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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, October 19, 1891, Image 1

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OFFICIAL PAPER
o———OF———-o
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
‘ Thurston County.
VOLUME 11. NO 149 >
_¥_-‘____ . MISCELLANEOUS. _ w A
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROBT. F. WHI'IHAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRAOI‘ & TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED)
Draughtin g and Blue Printing.
Our Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and are the 01115 r complete set of Abstracts from
Government to date in the county.
Upstairs in Chalnbers Block - - - - Olylnpia, Wash.
(3-. ZN'OSOI—IKA,
Leadlng Merchant Tailor.
»—--——Always keeps a full assortment of“ -
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
) REPAIRING NE.A.TI..Y DONE.
C 1 NE W, GA STLE C 1
, ——-ANDr—- 0a
0a . BUOODA ’
The Best, Cheapest and Cleanest Fuel.
THOMAS HEAGOCK AND A. D. GLOVER, Exclusive Agents.
Dealers in all kinds of fuel. Orders Iclt at R. FROST’S store will receive prompt attention.
'l‘. J. MCBR ATNEY
‘ ' 5 D . W '
211 m .6 IV €l’V agons
. Carriages, Buggies. Road Carts, Plows, Etc.
Agricultural Irnplements of Every Description.
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIFTH STREET:
G- U RNEY
a an IEIHS GI O.
Successors to E 05113“ &, LABEHEE.
We have added to our already large stock a FIRST-CLASS WAGON. specially fitted
for the removal of Pianos. Furniture and Baggage. Our facilities for the re
moval of safes and all other heavy goods are of the best. All orders for
Hacks, Gurneys, Livery. Trucks, Baggage, etc., pronmtlyat
tended to. A first~class boarding stable in connection. ‘
CORNER MAIN AND THIRD ST.
~ ' Telephone Nurnber 3.
C - BEARY,
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
GENERAL REPAIRING. ‘ .
CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KIN D 3.
Silsby Bloc‘k, Main Street, Olympia.
STATE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY
_ N (I.
Book : and : Job : Printing : Specialties.
‘Nortlleast Corner. of Fourth and Adams Street, Olvlnpin, \Vnslxington.
- EARNED <95 BATES»?
'3 I
Undartakers and Funeral Dll (actor:
3i Especial Attention Given to Embulming for Shipment.
OPEN DAY ANiD NIGHI: TEL- NO. '7-
116 West Sixth Street. _
" 3'l 81 G '
»~ 6 » ,
\l . firl-IARD WARE, 3 1
- L332}; fiivwh—fif‘
% STOVhS AND TINWARI:
W _ ......u—___...___._____._
___ _ TACOMA ADVERTISEMENTS.____M_ _
KIMIBALL BROTHERS
V . arr.“ w ,-».—r~.-.w- m. > r’ ‘—
rd“: ' V’VU ,__
xgiggillelagfiyrégfiim send to 113 for prices on Guns, Ammunition, Bicycles, Etc.
. KIMBALL “1:05., I 132 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, Wash.
W
SOI—IOLL & HUTH, Prop.
Tacoma - ' - —' - - Washington.
M“
Music and. Instruments.
V
’ Standard and Popular Sheet Music. Latest Songs and Piano Music. All Kinds 01
Instruments, Strings and Fittings. _.
>A- A. TAYLER 8c (30., 9:0 CSTREET,TAconA, WASH.
OLYMPIA TRIBUNE
OUR ADVERTISERS.
ABSTRACTOBS.
Capxtal City Abstract & Title Ins. 00.
Olympia Abstract & Title Ins. CO.
AMUSEMENTS.
Olympia. Theater—The Burglar.
ATTORNEYS.
Atwell, Homer 0.
Bailey, Laughton & Church.
Crawford, J. W.
Eddy & Gordon.
Fitch, A. P. _
Franklin, H. P.
Gaby, Daniel.
Henry, Francis.
Kleber, J. C. .
Linn, 0. V.
Root & Mitchell.
Simmons. E. B.
BANKS.
Capital National.
First National.
State Bank.
BOOK AND JOB PRINTING.
State Printing Co.
BREWERS.
Puget Sound Brewery.
BUILDING ASSOCIATIONS.
Olympia Building and Loan.
COAL AND FUEL.
Heacoek & Glover.
Reagh, John D.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Emerson & Bradley.
CO ETEACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Card & Brown. .
