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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 02, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-11-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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—WOFFICIAL PAPER
o—‘—OF——o
The'Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
M;,,,,,i,,,,,
V'OLUME 11. NO. 161 >
S ' e & White
—————-PROPRIETORS OF—-—-—~
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‘ ———MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS [N‘—
él-DOORS SASH AND BLINDS‘KI—
I
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES- '
Corner of Third and Jefferson Street, Olympia,
-—————————————_—_—_________
E. S. HORTON
' STEAM
—AND—~
' GAS~FITTING. 3
STOVES AND TINWARE,
REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDETD TO.
424 Fourth Street. Telephone No. 13. :
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROBT, F. WHI’IHAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
' CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRAO I‘ At TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED) W”
. Draughting and Blue Printing. '-
Our Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and are the only complete set of Abstracts from ,
Government to date in the county.
[Tpslairs in Chambers Block - - . - - Olympia, Wash. 1
W ,
C}- NOSOI—IKA,
Lead Ing M erchant Tar lor.
-——-—Always keeps a full assortment of——— ,
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
REPAIRING NEATLY DONE-
T. J. MCBRATNEY
' aD l .
211 m . eIV erV agons
Carriages, Buggies, Road Carts, Plows, Etc.
Agricultural Implements bf Every Description.
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIFTH STREET.
W
C 1 NE W CASTLE C 1
—AND—
-061 BUCODA ’O3
The Best, Cheapest and Cleanest Fuel.
THOMAS HEACOCK AND A. D. GLOIER, Exclusive Agents.
Dealers in all kinds of fuel. Orders left at R, FROST’S store will receive prompt attention. '
W
G- U RNEY
aan rams er to.
Successors to FOSTER a; LABEBEE.
We have added to our already large stock a FIRST-CLASS WAGON, specially fitted
for the removal of'Pianos. Furniture and Baggage. Our facilities for the re
moval of safes and all other heavy ioods are 0 the best. All orders [or
Hacks, Gurneys, Invery. Truc s,'Bagga%’e, eta, promptly at
tended to. A first-class boarding sta Ie ;n connectlon.
CORNE R. MAIN AND THIRD ST.
Telephone Number 3.
——-———————.—_——_______________
, C - BEARY,
GENERAL REPAIRING.
CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KINDS.
Silsby Block, Main Street, Olympia.
——_____.—_________
I““
f; EARNED & BATES
Undertakers and Funeral Drrectors
; - Especial Attention Given to Embalming for Shipment.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TEL. NO. 7-
116 West Sixth Street.
Mm
“m
STATE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY
Book : and : Job : Printing : Specialties.
Northeast Corner of Fourth and Adams Street, Olympia, \Vashlngton.
OLYMPIA TRIBUNE
i BLANK BOOKS
0
School . Books
Stationery of All Kinds.
Inks, Mucilage and Wall Paper.
’M- CEO—ENOR
309 and 311 Main street, Olympia.
F. W. TINKHAM
Beef, Mutton, Pork and Veal.
HAMS, BACON, LARD,’ BUTTER
AND EGGS. 1
Poultry of all 1;;1-sfg;oice Vegetables}
in their Season. 1
Silsby’s Block, Mains?” Cor.,7th. Tel., No.BB 1
W. M. CHANDLER
Insurance Agent
Fire Insurance writt-en in leading Com—
pames.
O‘AGHNT :FOR—o
The Travelers Life and accident
INSURANCE CO.
224 4th Street - Olympia, Wash.
THE BIG BAZAAR!
W. A. VAN EPPS, PROP.
Headquarters for Everything.
—-—A magnificent stock of——-
WALL PAPER AND
Ceiling Decorations
Just received.
East 4th at - -
OLM Y PIA
Collegiate Institute
___o__
“The Pioneer School of Washington.”
-———o—
COURSE, per term, - sl2.
NORMAL COURSE, per term, - 12.
COMMERCIAL COURSE, per term, 13.
GRAMMEE COURSE, per term, - 8.
MUSIC, per term, - - - 12.
ELOCUTION, per term, - 15.
STENOGBAPHY, per term, - - 10.
