
10%; Oregon Navigation, 76; North Am
erican,l9%; Pacific Mail, 36% ; Rock Island,
82%; St. Paul (St Omaha, 34; Texas Pa~
cific, 34%; Union Pacific, 41%; Wells
Fargo Express, 38; Western Union, 82%.
l FERRY 7T6 RESK’N
, I 0
THE GREAT FRENCH STATESMAN
ON THE QUESTION OF PORK.
lle \Vants the Prohibition: of the
American flog’s Entry In to
' France Removed.
PARIS, Oct. 17.~—Peace reigns once more
in the customs committee of the senate.
At yesterday’s meeting of that committee,
ltibat, minister of foreign affairs and
Roche, minister of colonies, defended the
government’s proposition for raising the
prohibition upon the import of
American pork and to substitute for‘ this
prohibition a duty of twenty francsi, Fer
ry, after the several members of the: cym
mittee had expressed their‘ views in ofipo-,
sition to the measure proposed to postpone
discussion until today. This motion was
rejected by a vote of eight to five, where
upon Ferry declared he would at once
resign the presidency of the committee.
Efi'orts were made to induce Ferry to re
consider his determination, with the
rerult that he consented to withdraw his
resignation.
5.5 WHERE TO WORSHIP.
Time of Servhes at the Various
Churches Tomorrow.
Regular services at the Congregational
church, at 11 a. m., and 7:30 p. in.
Services in_ St. John’s Episcopal church
tomorrow at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Rev.
H. H. Buck will conduct the services.
Tomorrow afternoon’s Y. M. C. A. gos
pel meeting will he held at the Olympia
Collegiate institute, at 3:30. The public is
cordially invited.
At St. Michael’s church low mass will be
celebrated at 7 a. m., high mass at 10:30,
catechism at 2 p. m. and vespers at 7 p. m.
Father Olaesscns. '
“Popular Objections to Christianity” is
Mr. Prichard’s subject for tomorrow even
ing at the First Baptist church, Adams and
Eighth streets.
Presbyterian church, corner of Sixth
and Franklin streets, Rev. T. J. Lamont,
pastor. Preaching by the pastor tomor
row at 11a. m. and 7:150 p. m. Morning
subject. “Drawing Nigh to God." Evening
subject, “Foundations.” Sunday school at
12:20 p. 111. Young people’s meeting at
(5:30 p. nl.
Temple Baptist church. in Columbia
hall. Services Sunday at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.
111.; Sunday school, 12111.; Young people’s
meeting, 6:30: p. In. Prayer meeting,
Thursday evening at 7:30 p. 111. Westside
Mission, 3p. m. Come and attend these
111eetings. Preaching at Mission by Mr.
Butler.
Services at the M. E. church tomorrow,
Rev. F. E. Drake pastor. 11 a. 111., first of
alseries of morning discourses on "The
Cardinal Doctrines of Christianity.” First
theme, “The Dignity of God’s Law." 7:30
p. m,, the first of a series of evening (lis
courses on “The Evidences of Revelation."
Unitarian church: Services tomorrow
at 11 a.m. and 7:30 P.m., at Tacoma hall,
corner Fourth and Columbia streets, Rev.
Napoleon Hoagland. minister. Subject:
“The Two Theories of Insniration." Sun—
day school at 12:15. Geo. H. Funk super
intendent. Intermediate classes’ study:
“Life andN’l‘eachings of‘ Jesus,” as illus
trated in )ictures and parables. Pastor’s
class: “iligher Criticism of the Hebrew
Scriptures.” Adult class: With Byron
Fillet, as leader discusses “Social Prob
ems.
Tacoma’s Big Chunk of Coal.
New York Sun: In front of the Tacoma
hotel, in the flourishing city of that name.
stands a heavy wagon on which is a solid
chunk of coal. It is quite safe to say that
New York never saw in Its streets so large
a piece of coal. It weighs over 16,00
pounds, and was exhibited with great pride
to President Harrison when he visited the
city. Above the wagon is a large sign;
“We can warm the world on coal.” The
Piece is thirty inches thick and twenty feet
ong.
