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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, October 21, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-10-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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" ' 'OFFEIAL PAPER
o—-—OF—————o V _ '
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
,7 , Thurfit‘m, C 9999;
V'OLUME 11. NO. 151 >
MISCELILANEOUS. _
MILLARD LEMON. PBESIDENT._ . MARY L. PAGE. SECRETARY.
ROBT. F. WhI’IHAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRACT Ar TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED)
Draughting and Blue Printing.
Our Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and _n.re the only complete set of Abstracts from
Government to date 1n the county.
Upstairs in Char-Abel's Block - - - - Olympia, Wash.
C}- NOSOHKA,
Leading Merchant Tailor.
. -——Always keeps a full assortment of~——-
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
' REPAIRING NEATLY DONE-
C 1 NEWCASTLE C 1
‘ ' —AND— a
Ca BUCODA . 0
The Best, Cheapest and Cleanest Fuel.
THOMAS HEACOCK AND A. D. GLOYER, Exclusive Agents.
Dealers in all kinds of fuel. Orders left at R. FROST’S store will rccelvevprompt attention.
T. J. MCBR, ATNFJY ,
4‘ g A» T ~'
F2ll m gDeln erV W agons
, Carria es, Bu gies, Road Carts, Flows, Etc.
V g g 5
Zigricultural Implements of Every Description.
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIF'I‘I—T. STREET;
G- U RNEY
Cab 8111 d TIELHSICI CC.
5 Successors to FOSTER & LABEREIC.
We have added to our already large stock a FIRST~CLASS WAGON, specially fitted
for the removal of Pianos, Furniture and Baggage. Our facilities for the re—
, moval of safes and all other heavy goods are of the best. All orders for
. Hacks, Gnrneys, Livery. Trucks, .Baggage, em, promptly at
tended to. A first-class boarding stable .n connection.
CORNER MAIN AND THIRD ST.
3 Telephone Number 3.
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
I GENERAL REPAIRING. ‘
CNRTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KINDS.
Silsby Block, Main Street, Olympia.
: STATE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY
FINE PRINTING
JVBOOk : and : Job : Printing: Specialties.
Nart’heasi Corner orFourtln and Adams Sue“, 01vmpla, \Vashington.
:figldertakers and Funeral Dlrectors
“if as ecin Atxention iven o .m a ming or Shipment.
”:1 OPENFJPDA:Y 34:13 :NFIg-IE-ITf TEL- NO- 7-
... 116 \Vest Sixth Street.
us? 1 gm‘ omg
- ,\(-S‘VV.,""»IV'IE~I#‘ ”LI? Pacifier”?! , ,
a 5“ HARD WARE, :
5% saw STOVBb AN D TINW ARE
‘ ' lag-£3 #77:»;va "‘ "‘4'"— 4
_. TACOMA ADgfiE‘TmIéEMENTS.
KIJSABALL BROTHERS
’ V A (”e-v“;
ml wiil 'pay you to send to 11s for prices on Guns, Ammunition,Bicycles, Etc.
\Vholesale and retail.
KIMIEALL KINDS., 1 132 Pacific Avon no, 'l‘uconla, “lash.
W
SCI-IOLL & I—IU’I‘I—I, Prop.
Tacoma - - ' - - - Washington.
WW
Music 5 and. Instruments
-1;
Standard and Popular Sheet Music. Latest Songs and Piano Music. All Kinds 01
’ Instruments; Strings and Fittings.
A- A. TAYLER & con 910 c STREET, “may”, \VASH<
OLYMPIA TRIBUNE l
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 21. 1891.
.A. ELLIS ‘
0.. __ .—-——-TllE——n——————o
Has constantly on hand the Largest and most Complete Line
of Furniture, which he will sell at prices that defy
competition. The same discounts given to
small dealers as they get in Port
land and Tacoma.
Corner of Main and Third Street ‘
CAPITAL V
VV'. I). ,ROBERTSON, Prop.
Ladies’ and Gents’
Ulothin g Cleaned,
Dyed and Repair-ed.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED OR NO CHARGE,
I l 9
Mam Street, Opposne Yeungs Hotel.
POSTOFFICE BOX 886
OLYMPIA.
