OCR Interpretation


Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 02, 1891, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-11-02/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

OLYMPIA TRIBUNE
.m' i ‘ ‘ .
Pusprsnso EVERY EVENING mxcsrr SUNDAY.
OFFICE: 509 and 511 Main street.
Advertising rates according to space or time.
Copy ior changes of advertisements must be in
not later than 9 o’clock a. m. Those received af
ter that hour will be changed the following day.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
DAILY.
Oneyear, bym511................,.......... $7 00
Sixmonths, bymai1........................ 3 50'
'l‘hreemonths,by mall 2 00
Delivered by carrier, per week. .i.... .i. . . . 25
Delivered by carrier, per month. . . l 00
Single c0pie5m....................,........ 5
‘ WEEKLY.
Oneyear bymai1.,..............c.......... l 50
Sixmonths. by man 100
Threemonths,by mai1....‘.... 50
111-variably in advance.
Address: _
THE TRIBUNE,
Qlymph, Wash.
J. MILLSPAUGH, Busmess Manager.
.‘ .
Carma! of State of Washmgmn.
Population 8500.
ADVERTISE, if you wish to succeed in
business.
—_—_—
THE ocosta Pioneer in discussing Boss
McGraw’s protested draft on Senator
Squire says: Probably the senator had
started west with the money before the
draft was presented; but perhaps he came
to collect some more of the notes taken by
him last winter and use the proceeds from
them to liquidate the draft.
THE Weekly Rat Printer, alias the Cap-i
--tal, thinks THE TRIBUNE draws its inspira
tion from the democracy. Even that
would be better than suddenly selling out
for cash to the other fellow in a republican
senatorial election. But the W. R. P. is
mistaken, as it generally is; besides, it is
not the kind of a newspaper to attempt to
teach republicanism to THE TRIBUNE.
Ir Govenor Ferry desires to put the
credit of this state in good shape he
should certainly call an extra session of
the legislature, so that the creditors of the
state could be given the money, by proper
appropriation laws, which is now in the
treasury and belongs to them.——Ocosta
Pioneer.
Thousands of dollars are due and some
thing new turns up every day to add to the
army of creditors, yet much valuable time
is spent by the chief exeutive in evolving
schemes to avoid an extra session, which
would be the cheapest in the long run. '
THE Wildcat West Coast Insurance com
pany of Tacoma was a suspicious organi
zation from its inception. It appears from
the records in the auditor’s office that the
lots in Southeast Tacoma, which were
mortgaged by Brother Ithurial Mulliga
tewny Howell at $90,000 as security for $40,-
000, were assessed to SSO each, but he ap
peared before the board of equalization
and declared that S2O each was their full
value. Subsequently they were reduced to
$lB each bv the horizontal reduction in the
assessment by the state board. Brother
Howell is a daisy. So is his insurance com
pany.
So FAR as we are able to judge, talk of an
extra leiislative session is confined to those
who ma e a trade of politics.-—Post Intel
ligencer.
The above is not complimentary to State
Auditor Reed. Land Commissioner For
rest, Secretary Weir and other officials, as
well as scores of republicans in the state
who long ago saw the necessity of an extra
session and were opposed to patching laws.
Thousands of dollars are due to people all
over the state who have justly earned it
and cannot get a penny until after Janu—
ary, 1893, unless a special session is called.
There are stronger reasons than this, how
ever. for an extra session, one of which is
a democratic victory in November, 1892,
unless certain wrongs are righted before
that time.
TOMORRO “I .
What will the harvest be tomorrow? is
an interesting political question all over
the Union today. Elections will occur in
about a dozen states, in a few of which
there is significant importance attached to
the results. All eyes are turned toward
Ohio and New York. The former has a
general state election and votes upon a pro
posed amendment to the constitution pro
viding uniformity of taxation. Campbell
the present governor is running against
McKinley.
McKinley will be elected. '
New York‘s election is a general one, in
cluding a member of congress from
Flower's district. The young republican
leader, Fassett, has made a gallant fight
against the encroachments of the Tam
many tiger, and the campaign 'ending to
night is one of the most brilliant ever held
in the state.