Tacoma does not have to go far for its
coal. The fields lie along the base of the
Cascade mountains, only about thirty miles
east of the city. Spurs from the mam line
i of the Northern Pacific railrod lead to them.
The quantity is practically unlimited, and
the coal is bituminous and semi-bitumin
nous. Tacoma has already a very large
sea-going coal traffic. Its coal is shipped‘
from great bunkers along the wharf, in ‘
which the coal is piled as high as the masts
of some of the vessels. .
Good Suggestions from Gen. Miles.
WASHINGTON, D. C. Oct. 17.-—General
Miles in his annual report recommends
that the national guard country be mobi
lized or assembled at the World’s Colum—
bian exhibition in 1893, and that congress
be recyested to make an anpropriation to
pay t e cost of transportation.
ITO THE METHODISTS FROM ALL
PARTS 01“ THE WORLD.
He is in Favor of Maintaining
Peace by Arbitration and is
[loudly Applanded.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.-—Rev. Dr. Will
iams, of the Methodint church of Canada.
presided over the ecumenical council to
day. HOll. Charles Foster, secretary ofr
the treasury. made a short address. The
announcement of Bishop Wayman, ot the
African M. E. church that the colored
churches had decided unanimously in favor
of organic union was received with ap
plause. The general topic today was “war
and peace.” "
The first essay, ”International Arbitra
tion,” was read by T. Snape, of Liverpool.
While reading the address, President Har
rison and Secretary Noble” entered the
hall. Everybody in the church rose to
their feet and there was a burst of applause
as the president ascended the platform. He
was presented to the chairman, who in
turn introduced him to the assemblage.
Another burst of applause followed, and
when it died away the president stepped
forward and said': “i. came here this
morning to make an expression of my re
spect and esteem for this great body of
delegates assembled from all countries of
the world, and much more to give mani—
festation of my respect and love for that
greater body of Christian men and women
for whom you stand.
“Every ecumenical conference is a dis
tinct step in the direction not only of the
unification of the church, but the unilica—
tion of humanity. It is the natural order
that subdivisions should be wiped out be
fore the grand divisions of the church can
be united. You have today as the theme
of discussion the subject ‘lnternational
1 Arbitration,’ and this being the public and
i enlarged use of the word, perhaps makes
lmy presence here as an officer of the
United States especially appropriate." [Ap
plause] The subject is one which has
ong attracted my attention and I think I
may say has as greatly attracted the inter
est and adherence of the United States as
that of an other Christian power in the
world. [prlause] ’Tis known to you
all that in the recent conference of the
American states at Washington a proposi—
tion was made and adapted by the ad
herents of all or nearly all governments
represented; that as applied to this hemi
sphere all international disputes should be
settled by arbitration. [Applause]
”Of course there are lim tations as yet
in the nature of things to complete the con
summation and general adoption of such
a scheme. ’Tis for Christian sentiment to
manifest itselfin the removal forever of
causes of dispute and then what remains
will be for the use of fair international
arbitration” (applause); “but 1 did not in
tend to enter into a discussion of the theme
for setting forth which you have with de
liberation appointed those who have given
it attention.” Let me therefore say simply
this: “For myself temporarily, in a place
of influence in this country and much
more for a great body of its citizenship, the
desire of America is for peace with the
whole world. {Grreat applause] It may
beand is probably true that the devrl still
being unchained, that we should have our
own foundries and that we shall promote .
the settlement ofinternational disputes by
arbitration, when it is understood 1f ah ap
peal is to be made to some other tribunal
we shall not be unprepared.” [Applause]
There is one unitly of church am ut one
of humanity. tis through this great
Christian sentiment characterized [y a
high sense ofjustice and by spirit of (we
and forbearance imposed on civil institu
tions and civil governments of the world
that we shall approach the best arbitration
methods of settling disputes.”
As the president concluded and assed
out of the church, the entire confldreiice
rose and applauded his remarks. Secre
tary Noble made a few rewarks. He
was followed by Sir Julian I’auneefotew
who was present but made in;
address. The discussion of the subject
was then resumed. The following gentle
men then spoke upon it: Representative
Taylor, Ohio; Rev. Enoch Sat, London;
Bishop Newman, Nebraska; Rev. Father
Atkinson, London; T. liuddle, Devon;
Rev. Dr. Buckly, New York; I. 1. Me»
(llaren, Toronto; Rev. Wm. Arthur and
Rev. John Bond, London. Conference ad
journed at 12:30.