PASSENGER AND TRANSFER STABLE.‘
. ‘)\ 1
‘ conne‘éfi‘o‘? ‘R’fififieß‘fé‘Efié‘féi‘édfi? :‘l?.;"s2§“§P%3%°’ ARENA??? $319123”; 133%? ‘é‘l‘t‘e‘fgé‘é
s2ll2ll§§§ew§sg3ué and promptneas. Charges reasonablé. Sixth and éolumbiu aueets.’
DREWRY AND SON. Pronrietors-
BREWER & WRIGHT
—-—WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN—-
Dressed Beef, Mutton, Veal, Po rk,
POULTRY, 231-0., ETC.
Telephone NO. 10. Office and Salesroom, 622 Fourth st.
OLYMPIA THEATER
L n
——o-—-
John Miller Murphy, Proprietor and Manager.
__o___.
I .
Frlday Erenmg, October 30
_...o_.__
9' l I N N E S [6'
o o
I 0
--——AND HlS—
fl - ,
14 amous Band
DIRECT FROM THE
Madison Square Garden, New York.
(The Largest Place of Amusement in
the World.)
-——o—
«Great Instrumentallsts—- '
Q.
_.o__._ '
Mr. B. C. Bent, the greatest of all American
()ornetiats.
Sig. N. Norrito and Herr Alois Freund, the in
comparable Clarlnetist. '
Mons. Antoine Frign'el, the famous French
Oboeist.
Sig. J. Norrlto, the greatest of all Piccolo
players.
Mons. Henri Morin, the only Contra-Baas Sax
ophone Soloist in America, and
INNES
the greatest Trombone player in the world, who
will be heard in a solo at each nerformnnee.
Reserved seasts on sale at the ulympia Theater.
l’rlces as usual.
JEFF DAVIS’ SHAWL
AND THE WATERPROOF CLOAK HE
WAS WEARING
When He Was Captured In
Georgia, Twenty-Six
Years Ago.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2L—An incident with
an important bearing upon one of the
most interesting episodes of the closing
days of the civil war happened yesterday
at the War department. For twenty-six
years an iron chest whose contents were
unknown to all save the different secre
taries of war and the particular officer
charged with its safe-keeping. has lain in
the vaults of the War building. The Inys~
tery surrounding this chest and its con
tents has been at last disclosed; It was of
recent years in the charge of Major A.
MacArthur; It is now in charge of Briga
dier General Breck, assistant adjutant gen
eral of the army.
This change of custodians necessitated
the opening of the chest and an examina
tlon and inventory of its contents. It was
brought into the ante-room of the secretary
and there unlocked and opened in the pres
ence of witnesses.
After the inventory was made and re
ceipts were exchalfllggd th‘e doqbgg 1091;} pf
the chest were re-fastened, and it, with its
contents was again placed in one of the 1
stron vaults of the great triple depart— 1
Illelltauilding. i
The contents of this carefully guarded;
strong b’ox were, first a large old—fashioned :
waterproof of ample dimensions, such as}
were worn in the days when gossamers I
were not known; secondly, a cashmere
shawl, and thirdly a pair of rusty spurs. ‘
There is a story behind them, for they
are mute testimonials of the truth of the
long-doubted, much-denied story of J effer
son Davis, the fallen president of the con
federacy, was, when captured, disguised
in woman’s clothes. These are the identi
cal garments, it is asserted, with which he
was said to said to be seeking to hide his
identity long enough to enable him to pass
the cordon ofUnion cavalry which had sur
rounded his little camp near Irwinville,
Ga, in the gray hours of morning.
, The story‘of iis disguise has often been
told and as frefiuently denied by those who
ibelieved that r. Davis would not resort
‘ to so undignified a ruse to avoid capture.
During all these contentions the existence
of this chest and its confirmatory contents
has never been made public.
The oflicials of the war department
would gladly be rid'of these garments, but
they are public property, and no one is an
ihorzized to destroy them; so they must be
e . -
’Fhe waterproof is of light gray cloth, the
lower part coated, with hard, dry mud,
gathered, it is said, on the roads and in
the woods of Georgia twenty-six years ago
as the fugitive president and his party
vainly sought safety in flight. The shawl
is of cashmere, the body of a dark red
color, with a wide black margin running
around i_t. _ __ . __
Mr. Davis, according to the story,
donned the 'waterproof, threw the shawl
about‘his head, Kicked up abucket and
started as thoug to get afrail of water.