Libermau I.
Roberts, j. W. V
Rogers, W. A.
Savagedt 00., G. M.
Weeks & Co.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
Hong Yek Lee.
DENTIBTS.
Carlyou, Dr. P. H.
Oliver, Dr. A. S.
Woodard, Dr. A. B.
DRUGGISTS.
Capital Pharmacy.
Cromhy, F W.
Marr & Ross.
DYE WORKS.
Capital Steam Dye VVOrks.
EDUCATIONAL.
Olympia Collegiate Institute.
FLOUNING MILL.
Capitol Mills, Tumwater.
FIRE ARMS.
Kimball Bros.
FOR RENT.
Four unfurnised rooms.
Furnished apartments.
Eight room house.
m _ FOR SALE.
Old papers. 7
Steam saw mill.
Timber.
~ FURNITURE.
T. B. Cantril.
FURS.
M. Scully.
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
C. Beary.
HOTELS AND LODGING.
Arlington Honse.
INSURANCE.
Chandler, W. M. '
JEWELEEB.
Rose & Godard. '
Simenson, O. R. 4
{Balcott Bwfi. _ _ g.
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE BTABLIES-.
Olympia Horse and Mule Market.
Drewry 5?; Son.
Foster & Laberee.
LUMBER.
Westside Mill 00.
George S. Allen.
MEATS AND VEGETABLES.
Brewer & Wright.
Tinkham, F. W.
MEDICAL.
August Flower.
Big G.
Oastoria.
Dr. Powell Reeves & Co.
Electric Cough Cure.
Electric Liniment.
Hibbards Pheumatic Syrup.
Oregon Kidney Tea.
System Builder.
MERCHANT TAILons.
J. Noschka.
MILLINERY.
Miss Dora Sternberg.
MUSIC DEALERS.
A. A. Tayler & 00.
NEW AND SEcoND HAND STORES.
Bernhard & Fisher. -
Biokford & 00., EC.
PHYSICIANS.
Kilicaid,;Dr. R.
Armstrong, Dr. G. S.
Adams, Dr. M.L.
Ingham, Dr, Geo. W.
Jento. Dr. J. P.
Watt, Dr. J. F.
' PIPE COMPANIES.
Puget Sound Pipe 00.
REAL ESTATE.
Case, Chas. C. .
O’Brien & Woodruil.
Scammell, G. R.
Thompson & Mumford. .
Thurston County Land 00.
STEAM TUGS.
The Doctor.
T 0 LEASE.
Six room cottage.
STONE YARDS.
Carkeek & Nicholas.
UNDERTA KERS.
Harnod & Bates.
. STOVES AND HARDWARE.
Bilger & Going.
' Frost, Robert. ,
TRANSPORTATION.
Steamer Baily Gratzert.
Canadian Pacific R. R.
Steamer Fieetwood.
Northern Pacific R. R.
Olympia and Chehalis Valley R. R.
WAGONS AND FARM IMPLEMENTS.
Mcßratney, T. J.
WANTS.
Furnished rooms for light housekeeping.
Room and board. ‘
‘ ———-NEW AND—~—
S cond Hand G 0 d
Bought and Sold.
Highest price paid for Second Hand Goods bf
all kinds. Call and see us, Corner Second
and Main Streets, Olymplu.
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. MONDAY. OCTOBER 19, 1891.
ADVERTISE
...... IN _
The Tribune.
SDIUGGLER’S ARRESTED.
An Organized Gang of Men Arrest
ed at Roche Harbor.
TACOMA, Oct. [Sm—About the most exten
sive gathering in of alleged smuglers has
been made at Roche Harbor, on San Juan
islands, and as a result seven men spent
last night in the county jail in this city,
having been brought from ROChe Harbor
by Deputy United States Marshal J. H.
Boyce. The prisoners are Isaac Sandwith,
Cyrus Stowe, Richard Knight, John Gross,
Fred and Alexander Lightheart and George
Lawson. They were captured on Saturday
night by Deputy Boyce, Customs Inspect”
ors C. B. Fox and Geo. W. Dillon and of
ficers of the revenue cutter WOlCutt. They
also captured the sloop Annie of Fuirha
ven, which is alleged to have played a very
important part in the smuggling. The
ringleader of the gang is said to be Ike
Sandwith, who keeps a country store at
Roche Harbor. At his place the arrests
were made, after carefully laid plans.