Fussebt will beat Flower, we believe.
lowa elects a governor and other state
officers and a legislature. The republicans
of that state have monkeyed With the pro
hibition question so much that the election
of Wheeler, the candidate for governor
over Boies the present governor, is a mat
ter of doubt.
Pennsylvania will elect a state auditor
and state treasurer and settle the question
as to whether a constitutional convention
shall be called. It looks as if the democ~
racy would carry this republican strong
hold because of Boss McGraw’s methodsl
in that state. The state is safe for a repub
lican presidential candidate. It has never
cast its vote for a democratic candidate
since 1856.
Watch Maryland tomorrow. It elects a
governor and other state officers and a, legis
lature and votes upon six proposed amend
ments to the constitution. The first em
powers the governor to disapprove separate
“ items in appropriation bills; the second
restricts the exemption of corporations
from taxation; the third provides for uni
formity of taxation; the fourth relates to
the election of county commissioners; the
fifth authorizes the sale of the state’s inter
est in all works of internal improvement;
and the sixth empowers the legislature to
provide for the taxation of mortgages, if
such taxation is imposed in the county or
city where mortgaged property is situated.
This state has steadily been advancing in
republicanism and it would not be surpris—
ing to see democracy defeated there. Both
candidates for governor are farmers.
In Massachusetts the young democratic
governor, Russell, hasa strong following
and hopes to be re-elected, but it is claimed
by the leading republican papers that Al
len, his republican opponent will pull
through. Nebraska will go republican,
while the democrats Wlll undoubtedly win
in Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia.
If Flower should win in- New York, it
will be a victory for Hill and the delega
tion from that state to the national demo
cratic conventian would no doubt be in his
favor. McKinley’s victory tomorrow will
place him in the front rank of presidential
possibilities on the republican side. What
a great ticket McKinley and Fassett would
make for November 1892, in case both carry
their states tomorrow, by sweeping ma
jorities.
No’l‘ BE’I‘ROTHAL, BUT Hummer}.
A Young Woman Consents 10 a Civil
Ceremony um] ls Vastly Sur
prised.
Miss Lillis Voorhees, of Morriston, N. J.,
has been married to Harold C. Heverin, a
son of James Heverin, a noted criminal
lawyer of Philadelphia. He is a graduate
of Princeton and has taken a course of
study in the New York Theological semi
nary with the intention of entering the
ministry.
Miss Voorhees met Heverin some time
ago, and they soon became engaged. About
three weeks ago Miss Voorhees went to
Haverstraw to visit a. relative. Soon Hev
eriu appeared there. He took her for a ‘
drive. When they were returning Heverin ‘
accused her of having ceased to love him.
This she denied, and when he asked her to ‘
prove her constancy by having a betrothal
ceremony betore a civil officer performed
she consented. They then drove to the of
fice of a Justlee of the peace, who performed
not a betrothal but a marriage ceremony.
Miss Voorhees says that not until the jus
tice informed her that she was legally a
wife did she realize that she had been de
ceived. She immediately returned to her
father’s house, but said nothing about the
affair, and it was not untila person who
was in Haverstraw at the time brought-the
news that the fact became public. Hever—
in has not been seen since his bride re
turned home, nor is anything known as to
his waereabouts. Miss Voorhees' father
hath Baken steps to have the marriage an
nu e .
A Time to Protest.
Kansas Chief: It. is time to enter a pro
test against the desecration of Abraham
Lincoln’s memory, now going on. The
disgruntled A.'K. McClure, of the‘Phila
delphia Times, began it, in writing a se
ries of articles to prove that Lincoln had
no honor or sincerity, and trusted nobody.
OLYMPIA THEATER.
John Miller Murphy, Proprietor and Manage
Monday, November 2, 1891.
The First Time in Olympia. Jacob Litt’s Big
Comedy Sensation
Presented by Gns Heege, the creator of Swedish
Dialect Comedy.