ART INSTRTCTION, per hour, - 25 c.
The after of board, tuition and room rent {or
$l5O per year in advance has already brought
about 75 students to Olympia from abroad. All
the priveleges and opportunities of the Institute
are open to the patrons of Oiympla for the price
of tuition alone .
A Faculty of nine Instructors and Sgeciallsts,
completely furnished boarding an lodging
halls, literary and debating societies and t or
ough work in all departments are the advan
tages offered.
For further information call on or address
REV. LUTHER COVINGTON,
PRESIDENT.
m
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
G M. SAVAGE (it 00.
C
CONTRACTORS.
Bridge Building and Pile Driving.
1 LIBERMAN
, C
CONTRACTOR.
Grading and Bridging. Office: Room
8, Woodrufl block.
“I A. ROGERS
o
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates made on application.
OLYMPIA - - - - - WASH.
I W. ROBERTS
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Otfice fittings, counters, shelving and all
jobbing promptly attended to. , stimates
furnished on application. P. 0. box 177.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
WEEKS & co
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Plans and specifications furnished.
OLYMPIA AND TACOMA - - - - WAsn.
CARD & BROWN
GRADING AND EXCAVATING.
Lot and land clearing done proxriptly
Camp on Westside on Fourth and ront
streets.
OLYMPIA - WAsn.
m
Notice of Dissolution.
NOTICE is hereby given that the firm of F.
C. Williams 6: Co., heretofore doin bus
iness in the city of Olympia, County of g‘hurs
ton, and state of Washington, as Undertakers,
has been this day dissolved by mutual consent.
The said business will hereafter be conducted
in the name of F. C. Williams, he succeeding to
all of the interests of the firm, retaining all
property of the firm. paying all debts and col
ecting all amounts due the firm of F. C. Will
iams Co. oct2‘2-6t.
Dated at Olympia, Wash., this 21, of Oct. 1891.
‘ F. C. WILLIAMS 6: CO.
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 2, 1891.
TAOOMA’S BOOM.
THE GREATEST SHIPPING POINT
0N PUGET SOUND.
Wheat Vessels, Coal and Lumber
Grain-Passing Portland in
Vessels and Tonnage.
TACOMA, Nov. 2.——The wheat export from
Tacoma during the current season to the
end of August next will amount to 5,500,-
000 bushels. In only two seasons during
the last ten years have the wheat exports
of Portland exceeded this large amount,
those two seasons being 1881—82 in which
Portland shipped 6,174,986 bushels and that
of 1885436 in which she shipped 6,619,760
bushels. Her average for the ten years is
4,751,050 bushels per year, less by about
75,000 bushels than the estimate for Taco
ma of current exports. Although Tacoma
has led Portland thus far the present sea
son in shipments foreign of wheat, the
difference being about 50 per cent. in her
favorryet this was not due to lack of wheat
in Portland, but of ships to move it away.
From the let of September to the middle of
OctoberTacon.a sent to sea eleven ships with
wheat against Portland’s eight, and be
sides, the eleven which took cargo here are
of larger size than the eight of Portland.
That Tacoma is becoming the great ship
ping plort of Puget Sound, can be seen
from t e following reoapitulation of ships
now in the sound:
Ports No. Tonnage.
Tac0ma......................14 11,044
5eatt1e.................4...” 7 9,319
P0rt81ake1y................. 9 8.076
P0rtGamb1e....i.......,.... 6 4,539
P0rtLud10w..,.............. 4 3,624
P0rtMadi50n................ 6 3,436
P0rtHad10ck.............. 5 3,480
Port T0wn5end.............. 4 4,247
Bellingham 8ay........>.. ... 3 2,729
Nanaimo,B. C............,. 14 15,774
Vict0ria,8.C............... 3 2.524
Vanc0uver.,.r......i....ii.. 7 7,378
New Westminster ...... ... .. 1 750
T0ta1.....................53 75,920
FRESH STATE NE‘VS.
There is said to-be a row in the Union
club of Tacoma over Paul Schulze.
The Lincoln Republican Club of Van
couver is opposed to an extra session.