FRESH STATE NEWS.
The Snohomish Republican is the latest
weekly newspaper, “just out.” W. B.
Shay, is the editor and manager.
~ The bank clearings on Saturday were
Tacoma $171,420.60, balance $48,576.72; Seat—
tle $138,985.04, balance $40,134.08.
The late representative, Chas. W. Law
ton, of King count ~ was buried yesterday
at Seattle, in a proilnsion of beautiful [low—
ers.
Villard is laughing about Everett and
says the “Whaleback” works Will not be
built there. He once laughed about Ta
coma.
The strike in the Gilman coal mines,
which was inaugurated March 12th, has
been broken by the strikers themselves.
At a meeting of the strikers, held yester
day, it was decided to call the strike off.
John M. Perry, ex-justice of the peace at
Tolt, was arrested last evening on a charge
of arson. His grocery store and saloon at
Tolt were burned en the night of Septem
ber 13th, and later the Good Templar’s
building caught fire and was burned to the
ground, He is suspected in both cases.
Edward E. Albertson, the detaultingeash—
ier of the Fidelity Trust bank, of Tacoma,
arrived in Tacoma last night. He admits
his guilt, and will plead guily, throwing
himself on the mercy of the court. Mrs.
Albertson returned to her parents, in lowa,
some time ago.
Senator Allen as Judge.
THE TRIBUNE received a special telegram
from Washington City on Saturday too
late for its issue, as follows: “It is cur—
rently reported in this city that Senator
John B. Allen will be appointed U. S. dis
trictjudge in place of Judge Sawyer. de
ceased. and that the governorof the state
of Washington will appoint ex-Delegate
Tom Brents, of Walla. Walla, U. S. senator
to succeed Senator Allen until the next
meeting of the state legislature. The ap
pointment of Allen is looked for every
day.” . .
Balmaceda is Masthead.
CINCINNATI, Oct. 19.—Dr. Erancis Rivers
and Signor Carlos del Rio, late of the mili
tary stafl‘ of President Balma‘ceda of Chile,
arrived here yesterday engoute for New
York. They had with then} Louis Bloch,
of California, as interpreter. _ Through him
they said that. Balmacedajsl not dead, all
reports ofsuiclde to the‘c‘oiitrary notwith
standing; and they expeeted» to meet himl
either in _Ncw York or iflurope. l
AWihT sibrnr {Eli-45:4” 11.; ~ ‘
LONDON, Oct. 19,—The hurricane ' which
prevailed on the west coast of Ireland for
several days past is pronounced to be the
worst storm known in that part of the
. country in twenty years. The river Shan
-Inon overliowed its banks and submerged
‘ large quantities of land in its vicinity,
‘drowinga considerable number of cattle
and sheep and destroying many barns and
other buildings.
Ran Away With Her.
K NADA, Cal., Oct. ISL—Dr. E. Z. Hennesy,
mayor of Napa, and Miss Mamie Tyther
were married late last night by Superior
Judge Ham. Mr. Henncsy spirited the
young lady away from home, drove hastily
to this city, where the marriage tookdulace.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. an Mrs.
Tyther, he a well-to-do farmer. They had
opposed the marriage, being Catholics, and
the prospective bridegroom a divorced
man. The wedded couple went to San
Francisco today. Mr. and Mrs. Tyther (lid
not discover the elopement until this morn
111g.
The Pope ls Bitter.
ROME, Oct. 10.—The Pope has written to
Harmel, organizer of the French Work
ingmens pilgrimages, which recentlylvisited
this city. expressing bitter grief at seeing
the French pilgrims ”abandoned” without
provacation to the attacks of an ungovern
able populace." The pope in his letter adds
’he is deeply grateful to the pilgrims who
came to Rome and to those who are pre
vented from coming by violence and in—
iqutnous hatred. He sends his blessing.
An Envlnus Dispatch From Chile.
LONDON, Oct. 19,—A dispatch to the
Times from Valparaiso says: “Evidence
from neutral sources confirms the state
ment that the United States squadron in
l Chilean waters, both in words and deeds,
displayed enmity towards the congres.
sional navy during the recent civil war in
Chile.” . ‘
Balfour’s Appointment. 3
Lennon, Oct. 19.—The Pall Mall Gazette
this afternoon in referring to the appoint
ment of Balfour as first lord of the treas—
ury and therefore, as a conservative leader
in the commons, in succession to the late
William Henry Smith, says: “The ap~
pointment is not a bad thing for the oppo
sition. We prefer to meet fighting men.