Thus clad he looked like a ta] woman, the
waterproof completely covering his own
clothing,whiletle shawl about his head
hid his masculine features and beard. The.
ruse might have succeeded but for the
spurs he had unlucklly forgotten to re
move. Atrooper spied them protruding
from under the waterproof. He was fol
lowed, halted, discovered, captured. Such
is the story, and in proof of it are the
muddy Waterproof, the red shawl and the
rusty spurs.
FRESH STATE NEWS.
Peter Wilkinson, of Arlington, has sui
cided.
Mrs. O. W. :Johnson, .of Puyallup, tried
to kill herself With morphine.
The Colville Republican urges the nom
itation of John L. Wilson for governor.
The Roche Harbor smugglers have been
taken from Tacoma to McNeil’s Island.
The houses on Patrick Russell’s farm
five miles from Walla Walla, were burned ,
last night. ,
it is reported that Editor Johnson. of the ,
Spokane Spokesman, has joined the Salva
tion Army.
The supreme court has decided that the
consolidation of Whatcom and New What
com was valid.
The United States topografiihic work will
begin next year. Governor ‘erry has been
1 in ormed or that fact.
Sheriff Price. of Pierce county, destroyed
$2030 of gambling apparatus in the county
jail yard in Tacoma yesterday.
The Colville Reimblican says Thomas
Henderson Boyd ias bought a mine in
Stevens county and is a man of sound
business qualities. It savs he would be
acceptable to the people ofSteveus county
as deputy collector o the port of Tacoma.
The hearing of Andrew J. Littlejohn and
James 'l‘. Elder, the Tacoma men charged
with the theft of valuable documents from
the land office at Washington City, took
place yesterday afternoon before Judge
Hanford, who ordered a warrant to issue
for the removal of the prisoners to the Dis—
trict of Columbia.
Engineer Peri-in, of" the steamer Glam
Brown went to Seattle yesterday to tie up
the steamer in the interest of the em-:
ployes, to whom is due SILL ) for wages. It ‘
ISC aimed that the earnings of the steam
er were put into Tacoma real estate instead
of paying the employes.
A serious difficulty took place between
the ofiicers on the steamer Olympian yes
terday morning at Seattle as she was leav
lmf for Victoria and exciting and disgrace
fu scenes were witnessed by the passen—
gers at various intervals all the we. 7 to Se
attle. So warm did the trouble hecoms
that Captain McAlnine and Flrst Officer
P. Burns drew revolvers and threatened to
shoot Henry Smith, first assistant engi—
neer. The accounts are conflicting.
The City Council.
The city council adjourned last night
until tomorrow evening. The street com
mittee recommended the extension of the
macadamizing on Main street to Seventh.
The recommendatlon will be acted upon at
the next meeting. The city attorney sub
mitted an opmion statmg that all work of
graveling streets should be let by contract
except in cases of emergency.
A Surprise All Around.
A pleasant surprise to Miss Beth Laugh
ton was given last evening at the home of
Miss Jennie Young. Mark and Miss
Emma Reed, L. B. Faulkner and Miss
Anna Tarbell, Mr. and Mrs. Paisley, J. P.
Armstrong and Frank Donnelly were dpres
cut. The gathering was informal an en
joyable. ___
Worse Than Leprosy.
Catarrh.and there is but one prepara
tion that does cure that disease. and that
is the California Positive and Negative
Electric Liniment. Sold at Mart & Ross’
drug store. It. also cures neuralgia, rheu~
matism. headache, arming, burns, and all
gain. Try it and tel your neighbor where
0 get it. - tf.
Look Here!
Have you tried Davis’ best flour, made at.
your home mill? If not just try a sack.
l‘elephone, No. 98.
‘ TELEGRAPIIIC Trams.
The loss of the U. S. Steamship Dispatch
‘ is to be inquired into.
‘ . Reconciliation between the Irish factions
is said to be hopeless.
The SeariesHopkins will case was again
heard at Salem, Mass, today.
Stephen B. Elkins, of West Virginia, has
been offered secretary of war.
. Maud S. is eclipsed. Sunol made a mile
in 2:08% on the Stockton, Cal., track yes—
terday.
_ Sulggar has dropped to four cents a pound
111 hiladelphia. Spreckles force down
the price.
The famous Anaconda copper mine at
Butte, Montana, will start up again in ten
days’ time.