The lumber rates would probably be re
ruced by an extra session of the legislature.
“Licensed to Raise a, Family,” is the way
the Walla Walla. Union heads up marriage
licenses.
The American ship Pormita’ came into
Tacoma thirty-six days ago from Japan to
load wheat.
Henry Villard and wife went to the
Gray’s Harbor country and Ocosta, thence
to Portland.
The Chehalis Nugget remarks: “Jones
is a candidate for congress. Spokane
against the world for candidates.
Mrs. F. I. Blodgett formerly of Olympia.
wife of the (ax-territorial treasurer lectured
on “Theosophy” in Tacoma, yesterday.
Emma Thursby has entered suit against
the Tacoma Exposition company for $250
contract price for singing on the last day
of the exposition and SSOOO damages.
Judge T. L. Stiles and Judge W. H.
Calkins of Tacoma will speak tonight at
the opening of the new Republican League
club rooms, 925 C street, Tacoma.
Seattle coal dealers have reduced the
price of screened coal to $6 per ton, 2240
pounds to the ton, a pretty high figure
when it is remembered the mines are but a
a few miles away.
Albert Friederich. the murderer of Julius
Scherburn in Seattle, who was denied a
new trial, is writing a letter to the em eror
of Germany to save him from the galrows.
The ocosta Pioneer says: Collector (by
grace of the trade) Wasson has undertaker:
the contract of Eroving his action in the
senatorial fight onorable. Itis probably
the largest contract ever entered into in
the state.
The suit against the Tacoma City officials
to recover funds drawn out of the treasury
illegally, was decidedagainst them on Sat
urda . Judge Robinson who was acting
for fudge Allyn instructed the jury to
bring in averdict for plaintiff-—the city.
A motion for a new trial was given.
0n the Lake shore at Biue Canyon,
Whatcom county, yesterdav, while mov
ing a three ton boiler W. E. F. Suiter of
Fairhaven, Chris Allison of Lake 'What
com were instantly killed and Chris Chris
tianson of Fairhaven, badly injured.
The Tacoma Globe has changed its direc
tory, Louis D. Campbell, Chas. H. Boyn
ton and Miles C. Moore having disposed of
their interests and been succeeded bv P. O.
Sullivan, Lake D. Wolfard, E. G. Kreider.
The new trustees are Sullivan, Wolfard,
Kreider, Metcalf and Senator J no. S. Ba
ker.
The Chehalis Bee says: “Some of our
exchanges are saying a good word for Hon.
J. H. chi for governor. Senator Lonig
has served ewis county well in three di -
ferent legislatures. He is a hard worker,
is full of vigor and enterprise and would
give the state an administration in the
executive office such as has not been known
for years.” _ _
Cooked :1 Fireman.
NEEDLES, Cal. Nov. 2.—Au eastbound
train struck a misplaced switch at the end
of Franconia yards yesterday and the en‘
gins and one car was overturned and
ditched. The engine was hurled to one
side and fell burying her smokestack and
dome inside of the cut. The fireman, Chas.
Johnson fell under the boiler head and was
pinned there bl}; heavy timbers and ma
chinery, while t e escaping steam cooked
his limbs and part of his ody for neary
three hours. Engineer George Cook was
thrown through a cab window but landed
miraculously withouta scratch. It is be
lieved Johnson cannot recover.
Burning Out the Farmers.
ST. LOUIS, Nov. 2.—One of the most dis
astrous forest fires ever known in St. Louis
county has been raging for the past three
days in the western part of the count .
Thousands of dollars worth of valuable
property has been destroyed and unless
there is rain within a few days the losses
will reach an enormous figure. Man
acres of wheat and timber are destroyed:
Farmers are fighting for their homes.
Bunting the Senators.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 2.—Senator Wil
liams was before Judge Wallace today on
a citation for contempt. Owing to the ill
ness of his counsel the case was continued
until next Monday and Williams has fur
nished bonds in the sum of fifteen hund—
red dollars. Sherifl‘ Lanmiester received a
dispatch from Deputy Stair at Merced, say
ing Senator T. D. Harp, who is wanted here
in connection with the grand jury investi
gations, left for Missouri last week.