It will be nothing but a boon to the liberals
to have opposed to them a man specially
identified with coercion in its most defiant
fonn.”
Farmers, Alliance Dislluegrating.
BALTIMORE, Oct. 19.—Ex—United States
Senator Wade Hampton, who is visiting
here, in an interview with the Sun reporter
says: The {Farmers’ Alliance is rapidly
disintegrating in the South and that within
the next four years‘it will entirely disap
pear. The people, he says, are rapidly
awakening to the absurdity of the demands
the organization has promulgated.
Len tor Buenon Ayn-e 5.
BUONOS AYRES, Oct. 19.—-At a special seb
ting of the Senate the nation censuring the
president of the Argentine Republic. Bel
igrim-, for the presidency, passed aft-er a
heated discussion on the subject. Gen.
Boone and his family haye left for Buenos
Ayers. '
I'lrs. Parnell Seriously 111.
LONDON, Oct. 19.——Mrs. Parnell, widow of
Chas. Stewart, Parnell, continues in a very
‘ weak And precarious condition. She is un
‘ able to sleep without the aid of drugs and ‘
cannot partake of solid food.
Olympians Win.
The Olympia boys played at Centralia
yesterday and beat them by a score of 15
to 11. Quite a number of Olympians
accompanied the nine and an interesting
game was witnessed.
1 OUR CUSTOM HOUSE
L . ‘
ITS HISTORY IN OLYMPIA, PORT
ANGELES AND PORT TOWNSEND.
An Interesting Article Relative to
the Troubles of Collecting the
Revenue and Running
the (”flee-
The Seattle Telgraph today prints an in—
teresting history of Puget Sound’s custom
house, which was first established on Pu
get Sound in 1851, at Olympia. The aver
age life in the office of the 20 collectors ap
pointed by various presulents, was 25
months. The only two officials who made
a success of the office was the first collect—
or, Simpson P. Moses, and Henry Webster.
Moses’ administration was a success be
cause the Indians were so thick and hostile
that it was exceedingly diliicult to get any
one to take the office. Webster was inde
pendent, politie, al'l'ahle and had a peculiar
way of satisfying the public and himself
at the same time. -
Simpson T‘. Moses. thellrst collector, was
appointed by president Fillmore. At that
time the Indians around Olympia were
hostile, and he secured from the Gen. E.
A. Hitchcock, commanding the Pacific
division of the U. 8, Army, arms and am
munition for the protection of the govern
ments interest. .
Shortly before Moses organized the 'dis
trict, a convention of delegates assembled
at Cowlitz, Lewis county (August 29, 1851),
passed resolutions callingthe government s
attention to the wholesale smuggling of
English goods into Oregon territory by the
Hudson Bay Company.
On November 29th of that year the eol~
leetor verified the report to the department.
His subordinate appointments were Will—
iam 1). Miller as surveyor of the port of
Neqsually, and Elwood Evans, then of
Olympia. ,
During December, 1851, a friendly Indian
broughta letter to Collector Moses from
William Rowland, who was master of the
brig Georgina, with 22 passengers and a
crew of live men, which was lostabove Fort
Simpson on the West coast of Vancouver
Island, B. 0., November 19, 1851. Indians
robbed them of their clothes and blankets
and kept them as capttves, penniless and
starving, on the beach. The vessel had
left Olympia and Fort Steilacoom for San.
Francisco with many well known people
aboard._. .4. > __ 7 fl 7
Captains Mitchell and McNeil of the
Hudson Bay Company’s brigantine Una
were sent to their relief. A squad ofAmer—
ican soldiers accompanied the expedition,
commanded by Lieut. John Dement, U. S.
A. The expedition failed, and Lieut.
Dement negotiated with the Indians for the
release of the shipwrecked colony on pay
ment of.beads, clothing, blankets and pro—
visions.
The first revenue oificer a winked at
Port Townsend was Henry C. Vinson, who
was appointed. United States inspector of
customs by Collector Moses. Wilson, L.
B. Hastings. sr. and A. A. Plummer, 81'. all
of whom are now dead. were the first set
tlers at Port Townsend. The a pointment
took effect February 15. 1852. gimpson I’.
Moses returned to 'Washington in 1853
since which time he has never been heard
from.