NIE'I‘EOIIIDLOGIUAL lIiGPOR'I‘.
OLYMPIA, Wax-111., Oct. 16, 1801.
E E 3397? :s}?
Place of g: g 55g '1 BE“ 95% Stntc of
Observation. 5' 5 :11 gm», 5?: weather.
a = as =s2 m H
7, .~ .s:1 34 E'
SEE-13a 30.22 3807:1125; .m (Bondy——
Portland . .-. 30.22 Ll 2 N Ellrigho‘. .00 Cloudy
Fort Cnnhv... 31).145|1HE 20 .10 Cloudy
Walla Wollnv, 30314241~§W Lil'ht .00 (Jlomllesn
5p01r0ne...... 2%).352H'Cm Colin 0) Cloudy
Baker City.... 31.:332‘ 5E r. .00 moumess
Roseburg..... 20,20 50 S Mont .(Mll‘oggy
Eureka .... . ~ 30,14 0‘: (1m (:m In .00 Foggy
Rod Blufl. .. .. 30.14 425 NW light .00 Cloudless
Saormnento.,. 30.12 s‘2]er Light .00 Cloudlcss
San Francisco 30.11150 N Lighp .00 Cloudlcss
Loom. REPORT.
The maximum temperature today was
65 degrees and‘the minimum 48. Amount,
of rainfall, .01 Inches. _Amount of rain
fall since July 1, 1301. 6.05 inches; av
erage (for sovera|_years) since July 1, 1891,
0.75 inches; dellclency since July 1, 1801,
0.70 inches. Farr weather probable for
Sunday. E. B. OLNEY, Observer.
Superior Court.
In the superior court today, an order for
suit was filed in the case of Chapman Y 5
Prince. '
Johnson vs. Liberman, order granting
leave to amend complaint. .
Ayer & Son vs. J. O. Rathbun, aflidavrt
and motlon for written pleadings filed.
Knittle vs. Adams, judgment entered.
Whlte Winged Peace.
NEW YORK, Oct 17,—:11 special cable dis
patch to the Herald from Teguemgalpa,
Honduras, says a. formal treaty of peace
and amnesty between Honduras and San
Salvador has been signed. This action
makes sure for the time being at all events,
peace-in the Central American states.
“'eckly Bank Statement.
NEW YORK, Oct. 17.—The weekly bank
statement shows the following changes:
Reserve increase, $2,390,000; specie in
crease, $5,823,000; circulation decrease. $53,
000. The banks now hold $5,029,000 in ex
cess of legal requirements.
Falluren on the (Journ-
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17. ——Bradstreet’s
Mercantile agency report twelve failures in
‘ the Pacific Coast states and territories for
the week ending yesterday, as compared
with seventeen for the previous week and
thirteen for the corresponding week of"
1890. ‘
A Saw Mill Exploslon. ‘
JACKSON, Miss., Oct. 17.—At Clarksburg
a saw mill and boiler exploded killing Sam
Harold and Ephraim Bailey and mortally
wounding Allen Lindsley. _
California urafil-Market.
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17.—Wheat, buyer
351.73%; season, sl.Bl. .
FRESH STATE NEVVS.
The annual convention of fifty“ mtian
church is in session in Seattle...“ _.
There are now 21') inmates of tlze' Jheha
lis Reform School and at the rate they are
being sent there there will be a hundred
before spring.
Eward J. Houghton, Post G. A. R. has
been orgrnized at Harvey, Stevenscounty,
named after one of the men who blew the
rain Albemarle.
The citizens of Tacoma are protesting to
Secretary Foster that they do not want
Thos. Henderson Boyd as deputy collector ,
of customs and say he is totally unlit for‘
any public oflice.
The decision of Judge Robinson that a
railroad com any cannot condemn private
property for branch line right-of-way with
out settlement with owner of such private
lands will be received by the people of this
state as good common sense. ' Seattle
Times.
1 Elder Henry H. Cogswell. of Puyallup,
one of the oldest ministers of the Christian
church, was stricken with paralysis during
the business session of the convention of
that church in Seattle yesterday.