He Whipped Two Greasers.
CITY or MExxco, Nov. 2.—At the mining
camp of San Pablo, near Buena Ventura,
Coahuila, there was a sanguinary battle re
cently between John F. Moulton, an Amer
ican, and Antonio Ventura and Leonardo
Rodriguez, Mexicans. The Mexicans fell
upon Moulton with knives in hand and he
defended himself with a dagger. At the
conclusion of the tight Ventura was dead,
Rodriguez had four dagger wounds in his
‘ body and Moulton was badly slashed.
CHILEAN AFFAIRS.
LtTES'I‘ NEWS FROM VALI’ARAIso
OF A PEACEFUL NATURE.
What a. New Yorker Says-"An In-
sun to German Naval OHl
cersc-Blalne and the
President.
VALPARAISO, Nov. 2.——The Libertad Elec
toral, the semi ofi‘lcial organ of Junta, pub
lishes an editorial in which it says that for
the last few days rumors have been preva
lent at Santiago, that an alarming rupture
of amicable relations between Chile and
the United States, was imminent, “we as
sure the public,” it added, “that these ru—
mors are unfounded. We know this to be
a fact, for this very day a dispatch has
been received from Senor Pedro Montt, our
minister at Washington, asserting that the
utmost cordiality exists between himself
and Secretary Blaine. This certainly is the
very opposite of hostile feelings."
INSULTING THE GERMANS.
Two officers of the German navy were
insulted Saturday night while on the train
running between Valparaiso and Santiago.
The insult is supposed to have been the
outcome of feeling towards the German
naval oflicers because the German warship
Leipzig harbored a number of Balmacedist
refugees. The German admiral Valois
complained about the insult to the Inten
dente, who has promised to use all his
power to prevent a repitition of it.
WHAT A NEW YORKER SAYS.
New Yoax, Nov 2.—VV. R. Stern, who
has been for live years manager at Val
paraiso,ior a firm Chilean merchants in
this city. and his business brought him in
contact with the leading men of the politi«
cal and business circles in southern repub
lic. Stern is now in the city. He left Val—
paraiso four days before the riot in which
the “Baltimore’s” sailors were involved.
“To understand the exact. feelings just
now,” said Stern,,“it must be remembered
the governing and influential class of Chil
ean people are well educated, cultivated
and shrewd as the Americans; They have
aclear comprehension of the extent and
power of the United States, and know ”net
as well as we do what would be suicidai for
them in points of governmental policy.
The Chilean masses are ignorant. but
they have no influence or hand in alfairs
A ittle tilne and consideration among
such able men as Chilean leaders results
usually in calm and good judgment. The
final Chilean action in the premises. I pre
dict, will be dignilied and reasonable. It
isa p 0 ular and sadly mistaken feelings
that CKileans are an inferior lot of men,
that is responsible for so much talk of war
in this country. I think it will blow over.
There are three recent events which have
combined to incite Chilean indignation
against American favor, Admiral Brown’s
operation when the insurgents landed at
Quinteros, aroused the whole people.
Quinteros is forty miles from Valparaiso.
The day of the landing, the San Francisco,
commanded by Admiral Brown, was in
Val araiso bay and the Esmeralda and
Cochrane were vessels of the insurgents.
The San Francisco suddenly steamed
down toward Quinteros and refused to
answer the signals of the Esmeralda which
was passe by four times. Admiral Brown
ran close to the insurgents landing place
and cruised about gaining a complete
knowledge of the strength of the insur
gents. After gaining comnlete informa«
tion the'San Francisco steamed at once for
Valparais. Upon arriving there an
officers was sent ashore who went
immediately to Balmaceda,s palace.
That night the Valparaiso papers came out
with complete information of the strength
of the insurgents, accrediting it to the
the United States man-of-war. This made
things so hot for Admiral Brown that four
weeks later when the insur ents were in
control he explained that iris officers in
visiting the palace had given the informa
tion but as all cable messages had to be
read by the government before being sent
his visit was for that pur ose of and in
checking this message to Vilaashington the
government got the information. But that
ex lanation did not satisfy the people. if
ACfmiral Brown did give out information
obtained and ap rise Balmaceda ofjust
what was coming lie ought to be dismissed
frdrn the service. Perhaps his explanation
is correct, but it can rea ily be seen how
no extplanation can dissipate the intense
preju ice aroused.