001. John N. Ebey was appointed in
1853 to succeed Moses, and assumed char e
of the district at Olympia, and in accord
ance with his recommendation, the custom
house was removed from Olympia. to Port
§ofignsgg darling} stating glint cofiignercial
" P9B mlthcfl h a. ‘ e‘ was.
getting very tired of tiiegoscemamiz~me¢
about ready to resign, when in 1856 a
northern band of Indians came down from
the northern part of Vancouver island to
‘make war on the American whites. The
‘lndians wanted _a Tyee’s scalp. They
‘killed 001. Ebey at his home on Whidby
island and took his head up north; Sev
eral months later the scalfi was recovered.
Authorities differ as to w o recovered the
seal . Judge J.G. Swan of Port Town
send: says that he recovered it with the as
sistance of a British captain who was trad
ing north. Another account says that L.
M. Keene, who was trading among the
northern Indians in a sloop, secured the
head. Keene was afterwards pilot on the
revenue cutter Pilot and now resides near
Mount Vernon, on the Skagit river.
M. H, Frost succcded Ebey, and died
twelve years ago at Muckilteo.
President James Buchanan appointed C.
0. Philips of Whidby Island to succeed
Frost, until Abraham Lincoln’s election.
when the change in administration brought
Victor Smith from the East. Smith wasa
personal friend of President Lincoln. On
his way out from the East he brought $3,-
000,000 in currency to San Francisco for the
government.
Smith became interested in Port Angeles
and the citizens of Port Townsend became
suspicions that Smith was tryingto remove
the custom house to Port Angclcs. A
long-winded petition denouncing Smith ‘
was framed by the citizens and forwarded 1
to President Lincoln, demanding the re
moval of Smith from ollice. Smith con
cluded that he had better go to Washing—
ton and repair his fence. He left and First
Lieut. Merrimafl of the revenue cutter
Shubrick, was detailed by Collector Smith
to take charge of the district during his ab
sence. Lieut. Merriman was a jovialna—
tured gentleman and took a great liking to
the people of Port Townsend. President
Lincoln asked Smith to resign from the
collectorshif) and take a. government
position e sewhere. but the offer was
declined. When Sinith returned to
the Sound and intimated his inten
tion of removing the oilice to Port
Angeles, Lieutenant Merriman, backed by
the Port Townsend people, refused to sur
render the oflice. Smith ordered Second
Lieutenat George B. Tansill and a squad
of marines from the revenue cutter‘to come
ashore and take the office by force. Merri
mau, Tansil’l’s superior oiljcer, would not
surrender. _ _ _ > _.. >
The cutter hauled broadside on, threw
open her portsJoaded her guns and cleared
away for action. Smith sent a note ashore
giving Merrimau just thirty minutes to
surrender the oliice or he would Commence
to bombard the city. The custom house
capitulated. A few months later the cus
tom house was removed to Port Angeles.
Smith then resigned and returned, where
he was appointed special treasury agent.
He returned to the coast in 1865 and was
drOWned on the old steamer Brother J one
than, which was wrecked on the Califor
‘ nia coast that winter. Many prominent
‘ Pacific coat men and officers of the govern
ment were also drowned. Smith has two
sons, Norman R. and Victor, now living at
Port Angeles.
Dr. L. C. Gunn was appointed to fill out
Smith’s term of office?” . _ .
In the autumn of 1863 a great rainstorm
prevailed. In 24 hours, J udfie Swan says,
seven inches of rain fell at . eah Bay. L.
C. Gunn, collector of customs, at Port An
geles, now living in San Diego, under date
of December 29, 1863, wrote the following
account of the storm to Salmon P. Chase,
secre any of the treasury department in
WaiAington, D. 0.: ‘.
” ly present letter is the bearer of evil ‘
tidings. 0n the :evening of the 16th inst.
an avalanche swept down the valley at the
mouth of which the custom house is sit
uated and car§ied away the government
buildings Witl all of their contents. A
deputy collector. Mr. J. M. Anderson, and
one of theinspectors, Mr. Goodell, a brother
of Hon. M. Z. Goodell, of Montesano, were
killed. My own escape was providential,
having enabled to jump upon one of the
floating logs after it had struck the buildin
and while the others were falling, whicfi
temporarily arrested the progress of the log.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoma.