Collector Wasson has accepted Deputy
Collector Alexanders resignation and says
in reply that he, Alexander, is not a gen
tleman. Wasson appears to be angry be
cause Alexander bursted out the truth.
Christian Schuerman, a wealthy citizen
of Seattle, has brought suit in the superior
court against his eight children and the
two illegitimate children of his dead wife,
to quiet title to valuable property in and
about Seattle.
The court martial of Colonel llaines,
which will convene in Olympia November
5. will be composed of Brigadier General A.
P. Curry, of Spokane; Colonel Enoch W.
Pike, of Coldendale; Colonel E. M. Carr, of
Seattle; Colonel Henry Landes, of Port
Townsend; Colonel Wellington Clark, of
Walla Walla; Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, of
Spokane; Colonel Frank ‘l‘. Gilbert. of
Walla Walla. Judge advocate, First Lieu—
tenant Chas. R, Dorr, of Dayton.
Contractor Lillis has nearly completed
the new three-story brick wing to the West
ern Washington insane asylum. This ad—
dition will have a capacity for 165 patients.
There are about 300 patients in the asylum
now. Previous to the trans ortation of
about 140 patients to the Mxedical Lake
asylum, the institution was crowded.
With the new wing it will easily accom
modate about 400 patients.
A STARTLING TA] E
V A) I
EXPOSURE OF A HUGE Ol’lyM
SMUGGLING RING.
United States Senators and Repre
sentatives Said to be Impli
caleauA Ll‘islly Story.
CHICAGO, Oct. i7.—The Times has a spe—
lcial dispatch from Washington, D. 0.,
‘which says that startling disclosures are
promised in regard to smuggling opium
into the country from the British posses
sions. lt declares that after six months’
investigation the officers of the secret ser
vice made a pondercns report to the trees
ury department, showing the existence of
an opium smuggling ring which includes
many prominent men and United States
government ollicials, and that in extent it
is not equaled since the famous whisky
ring of 1876. At least two United States
senators and five congressmen are impli
cated.
A Medical Sensation. I
Sr. Lours. Oct. 17.——The ali'airs oi the
Pan-American congress developed another
medical sensation. It appears the Ameri
can Medical Association appointed Dr. A.
L. Gihon to represent thhe medical depart
ment of the U. S. navgrbut Dr. Gihon be
ing extremelv busy ecretary Tracy sent
Dr. Howard E. Amos in his stead. The of
ficers of the congress declined to receive
Dr. Ames except as a proxy. This Amos
would not cansent to and he therefore was
entirely ignored in the proceedings of the
committee. ‘
, Sued for Damages.
Lomsvrmuc, Oct. 17.—George Martin, a
Versailles tnrfman, sued Williams, owner
of Allerton, for s2s,ooodamages. Martin
attended the race at Independence, lowa,
between Allerton and Nancy Hanks. While
he was there the grandstand fell and he
was crushed under it and permanently in
jured. Williams owned the track and the
stand. ' ’
olymplu “fill Get Free Delivery.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.—The postmaster
general is now preparing for the establish
ment ofa free delivery service within the
next ninety days in the folloWing‘ towns: ‘
Olympia, I’ort’l‘ownsend and New What-1
com, Washington; Laramie, Wyo.’ River
side, Cal.; Boise City, Idaho; Alhuquer
que, N. M.
l Emigration From Russia.
‘ LONDON, Oct. 17.-—A special to the Times
from Miplowitz, in Prussian Silesia, says:
The Russian authorities Will prohibit the
exportation of wheat. at the end of the
month. A dis]’>atch to the Standard from
()dess says: Orders received here for the
suspension of operations of anti-Jewish
1 measures. Emigration from South Russia
l is diminishing.
1 Lost “’ltll All on Board.
l Bosron. Oct. 17.——The schooner Rebecca
l‘l‘aulane, ef Boston, carrying a crew of
l seven men, has doubtless been lost with all
on boord. The ’l‘aulane left Newport
News, Va., on the 28th for Galveston with
a cargo of coal and has never been heard
feom since. She. was valued at about
$17,0C3.