ANNIE LE W IS,
Queen of Comediennes
—.\ GREAT CAST, INCLUDING -
I \ y I
[le LUMBERMEN S QUAR PET.
The Scenic Revelation—A LUMBER CAMP IN
WINTER.
The soul thrilling Sensation—THE BREAK—
ING OF A LOG JAM.
__9._
”Regular prices. Reserved seats for sale
at the Theater box otfiee.
OLYMPIA THEATER.
...0...
John Miller Murphy, Proprietor and Manager.
”0“. .
TWO NIGHTS ONLY, COMMENCING
Thursday, November 5, 1891.
__o_
America‘s Representative Tragedian,
MR- THOMAS W’
And an excellent company of players, in the
iollowing select repertoire:
Ihursday—RICHELIEU.
FrIday—RICHARD 111.
_o__
”PET uette and first row in balcony, $1.50:
balcony, £11; gallery, 50 cents. Sale of seats open
Monday at 9 mm.
C. d . P If.
R AILWAY -
SAVE $5.00 to SIO.OO. Arrangements have
now been completed between this company
and the B. B. & B. O. Ry. Co. whereby
passengers to and from Puget Sound ports
and ionrts south will be sent via our Mis
sion ranch, which extends from Mission
Junction, on the Main line, to Hunting
don, on the boundary, and the B. B. & .
0. Ry., which extends thence to New VVhat
com, Wash.
The service between New Whateom and
lower Puget Sound ports will be daily, the
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company's
steamer Premier and Eastern Oregon, mak
ing alternate trips.
Sails Nov. 22d from Vancouver, BA).
For full particulars call on or write D. E.
Brown, Assistant General Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.

la. E. Crego, Agent,
Cor. Main and sth sts.. Olympia.
W
OREGON IMPROVEMENT 00.,
-——-OPERATING THE-—-
l
-___o_....
Time Card to take effect Sunday Nov. ].
“—o—-
NO. 1.
yLeave,.............01ympia...... ......9240 a. m.
,Arrive..............Tenin0............10:30a. 111.
NO. 2.
Leave...............Tenin0............10:50 a. m.
Arrive...:...........01ympia...........11:50 a. in.
NO. 3.
Lea.vc...............01ympia............3150p. m.
Arrive...............Tenin0...........,.4:50p. In
NO. 4.
Leave................Tenin0............5:05p. m.
Arrive..............01ympia............51551). m.
_—o.——~_
Nos. 1 and 4 run daily. Nos. 2 and 3, daily ex
cept Sunday.
The morning train makes close connection
with the Northern Pacific train from Tacoma
to Portland, and the evening train connects
with the train from Portland to Tacoma.
J. C. PHELPS,
Ass t., Supt,
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2", iß9i.
“G erman
Syrup”
J. C. Davis, Rector of St. James’
Episcopal Church, Eufaula, Ala.:
“My son has been badly afflicted
with a fearfuland threatening cough
for several months, and after trying
several prescriptions from physicians
which failed to relieve him, he has
been perfectly restored by the useot
two bottles of 80-
An Episcopal schee’s German Syr
up. I can recom-
Rector. mend it w ith ou t
hesitation.” Chronic
severe, deep-seated coughs like this
are as severe tests as a remedy can
be subjected to. It is for these long
standing cases that Boschee’s Ger
man Syrup is made a specialty.
Many others afflicted as this lad
was, will do well to make a note of
this. , '
J. F. Arnold, Montevideo, Minn.,
writes: I always use German Syrup
for a Cold on the Lungs. I have
never found an equal to it—far less
a superior. G)
G. G. GREEN, Sole Man’fr,Woodbury,N.J.
PROFEBS IONAL.
K P. FITCH __
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Rooms 2 and 3, - - Turner Block.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
Wm. S. Church Dav E. Baily.
Chas. E. Laughton.
BAIL Y, LAUGHTON & CHURCH
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Rooms 5 and 6 - - Talcott Block,
Main street, Olympia.
J. P. moon. GEO. A. ALLEN.
MOORE &' ALLEN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Rooms 5 and 6 - - Turner Block,
Olympia, Wash.