Several lakes near Bangor, \Vales, burst
their banks and flooded neighboring slate
quarries. Thousands of workmenjare idle
in consequence.
Return Jonathan Meigs, the venerable
clerk of the supreme court of the District
of Columbia, died in Washington yester
day, aged 90 years.
AN AWFUL CRASH“
SUBDEN DEATH TO I’AfiISENGI‘IIiS
{ON THE C. B. 55 Q. ROAD.
A Whole Train Derailed Near (Sales
lnurg—fleart-ll en ding Scenes
at the Wreck.
GALESBURG: Ills., Oct. 11.~«The Chicago,
Burlington &. Quincy fast passenger train,
which left here at 10:301ast night was de
railed at Pottery switch near Monmouth,
16 miles west of here, by on open switch.
The whole train, of seven cars, save the
sleeper, turned over on its side and killed
Engineer A. L. Emerp, (lalesburg, Travel
ing Engineer, George Courtney, Galesburg,
Mrs. George Allen, Lamonia. lowa, and
Frank L. Johnson, Avon, 111. About
eighteen were seriously injured. Great sur
prise is expressed that the list of causalities
is not larger. The saddest casualty hap
pened in the first chair car. Mr. George
Allen, his wife and baby were seated in the
middle of the car when the accident oc
curred. The car tipfed over and Mrs. Al—
len was killed. "he baby was hurled
across the car and except for a cut on the
head was uniniured. Mr. Allen received
only bruises. ’lhe scene after the wreck
was heart rendiug. The imprisoned pass
,engers broke out the windows of
j the cars to eflect their escape.
l A large force of surgeons and railroad 011 i.
cials went from here and the Burlington
coroner visited the scene of the wreck and
will hold an inquest tomorrow.
.. F. C. illice, superintendent of the Illinois
lines of the Burlington road, expressed
the opinion that the switch had been
tampered with after the wreck as it was
found half turned., The news of the wreck
created. great excitement here and hun
dreds are visiting the scene.
I
rI HE GOOD TEMPLARS
JUDGMENT VACA'I‘ED AND A NEW
TRIAL ORDERED.
Judge Campbell lloids Thai. Judge
Irwin Did Not [lave Juris
diction After the Dis—
trict “Ins Divided.
‘ A new trial has been ordered in the mat
ter of the Good Templars’ property, at 001-
umbia and Fourth streets. Some time in
the 00’s Captain Finch, then a resident of
Olympia, deeded to the Good Templars
the lot where Tacoma hall now stands.
specifying in the deed that» the property
was to be maintained for the promotion of
temperance and morality and for the per—
petual maintenance of a free library and
reading room.
A few years ago, Captain Finch finding
that the free library and reading room was
not being maintained by the Good ’l‘em
plars, deeded the property to the Olympia
Collegiate Institute. The Good ’l‘emplars
then rought suit against the Institute, to
restrain the latter from asserting its claim
to the property, and obtained Judgment,
April 22, 1891. This judgment was ren
dered by Judge Irwin more than a year
after the cause had been submitted to him,
and after the superior courts of Thurston,
()hehalis, Lewis and Mason counties had
been separated by the legislature into two
Lurisdictions, by which Judge Robinson
ecame the sole judge of Thurston county,
and Judge Irwin the sole judge of the re
maining counties.
On Sept. 18th last, motion was made by
counsel for the Institute to vacate the
judgment for the reasons heretolbre men
tioned and the further reason that the
judgment and the findings of the court
were liled simultaneously, so as to allow
the Institute no time between the liling of
the findings and the rendition of judg-1
ment in which to move for a new trial.
The motion was referred to Judge (Jump—
bell, who came to Olympia today for the
special purpose of rendering his dealsion
t iereon. He ordered thejudgment vacated
and anew trial to be ha . Judge (lamp
bellheld, with counsel for the Institute,
that Judge Irwin had nojurisdiction to de
eide 01d causes after Judge Robinson was
appointed and qualified. That the clause
0 the constitution, providing that a. super
iorjudge shall decide a. case within ninety
days after it is submitted to him is manda
tory, and that the findings of fact and a
ju gment cannot be tiled at the same timel
thus precluding a party from moving for n.
new trial. _
, Root (it Mitchell and Palmer & Savage
, are the counsel for the Good Templars, and
. Homer 0. Atwell for the Olympia. Collegi
ate Institute.