Railroad officials summoned. :
ST. LOUIS, Me., Oct. 17.—-A morning pa
per says: “United States deputy marshal.
served subpoenas upon the officials of the
Missouri Pacific, Wabash-Alton, and other
roads to appear before the general grand
jury the coming week. The complaints it
is said are founded upon allegations of
payment of rebates, commissions, etc., to
strengthen bvsiness.
Chlcagn Produce Market.
CHICAGO, Oct. 17. —— Glose— Wheat——
weak; cash, 95%0; December, 97%13;
May, $1.03%@L03§.
Corn—Steady— ash, 53%0; May. 41%c.
Oats—Steady; cash, 27%c; May, 30%-
@3o%c. .
Pork Qulet; Cash, [email protected]%;
January, $11.37M.
Lard—Easy ; cash, $6.30; January, $6.42M.
Barley—Steady; [email protected]
A New York I‘ll-m All Right.
NEW YORK, Oct. 17.—1 tis announced
in connection with the forgeries, by their
defaulting employe Thomas B. Stout, that
‘ the firm Keneth Hopkins & Co. is all right
Lnnd that any claims against it made by
Thomas J. Briggs will 6 paid when es
[ tablished.
Sullivanites Arrested.
CHARLESTON, Oct. 17.—Coal miners had
seventeen detectives on guard at Raymond
city, Marmot Mines, arrested, charged
with being members of an armed body in
vading the state in violation of law, on a
charge of carrying concealed weapons.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoina.
< EVENING EDITION.
3
BLAINE S BLAST
HE TAKES THE WIND (MIT 01“
, DEMOCRATIC SAILS.
Ills Explanation of :1 Remark he
Made Relative to the McKin
ley Tariff Bill.
NEW YORK, Oct. 17.—An Ohio editor hav
ing written to Mr. Blaine that the demo—
cratic papers were parading him as an op
ponent of the McKinley bill, he replied:
AUGUSTA, Me., Oct. 14.
John Hopley, Esq., Editor Journal, Bu
cyrus, 0.-My Dear Sir: You inform me
that a democratic paper in your town, and
many democratic papers throughout Ohio,
keep the following paragraph standing in
type:
“But there is not a section or line in the
McKinley bill that will open the market
for another bushel of wheat or another bar
rel of pork. l
(Signed) JAMES G. BLAINE.
“To Senator Frye, July 11, 1890.”
This sentence is garbled and taken from
its proper connection. What I did say is
the following:
“i do not doubt that in many respects
the tarill‘bill pendingin congress is a just
measure, and that most of its provisxons
are in accordance with the wise policy of
protection, but there is not a section ‘or
line in the entire bill that will open the
‘ market for another bushel of wheat or an
} other pound of pork.”
1 The letter in which this paragraph oc—
‘eurs was written to Senator Frye, July 11,
‘ 1890, and the McKinley bill did not become
a law until October 1., nearly three months
thereafter. In my letter to Senator Frye I
objected to the hi 1 because it did not con
tai n a. reciprocity clause which would pro
vide a market for wheat, pork and other
products of the farm, and for various
fabrics. Before the bill was finally passed,
a reciprocity clause was inserted and a
larve addition made to the free list. It
wiil therefore be seen, from what I said in
my letter, that the objection which I made
to the McKinley bill was entirely re
moved before the bill beccme a law.
Let me further say that the reciprocity
clause has given anample market for many
barrels of flour and many pounds of pork.
Brazil, some months ago entered into a
treaty by which many American articles
are admitted free. Flour is made free, and
pork admitted at a nominal duty. Cuba
and Porto Rico have reduced the duty on
llour from $5.80 a, barrel to sl, which gives
us the market, besides putting nearly one
hundred articles of American production
on the free list. San Domingo has made a
reciprocity free list besides a. large number
of other articles. Other treaties for recip
rocity are in progress Germany, without
negotiating a formal treaty has removed
the prohibition on (pork, and our
government in consi eratlon thereof,
has left her sugar on the free list.
This opens to us an entirely new market,
and $15,000,000 to S2O,O3O,COL)>Of American
pork will be consumed per annum Where
not a pound has been taken for ten years.