IN \VAsanros.
WASHINGTON. Nov.-2.——The flagging in
terest in the Chilean affair was revive in a.
measure this morning by a visit of Senor
Don Pedro Montt to the Navy Department.
He remained with Secy. Tracy for an hour.
Meanwhile messengers had been sent to
the defiartment of state. They reported
Secy. laine with the president at the
white house. Aiter a conference with the
president, Secy. Blaine returned to the
state department and Secy. Tracy and the
Chilean minister had a conference with
him. It is impossible to learn the object
of Senor Montt’s visit. '
TELEGRAPH [0 TA LES.
The noted Maverick National Bank of
Boston has suspended.
The steamer Fulda from New York ar
rived at Gibralter today and proceeded to
Genoa.
Arrived in New York, steamers The
Queen from Liverpool, and Anchoria from
Glasgow. ‘
In Berlin, the printers who struck re
cently have mostly been replaced by non—
union men.
In London today) is a holiday on the
Stock Exchange, it eing the semi-annual
settling day of the Bank of England.
A formal welcome was tendered to Henry
Villard today in Portland. Addresses were
made bfiMayor Mason, on behalf the city,
and C. . Dodd, representing the chamber
of commerce.
In Camilla, Ga., Clark N. Nix. who
brutally murdered Geo. Muze a week ago,
was taken from the guard who had cap
tured him, last night, and lynched.
Col. Samuel E. Uhalfin, of New York,
died in Savannah last night. He was in
structor at West Point in the fifties and
served in the rebel army during the war of
the rebellion.
In Cork, as showing the seriousness of
the outbreaks there recently, it may be
stated no fewer than 32") cases w‘ere treated
at the different hospitals of that city dur
ing the election mots. ,
Four bogs between 12 and 15 years old
named Jo n Clarkson, Peter Hewes, Leo
Johnston and William Alliston were
drowned yesterday in Midland. Ontario,
through the upsetting of a sailboat in a
squall.
Ca tain Frelon J. Babcock, county clerk
of Marion counltiy, Oregon, died this morn
ing at Salem. e was aprominent Mason.
having once been grand secretary of the
grand lodge of the state of Oregon, for sev—
eral years. 4
The ravages of cholemin Damascus show
an alarming increase. The record for the
week past shows 180 cases and ninet
deaths. Owing to the prevalence of chef:
era. Hodeia, is in nearly as bad a situation
as Damascus. but in Aleppo the plague is
subsided. V
Despatches from Brighton say Mrs. Par
nell is much weaker today and the Free
man’s Journal says unless a change for the
better takes place in her cbndition within
two days it fears the worst will happen.
The new fire engine housé just finished,
in Tacoma, opgoomte the Tacoma hotel is
the finest on t. e Pacific Coast.
DID SHE KILL HIM?
MRS. MAYBRICK’S MURDER CASE
IN THE ENGLISH COURTS.
An Important Questlon Relative
to the Payment of SIO,OOO
Insurance.
} LONDON, Nov. 2.—-ln the court of appeals
the Maybrick case was commenced today.
Sir Charles Russell in opening his argu
l ment said the appeal raised was a most inl
portant question. The plaintiffs for whom
he appeared were executors of the late Mr.
Maybrick, who had effected an insurance
of SIO,OOO with defendant’sinsurance coni
pany in favor of his wife Mrs. Florence
Maybrick, now confined in the working
jail. Defendant’s counsel‘ had paid on ac
count SIOOO of amount claimed, but; they
refused to pay the remainder. In support
of his refusal he said the defendants sub
mitted the conviction of Mrs. Maybrick
was not conciusive. Continuing, Sir
Charles said on the contrary, plaintiffs
submitted the fact that the sentence com
muted was not evidence of innocence. The
real question, he claimed, was whether Mr.