‘ Wilson and other prominent Refiubliv
cans. including the late Marshal linn,
‘ who died in San Francisco, a few years ago,
bolted the ticket in 1869 against Selucrus
Gariielde, now deceased, w no was a candi
date for delegate to Congress. Blinn run
independent. Garfielde was immensely
popular and was called the "silver-tongued
orator of the West, and was elected.
For about three months in 1865, after Dr.
Gunn had retired and before a collector
qualified, J. M. Asher was the acting col»
lector of customs.
Henry Wilson, one of the Wilson broth
ers who had conducted mercantile estab—
lishments at Port Townsend wlth the late
E. S. Fowler, was appointed, and on the
very day of his appointment suddenly
died in San Francisco. Three days before
J. “’ilkes Booth murdered President Lin
coln the latter signed the commission (of
Fred A. Wilson. brotherto Henry. appoint
ing him collector of the port and on Nov.
1860, the custom house was again moved
back to Port Townsend.
Garlielde’s appearance at the national
capital assisted in the retirement of Wilson
and the appointment of Mike Drew by
President Grant. Drew now resides in Se
attle. He held the oifice about eighteen
months, when Fred Drew—no relation to
Mike—was appointed in November, 1871.120
the oiiice of collector. Fred Drew is now
in the employ of the Puget Sound Mill
Company and lives at Olympia. He took
the olflce during Garfielde’s second term as
a delegate to congress, and at that time he
(Drew) gave to Garfielde his resignation of
blank date, stating that at any time he
(Garfielde) thought that the best interests
of the republican party or the government’s
interests could be served he was willing to
resign. i- 1 ‘ 1. _ m _
The late Judge McFadden of Olymgia, a
prominent democrat. defeated Garnel e for
a third term. Garlielde was in Washing
ton. He presented Drew’s resignation
and was appointed as his successor in 1875.
Garfielde was removed in 1878, throufih the
influence 01 Special Treasury Agent {zyz
anski. szzanski was a brigadier general,
U. S. A., in the civil war, and was an ex
ile from Poland. Garfielde immediately
proceeded to Washington, where he had
enough influence to cause the removal of
szzanski. After Gal'llelde’s death, how
ever, he got back into the treasury service
and was sent to Panama, where he waslast
heard from. ,
Henry Wehsler, who was at Washington
when Garfielde was removed, secured the
oflice of collector. His administration was ,
a perfect success. \Vebster for man years l
previous was Indian agent at Neah Bay.
The government tried to deprive him of
his claim and he contested the case in the
department for years, where he was finally
paid $20,000 for the improvements. Web—
ster was very ill during the latter part of
his administration and was unable to at
tend to the duties of his oliice.
In June, 1881, Albert W. Bosh of Indi
ana succeeded Webster, who died a couple
of years later. 7
Capt. Herbert F. Beecher, son of Rev.
Henry Ward Beecher, succeeded him.
Beecher was not confirmed and William
M. Harned was acting collector until Major
Quincy A. Brooks of Oregon was agpointed
and took charige of the office in anuary,
1887. Granvi le William Thurman suc
ceeded him in 1888.
James W. McCabe, a popular democrat
of Port Townsend, was actm collector atL
ter Thurman was dismissedg: January 2],
1889, until Leslie Cullom of Tennessee,
then a clerk in the printing department
at ‘Vashington, D. (1., assumed charge as
collector.
Before Cullom could be confirmed by
the senate President Harrison, in Aprll
1889, appointed Charles M. Bradshaw of
Port Townsend, as collector. Bradshaw
had been defeated for congress in 1886 by
1 Charles S. Vorhees. 0
Andrew Wasson, at Port Townsend, a
member of the state legislature, and form
erly sargeant at arms of the California sen—
ate, was appktlfintedl at; Bradshiawsdsuccfs
ram-Went at M Jag-an . s 'i ,e, nesrw
’he took chargefi t‘fi‘é"W%r£tMlm , ~.; 2;,
#n '
A TREMENDOUS GUN
IT WILL THROW A BALL TWELVE‘
MILES. . ‘
Why a Gun Foundry In to Be Eulabf
”shed on the Paelflc -
K Coast.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 19.-——A twelve inch;
gun for the Monterey, the largest specimen
of heavy ordnance ever manufactured in
this country, which when mounted upon
its carriage at the navy yard in this city
for necessary test in firing, will be taken to
the proving grounds down the Potomac
river at Indian Head, within a day or two.