Practice before the Supreme Court a
specialty.
DANIEL GABY
I
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Rooms 20 and 21, - - - Temple Flat.
OLYMPIA, WASH.
r. v. EDDY, M. J. GORDON.
EDDY & GORDON
. ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
OLYMPIA, - - WASHINGTON. i
ALLEN, AYER & FRANKLIN ‘
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law. .7 ‘
1
Rooms 5, 6 and 7 - - - Horr’s Block, 1
OLYMPIA, WASH.
MILO A BOOT, JOHN R Myron—lE.
ROOT & MITCHELL ‘
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Ofiice rooms 2 and 3, Odd Fellows Temple,
OLYMPIA, WABHJ
HOMER C. ATWELL
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Turner Block, corner Main and Fourth st.
‘ OLYMPIA, WASH.
J W. CRAWFORD
O
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
No. 120 Fourth st., Williams Block, op
posite the McKenny Block. S ecial atten
tion given to criminal and givorce "pro
ceedings. Will also Igractice before local
and general Land O ces,’ and prosecute
pension and bountv claims.
J C. RATHBUN
I
LAWYER AND JUSTICE OF PEACE.
Prompt attention given to collections.
Lands rendered and taxes fiaid for non-res—
idents. Conveyancing. ents collected.
South side Fourth st., between Main and
Columbia. Choice residence lots for sale.
FRANCIS HENRY
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Proprietor of Thurston county abstract,
the oldest in the state.
OLYMPIA - - - WASH.
E B. SIMMONS ’
. .
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. '
Rooms 14 and 15. - - - Stuart Block.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
JOHN G KLEBER
LAWYER.
Turner Block, Cor. Fourth and Main St.
OLYMPIA‘ WASHINGTON.
Mm
O V. LINN
I
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Williams’ Block,
‘OLYMSPIA . - . WASH.
1 m
Gutter Lumber
D 11 d t t i th
$8 ° Effiéatép‘z‘lyl,o%%fleél 9 $8
5idewa1k1umber.......................$ 9
5urfaced................................ 10
A
G. D. ALLEN
THIRD AND JEFFERSON ST.
E C. BICKFORD 6: 00..
NEW AND SECOND HAND GOODS
Bought and sold for cash. See our prices be
fore buyinvg. Corner Fourth and Columbia m.,
Olympia, ash.
THE THURSTON .GOUNTY
LHND COMPHNY
WOODRUFFBLOCK
November Ist.
THOMPSON & MUMFORD‘
r 7
Real Estate
—AND-——-
LOAN BROKERS. .
Choice PropertfoOOfn 331;: Loans Closed
ROOMS 13 AND 14 REED BLOCK.
; \\\\,., \\\\\\\‘§x\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \“\‘\\\\ \ \x\\\:§\\.¥;\l/&
we“ \ Inf-'1"? .7
"L; 7’55 "3.7:: 2 2 Q I 3;. .. ’3;:.,:;f/
' 7525352 '27:: 2.3:, s2,} D LEI; 2r
si;l?;ff,il,';:~ : “if; -_ {5, 3?: “2,
r e.. A
" ' 2 ’2 ‘ i - :5 :3: i: 3':-
2:252:22 : €25; .. ~_ 5 .2 =3) '; .2 x .35“. 2. , n 5353213,,
///r \\ 2 I\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\-\\\\\\l\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ X \\" \\\\\\
for Infants and Children.
“Cast, Trials so well adaptedtoclfildten that
I recommend itas superior_to any prescription
known to me." E. A. Amman, M. D.,
111 80. Oxford St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
“The use of ‘Cestoria’ is so universal and
Its merits so well known that it seems a work
of supererogation to endorse it. Few are the
intelligent families who do not keep Castoria
within easy reach."
CARLOS MARTIN, D. D.,
New York City.
Late Pastor Bloomingdale Reformed Church.
ADVERTISE
DAILY ae TRIBUNE. I
It Will Bring You the Quiékest Returns.
ALFRED THOMPSON, M. E. MUMFORD,
President. Manager.