Maybrick, having efiected a policy in favor
of his wife and whether, assuming he died
at her hands, this was any answer to the
executors claims. The ex-attorney general
then proceeded to cite authorities in favor to
the contention. The present appeal grew out
of a judgment given July 20th ast, U 1 an ac
tion brought in the interest of Mrs. May
brick against the insurance association to
recover slo,ooinsurance upon her husband’s
life. The court then (leaded as Mrs. May
brick had been convicted .of having mur
dered her husband she could not recover
the amount for which his life was insured
as his death was caused by the person for
whose benefit the action was brought. The
day after this judgment was rendered a
high legal authority made the assertion
that the insurance association's refusal to
pay Mrs. Maybrick the insurance on her
iusband’s life on the ground thathis death
was caused by her, would enable the con
victed woman to bring out in a civil action
the facts traversed in the murder trial,
since she could compel the insurance coni—
Eany torlprove that she murdered her hus
and. his high legal authority is said to
have based his opinion on the fact that
according to English law convxction is not
proof between other parties, but only be
tween the prosecution and the prisoner.
CAME ’l‘o LIFE IN ’l‘llE GRAVE.
A 'l'errlble Spectacle Witncnncd In
an. Erle Cclnctery.
Ema, Nov. 2.—TWO weeks ago Farmer
George Heidecker, of Green township, ap
parently died very suddenly of what was
supposed to have been heart failure. The
remains were buried four days later from
the St. John’s Lutheran church of this
city and temporarily interred in a neigh
bor‘s lot in the Erie cemetery. The trans
fer was made today, and when the re
mains were exhumed the coffin was opened
at the request of the family, when a lorri
fying spectacle was presented. The body
was turned around lying on its face, and 1t
and the interior of the coffin bore traces of
aterrible struggle with death in its most
awful shape.
A TERRIBLE STRUGGLE IN THE GRAVE.
The distorted and blood-covered features
bore evidence of the horrible agony on
dured. The clothing about the neck and
chest had been torn into shreds, as was
likewise the lining of the coffin. Bloody
marks of the finger nails on the face, throat
and neck, told of the awful despair of the
doomed man, who tore his own flesh in his
terrible anguish. Several fingers had been
entirely bitten oil, and the hands torn with
the teeth until they scarcely resembled
those of a human being.
KEENE.
The eminent tragedian Mr. Thomas W.
Keene and his excellent company will be
the attraction at the Olympia theater on
next Thursday and Friday nights. The
plays selected are Richelieu on Thursday
and Richard 111 Friday. Eleven years’
service constantly engaged in portraying
the leading characters in the Shakespear
ean dramas, certainly gives Mr. Keene a
claim to popularitg' and consideration, and
wide recognition y the most eminently
American critics secures for him a place in
the dramatic history of this country since
he made his debut as a tragic actor, in
“Richard III.” He from the night of his
debut, has verified the most sanguine
prophecies made by his admirers. He se
cured public at once. He has done so by
hard work and patient study. He has
overcome the natural opposition to all new
exponents of classic roles, and the ad
mirers of his originality and vigor have
swelled from hundreds into thousands in
every city in this country.
Unity Club This Evening.
The program for the novel section of the
Unity Club this evening, is as follows:
The learning of Florence, Miss Janet
Moore; Lorenzo de’Medici and the Floren
tino Republic; select reading, from “Ro
mola”; George Elliot’s views of Christian
ity, Rev. N. Hoagland; select reading,
sketches from the life ofMichael Angelo.’l‘he
meeting will take place at 8 o’clock, at
Barnes’ hall, Adams and Fifth street.
Jim in Jail.
Mayor Horr’s Chinaman Jim, is con
fined in the county jail awaiting the sen
tence of Judge Allyn who heard the case.
The mayor visited his celestial yesterday,
and somebody locked the door, keeping
the mayors prisoner. He furnished bail
in cigars, and was released.
New York Stock Market.