Great interest is taken in the gun. The
length is thirty-seven feet and it is design
ed to propel an 800 pound projectile twelve
‘ miles , necessitating a powder of charge
six hundred pounds. Other guns of the
same calibre and even larger will be turned
out as rapidly as possible. The gun just
completed will be shipped to San Francisco
as soon as it is demonstrated that it is
equal to the tests required by navy depart
ment. The cost, transportation and risks
thus entailed are such that the project ofes
tablishing gun foundry on the Pacific
Coast is deemed of great importance by
naval officials.
TELEGRAPHIC TALES-
Mrs. Allen J. Thurman died Saturday
afternoon. at Columbus,“ Ohio, aged 80
years.
James Parton, the well-known historian
and husband of the late Fanny Fern, sis
ter of N. P. Willis, is dead.
A Three Mill Levy.
The state board of equalization adjourned
Saturday and fixed the tax levy at 3 mills.
The total value of Washington’s wealth,
in real, personal and railroad property,
was fixed by the board at $320,000,000. on ‘
‘which a state levy of 3 nulls was placed.
with which to meet the running expenses
lof the state government for the vear. The
total reduction made by the ‘board was
$27,772.288.
Returned to Olympia.
E. S. Horton, formerly superintendent
and manager of the Olympia waterworks,
and who went to Fairhaven, has purchased
the business of George Jones, on Fourth
street. and will carry a complete line of
stoves, hardware, tinware and plumbing
material.
Our Postoilice.
Postoflice Inspector Patton, to whom
Olympia is indebted for its new postoflice,
is home from beattle. He will shortly
makea trip to Seattle and will then go
east. Mrs. I’atton.who accompanied her
daughter to Ann Arbor, will return with
him. “Olympia’s postofl‘lce,” said the in
spector, ‘is equal to any in the state, in
proportion to its size.”
‘ Vulgar and Offensive. ‘
‘ Editor Tribune:
‘ If “Emma” is determined upon killing
the goose that lays her golden egg a few
more breaks like the stupidl vulgar and
highly offensive criticisms of church soci
eties and church entertainments willefi'ect
ually do the business. It would pay the
financml supporters of the paper to hire
her, him or it, to stop. Cannon.
< EVENING EDITION.
EATING IT UP
. I
THE LAWYERS GETTING ALL OF
THE DAVIS ESTATE.
What the Principal Legatee of the
Famous Davis Will Case
Has to Say of It.
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct., 19.—-J. A.’Davis,
of Butte Montana, principal legatee named
in the famous Davis will, which the yOung
er relations have been trying to break, ar
rived here yetei-day. Many of the Davis
family live in or near [San Francisco. In
an interview he said: “The estate of my
brother,A.J Davis, |whieh has been the‘
object of {so much litigation, has been
largely over estimated. I remember that
when I was in the east after my brother’s
death, the newspapers had it that the es
tate was worth $20,000,000 that is mere nonv
sense. I suppose if he had died intestate,
and a smart administrator been appointed
then the estate might haVe produced
$4,000,000. but now there has been a lot of
Kilkenny fighting, it will be for less than
that. As pretty nearly every one knows,
my opponents claim that the will is forge
ry and the jury before whom the case was
tried recently disagreed after a trial which
lastediive weeks” Davis says the case
will be tried again shortly, as there is no
possibility of an amicable settlement. “I
will return to Butte ‘before long.”
THIRTI FOUR YEARS AGO.
An Old Timer Gets Back After a Long
Absence.
T. T. Lewis,one of the oldest steamboat
and railroad agents on this coast was in Seal
tle yesterday for the li rstztimesince 1857. He
told a reporter of the Telegraph that he was
dazed at the changes in thirty-four years.
He said: “I came here then on the steam
er Northern. and Seattle then had a land
ing and a few houses. \Vhen I think of
the fortune I lost by not staying and grow—
ing up witn the countryit almost makes
me Tsick. I went to Olvnmia on that same
trip. Then Mr. Westbrook kept the big
saloon there, and Miles (ialliher the hotel.
Rice Tolley then carried the mail on horse
back between Olympia and Cowlilz land
ing.
"The steamers in those days," said Mr.
Lewis, “used to come up from San Fran
cisco for the Sound, ltop at Seattle, Olym
pia and elsewhere, and then go to Astoria,
Portland and then back to San Francisco.”
. “I was on board the first steamer that
ever went ironi Deschutes to Wallula on
the Columbia river,” Said Mr. Lewis.