Superior Court.
Carl Ha) tman, who was on trial for sell
ing liquor at the Germanizt picnic, without
a license, was discharged. V
It was after 11 o’clock last evening when
the jury returned a verdict in the case of
Christian Hildebrandt, who was charged
with forcing an entrance into the salomrof
Godfeldt & Bennett. Thedury brought in
a verdict of not guilty. ildebrandt has
beerli in jail nearly four months, awaiting
tria .
In the state vs. Daniels «it Howard, and
veroschka, in formation liled.
Delos McKay vs. G. H. Foster, ten days
in which to file answer to amended oonr
‘ plaint.
‘ Jury returned verdict of uilty of assault
‘ in case of state vs. Chas. Williams.
John Conners plead guilty of assault.
The apiflication for afipointment of a .
guardian 'or I’eterfield urpin, was post
poned until tomorrow at 1:30.
In the superior court of Lewis county
today, a non-suit was granted in the ease
of Drs. Dumond and Francis vs. Dr. Mink
ler, charged with obtaining money under
I false pretenses.
Czar-9 Gift to Furnishing People.
ST. Parnassone, Oct. 21.——-The Czar gives
three million roubles from his own private
purse to the famine fund and has issued an
appeal to members of the robility and
landed fgent?! to form another fund for the
reliefo the amishing people.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
o————-—O————~o
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoma. ‘
4 EVENING EDITION.
l“1 1 - 1
bi 4 .
SHE BEATS THE RECORD AND IS
THE FASTEST IN THE WORLD.
The Record of [Hand S. Broken——
A Wonderful Marc’s 'l‘rol. on a
Kile Shaped Track.
NEW YORK, 2L—Robert Bonuer’s eyes
sparkled last night when he received a
telegram announcing Sunol’s great victory
over time. He said: “I regard Sunol es
the inost wonderful animal that was ever
foaled. I hesitate to compare her to Maud
8., as the latter made her record overe
reg-elation track, and as all horsemen
know, the kite shaped track over which
Sunol trotted today isa trille faster; then
the regulation one. Still, it 'is a glorious
record. To show you how much superior
I regard Sunol to Maud 8., I will say that
I paid forty thousand dollars for Maud S.
and’forty—one thousand dollars for Snnol.
There is a regulation track at Stockton
and Sunol will trot over it later, butl
think she will excel Maud S.’s marvelous
speed. These two horsee I: regard as nearly
evenly matched. Senator Stanford, from
whom I purchased b‘unol has written to me
that the mare will trot in 2:06. He knows
more about her capabilities than I do, end
he may be right. I believe her perform
ance of 210% as three-year old, is greater
than this, her record as live—year old,and
I think every horseman willagree with me
Three of the greatest trolters in the world
are, in my opinion Maud 8., Sunol and
Nancy Hanks. We have not had enough
experience with the kite-shaped track to
tell what may he accomplished on it.
Charles Mervin, Governor Stanford’s twin
er and superintendent on his ranch has
written to me that that kite-shaped track
being new is smnewhat slow. He says af
ter fallrains, in a week or so, the track
will bepucked and solid and that Sunol
3 will reduce, perhaps by a fraction 01 a. sec
ond, her present magnificent time. Maud
S. is now breeding, but I believe that when
she is 11] perfect condition and good train
ing slie can trot in about 5:07. I believe,
also, that Sunol can equal her on a regula
tion track. 1 will bring her here about
November lst and will jog her on the romls
for awhile. In the {spring I will have her
put in training to beat her record over a
regulation track.” '
THE WORLD’S TROTTING RECORD.
The world’s best trotting record in har
ness, 2:08%, which was lowered by Sunol
today, was made by Maud S. at; Cleveland,
0., on July 80, 1885,5117 a time when kite—
shaped trucks were not in vogue.