ABSTRACT AND TIT] E
J
INSURANCE CO
(Aryan System.)
Our bo‘oks Complete to date and Abstracts
furnished promptly.
ROOMS 13 AND 14 REED BLOCK. .
Castoria. cures Colic. Constipation,
Sour Stomach, Diarrhoea. Eructation,
Kills Worms, gives sleep, and promotes d 1»
fimqnz . .
Wi out mJunous medication.
“ For several years I have recommended
your ‘ Castoria, ’ and shall always continue-to
do Sufism“ has invariably produced beneflcxal
res s.
Enwm F. Pawn. M. D.,
“The Winthrop,“ I%th Street and 7th Ave.,
New York City.
Tan Gamma. 001 mm, 77 Mummy STREET, NEW Yoga.
._A_
San Francisco Newspaper
And of course you want a good one.
*o—
Weekly Examiner fills that want
completely, for it is the best. It gives gou
every wee not only the news, but the est
literary and miscellaneous matter published
on the American continent—that is its
specialty; being the best. It wants your
subscription—yours particularly—and of
fers not- only to you, but to every other sub
scriber, one or more attractive premiums.
In the first place it gives to every sub
scriber, one of the four magnificent paint
ings or etchings described be ow, and de
livers it safely at his address, postage paid:
“The Retreat from Moscow,”
by Meissonier.
“The Roman Chariot Race,” _» .1-
by A. Wagner.
Each of these pictures is 21x28 inches,
and they are elegantly reproduced in fac
simile, showing every tint and color of the
great originals, either one of which coul
not be purchased for SIOO,OOO.
”\Vomen and Children Fug.” . fl
Eby O. Napier Hemy.
“Christ Leaving the Praetorium,”
by Gustave Dore.
Each of these pictures is reproduced in
photogravure, size 21x28, 3. d eminently
fitted for framing, and will agorzi the walls
ofjhegnosl; refiped house: » _ -
Each subscriber has the choice of any
one of these four ictures, which Will be
mailed him in a tuge direct from the Ex
aminer office, as soon as the subscription is
received. _ _ _ _ A
In the second place it will give 5000 pre
miums, valued in the aggregate at about
$125,000, to its subscribers this year. If
there are 50,000 subscribers, one in ten will
get one of these premiums; if there are
SIOO,OOO only one in twenty. But no mat
ter how many there are, each and every
one of these premiums—«which range in
value from 50 cents to s6ooo—Will be given
absolutely without cost to some of those
who have {laid $1.50 for the WEEKLY
EXAMINE for one year.
The Examiner is thoroughly responsible,
as you know, or as Wells, Fargo & Co. or
any bank or commercial agency in San
Francisco will assure you. and the leading
men of the city will see that its premiums
are distributed exactly as agreed and that
everv subscriber no matter where he is lot
gatea, will receive just what is assigned to
Im.
Of course you want your home paper also,
and you can just as well as not save a little
money by takina the EXAMINER with it.
The price of the WEEKLY EXAMINER
is $1.50 per year, including the premium
picture and your share of the $125900 list
of premiums, which are fully described in
the twelve page Premium Supplement,
which will be sent free upon application to
W. R. HEARST,
Publisher, San Francisco, Cal.
The Examiner and THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE
the combined price of which is $3, will be
sent you for one year, postage paid, for
$2.50. Send the monev to theTRInUNE and
your subscription will be promptly for
warded to the Examiner, and you will re~
ceive therefor the Examiner’s numbered
receipt. You can get a Premium Supple
ment by applying at the 'JJRIBUNE office.
THE TRIBUNE,
R. (:‘r. O'BRIEN. S. (J. WOODRUFF.
NOW IS THE TIME
FGEE’S I
M EBB .4
_ ‘ Adjoining the Capitol Grounds. ’ '
Choice List of Property in all parts of the City.
‘One thousand acres of fine Lbottom land at $3 5 per acre;
easily cleared and near railroad.
Loan and Insurance Agency.
YOU WANT
ADDRESS
OLYMPIA.

xml | txt