New YORK, Nov. 2. Noon - Money
easy at 3 per cent. Stocks, dull, steady
at a fraction above opening prices. Fours
coupons, 16%; Pacific 6s, 11; Atchison,
42%; Central Pacific, 32; Burlington,
97%; .Denver& Rio Grande, 18; Nort nern
Pacific 27%; Northern Pacific Ereferred,
73%; Northwestern, 16; New Yor Central,
12%; Oregon Navigfition, 74; North Am
erican. 18125 ; Pacific ail, 37%; Rock Island,
82; Bt. aul & Omaha, 33%; Texas Pa
cific, 30%; Union Pacific, 40; Wells
Fargo Express, 38; Western Union. 82.
Chicago Produce Market.
CHICAGO, Nov. 2. ~— Close Wheat—‘
Steady; cash, 92c; December, 94%c;:
May, $1.01% ;
Corn—Steady~—Cash, 54%c; May 43%0.
Oats—Steadly; cash, Sol/fie; May, 31%c.
Pork—Stea ; Cash, [email protected]%; Jan
uary, $10.02Mé51005.
Lard—~Steady; cash, $5.90; January,
$6;12%.
Helping Out a. Bur-neg. Bank.
BosroN, Nov. 2.——The banks voted to as
sess themselves three per cent of the
amount of their-loan. This will raise about
$4,000,000 for a loan to the Maverick bank
to help it out of its difficulties.
i Samuel of Panel: Pleads.
‘ SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 2.——M. E. Curtis
Eleaded not guilty today to the chargeof
illing Officer Grant Sept. 11th. The case
is set for trial Saturday.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoma.
4 EVENING EDITION
MORE FREEDOM.
FIVE-HUNDRED CONVICTS LOOSE
‘ 1N TENNESSEE.
'l‘lle Mountaineers Come to Their
Rescue and Send Them Away
From the Mines.
KNOXVILLE, Tenn., Nov. 2.——At 1 o’clock
this morning two hundred mounted men
1 came in from the mountains and liberated
two hundred convicts, working in the
mines at Oliver Springs. 80 quietly was
it done that people in the town knew noth
ing about what happened until this morn
ing when they discovered the stockade was
amass of smoking ruins. The short term
prisoners were furnished with citizens’
clothing, and with the exception of a few
captured all are now at large. This makes
more than live hundred penitentiary con
victs turned loose in that locality since
Friday evening. The governor of the state
was here yesterday, but left for Nashville
this morning, It does not appear there
was any resistance on the part 01 the
guards and nobody was hurt. The wild
est rumors prevail of which one is that the
miners will immediately proceed to Tracy
city and release the convicts there.
IVIE'I‘EORI)LO(iIGAL REPflll'l‘.
OLYMPIA, Wash” Nov. 2, 1891.
E” 3339335 film?
Place of E sfig"’E. 35 State or
Observation. 6, , 0 win. €514 g 5. weather.
5; Bgo 5: g .‘E m H
r 1 - ’D 7' w? 5'
o_lym—_p—ia. ... .3 20.58 E a; calm 7.) Elfin—g—
Portland...... 20.68 SOISE Light .08 Raining
Walla Walla. 28.8838 SE Light .00 Cloudy
Spokane 28.98 40 E (s .00 Cloudy
Baker City.. .. 29.96 34 SE 6 .00 Cloudy
Roseburg..... 29.7656 S 10 .00 Cloudy
Eureka. 29.00 58 SE 10 .10 Raining
Red‘Bluil. .. .. 30.10 52 NW Light .02 Cloudy
Elucrmneuto... 30.1048 N Light .00 Cloudy
San Francisco 30.08 54 W Light .00 Cloudy
florid, ... ‘:_';_2[‘Hl‘i 50 H 21 .. .730‘linining
_ LOCAL REPORT.
The maximum temperature today was
58 degrees and the minlmum4B. Maximum
spce( of wind, 10 miles per hour, from
southwest. Amountot'rainfall, 1.02 inches
(for twenty-four hours ending at 3 p.m).
Amount of rainfall since July 1, 189],
12.05 inches; average (for several years)
since July 1, 1891, 9.00 inches; excess
since July 1, 1891,305 inches. Indications
for tomorrow, ram.
E. B. Orlnav, Observer.
DIED. ~
Dewitt C. Dennison died at his home on
Smith’s Island near Port Townsend, Oct.