“That was in 1858. Capt. White was in
charge and John Torrence chief enizineer
and Mr. Buckmeister purser. Walln a was
then the head of navigation. At a later
date, however, we ran the steamer on as far
as Priest’s Rapids.
“At Portland I took the contract in 1859
to paint the first houses, built bKIIJ. J. Mc
l Cracken and R. R. Thompson. cCracken
is now a merchant prince and R. R. Thomp
-Ison, I see, has had the honor of havinia
big Columbia river steamer named, at" ’l‘
him. They were comparatively poor men
in 1859 when I did this work for them.
The Lincoln club;
e In order to pefect the organization and
ifierease the membership of the Lincoln
club of Olympia, T. N. Ford and E. E.
0112?), of the First ward; C.F. Leaven—
wor h and Philip. Hiltz, of the Second
:Wfiggxfind .B. W. Davis and S. P. Wiman,
bi 'e‘Tlilfdfivuwuhmre been dele§ated to
solicit member. They will ’secu're ists for
signatures from the secretary, E. 0. Mac-
Donald, at the governor’s oi ce. The next
meeting of the club will be held on the sec
ond Wednesday of next monthl at which
time a treasurer and vice president will be
elected.
The Play of The Burglar.
Go and get a seat for the beautiful play
of the Burglar, at the Olympia Theatre,
on Thursday night. \Vith no attempt to
preach and no 'claim to being a moral
‘ play, The Burglar has its lesson, and it is
not us zessary to label it or announce it on
I the house-bill. So long as these. our stars
}of the Pacific coast, the Grimm-Davis
‘Company. choose to present a repertorie,
‘ so long will they find it to advantage to re
tain The Burglar in their list—«a play so
perfect in its many perfections that it will
keep the stage for a long time to come.
But, after all, as sordid. or as worldly, or as
mntter-of-i'uct as we may be, we all have
that bit of sentiment in our compositibns
which will let us he led by a little child—
even to tne theatre.
11. 8. WI‘JATIIEH BUREAU.
OLYMPIA, Oct. 19.
The maximum temperature today was
62 dtggrees end the minimum 54. Maximum
spee of wind, 4 miles per hour. Amount
of rainfall, .00 inches, Amount of rain
fall since July 1, 1891, 7.05 inches; av
erage (for several years) since July 1, 1891,
6.05 inches; deficiency since July 1, 1891,
1.00 inches. Fair weather probable for
Monday. E. B. OLNEY, Observer.
A Delicate Operation.
llr. Kelly, of Seattle, assisted by Dr.
Armstrong, of this city, performed a. deli
cate operation on Mrs. W. F. Keady yester
day by removing her right eye. Mrs.
-Keady lost the sight in the riihi’. eye about
three months ago. smce whic time it has
effected the left eye so seriously that it be
came useless also. The operation was
thought to he the only means of saving her
sight. and the removal of the affected
eye will strengthen the left eerie, and im
prove the physical condition. rs. Kandy
is much improved today.
Ballard at Snohomlsh. ,
l). P. Ballard telegraphed to Tim Trun-
UNE on Saturday evening, denying that he
had deserted his family. He stated that
he was interested in mining business at
Snohomish, end wascut off from tele—
graphic communication. He also tele
graphed to his attorney, Mr. G. Gordon tell
in him to sue the Post Intelligeneer for
$15,030. Mr. Gordon will take no action
until he sees Mr. Ballard. It is thought
that it will be a poor case for a suit.
'l‘o Quiet Any outbreak.
CLIFTON FORGE, Va., Oct. 19.—A detach
ment of Monticello guards, of Charlottes
ville, arrived here. All is quiet. It is not
believed there will be any attempted out
break of negroes.
The City Marshal’s Horse.
The police are laughing? at the city mar
shal, and the latter can’t ielp laughing too.
He recently gave them explicit orders
about impoun ing all stray horses and cat
tle. Officer Mon-ell locked upa horse on
lSaturdafi night which he afterwards
learned elouged to the marshal. and the
latter had to pay one dollar to redeem it.
Monday Morning
Tell your grocer to send you up a sack of
Davis’ Best Flour, made in the Capital
City. You want to tryvit. Telephone 98.
Superior Court.
The case of Whitneg' vs. Chambers, is
yet on trial, and will e followed by the
criminal cases on the docket.

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