The following: horses have in succession
lowered the nule trotting record:
~___._._______.,W__.. -., “Wm. h, 6
1 S
*3 11011311. B’,
Q :4
18015Ynnkce—snddlo.... .2511
1810 A home from Bostonqlmidlo , . . l, 2 138),;
1821’l‘opgnllmlt~—smldle . . . . '.5 41)
1830 Buster—saddle 2 42
1834 Edwin Forrest—Huddle. l . . 2 :12
1843 LuflyHufi'hllo—muhllo . . . . l . 2 23
1844 Lady Sullolk~suddle . i 2 211%
11852,Taoouy—su.ddle.. 2 :26
118.5.‘3Tac0uyw5ndd1em,...,....,,i..,i...., 2 253 a;
‘lB56FlOm ’1‘0111]:1c.......,. 2 21%
1850F10m ’1‘en1p1e.,,....w. 2111),;
1865 Dexter........ 2187 M.
18%.Dexter ‘3. 11%
18(17Dexter 2 17%
1871 Goldsmith Mnid. 2 17
1872 Goldsmith 111111112“... . . .1 l . , , ......H 2 16%
1874 Gnldsmitthid... 2 M
1878 Burns 2 1:11;;
187D5t.Ju11en...i..........,.H....1,..,...2111,4
lmMnud B 2 10%
LSBOMHudSH . 210%
1884lJny-Eye-Bee... 210
1884111“de 2 09314
1884 Mnuds 2 09%
1885 MuudHuunhnu 2 08%
1886 18:57, 1888, 2xßlland 1800 11013 lowered
189181111012 0814
FREE AND EASY TITLES.
A Story About General Ferry and
~ Colonel Boyd.
The Ledger of this morning in referring
to Governor Ferry (liguifying Thomas
Henderson Boyd With the rank of Colonel,
says:
“This reminds us that free and easy mil—
itery' titles have for many years been popué
lar with Governor Ferry. When we recall
this story ofthe chief executive of our be
loved commonwealth we feel embarrassed,
uncomfortable, ehagrined, ashamed. But
we shake off these ill feelings and View the
matter cheerfully. We see Mr. Ferry away
hack in the seventies, wending his way
hither, commissioned as United States sur
veyor-general for the then territory of
Washington. He is in the cabin smoking
room of the ocean steamer bound north
from San Francisco. In the same room
are a number of otlicers of the regular
army. Mr. Ferry essays their acquaint
ance. He passes out his card, on which
is the clear-cut impression ofu beautiful
steel engraving reading “General Ferry,”
The army officers shake hands and become
acquainted with General Ferry; but unfor
tunately they are curious to learn precisely
his military status, and, . after the curd
party ad'ourned they metle research and
dismissal]! at length the possibilities of the
l case without gaining any light on the sub
;ect, for one and all inquired: “\Vho is
xeneral Ferry ‘?” At the next meeting one
of them )ut the direct qneqtion to him and
then—«lei, us only imagine the mortilicn
tion! 11in reply necessarily was: “Oh. I
am not an army oflicer. I run surveyor
general (it the territory of Washington;
just got my nppointment.”
A Pure Baking Powder.
A baking powder that. can be depended
upon to be free from lime is a desidcraluni
in these days of avlultnrated food. So far
as can be judged from thealllcial reports,
the Royal seems to be the only one yet
found by chemical analysis to be entirely
Without one or the other of these sub
stances and absolutely pure. This, it is
shown, result}; from the exelnsivo use by
its nianufacturera of cream of tartar spe
eially relined and prepared by patent pro
, ceases which may remove the tartarate of
lime and other impurities, The cost of
this chemically pure cream of tartar is
much reater than any other, and it is used
in no Eaking powder except the “Royal.”
the manufacturers of which control the
patents under which it is refined.
Dr. Edward G. hove, formerly analytical
chemist for the United Statet government,
who made the analysis for the New York
State Board of Health in their investiga
tion of baking powders. and whose inti—
mate knowledge of the ingredients of all
those sold in this market enables him to
speak authoritatively, says of the purity,
wholesomeness and superior quality of the
“lloyalz” ' A
“I find the Royal Baking Powder com
posed of pure and wholesome ingredients.
[tisa cream of tartar powder and does
not contain either alum or phosphates, or
other in 'nrious substance.”
Prof. liove’s tests and the recent official
tests by both the United States ond Cana
dian governments, show the Royal Baking
Powder to be superior to all others in
strength and leavening power. It is not
only the most economical in use. but
me es the purest, finest llavored and most
wholesome food.
Crushed to Death. “
MONAncn, Colorado, Oct. 2L—Wiliium
Davis and T. L’ock, miners, were overcome
by foul air while descending a mine near
here yesterday morning. They fell out of
a basket to the bottom of the shaft fifty
feet below‘and were crushed to death.

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