27th, where he had been light-house keeper
for several years.
The deceased was born in the state of
Vermont, and was a brother 01' 15. 14‘. Dew
nison of Olympia.
His death was caused by anecurism re—
sulting from a gun-shot wound in the leg,
inflicted several years ago.
He. was a member of the G. A. R. and
was With General Lyons at the battle of
Willson’s Creek where Lyons was killed.
He was wounded in that battle, and was
afterwards discharged for disability, and
canilelto the Pacific Coast.
At nie'tiinéiir'iiis‘ death he had been in
the employment of the government on
Puget Sound as inspector of customs and
liflt-house keeper eight or nine years.
is widow and childeren are still in
charfie of thelight-house on Smith’s Island,
and ave the sympathy of many t'riendls.
- ).
You Yonson 'l‘onlgllt.
The new and surprisingly successful
Swedish—American comedy, “You Yonson”
makes its appearance in this city tonight.
A San Francisco pager says: “Playgoers
whose palates have ecome jaded with the
old stereo‘tlyped dialect comedies will find
in “You onson” anew and piquant flavor
that cannot fail to merit their fullest ap
probation). With a story ofstrong human
interest, a series of intensely thrilling situ
ations, a regular bonanza of bright and
sparkling comedy, and scenic appurtenan
ces that lave never been surpassed'in a
similar production. and but seldom
evened, it is little to be wondered at that
“ oh Yonson" took so strong a hold ugon
the afi'ections of the theater going,r pn lio
from the very first day that it was pro
duced. AFR“) it is to be remembered that
the centra figure, that of “You Yonson”
himself, as impersonated by Gus Heege the
originator of Scandinavian dialect and
comedy and one of the authors ofthe piece,
there is seen a character unique, quaint
and absolutely a stranger to the glare of
the footlights, supported by a good com
pany. ' _~_
An Astute Councilman.
Editor Tribune: ‘
Some weeks ago I saw in John Miller
Murphy’s paper, the Standard, the follow
ing:
“It seems that those who control the
purse-strings of moneyed institutions see
nothing alarming in Olympia/s financial
condition when they oi ’cr a premium on
her bonds. They are not as astute Jinan
ciers, however, as some people who draw
their checks on a paste-pot.”
Probably the astute councilman and
editor who wrote the above can now fully
unravel the financial condition of the city
and get the moneyed institutions to offer
enough premium on our bonds to purchase
a paste-pot or a bar of soap. ALECK.
Dissatisfied With the Council.
Deputy County Attorney George Hatch
of Port Angclcs is in the city in relation to
the suit to disincorporate that city. Suit
was brought to disincorporate the city as
a means of revenge because of dissatisi'ac
tion with the council, and as a means of
escaping taxation. The decision was in
favor of the City, and Mr. Hatch visited
Spokane to consult with the attorney fien
eral in relation to an appeal which is mad
filed. The attorney general decided that
there were no grounds for an appeal, and
Mr. Hatch is here to withdraw it.’ ‘
New lneorporatlous.
Articles of lncorpo—mtion were filed to
day by the Mukilteo, Lowell & Everett
Motor company, of Snohomish County.
Cafital, $25,000.
’ he 0. ,1). Elder decorating company, of
Tacoma. Capital, $30,000.
The Spokane Ice and Cold Storage com—
‘ pany, o Spokane. Capital, SIOO,OOO.
: We Are Kicking Today.
Because there is no crossing on" Adams
street at Sixth.
Because the (gutter at Main and Tenth
street is choke up and the street is flooded.
Because of the sewerafge reservoir in
front of Odd Fellows temp e.
Because of the lamp-post in the center of
Fourth street at Adams.
At the Olympia.
Fred H. Lvsons of Snohomish, Senator
Frank H. Richards, 01' Whatcom, w. E.
Smith, of Port Angeles, Charles Eisenbeia
and T. L. Miller, of Port Townsend, Geo.
C. Hatch, of Port Andgeles, A. C. McDonald,
of Colfax, B. F. Ha ley of Port Madison,
lowa. Robert Ewart and wife, of Portland,
are at the Olympia,

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