The reciprocity provision is proving verry
successful, eslpecmlly in farm products, and
more particu arly in the case of two arti
cles mentioned in the paragraph quoted—
liour and pork. lam not, t ierefpre,an op
ponent of the McKinley bill, as the demo
cratic yapers in Ohio are constantly alleg
ing. (3n the contrary, I have cordially
supported it ever since it was perfected by
the insertion of a reciprocity clause. Very
respectfully yours, JAMns G. BLAINE.
PEIESIINAL [TIES-
Mayor Williams of Salem, is in the city.
Geneml O’Brien went to Tacoma this of
ternoon.
George Sleater was admitted to citizené
ship today.
John Arthur, oi the University building
commission, is in the city.
W. E. Sebree, former owner of Sebree’s
addition, is at the Olympia, registered from
New York.
T.G. Wilson, of Skagit county, and F. G.
Weilei‘, of Tacoma, have been appointed
notaries public.
Rew- ’l‘. J. Lamont has returned from
Spokane and will occupy his pulpit as
usual tomorrow.
Mr. A. J. Golf, who has been absent for
some time, returned to the city last even
ing and was welcomed by his many
friends.
W. ’l‘. Muigs, Grays Harbor, Henry C.
Cooper, Montesano; R. H. Evans and Ed—
win 0. French, of Aberdeen, are at the
Olympia.
State Treasnrer Lindsley has gone to
Portland to attend memorial services in
honor‘of his late father in that City to
morrow.
’l‘. M. Mofl'ett. Kewanee, 111.- J. W. Vree
lend, New York: 'l‘. E. D. Stailinqs, Port
land. and A. J. Gabriel, of Chicago, are at
the Olympia.
Lynn Bloom, of Olympia, and Grace W.
Lloyd, daughter of Councilman Lloyd, of
’i‘umwater. were granted amnrriage ieense
to wed today.
Mrs. lioggs, of Tacoma, department in
spector afthe Woman’s Relief corps, will
visit (-i‘eo. H. Thomas Relief corps of this
city next Monday afternoon.
S. G. Berry. Hugh McCamant and John
Borg, of ()hehaiis; 'l‘. B. ltawson and L.
W. Eill, of Seattle; H. F. McKay, Hon.
John Paul Judson, J. I’. De Witt, . Smith
and H. I’. Bush, of Tacoma, and J. M.
1 Baird, of Ellensburgh, are at the Carlton
1 house.
‘ D. Germanas. Robert Burns and H. W.
Clement, of Tacoma; Mrs. M. Young, 0.
H. French and and wife, Hon. John Ar
thur, Col. J. C. Haines, ’l‘. L. Stiers. and
J: I’. Anderson, of Seattle, are at the Olym
pia.
W. E. Sebree, owner of the addition on
the Eastside by that name, is in the city.
His appearance on the street brinfis to the
mind of many the good times w ich gre
veiled eighteen months ago He lande in
Olympia with little ceremony, put his
money inetract of land, Iplatted it, and
sold it like hot cakes. {e cleaned up
nearly $40,000 and has since Visited Alaska,
Euro e and other places of interest. Now
' he is geek and can hardly realize the im
i provements that have taken place.
I’LUMB sTA'I‘mN'I'TEMS.
Bucoda Enterprise :. Mr._Bower, of Hot
Springs,is visiting With friends and rela
tives in this vicinity.
Mrs. Elliot Jones visited with the family
of J. C.Spirlock one day this week.
Conductor Phelps end a party of friends
spent Sunday hunting and fishing near
here.
Miss Theresa Cratz leaves this week for
Seattle, where she will become a student of
the State university.
Wednesday evening a. party of hobos
sampled the milk in the cans ready for
shipment, at the house of E. A. Sheldon,
l who liver near the station.
In the future Plumb Station will be sub
lied with fresh meat twice a week from
{)he wagon of Mr. Teal. the Tumwater
butcher, Success attend his venture; it is
a. boon to this community.
J . D. Spirlock’s sale was well attended,
but few bids were made when it was found
things were not going at bed rock prices.
One span 0t horses. however, were sold for
$l6O, on time, at ten per centinterest, an
nually, secured by a mortgage on real es
tate.
The school board met last Friday and
transacted some business in regard to the
finishing of the school building, fences, etc.

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